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FTR #1011 Miscellaneous Articles and Updates

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This broadcast was recorded in one, 60-minute segment.

Paddock’s Weapons

Introduction: This broadcast updates and highlights previous topics of discussion, focusing largely on online/Alt-Right/Nazi fascism and some of the malevolent communities that coalesce around various ideological manifestations of that phenomenon.

There has been little public recognition that many of the mass shooters whose activities have dominated much of the news cycle in recent years,have been immersed in one form or extremist far right ideology or another.

The release of ~1,200 pages of documents related to the Las Vegas shooting reveals that Stephen Paddock appears to have been “a sovereign citizen.” . . . . In the documents, those who encountered gunman Stephen Paddock say he expressed conspiratorial, anti-government beliefs characteristic of the far right . . . . But tantalizingly, people who encountered Paddock before his shooting say that he expressed conspiratorial, anti-government beliefs, which are characteristic of the far right. . . .”

Paddock’s actions are not unexpected for someone with his ideological mindset: ” . . . . In surveys conducted in 2014 and 2015, representatives of US law-enforcement ranked the risk of terrorism from the sovereign-citizen movement higher than the risk from Islamic extremism.”

Nazi/alt-right culture was a primary influence on accused Santa Fe (Texas) gunman Dimitrios Pagourtzis. ” . . . . Dimitrios Pagourtzis, the suspected gunman who opened fire at a Texas high school on Friday morning, apparently posted photos of neo-Nazi iconography online, according to social media accounts flagged by classmates and reviewed by The Daily Beast. . . . Other images on Pagourtzis’ now-deleted Facebook page suggest a possible interest in white supremacist groups. Pagourtzis uploaded a number of T-shirts that feature Vaporwave-style designs. Vaporwave, a music and design movement, has spawned a related movement called Fashwave, which borrows the same aesthetic but applies them to neo-Nazi subjects. Pagourtzis’ Facebook header image was the cover of an album by musician Perturbator. Perturbator’s music has been co-opted by members of the Fashwave movement, BuzzFeed previously reported. Neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer frequently includes Perturbator’s music in “Fashwave Fridays” posts. . . . .”

Initial press reports about the Santa Fe shooting discuss possible accomplices of Pagourtzis. Was he part of a group of some kind? “. . . . On Friday, authorities intended to question two other people: One was at the scene and had “suspicious reactions,” according to the governor, and another had drawn the scrutiny of investigators. . . .”

Pagourtzis, as we saw above, had taken to wearing a trench coat, even in 90 degree weather. Press reports have described him as a “copy-cat” killer, having imitated Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris of Columbine shooting fame. (Pagourtzis was too young to have memories of the incident, though he may well have absorbed information about the Columbine perpetrators.)

Dylan Klebold’s Universe

The media have, for the most part, not mentioned that Harris and Klebold were heavily influenced by Nazi culture. . . . . Nineteen days before they were to graduate, Harris and Klebold seemed inseparable and troublesome. In Columbine’s hallways, they spoke broken German and referred often to ‘4-20,’ Hitler’s birthday and the day they chose for their assault. . . . Some Columbine students said the violent side of Harris and Klebold became more obvious in recent months. They became obsessively interested in World War II, Nazi imagery, Adolf Hitler. John House, 17, a Columbine senior, told reporters that when he went bowling with Klebold, ‘when he would do something good, he would shout ‘Heil Hitler’ and throw up his hand. It just made everyone mad.’ . . . .”

In FTR #995, we examined the Atomwaffen Neo-Nazi group. Atomwaffen member Andrew Oneschuk was about to join Ukraine’s neo-Nazi Azov Battalion. ” . . . . . . . Andrew, who was one-eighth Ukrainian, took to the cause, chatting with fighters and their allies. He began formulating a plan to join the Azov Battalion, a notoriously brutal band of international fighters helping in the resistance against the Russians. . . . Andrew took it further, eventually adopting the online handle “Borovikov,” after a famous Russian neo-Nazi gang leader. That spring, he hung an SS flag in his bedroom as well as a giant swastika. . . .”

Online networking between resentful, sex-deprived men who call themselves “incels” (a contraction of  “involuntary celibates”) overlap Nazi/Alt-Right elements. The ideological collision of the online “incels” and the #MeToo movement may well generate some truly pathological violence. . . . . The alt-right, right-wing populism, men’s rights groups and a renewed white supremacist movement have capitalized on many white men’s feeling of loss in recent years. The groups vary in how they diagnose society’s ills and whom they blame, but they provide a sense of meaning and place for their followers. And as different extremist groups connect online, they draw on one another’s membership bases, tactics and worldviews, allowing membership in one group to become a gateway to other extremist ideologies as well. Today, for example, posts on Incel.me, an incel forum, debate joining forces with the alt-right and argue that Jews are to blame for incels’ oppression. On one thread, users fantasized that if they were dictators, they would not only create harems and enslave women, but also ‘gas the Jews.’ . . . . By dividing the world into us-versus-them and describing vast injustice at the hands of the supposedly powerful, these groups, experts say, can prime adherents for violence. . . .”

Combat helmets of the Azov Battalion.

Incel culture is metastasizing into “lone-wolf”/leaderless resistance terrorism. ” . . . . In 2014, a gaming award ceremony set to honor the feminist critic Anita Sarkeesian received a bomb threat; an anonymous harasser threatened to detonate a device unless her award was rescinded. Before Milo Yiannopoulos was a well-known alt-right figure, feminists knew him as one of the primary architects of Gamergate, a movement of young men who harassed and threatened women in the videogaming industry. Two fans of Mr. Yiannopoulos were charged with shooting a protester outside of one of his speeches. . . .”

Nazi killer Anders Breivik embodied the overlap between Alt-Right white supremacy and institutionalized misogyny: ” . . . . On July 22, Breivik slaughtered 77 of his countrymen, most of them teenagers, in Oslo and at a summer camp on the island of Utøya, because he thought they or their parents were the kinds of ‘politically correct’ liberals who were enabling Muslim immigration. But Breivik was almost as voluble on the subjects of feminism, the family, and fathers’ rights as he was on Islam. ‘The most direct threat to the family is ‘divorce on demand,’ ‘ he wrote in the manifesto he posted just before he began his deadly spree. ‘The system must be reformed so that the father will be awarded custody rights by default.’ The manosphere lit up. Said one approving poster at The Spearhead, an online men’s rights magazine for the ‘defense of ourselves, our families and our fellow men’: ‘What could be more ‘an eye for an eye’ than to kill the children of those who were so willing to destroy men’s families and destroy the homeland of men?’ . . . .”

The “psycho-political” polarization of the #MeToo movement and the “incels” misogynist community holds devastating potential.

Program Highlights Include:

  • Journalist Ronan Farrow’s authorship of the New Yorker article that took down Harvey Weinstein. (For more discussion of the #MeToo Movement and weaponized feminism, see FTR #’s 998, 999, 1000, 1001.)
  • Farrow’s State Department work suggestive of involvement with the intelligence community.  “. . . .  Post-law school: Lands a job at the State Department, as a special advisor focusing on conflict in Afghanistan and Pakistan. . . .”
  • Farrow’s co-authorship of the New Yorker article that took down former New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, a major Trump nemesis, who was also criticizing and investigating other individuals and institutions associated with the Trump/GOP power elite.  “. . . . Schneiderman had already been declared ‘the man the banks fear most’ by the liberal magazine ‘The American Prospect.’ . . . . In the days since November 9, Schneiderman fired off a letter warning Trump not to drop White House support of Obama’s Clean Power Plan, introduced a bill in the state Legislature to give New Yorkers cost-free contraception if the Affordable Care Act is dismantled, threatened to sue after Trump froze EPA funding of clean air and water programs, and joined a lawsuit that argues that Trump’s executive order on immigration is not just unconstitutional and un-American, but it brings profound harm to the residents of New York State. . . . He’s on the opposite side of the Clean Power Plan fight from Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, since named head of the EPA, and who Schneiderman labeled a ‘dangerous and unqualified choice.’ . . . . “
  • Schneiderman was also investigating the powerful, well-connected NXIVM cult, one of whose associates was Roger Stone, the long-time Trump/GOP dirty trickster who signaled the #MeToo takedown of Senator Al Franken.

1a. There has been little public recognition that many of the mass shooters whose activities have dominated much of the news cycle in recent years,have been immersed in one form or extremist far right ideology or another.

The release of ~1,200 pages of documents related to the Las Vegas shooting reveals that Stephen Paddock appears to have been “a sovereign citizen.”

“New Documents Suggest Las Vegas Shooter Was Conspiracy Theorist – What We Know” by Jason Wilson; The Guardian; 5/19/2018.

In the documents, those who encountered gunman Stephen Paddock say he expressed conspiratorial, anti-government beliefs characteristic of the far right . . . .

. . . . But tantalizingly, people who encountered Paddock before his shooting say that he expressed conspiratorial, anti-government beliefs, which are characteristic of the far right.

In a handwritten statement, one woman says she sat near Paddock in a diner just a few days before the shooting, while out with her son. She said she heard him and a companion discussing the 25th anniversary of the Ruby Ridge standoff and the Waco siege. (Each of these incidents became touchstones for a rising anti-government militia movement in the 1990s.)

She says she heard him and his companion saying that courtroom flags with golden fringes are not real flags. The belief that gold-fringed flags are those of a foreign jurisdiction, or “admiralty flags”, is characteristic of so-called “sovereign citizens”, who believe, among other things, that the current US government, and its laws, are illegitimate.

“At the time,” her statement says, “I thought, ‘Strange guys’ and wanted to leave.”

Another man, himself currently in jail, says he met Paddock three weeks before the shooting for an abortive firearms transaction, in the carpark of a Bass Pro Shop. The man was selling schematic diagrams for an auto sear, a device that would convert semi-automatic weapons to full automatic fire. Paddock asked him to make the device for him, and the man refused.

At this point Paddock launched into a rant about “anti-government stuff … Fema camps”. Paddock said that the evacuation of people by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (Fema) after Hurricane Katrina was a a “dry run for law enforcement and military to start kickin’ down doors and … confiscating guns”.

“Somebody has to wake up the American public and get them to arm themselves,” the man says Paddock told him. “Sometimes sacrifices have to be made.”

Why would someone be worried about Fema camps? Isn’t Fema there to help in emergencies?

Yes, but for decades Fema has been incorporated into conspiracy theories promulgated by the anti-government far right.

Some conspiracy-minded Americans believe that Fema’s emergency mission is a cover story. The real purpose of the agency is to build and maintain concentration camps, which will house dissident “patriots” after a declaration of martial law. The supposition is that the US government will turn on its citizens under the direction of the “New World Order”.

This sounds implausible. Where did this idea come from?

The short answer is that it has been a staple of the radical right for perhaps three decades.

The first version of the Fema camp conspiracy theory was in the newsletters of the far right “Posse Comitatus” movement in the early 1980s. It was an update, or an adaptation, of the fears of foreign subversion that have animated the American populist right since the high tide of nineteenth-century nativism.

Posse Comitatus, active especially in western states from the late 1960s, believed that the US was controlled by a Jewish conspiracy, which it referred to as ZOG (Zionist Occupation Government). It also promoted “Christian identity” theology, which held that the white race was the lost tribe of Israel, and that Jews were in league with Satan. At some point, they thought, America’s imposter government would round up and imprison white men.

Apart from developing anti-government beliefs, Posse Comitatus’s crank legal theories laid the groundwork for a still-flourishing “sovereign citizen” movement.

But the FEMA theory really took off during the rise of the militia movement in the 1990s. Movement entrepreneurs like John Trochmann of the Militia of Montana elaborated the story in newsletters and in his infamous “Blue Book”, which was filled with pictures allegedly showing camps, trains loaded with Russian tanks and the arrival of “black helicopters” in preparation for the supposedly imminent New World Order takeover.

Trochmann and others also claimed to have pictures of the facilities which would be used as concentration camps. These turned out to be army training grounds, federal prisons or as-yet unoccupied bases.

These theories were nevertheless prevalent in a movement that some scholars say had up to 5 million sympathizers at its height. Timothy McVeigh, who killed 168 people when he bombed a federal building in 1995, also emerged from this anti-government milieu. . . . .

1b. Note that members of the sovereign citizen movement are seen as domestic terrorists:

“Sovereign Citizen Movement;” wikipedia.org

. . . . Many members of the sovereign citizen movement believe that the United States government is illegitimate.[11] JJ MacNab, who writes for Forbes about anti-government extremism, has described the sovereign-citizen movement as consisting of individuals who believe that the county sheriff is the most powerful law-enforcement officer in the country, with authority superior to that of any federal agent, elected official, or local law-enforcement official.[12] This belief comes from the movement’s origins in the white-extremist group Posse Comitatus.[13][citation needed]

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) classifies some sovereign citizens (“sovereign citizen extremists”) as domestic terrorists.[14] In 2010 the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) estimated that approximately 100,000 Americans were “hard-core sovereign believers”, with another 200,000 “just starting out by testing sovereign techniques for resisting everything from speeding tickets to drug charges”.[15]

In surveys conducted in 2014 and 2015, representatives of US law-enforcement ranked the risk of terrorism from the sovereign-citizen movement higher than the risk from Islamic extremism. 

2a. Nazi/alt-right culture was a primary influence on accused Santa Fe (Texas) gunman Dimitrios Pagourtzis.

“Dimitrios Pagourtzis, Texas Shooting Suspect, Posted Neo-Nazi Imagery Online” by Kathy Weill; The Daily Beast; 5/18/2018.

Before allegedly killing at least eight people, he apparently posted online images of a Nazi medal, a musician favored by the alt-right, and a ‘born to kill’ T-shirt.

Dimitrios Pagourtzis, the suspected gunman who opened fire at a Texas high school on Friday morning, apparently posted photos of neo-Nazi iconography online, according to social media accounts flagged by classmates and reviewed by The Daily Beast. . . .

. . . . On April 30, Pagourtzis apparently posted a T-shirt with “born to kill” printed on the front, boasting that it was custom-made.

That same day, Pagourtzis posted multiple pictures of a duster jacket emblazoned with a variety of symbols including the Iron Cross, a German military award last given by the Nazis, and other pins. He said he equated the Iron Cross with “bravery.” Pagourtzis said a hammer and sickle meant “rebellion,” a rising sun meant “kamikaze tactics,” and a baphomet meant “evil.” . . . .

. . . . “The sketchy thing is, he wore a full-on black trench coat to school every day,” Thurman said, adding she hadn’t had a class with him since eighth grade. Montemayor said that in retrospect, Pagourtzis’ trench coat was odd.

“Why would you wear a trench coat when it’s 100 degrees outside? When he first started wearing that trench coat, it was during the winter.” But in the hotter months, Pagourtzis didn’t take it off.

Pagourtzis began wearing the coat at the beginning of the year.

“It’s like 90 degrees outside and this guy is still wearing a trench coat,” Thurman said. “It should have been noted. That’s a red flag right there.”

Other images on Pagourtzis’ now-deleted Facebook page suggest a possible interest in white supremacist groups. Pagourtzis uploaded a number of T-shirts that feature Vaporwave-style designs. Vaporwave, a music and design movement, has spawned a related movement called Fashwave, which borrows the same aesthetic but applies them to neo-Nazi subjects.

Pagourtzis’ Facebook header image was the cover of an album by musician Perturbator. Perturbator’s music has been co-opted by members of the Fashwave movement, BuzzFeed previously reported. Neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer frequently includes Perturbator’s music in “Fashwave Fridays” posts. . . .

2b. Initial press reports about the Santa Fe shooting discuss possible accomplices of Pagourtzis. Was he part of a group of some kind?

“Looking for Motives in a Shooting Suspect Whose Past Is a ‘Pretty Clean Slate” by Julie Turkewitz and Jess Bidgood; The New York Times; 5/19/2018; p. A12 [Western Edition].

 . . . . By Friday afternoon, the suspect was in custody at the Galveston County jail, where he is being held for capital murder. Federal authorities are seeking search warrants to find explosive devices at two residences. . . . Police said the gunman brought several of these devices into the school. It was unclear whether any went off. . . .

. . . . On Friday, authorities intended to question two other people: One was at the scene and had “suspicious reactions,” according to the governor, and another had drawn the scrutiny of investigators. . . .

3. Pagourtzis, as we saw above, had taken to wearing a trench coat, even in 90 degree weather. Press reports have described him as a “copy-cat” killer, having imitated Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris of Columbine shooting fame. (Pagourtzis was too young to have memories of the incident, though he may well have absorbed information about the Columbine perpetrators.)

The media, for the most part, have not mentioned that Harris and Klebold were heavily influenced by Nazi culture.

“Shooting Pair Mixed Fantasy, Reality” by Paul Duggan, Michael D. Shear and Marc Fisher; Washington Post; 4/22/1999.

They hated jocks, admired Nazis and scorned normalcy. They fancied themselves devotees of the Gothic subculture, even though they thrilled to the violence denounced by much of that fantasy world. They were white supremacists, but loved music by anti-racist rock bands.

Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were bright young men who became social outcasts at their suburban Denver high school, and then built their own internal society by plucking strands from the pop whirlwind of cyberspace and fantasy games, the soundtrack of American youth, and a netherworld that glamorizes Nazi symbols and terrorist violence. . . .

.  . . . An initial sketch of Harris and Klebold and the Trenchcoat Mafia to which they claimed membership emerged yesterday from interviews with friends, fellow students and neighbors, and from police and school officials. If the boys left behind any detailed explanation of their horrific final cries, no one has found it yet. . . .

. . . . Nineteen days before they were to graduate, Harris and Klebold seemed inseparable and troublesome. In Columbine’s hallways, they spoke broken German and referred often to “4-20,” Hitler’s birthday and the day they chose for their assault. . . .

. . . . Some Columbine students said the violent side of Harris and Klebold became more obvious in recent months. They became obsessively interested in World War II, Nazi imagery, Adolf Hitler.

John House, 17, a Columbine senior, told reporters that when he went bowling with Klebold, “when he would do something good, he would shout ‘Heil Hitler’ and throw up his hand. It just made everyone mad.” . . . .

4. In FTR #995, we examined the Atomwaffen Neo-Nazi group. Atomwaffen member Andrew Oneschuk was about to join Ukraine’s neo-Nazi Azov Battalion.

“All-American Nazis” by Janet Reitman; Rolling Stone; 05/02/2018

How a senseless double murder in Florida exposed the rise of an organized fascist youth movement in the United States

Andrew Oneschuk and Jeremy Himmelman had been living in Tampa, Florida, for two weeks when, on Friday, May 19th, 2017, their roommate Devon Arthurs picked up an AK-47 rifle and shot them at close range. Oneschuk had just turned 18. Himmelman was 22. They’d been staying in a lush gated community near the University of South Florida, in a two-bedroom, terra-cotta condo rented by their fourth roommate, 21-year-old Brandon Russell, a rich kid from the Bahamas who worked at a gun shop and served in the Florida National Guard. Oneschuk, a prep-school dropout, was hoping to become a Navy SEAL. Himmelman also considered the military, though he was more of a drifter. Eighteen-year-old Arthurs, a pale, freckled kid who sometimes called himself “Khalid,” was unemployed and spent most of his time playing video games. All four had met one another online, in forums and chat rooms popular with the more extreme segment of the so-called alt-right. . . .

. . . . Increasingly, Andrew obsessed over issues like climate change and the Syrian refugee crisis. He’d also embraced an apocalyptic and conspiratorial worldview in which Western civilization was doomed, and he, a white male, was a victim. He was amazed at his parents’ complacency. Didn’t they realize blacks were responsible for 80 percent of the crime in America? he’d falsely claim, using statistics that seemed drawn from nowhere. “America is shit,” he said. “My generation is failing.” . . . .

. . . . Andrew, who was one-eighth Ukrainian, took to the cause, chatting with fighters and their allies. He began formulating a plan to join the Azov Battalion, a notoriously brutal band of international fighters helping in the resistance against the Russians. In January 2015, Andrew bought a fake passport and a one-way ticket to Kiev. The day before he was set to leave, having packed his camping gear and arranged for a limousine to Logan Airport, he casually told his mother on the way home from school, “I think I’m going to go to Ukraine.” . . . . 

Emily had been concerned when Andrew went through his German-army phase, though some of her friends told her that they’d also thought the SS was cool when they were younger. “I don’t think they understood they were actually bad guys,” says Emily. “It’s more like the bad guys in Indiana Jones with the cool car.” But Andrew took it further, eventually adopting the online handle “Borovikov,” after a famous Russian neo-Nazi gang leader. That spring, he hung an SS flag in his bedroom as well as a giant swastika. . . . 

5. Online networking between resentful, sex-deprived men who call themselves “incels” (a contraction of  “involuntary celibates”) overlap Nazi/Alt-Right elements. The ideological collision of the online “incels” and the #MeToo movement may well generate some truly pathological violence.

” ‘Incels’ Aren’t Alone In Online Harvesting of Men’s Sense of Loss” by Amanda Taub; The New York Times; 5/11/2018; p. A5 [Western Edition].

. . . . . ‘Aggrieved Entitlement’

For white men across the Western world, special rights and privileges once came as a birthright. Even those who lacked wealth or power were assured a status above women and minorities.

Though they still enjoy preferential status in virtually every realm, from the boardroom to the courthouse, social forces like the Me Too movement are challenging that status. To some, any steps toward equality, however modest, feel like a threat.

“There’s just this sense that ‘we used to be in charge, and now we’re not the only ones in charge, so we’ve been attacked,’” said Lilliana Mason, a University of Maryland social scientist who studies group identity and politics.

“If you have a sense that you’re owed, that your deserved status is being threatened, then you start to fight for it,” Ms. Mason said.

Often that takes the form of lashing out at members of whatever social group dared to challenge the established hierarchy.

“You’d think that young men would be treated nicely by society because we are the builders and protectors of civilization,” wrote a user named connorWM1996 on r/MGTOW, a Reddit message board for men trying to escape what they see as oppression by female-dominated society. “But no of course not. We are treated like idiots who aren’t good for anything.”

Some of these men may go in search of more extreme ideologies that make sense of their feelings of anger and loss, and seem to provide a solution. Others merely stumble into them.

“Plenty of people feel like they don’t have status and don’t revolt about it,” Ms. Mason said. “But the people who do revolt are people who feel that they are owed status, and they’re not being given the status that traditional society should give them.”

The incel movement tells its adherents that society’s rules are engineered to unfairly deprive them of sex. That worldview lets them see themselves as both victims, made lonely by a vast conspiracy, and as superior, for their unique understanding of the truth.

Greasing Extremism’s Rails

Extremism has always existed, but until recently its spread was limited. To begin with, there was the basic challenge to any collective action: how to find and gather like-minded people dispersed across great distances. Beyond that, there was the social stigma against any ideas perceived as outside the mainstream.Social media has lowered both of those barriers.

Now, men looking for a way to explain — and justify — their anger need only a few clicks to encounter entire communities built up around promises to restore male power and control. In the past, those might have been relegated to a few bars or living rooms, but now they exist in darker corners of some of the most popular social networking sites. . . .

. . . . The alt-right, right-wing populism, men’s rights groups and a renewed white supremacist movement have capitalized on many white men’s feeling of loss in recent years. The groups vary in how they diagnose society’s ills and whom they blame, but they provide a sense of meaning and place for their followers.

And as different extremist groups connect online, they draw on one another’s membership bases, tactics and worldviews, allowing membership in one group to become a gateway to other extremist ideologies as well.

Today, for example, posts on Incel.me, an incel forum, debate joining forces with the alt-right and argue that Jews are to blame for incels’ oppression. On one thread, users fantasized that if they were dictators, they would not only create harems and enslave women, but also “gas the Jews.”

By dividing the world into us-versus-them and describing vast injustice at the hands of the supposedly powerful, these groups, experts say, can prime adherents for violence. . . .

6. Incel culture is metastasizing into “lone-wolf”/leaderless resistance terrorism.

“When Misogynists Become Terrorists” by Jessica Valenti; The New York Times; 4/26/2018.

. . . . Later, after Mr. Rodger’s 140-page manifesto was released — outlining his fury over still being a “kissless virgin” — his name became synonymous on misogynist forums with revenge on women who reject men. Chris Harper-Mercer, who shot and killed nine people at Umpqua Community College in Oregon in 2015, mentioned Mr. Rodger by name in a manifesto he wrote in which he complained about being 26 years old with “no girlfriend, a virgin.”

And now, in the aftermath of the attack in Toronto, men on incel communities are hailing the killer as a “new saint,” with commenters changing their avatars to Mr. Minassian’s picture in tribute.

Feminists have been warning against these online hate groups and their propensity for real-life violence for over a decade. I know because I’m one of the people who has been issuing increasingly dire warnings. After I started a feminist blog in 2004, I became a target of men’s-rights groups who were angry with women about everything from custody battles to the false notion that most women lie about rape. In 2011, I had to flee my house with my young daughter on the advice of law enforcement, because one of these groups put me on a “registry” of women to target.

I was far from the only one. In 2014, a gaming award ceremony set to honor the feminist critic Anita Sarkeesian received a bomb threat; an anonymous harasser threatened to detonate a device unless her award was rescinded. Before Milo Yiannopoulos was a well-known alt-right figure, feminists knew him as one of the primary architects of Gamergate, a movement of young men who harassed and threatened women in the videogaming industry. Two fans of Mr. Yiannopoulos were charged with shooting a protester outside of one of his speeches.

Part of the problem is that American culture still largely sees men’s sexism as something innate rather than deviant. And in a world where sexism is deemed natural, the misogynist tendencies of mass shooters become afterthoughts rather than predictable and stark warnings.

The truth is that in addition to not protecting women, we are failing boys: failing to raise them to believe they can be men without inflicting pain on others, failing to teach them that they are not entitled to women’s sexual attention and failing to allow them an outlet for understandable human fear and foibles that will not label them “weak” or unworthy.

Not every attack is preventable, but the misogyny that drives them is. To stop all of this, we must trust women when they point out that receiving streams of death threats on Twitter is not normal and that online communities strategizing about how to rape women are much more than just idle chatter. There is no reason another massacre should happen.

7. Nazi killer Anders Breivik embodied the overlap between Alt-Right white supremacy and institutionalized misogyny:

“Leader’s Suicide Brings Attention to Men’s Rights Movement” by Arthur Goldwag; Intelligence Report [Southern Poverty Law Center]; 3/1/2012.

A little-noticed suicide last year focused attention on the hard-lined fringe of the men’s right movement. It’s not a pretty picture.

After 10 years of custody battles, court-ordered counseling and imminent imprisonment for non-payment of child support, Thomas James Ball, a leader of the Worcester branch of the Massachusetts-based Fatherhood Coalition, had reached his limit. On June 15, 2011, he doused himself with gasoline and set himself on fire just outside the Cheshire County, N.H., Courthouse. He was dead within minutes.

In a lengthy “Last Statement,” which arrived posthumously at the Keene Sentinel, Tom Ball told his story. All he had done, he said, was smack his 4-year-old daughter and bloody her mouth after she licked his hand as he was putting her to bed. Feminist-crafted anti-domestic violence legislation did the rest. “Twenty-five years ago,” he wrote, “the federal government declared war on men. It is time to see how committed they are to their cause. It is time, boys, to give them a taste of war.” Calling for all-out insurrection, he offered tips on making Molotov cocktails and urged his readers to use them against courthouses and police stations. “There will be some casualties in this war,” he predicted. “Some killed, some wounded, some captured. Some of them will be theirs. Some of the casualties will be ours.”

For people who associate the men’s and fathers’ rights movements with New Age drum circles in the woods, the ferocity of Ball’s rhetoric, the horror of his act, and, in particular, the widespread and blatantly misogynistic reaction to it may come as something of a revelation. When the feminist Amanda Marcotte, a bête noire of the men’s rights movement, remarked that “setting yourself on fire is an extremely effective tool if your goal is to make your ex-wife’s life a living hell,” a poster at the blog Misandry.com went ballistic. “Talk about the pot calling the kettle black,” he raged. “She is evil and such a vile evil that she is a disease that needs to be cut out of the human [consciousness] just like the rest of the femanazi ass harpies.”

Ball’s suicide brought attention to an underworld of misogynists, woman-haters whose fury goes well beyond criticism of the family court system, domestic violence laws, and false rape accusations. There are literally hundreds of websites, blogs and forums devoted to attacking virtually all women (or, at least, Westernized ones) — the so-called “manosphere,” which now also includes a tribute page for Tom Ball (“He Died For Our Children”). While some of them voice legitimate and sometimes disturbing complaints about the treatment of men, what is most remarkable is the misogynistic tone that pervades so many. Women are routinely maligned as sluts, gold-diggers, temptresses and worse; overly sympathetic men are dubbed “manginas”; and police and other officials are called their armed enablers. Even Ball — who did not directly blame his ex-wife for his troubles, but instead depicted her and their three children as co-victims of the authorities — vilified “man-hating feminists” as evil destroyers of all that is good.

This kind of woman-hatred is increasingly visible in most Western societies, and it tends to be allied with other anti-modern emotions — opposition to same-sex marriage, to non-Christian immigration, to women in the workplace, and even, in some cases, to the advancement of African Americans. Just a few weeks after Ball’s death, while scorch marks were still visible on the sidewalk in Keene, N.H., that was made clear once more by a Norwegian named Anders Behring Breivik.

On July 22, Breivik slaughtered 77 of his countrymen, most of them teenagers, in Oslo and at a summer camp on the island of Utøya, because he thought they or their parents were the kinds of “politically correct” liberals who were enabling Muslim immigration. But Breivik was almost as voluble on the subjects of feminism, the family, and fathers’ rights as he was on Islam. “The most direct threat to the family is ‘divorce on demand,’” he wrote in the manifesto he posted just before he began his deadly spree. “The system must be reformed so that the father will be awarded custody rights by default.”

The manosphere lit up. Said one approving poster at The Spearhead, an online men’s rights magazine for the “defense of ourselves, our families and our fellow men”: “What could be more ‘an eye for an eye’ than to kill the children of those who were so willing to destroy men’s families and destroy the homeland of men?”

‘The Homeland of Men’

The men’s rights movement, also referred to as the fathers’ rights movement, is made up of a number of disparate, often overlapping, types of groups and individuals. Some most certainly do have legitimate grievances, having endured prison, impoverishment or heartrending separations from genuinely loved children.

Jocelyn Crowley, a Rutgers political scientist and the author of Defiant Dads: Fathers’ Rights Activists in America, says that most men who join real (as opposed to virtual) men’s rights groups aren’t seeking to attack the family court system so much as they are simply struggling to navigate it. What they talk most about when they meet face to face, she says, are strategies to deal with their ex-partners and have better relationships with their children.

But Molly Dragiewicz, a criminologist at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology and the author of Equality With a Vengeance: Men’s Rights Groups, Battered Women, and Antifeminist Backlash, argues that cases in which fathers are badly treated by courts and other officials are not remotely the norm. The small percentage of divorces that end up in litigation are disproportionately those where abuse and other issues make joint custody a dubious proposition. Even when a woman can satisfactorily document her ex-husband’s abuse, Dragiewicz says, she is no more likely to receive full custody of her children than if she couldn’t.

The men’s movement also includes mail-order-bride shoppers, unregenerate batterers, and wannabe pickup artists who are eager to learn the secrets of “game”—the psychological tricks that supposedly make it easy to seduce women. George Sodini, who confided his seething rage at women to his blog before shooting 12 women, three of them fatally, was one of the latter. Before his 2009 murder spree at a Pittsburgh-area gym, he was a student — though clearly not a very apt one — of R. Don Steele, the author of How to Date Young Women: For Men Over 35. “I dress good, am clean-shaven, bathe, touch of cologne — yet 30 million women rejected me over an 18 or 25-year period,” Sodini wrote with the kind of pathos presumably typical of Steele’s readers.

Some take an inordinate interest in extremely young women, or fetishize what they see as the ultra-feminine (read: docile) characteristics of South American and Asian women. Others, who have internalized Christian “headship” doctrine, are desperately seeking the “submissive” women such doctrine celebrates. Still others are simply sexually awkward, and nonplussed and befuddled by society’s changing mores. The common denominator is their resentment of feminism and of females in general.

“It’s ironic,” the feminist writer Amanda Marcotte observes. “These [misogynist Web] sites owe their existence to feminism’s successes. At some point in the last couple of years, the zeitgeist hit a tipping point where female power — Hillary Clinton’s, Rachel Maddow’s, even Sarah Palin’s — stopped being questioned. Being sexist has become less acceptable than it used to be. This makes some men particularly anxious.” At the same time, of course, domestic violence and sex crimes are much more likely to be prosecuted than they were even a decade ago. Shelters, social services and legal aid are more available to most battered women than in the past.

But some experts argue that men’s rights groups have been remarkably successful. The groups, says Rita Smith, director of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, “have taken over the way courts deal with custody issues, particularly when there are allegations of abuse,” largely by convincing them that there is such a thing as “Parental Alienation Syndrome” (PAS). (PAS is a supposed clinical disorder in which a child compulsively belittles one parent due to indoctrination by the other — frequently leveling false allegations of abuse. It is not recognized as a clinical disorder by either the American Psychiatric Association or the World Health Organization.) Citing studies that show that false domestic abuse accusations against men are far less common than men’s groups and PAS enthusiasts claim, Smith says the groups nevertheless have “been able to get custody evaluators, mediators, guardians ad litem and child protective service workers to believe that women and children lie about abuse.”

Threats and Abuse

One kind of abuse that is undeniable is the vilification of individual women on certain men’s group websites. The best example of that may be Register-Her, a registry of women who “have caused significant harm to innocent individuals either by the direct action of crimes like rape, assault, child molestation and murder, or by the false accusation of crimes against others.” The site was set up by Paul Elam, the blogger behind A Voice for Men, less than two weeks after Ball’s suicide. “If Mary Jane Rottencrotch decides to falsely accuse her husband of domestic violence in order to get the upper hand in a divorce,” Elam boasted on his Internet radio show, “we can publish all her personal information on the website, including her name, address, phone number … even her routes to and from work.”

Under a headline reading, “Why are these women not in prison?” the site features photos and information about some 250 alleged malefactors, including notorious women like Lorena Bobbitt and Tonya Harding, although Elam hasn’t made good on his threat to publish home addresses or phone numbers. Many of those listed received prison sentences for various crimes, but large numbers were acquitted in court, while others were never accused of any lawbreaking. A well-known feminist, for example, is listed for “anti-male bigotry,” which is compared to racism.

Elam’s site can be frightening to its targets. In one case, he offered a cash reward to the first reader to ferret out a pseudonymous feminist blogger’s real name. In another, Elam singled out a part-time blogger at ChicagoNow who describes herself as a “vegetarian park activist with two baby girls.” The woman’s mistake was to write about her discomfort with male adults helping female toddlers in the bathroom at her daughter’s preschool. The blogger conceded that she was being sexist, but wrote that “I’d rather be wrong than find out if I’m right.”

After the woman was listed, she was widely attacked on men’s movement sites. “I don’t always use the word ‘cunt’ to describe a woman,” one poster raged, “but when I do it’s because of reasons like these.” Shocked, the “Mommy blogger” took down her original post and apologized for her “demonization of men.”

It wasn’t enough. “You targeted fathers, and just fathers,” Elam rebuked her. “It strikes me that you have never really been held to account for any of your actions in life. It is quite likely that the concept of complete, selfless accountability is just completely foreign to you.” Over at the Reddit Mens Rights forum, another poster fumed: “This entire episode should be a warning to all those male hating feminists out there who believe that they are safe screaming their hate messages on the web. Finally, they are held accountable for their hate messages and finally the rest of the world will find out exactly what type of depraved people they really are.”

“I don’t know if Thomas James Ball ever visited this site,” Elam wrote on his blog when he started Register-Her. “What I do believe is, though, that he, if convinced to stay alive, would have been a hell of a soldier in this war.”

Soldiers in the War

The first shots in this so-called war on feminism were fired 22 years before Tom Ball’s suicide. On Dec. 6, 1989, Marc Lépine, a troubled 25-year-old computer student, strolled into the Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal, Canada, carrying a Ruger Mini-14 semi-automatic rifle and a hunting knife. He walked into a classroom, ordered the men to leave, and lined the women up against a wall.

“I am fighting feminism,” he announced before opening fire. “You’re women, you’re going to be engineers. You’re all a bunch of feminists. I hate feminists.”

By the time he turned the gun on himself, 14 women were dead and 10 were wounded; four men were hurt as well. The suicide note in Lépine’s pocket contained a list of 19 “radical feminists” he hoped to kill, and this: “I have decided to send the feminists, who have always ruined my life, to their Maker. … They want to keep the advantages of women … while seizing for themselves those of men.”

Today, that kind of rage is often directed at all women, not only perceived feminists. “Women don’t need the powers-that-be to get them to hate and use men,” the blogger Alcuin wrote recently. “They have always used men; maybe they have always hated us too.” Added another blogger, Angry Harry: “There are now, literally, billions of dollars, numerous empires, and millions of jobs that depend on the public swallowing the idea that women need to be defended from men.”

“A word to the wise,” offered the blogger known as Rebuking Feminism. “The animals women have become want one thing, resources and genes. … See them as the animals they have become and plan … accordingly.”

And many are quick to endorse violence against women. “There are women, and plenty of them, for which [sic] a solid ass kicking would be the least they deserve,” Paul Elam wrote in an essay with the provocative title, “When is it OK to Punch Your Wife?” “The real question here is not whether these women deserve the business end of a right hook, they obviously do, and some of them deserve one hard enough to leave them in an unconscious, innocuous pile on the ground if it serves to protect the innocent from imminent harm. The real question is whether men deserve to be able to physically defend themselves from assault … from a woman.”

For some, it’s more than just talk. In 2006, Darren Mack, a member of a fathers’ rights group in Reno, Nev., stabbed his estranged wife to death and then shot and wounded the family court judge who was handling his divorce.

That kind of violence continues right up to the present.

In Seal Beach, Calif. last Oct. 12, a day after Scott Evans Dekraai and his ex-wife had been in court to fight over custody of their 8-year-old son (Dekraai had 56% custody but wanted full custody and “final decision making authority” on matters of the child’s education and medical treatment), Dekraai walked into the hair salon where his ex-wife worked armed with three handguns. There, he allegedly shot seven women, six of them fatally; he also is accused of killing two men — the salon’s owner, as he attempted to flee, and a man in a car outside.

8a. Ronan Farrow wrote the New Yorker piece that launched the Harvey Weinstein takedown.

From  Aggressive Overtures to Sexual Aggression: Harvey Weinstein’s Accusers Tell Their Stories” by Ronan Farrow; The New Yorker; 10/23/2017.

8b. An important detail about Ronan Farrow, who played a fundamental role in breaking the Harvey Weinstein case, concerns his background in the State Department, specializing in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Farrow is the son of Mia Farrow and Woody Allen.  ” . . . .  Post-law school: Lands a job at the State Department, as a special advisor focusing on conflict in Afghanistan and Pakistan. . . .”

Farrow’s background strongly suggests intelligence community involvement.

“Ronan Farrow: From State Department to Twitter Legend to MSNBC Host (a Timeline)” by Emily Yahr; The Washington Post; 2/24/2014.

 . . . .  Post-law school: Lands a job at the State Department, as a special advisor focusing on conflict in Afghanistan and Pakistan. . . .

8c. Farrow continued his work for State in 2011. ” . . . . 2011: Starts working alongside Hillary Clinton with a lengthy title: Special Advisor to the Secretary of State for Global Youth Issues and director of the State Department’s Global Youth Issues office. . . .”

Harvey Weinstein was a major donor to the Democrats, including Hillary Clinton. Might Farrow have been doing opposition research on Clinton while  working for her State Department?

“Ronan Farrow: From State Department to Twitter Legend to MSNBC Host (a Timeline)” by Emily Yahr; The Washington Post; 2/24/2014.

. . . . 2011: Starts working alongside Hillary Clinton with a lengthy title: Special Advisor to the Secretary of State for Global Youth Issues and director of the State Department’s Global Youth Issues office. . . .

8d. Farrow also co-wrote the New Yorker article that took down New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, a major Trump opponent who presided over the lawsuit against Trump University.

“Four Women Accuse New York’s Attorney General of Physical Abuse” by Ronan Farrow and Jane Mayer; The New Yorker; 5/7/2018.

8e. Schneiderman was actively going after other members of the oligarchy as well.

“Will This Man Take Down Donald Trump?” by David Freedlander; Politico; 2/3/2017.

. . . . Schneiderman took up the state’s existing case against Trump University—New York wanted the school to drop the “university” from its name, since it was not chartered as an institution of higher learning and lacked a license to offer instruction—and as he pursued it over the next five years, he became the target of a relentless series of personal attacks from the Trump camp. Trump filed an ethics complaint alleging that Schneiderman offered to drop the suit in exchange for donations; he went on television to denounce Schneiderman as a hack and a lightweight, and said he was wasting millions of taxpayer dollars when he should have been going after Wall Street. (Never mind that Schneiderman had already been declared “the man the banks fear most” by the liberal magazine “The American Prospect.”) “The whole scorched-earth strategy towards those who would challenge him, we got a preview of,” says Schneiderman.

The Trump University suit eventually was settled for $25 million days after the election, despite the then president-elect’s repeated pledges never to settle. Schneiderman could have left it at that. But Schneiderman has let it be known that Trump is still in his crosshairs. In the days since November 9, Schneiderman fired off a letter warning Trump not to drop White House support of Obama’s Clean Power Plan, introduced a bill in the state Legislature to give New Yorkers cost-free contraception if the Affordable Care Act is dismantled, threatened to sue after Trump froze EPA funding of clean air and water programs, and joined a lawsuit that argues that Trump’s executive order on immigration is not just unconstitutional and un-American, but it brings profound harm to the residents of New York State.

He has a record of going not only after Trump, but going after people now in Trumpworld. He’s on the opposite side of the Clean Power Plan fight from Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, since named head of the EPA, and who Schneiderman labeled a “dangerous and unqualified choice.” He’s gone after Rex Tillerson, who as CEO of ExxonMobil defended his company from a Schneiderman investigation; since the election he’s begun investigating a reverse-mortgage business once led by Steven Mnuchin, the nominee to be the next Treasury secretary. . . .

8f. Prior to his professional demise, Schneiderman was investigating the NXIVM cult, with its many connections to powerful people, including Trump/GOP dirty trickster Roger Stone, who signaled the #MeToo takedown of Senator Al Franken. Might he have been linked to the takedown of Schneiderman?

“Faces of NXIVM: An Alleged Cult’s Inner Circle and Beyond” by Joyce Bassett; TimesUnion; 4/24/2018.

. . . The Times Union reported on March 25 that New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s office was conducting a separate investigation of a nonprofit foundation associated with NXIVM that allegedly sponsored brain-activity and other human behavioral studies without any apparent oversight, according to court records. That investigation has been suspended due to the federal criminal investigation, officials said. . . .

. . . . The for-profit corporation NXIVM is based on a self-improvement curriculum called “Rational Inquiry.” Other high-profile names — including Republican campaign strategist and self-described political “dirty trickster” Roger Stone. . . .  have taken NXIVM’s executive success courses or were found to have ties to the organization, according to Times Union reporting. . . .

Discussion

5 comments for “FTR #1011 Miscellaneous Articles and Updates”

  1. Well look at that: It turns out the guy charged with intentionally starting the massive “Holy Fire” wildfire on the Cleveland National Forest in Southern California last week is a self-declared sovereign citizen. Surprise!:

    Kansas City Star

    Man accused of igniting CA wildfire is sovereign citizen with possible KS connection

    By Judy L. Thomas

    August 13, 2018 09:49 AM
    Updated

    The man accused of setting the Southern California fire last week that has scorched thousands of acres of national forest is a sovereign citizen who appears to have a Kansas connection.

    Forrest Gordon Clark has described himself on social media as an “interim congressman for Republic for Kansas” and has been involved in an organization that believes the U.S. government is not legitimate, according to J.J. MacNab, an expert on anti-government extremists.

    Clark, 51, was arrested Aug. 7 and is charged with aggravated arson, arson of inhabited property, arson of forest, making criminal threats and resisting arrest. He is being held on $1 million bond and faces a life sentence if convicted.

    The blaze, called Holy Fire, started Aug. 6 in Holy Jim Canyon. It has burned more than 22,000 acres of Cleveland National Forest and forced tens of thousands of residents to flee their homes, making it one of the most destructive wildfires of 2018. As of Sunday night, the fire was about 52 percent contained.

    The area’s volunteer fire chief said that the week before the fire started, Clark had sent him text messages threatening to start a fire and that Clark had run screaming through the area. He’d also been involved in a longstanding feud with a neighbor and other cabin owners in the area, the fire chief said.

    MacNab examined eight years of Clark’s social media posts and determined he’d been promoting sovereign citizen arguments since at least 2010.

    Sovereign citizens say the government is corrupt and out of control, so they do not recognize local, state or federal authority or tax systems. Not all are violent, but in recent years the FBI and other government agencies have come to consider them a top domestic terrorism threat.

    MacNab, a fellow with the Program on Extremism at George Washington University, said that in 2010, Clark was active in the Restore America Plan, which she said later became the Republic for the united States of America (RuSA). The RuSA, she said, is an alternative-government organization that believes the real U.S. government ceased to exist in 1871 and that an “imposter” or “de facto” government has been in power ever since.

    To remedy this situation, MacNab said, RuSA created a substitute government and is waiting until the current government collapses so it can step in and take control.

    Clark was such an enthusiastic supporter of the RuSA, MacNab said, that in 2010 he traveled to the first real gathering of the group in Colorado. His Facebook page contains a photo of a grinning Clark wearing a shirt with a large sunflower on it and a nametag that says, “Forrest Clark Representative Kansas.”

    In a notice dated Sept. 16, 2011, and posted on his Facebook page, Clark says “I Am A Sovereign Man” and calls himself a “Kansas free state — Interim Representative” and “DeJure grand Juror in service for the Lord, you, our republic, our nation.”

    In another post, he describes himself as “a general contractor/builder, a medical missionary, and a interim congressman for Republic for Kansas, trying to save America for those who are worthy & take the time to learn of freedom. Freedom is not free.”

    It’s unclear why Clark was representing Kansas in the alternative-government organization. Online searches show he has lived in Ohio and California.

    His Facebook posts include pushing such conspiracy theories as 9/11 was an inside job and insisting the FBI has murdered witnesses in the 2017 Las Vegas sniper shooting that killed 58. The site also contains posts about cannabis, religion and numerous close-up photos of what he says is skin cancer on his face and leg. It also suggests that he was involved in a dispute with a neighbor who he says was cooking meth.

    “Based on his social media pages,” MacNab said in a Twitter post, “Clark is a sovereign citizen who believes in just about every kooky conspiracy out there, including QAnon, Pizzagate, Jade Helm 15, flat earth theories, NESARA, Jesuit conservancies, shape-shifting lizard overlords. You name it, he believes it.”

    Clark appears to have a history of financial and personal troubles, according to the Palm Springs Desert Sun. In addition to multiple credit card collection cases, he was a defendant in a civil breach of contract case, accused of defrauding an employer of about $85,000. The lawsuit claimed that Clark and his co-workers were paid for landscaping work that his company never completed, the Desert Sun said.

    ———-

    “Man accused of igniting CA wildfire is sovereign citizen with possible KS connection” by Judy L. Thomas; Kansas City Star; 08/13/2018

    “Forrest Gordon Clark has described himself on social media as an “interim congressman for Republic for Kansas” and has been involved in an organization that believes the U.S. government is not legitimate, according to J.J. MacNab, an expert on anti-government extremists.”

    Yep, the guy who started the fire is a self-declared congressman for one of the many fake governments the sovereigns set up. In particular, Clark appears to be part of the “Restore America Plan” alternative government. Clark was even at its first gathering in 2010:


    MacNab examined eight years of Clark’s social media posts and determined he’d been promoting sovereign citizen arguments since at least 2010.

    Sovereign citizens say the government is corrupt and out of control, so they do not recognize local, state or federal authority or tax systems. Not all are violent, but in recent years the FBI and other government agencies have come to consider them a top domestic terrorism threat.

    MacNab, a fellow with the Program on Extremism at George Washington University, said that in 2010, Clark was active in the Restore America Plan, which she said later became the Republic for the united States of America (RuSA). The RuSA, she said, is an alternative-government organization that believes the real U.S. government ceased to exist in 1871 and that an “imposter” or “de facto” government has been in power ever since.

    To remedy this situation, MacNab said, RuSA created a substitute government and is waiting until the current government collapses so it can step in and take control.

    Clark was such an enthusiastic supporter of the RuSA, MacNab said, that in 2010 he traveled to the first real gathering of the group in Colorado. His Facebook page contains a photo of a grinning Clark wearing a shirt with a large sunflower on it and a nametag that says, “Forrest Clark Representative Kansas.”

    In a notice dated Sept. 16, 2011, and posted on his Facebook page, Clark says “I Am A Sovereign Man” and calls himself a “Kansas free state — Interim Representative” and “DeJure grand Juror in service for the Lord, you, our republic, our nation.”

    In another post, he describes himself as “a general contractor/builder, a medical missionary, and a interim congressman for Republic for Kansas, trying to save America for those who are worthy & take the time to learn of freedom. Freedom is not free.”

    It’s unclear why Clark was representing Kansas in the alternative-government organization. Online searches show he has lived in Ohio and California.

    And while the precise motive for setting this fire isn’t quite clear, the fact that Clark actually sent a text messages to the area’s volunteer fire chief the week before the fires started threatening to start a fire makes it pretty clear that he wanted to get caught (or was just out of his mind):


    Clark, 51, was arrested Aug. 7 and is charged with aggravated arson, arson of inhabited property, arson of forest, making criminal threats and resisting arrest. He is being held on $1 million bond and faces a life sentence if convicted.

    The blaze, called Holy Fire, started Aug. 6 in Holy Jim Canyon. It has burned more than 22,000 acres of Cleveland National Forest and forced tens of thousands of residents to flee their homes, making it one of the most destructive wildfires of 2018. As of Sunday night, the fire was about 52 percent contained.

    The area’s volunteer fire chief said that the week before the fire started, Clark had sent him text messages threatening to start a fire and that Clark had run screaming through the area. He’d also been involved in a longstanding feud with a neighbor and other cabin owners in the area, the fire chief said.

    And when trying to determine a motive, it’s worth noting that, as is typically the case with sovereign citizens, Clark’s beliefs went included just about any whacky conspiracy theory out there, including the QAnon/Pizzagate hoax. He is also convinced that the FBI murdered witnesses to the 2017 Las Vegas domestic terror attack by Stephen Paddock:


    His Facebook posts include pushing such conspiracy theories as 9/11 was an inside job and insisting the FBI has murdered witnesses in the 2017 Las Vegas sniper shooting that killed 58. The site also contains posts about cannabis, religion and numerous close-up photos of what he says is skin cancer on his face and leg. It also suggests that he was involved in a dispute with a neighbor who he says was cooking meth.

    “Based on his social media pages,” MacNab said in a Twitter post, “Clark is a sovereign citizen who believes in just about every kooky conspiracy out there, including QAnon, Pizzagate, Jade Helm 15, flat earth theories, NESARA, Jesuit conservancies, shape-shifting lizard overlords. You name it, he believes it.”

    Clark appears to have a history of financial and personal troubles, according to the Palm Springs Desert Sun. In addition to multiple credit card collection cases, he was a defendant in a civil breach of contract case, accused of defrauding an employer of about $85,000. The lawsuit claimed that Clark and his co-workers were paid for landscaping work that his company never completed, the Desert Sun said.

    Once again, don’t forget that Stephen Paddock, himself, appears to have been a sovereign citizen who was terrified of government FEMA camps and was convinced that “somebody has to wake up the American public and get them to arm themselves”.

    So, as with the case of Stephen Paddock, we once again are facing an act by a sovereign citizen that could be the action of a lunatic but also fits the profile of the far right strategy of ‘leaderless resistance’ and calculated random acts of domestic terror.

    It’s one of the signature characteristics of the sovereign movement: the members are so overtly detached from reality that it’s hard to determine if there’s any strategy behind their seemingly random and insane acts of violence or this just the manifestation of the insanity that infests the movement.

    It’s also a good time to recall that one of the key strategies of far right organizations for seizing power is to create one horrible event after another for the purpose of effectively driving a society insane and taking advantage of vulnerabilities that collective insanity creates. It’s something that’s going to be increasingly important to keep in mind as the sovereigns and other far right individuals continue their domestic terror campaigns: their overt insanity is intended to be infectious. Maybe bullets are intended to be the infectious vectors or maybe fire. Either way, the violence and mayhem is meant to spread. It’s the underlying method to the madness.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | August 13, 2018, 11:25 am
  2. It looks like the FBI investigation into the motive behind Stephen Paddock’s massacre in Las Vegas is officially ended with a “we have no idea what his motives were” conclusion. The FBI did conclude that Paddock was likely seeking some form of infamy and may have been inspire to follow in footsteps of his bank robber father. But beyond that, the FBI found no indication of particular motive and concluded that the gunman was not directed or inspired by any group and was not seeking to further any agenda.

    This conclusion of no inspiration by any group or agenda of course is completely contradicted by the witnesses who claim to have overheard Paddock in the days before the shooting expressing views in line with the Sovereign Citizens. Recall the account of a woman claimed she sat near Paddock in a diner days before the attack where he talked about with a companion about the 25th anniversary of the Ruby Ridge standoff and the Waco siege and heard him and his companion saying that courtroom flags with golden fringes are not real flags, in keeping with the Sovereign Citizen belief that gold-fringed flags are those of a foreign jurisdiction, or “admiralty flags”. And recall the accounts of a man who claimed he Paddock tried to buy from him a device that would convert semi-automatic rifles to fully automatic weapons. The man claimed that Paddock launched into a rant about “anti-government stuff … Fema camps”. The man claims that Paddock told him that the evacuation of people by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (Fema) after Hurricane Katrina was a a “dry run for law enforcement and military to start kickin’ down doors and … confiscating guns”. And he says Paddock told him, “Somebody has to wake up the American public and get them to arm themselves…Sometimes sacrifices have to be made.”

    So not only are there multiple independent accounts that point strongly towards Paddock being a follower of Sovereign Citizen ideologies, but if that account about Paddock saying “Somebody has to wake up the American public and get them to arm themselves…Sometimes sacrifices have to be made” is accurate, that strongly implies that Paddock would want to carrying out his politically motivated attack while hiding his political motive. After all, if someone who is concerned about the government confiscating guns and wants to “wake up the American public and get them to arm themselves” proceeds to carry out a mass slaughter of the nature Paddock did (where he was found surrounded by an arsenal of guns in his hotel room), there is one very twisted obvious logic behind that kind of terrorism: carrying out an unprecedented massacre in order to prompt a wave of government gun confiscations with the hope of seeing the American far right backlash.

    In other words, based on the circumstantial evidence, it looks like Paddock was making the bet that if he carried out an attack so horrific that the American government couldn’t resist some degree of gun confiscations, the mass armed insurrection that the American far right has long pined for would finally happen in response. And if that was indeed Paddock’s plan, of course he wouldn’t want to make his ideology clear. So based on the circumstantial publicly available evidence, not only does it look like Paddock had a political motive inspired by Sovereign Citizen beliefs but he also had a motive to hide those beliefs and for some reason the FBI has a motive to ignore this in its final report

    Associated Press

    FBI finds no specific motive in Vegas attack that killed 58

    By KEN RITTER and MICHAEL BALSAMO
    1/29/2019

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — The high-stakes gambler responsible for the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history sought notoriety in the attack but left his specific motive a mystery, the FBI said Tuesday as it concluded the investigation of the 2017 massacre that killed 58 country music fans.

    While the agency found no “single or clear motivating factor” to explain to explain why Stephen Paddock opened fire from his suite in a high-rise casino hotel, Paddock may have been seeking to follow in his father’s criminal footsteps, the FBI said.

    “It wasn’t about MGM, Mandalay Bay or a specific casino or venue,” Aaron Rouse, the agent in charge of the FBI’s Las Vegas office, told The Associated Press. “It was all about doing the maximum amount of damage and him obtaining some form of infamy.”

    Paddock’s physical and mental health was declining. The 64-year-old’s wealth had diminished, and he struggled with aging, federal agents said. The findings were contained in a long-awaited report compiled by the FBI’s Behavior Analysis Unit, a group of experts who spent months examining several factors that might have led to the rampage.

    “This report comes as close to understanding the why as we’re ever going to get,” Rouse said.

    Paddock, who acted alone, fatally shot himself as police closed in. Almost 900 people were hurt during the Oct. 1, 2017, attack on an outdoor concert.

    The gunman was inspired in part by his father’s reputation as a bank robber who was once on the FBI’s most wanted list, the report said. In many ways, he was similar to other active shooters the FBI has studied — motivated by a complex merging of development issues, stress and interpersonal relationships.

    His “decision to murder people while they were being entertained was consistent with his personality,” the report said.

    The gunman was not directed or inspired by any group and was not seeking to further any agenda. He did not leave a manifesto or suicide note, and federal agents believe he had planned to fatally shoot himself after the attack, according to the report.

    Kimberly King, who along with her husband was hurt at the concert, said Paddock was “just a sick person.” She doesn’t care why he carried out the attack.

    “How did he get the chance to do it? That’s what upsets me the most,” the Las Vegas woman said. “How could this have happened and how could we have let this happen?”

    Paddock was a retired postal service worker, accountant and real estate investor who owned rental properties and homes in Reno and in a retirement community more than an hour’s drive from Las Vegas. He also held a private pilot’s license and liked to gamble tens of thousands of dollars at a time playing video poker.

    His younger brother, Eric Paddock, called him the “king of micro-aggression” — narcissistic, detail-oriented and maybe bored enough with life to plan an attack that would make him famous. His ex-wife told investigators that he grew up with a single mom in a financially unstable home and he felt a need to be self-reliant.

    Police characterized him as a loner with no religious or political affiliations who began stockpiling weapons about a year before the attack. He spent more than $1.5 million in the two years before the shooting and distanced himself from his girlfriend and family.

    He sent his girlfriend, Marilou Danley, to visit her family in the Philippines two weeks before the attack and wired her $150,000 while she was there. Danley, a former casino worker in Reno, returned to the U.S. after the shooting and told authorities that Paddock had complained that he was sick and that doctors told him he had a “chemical imbalance” and could not cure him.

    Danley, who is Catholic, told investigators that Paddock often told her, “Your God doesn’t love me.”

    A Reno car salesman told police that in the months before the shooting Paddock told him he was depressed and had relationship troubles. Paddock’s doctor offered him antidepressants, but told investigators that Paddock would only accept a prescription for anxiety medication.

    Paddock’s gambling habits made him a sought-after casino patron. Mandalay Bay employees readily let him use a service elevator to take multiple suitcases to the $590-per-night suite he had been provided for free. Authorities said he asked for the room, which had a commanding view of the Strip and the Route 91 Harvest Festival concert grounds across the street.

    The night of the massacre, Paddock used assault-style rifles to fire more than 1,000 rounds in 11 minutes into the crowd of 22,000 music fans. Most of the rifles were fitted with rapid-fire “bump stock” devices and high-capacity magazines. Some had bipod braces and scopes. Authorities said Paddock’s guns had been legally purchased.

    Las Vegas police closed their investigation last August, and Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo declared the police work complete after hundreds of interviews and thousands of hours of investigative work. Lombardo vowed never to speak Paddock’s name again in public. A Las Vegas police spokesman declined to comment on the FBI’s report.

    A separate report made public in August involving the Federal Emergency Management Agency found that communications were snarled during and after the shooting. It said police, fire and medical responders were overwhelmed by 911 calls, false reports of other shootings at Las Vegas casinos and the number of victims.

    He left behind nothing that offered an explanation.

    “He acted alone. He committed a heinous act. He died by his own hand,” Rouse said. “If he wanted to leave a message, he would have left a message. Bottom line is he didn’t want people to know.”

    ———

    “FBI finds no specific motive in Vegas attack that killed 58” by KEN RITTER and MICHAEL BALSAMO; Associated Press; 1/29/2019

    The gunman was not directed or inspired by any group and was not seeking to further any agenda.” He did not leave a manifesto or suicide note, and federal agents believe he had planned to fatally shoot himself after the attack, according to the report.

    Paddock wasn’t directed or inspired by any group and wasn’t seeking to further any agenda. Those were the final findings of the FBI, which appears to completely ignore the witnesses accounts that point towards a heavily radicalized and deeply political individual who wanted to “wake up” America about the threat of government gun seizures.

    The Las Vegas police also concluded that Paddock was a loner with no religious or political affiliations:


    Police characterized him as a loner with no religious or political affiliations who began stockpiling weapons about a year before the attack. He spent more than $1.5 million in the two years before the shooting and distanced himself from his girlfriend and family.

    So we’ll see what, if any, additional information is eventually discovered about Paddock, his politics, and motive behind the attack. It’s hard to imagine that the FBI’s final report is really going to be the final examination of this case, especially given the “we have no idea” nature of their conclusions. But for now, for whatever reason, Paddock’s radicalized political beliefs appear to be such a sensitive subject by investigators that they’re acting like he didn’t have any.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | January 30, 2019, 2:42 pm
  3. Oh look, another American neo-Nazi domestic terrorist: a lieutenant in the US Coast Guard, Christophe Hasson, was arrested for plotting to a mass terror campaign modeled after Anders Breivik’s manifesto, with the idea of sparking a domestic conflict for the purpose of creating a white homeland. In addition to finding a stockpile of guns, Hasson appeared to have an interest in biological weapons and targeting the US food supply. In a 2017 letter, Hasson wrote, “I think a plague would be most successful but how do I acquire the needed/Spanish flu, botulism, anthrax not sure yet but will find something.” He also said in the letter that he would start with the biological attacks targeting the food supply and then would begin a “bombing/sniper campaign.”

    There’s a parallel with the bizarre case of Cesar Sayoc, the Trump super-fan who mailed fake pipe-bombs to a Democratic politicians and media personalities: In addition to being a big Trump fan, Hasson had a long assassination target list of a number of Democratic politicians and left-leaning cable news personalities like Chris Hayes and Don Lemon. His web search history indicates that he’s done a number of searches about the kind of physical protection these individuals have and their home addresses. So the guy was very interested in causing both mass casualties but also targeted killings. The particular hit list investigators found was apparently created on January 19th of this year.

    There’s also a big parallel with what appears to have been Stephen Paddock’s motive for the Las Vegas massacre: committing a horrific crime for the purpose of triggering a government crackdown that will fuel a ‘white backlash’ and hopefully trigger a civil war. Recall how Paddock was overheard by multiple witnesses shortly before the Vegas attack using sovereign citizen terminology, ranting about ‘FEMA camps’, and saying things like “Somebody has to wake up the American public and get them to arm themselves…Sometimes sacrifices have to be made.” In the case of Hasson, he wrote that the “liberalist/globalist ideology is destroying traditional peoples (especially) white,” amd, “No way to counteract without violence. It should push for more crack down bringing more people to our side. Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch. For some no amount of blood will be enough. They will die as will the traitors who actively work toward our demise. Looking to Russia with hopeful eyes or any land that despises the west’s liberalism. Excluding, of course, the Muslim scum. Who rightfully despite the west’s liberal degeneracy.”

    Hasson wrote about his plans to increase the planned unrest by targeting both law enforcement and protestors: “During unrest target both sides to increase tension…In other words provoke gov/police to over react which should help to escalate violence. BLM protests or other left crap would be ideal to incite to violence.” He also wrote, “Food/fuel may be the key, if I can disrupt two or three weeks. When (people) start to loot steal protest dress as cop and shoot them. Burn down Apt complex, bar the doors first. Thermite on gas station tank.

    It’s also noteworthy that Hasson wrote a letter in September of 2017 to someone described as a “known American neo-Nazi leader” where he expresses his desires to do something to spark the fight for a white homeland. The letter was apparently sent seven weeks after the Charlottesville “Unite the Right” neo-Nazi march. The Vegas shooting was on October 1, 2017, which is right around seven weeks after Charlottesville. So right around the same time Paddock commits the Vegas massacre, Hasson is writing to an American neo-Nazi leader about his desires to more or less do the same thing, but on an even larger scale.

    So Hasson was explicitly planning on doing something that would bring a “crack down” of some sort that would bring “more people to our side” because “Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch.” And he had a long list of left-wing assassination targets and wanted to become the American Anders Breivik. So it sounds like, once again, we have an American neo-Nazi domestic terror plot designed to catalyze a “crack down” (likely gun control legislation) that will “get whitey off the couch”. But in this case, the ‘getting whitey off the couch’ plans involve biowarfare:

    Heavy.com

    Christopher Hasson: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

    By Tom Cleary
    Updated Feb 20, 2019 at 7:01pm

    A 49-year-old active duty U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant arrested on gun and drug charges has been accused by federal prosecutors of being a “domestic terrorist, bent on committing acts dangerous to human life that are intended to affect governmental conduct.” In a court filing, prosecutors showed the lieutenant was inspired by far-right Norwegian terrorist Anders Breivik has corresponded with known white supremacists and identified himself as a “white nationalist” who has advocated for “focused violence” in order to establish a “white homeland.”

    Christopher Hasson, of Silver Spring, Maryland, was charged with possession of firearms and ammunition by an unlawful user or addict of controlled substances, and with possession of tramadol, but prosecutors in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Maryland called those alleged offenses the “proverbial tip of the iceberg.”

    In a chilling court document, federal prosecutors explain how Hasson appeared to be researching the Norwegian terrorist, studying the mass killer’s manifesto and gathering weapons, ammunition and other supplies with the intention of carrying out a similar attack in the United States in an effort to become the American Anders Breivik. The Norwegian killed 77 people in his 2011 attack. Prosecutors did not reveal if Hasson had a specific date in mind for an attack and also didn’t say how he was discovered.

    Prosecutors said in court documents that Hasson stockpiled weapons and was planning a domestic terror attack targeting Democratic politicians and journalists. He wrote in a letter to a Neo-Nazi leader that he had been dreaming of ways to “kill almost every last person on earth,” prosecutors said. Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Wisdom wrote, “the defendant intends to murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country.”

    The case was first uncovered by Seamus Hughes, a former Senate counterterrorism advisor who now works with the George Washington University Program on Extremism, which provides “analysis and policy solutions on radicalization, terrorism and extremism.” You can learn more about the GWUPoE and Hughes’ work here.. Hughes, the program’s deputy director, has revealed details on several cases involving American extremism and terrorism cases, often finding the information in federal court documents before the media.

    Hasson remains in federal custody and has been held on a temporary detention order since his arrest on February 15. The explosive details found by Hughes and the Program on Extremism were detailed in a motion by federal prosecutors for asking the judge to continue Hasson’s detention prior to trial.

    U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert Hur and his office have declined further comment on the case beyond confirming Hasson’s arrest. The FBI has also not commented further. It is not clear if Hasson has hired an attorney who could speak on his behalf and his wife and other family members did not immediately return requests for comment from Heavy.

    Hasson is a supporter of President Donald Trump and wrote that “liberalist/globalist ideology is destroying traditional peoples (especially) white,” according to prosecutors. Hasson added, “No way to counteract without violence. It should push for more crack down bringing more people to our side. Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch. For some no amount of blood will be enough. They will die as will the traitors who actively work toward our demise. Looking to Russia with hopeful eyes or any land that despises the west’s liberalism. Excluding, of course, the Muslim scum. Who rightfully despite the west’s liberal degeneracy.”

    Prosecutors said Hasson had also “conducted online searches” for “pro-Russian, neo-fascist and neo-Nazi literature,” and made “thousands of visits,” to sites with that information.

    Here’s what you need to know about Lt. Christopher Hasson:

    1. Hasson Has Worked at the Coast Guard Headquarters in D.C. Since 2016 & Served in the Marines From 1988 to 1993

    Lieutenant Christopher Paul Hasson has been stationed at the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington D.C. since 2016, according to court documents. He was promoted to lieutenant in June 2016, records show. He was commissioned into the Coast Guard on June 1, 2012.

    According to court documents, Hasson worked in “National Security Cutter Acquisition.”

    Federal prosecutors said Hasson served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1988 to 1993 and was in the Army National Guard for two years in the mid-1990s.

    Prosecutors have not said what led to the investigation into Hasson on the drug and gun charges.

    Hasson is married and has children, including a son who also served in the Marine Corps, according to social media profiles. He has previously lived in California, Virginia, South Carolina, Nevada, Arizona, North Carolina, New Jersey and has been in Silver Spring, Maryland, since 2017.

    A criminal complaint was filed against Hasson on February 14, 2019, along with an affidavit from FBI Special Agent Alexandria Thoman. The case was sealed until Hasson’s arrest on February 15.

    Thoman obtained emails in which Hasson wrote about owning and trying to buy guns, along with talking about going to gun ranges and shooting clubs in Maryland and Virginia, including the “NRA Range” at the National Rifle Association headquarters in Virginia. He bought guns at the NRA range, according to court documents.

    Thoman wrote in her affidavit that Hasson had been buying Tramadol, a prescription painkiller, from an unidentified person likely located in Mexico, since October 2016. The drugs were being sent from locations in California to addresses in Maryland and North Carolina, including Hasson’s home.

    “Other evidence suggests that Hasson is a user, rather than a distributor, of the Tramadol her purchases,” Thoman wrote.

    You can read the full criminal complaint below or or here:
    [see criminal complaint]

    2. Prosecutors Say Hasson Wrote in a Letter, ‘Send Me Your Violence So I May Unleash It Onto Their Heads … Guide My Hate to Make a Lasting Impression on the World’

    LT. Christopher Hasson wrote a draft letter to a well known American neo nazi advocating for a white state. pic.twitter.com/WhUlcnBFJQ

    — Seamus Hughes (@SeamusHughes) February 20, 2019

    Prosecutors said in court documents that Hasson appeared to have been studying the 1,500-page manifesto written by Anders Behring Breivik prior to his attacks in Norway. Breivik killed eight people in a bombing in Oslo before fatally shooting 69 people on the island of Utoya.

    Breivik had embraced “crusader nationalism,” which he believed would counteract the “Islamization” of Europe, and believed Europe was being destroyed by “cultural Marxism and political correctness,” according to prosecutors. Prosecutors said Hasson was following Breivik’s manifesto’s instructions to amass firearms, food, disguises and survival supplies.

    He had also searched in recent weeks for, “what if Trump illegally impeached,” “best place in DC to see congress people,” “where in dc to [sic] congress live,” “civil war if trump impeached,” and “social democrats usa.”

    In September 2017, he wrote a letter directed to a “known American neo-Nazi leader,” prosecutors said. He identified himself as a white nationalist for more than 30 years. The letter was sent seven weeks after the Charlottesville rally:

    In the letter, he said he has “been a skinhead,” before his time in the military. He wrote, that he fully supports a “white homeland.”

    “I never saw a reason for mass protest or wearing uniforms marching around provoking people with swastikas etc.,” Hasson wrote. “I was and am a man of action you cannot change minds protesting like that. However you can make change with a little focused violence.”

    You can read the full letter below:

    I am writing you regards to your ideas behind North West migration. To date I have read most of your books and briefly looked at your website. I am a long time White Nationalist, having been a skinhead 30 plus years ago before my time in the military. I have served in 3 branches currently serving as an Officer (never attended college) with 2 years till I hit mandatory retirement at 30. . . While I fully support the idea of a white homeland, my friends who still play at being a skinhead at 40 plus years old say that you are an informant. That is neither here nor there it is not an accusation the person who told me this served a 12 year prison sentence and never ratted me out so I will not dispute him nor will I accuse you. I never saw a reason for mass protest or wearing uniforms marching around provoking people with swastikas etc. I was and am a man of action you cannot change minds protesting like that. However you can make change with a little focused violence. . . The government has expertly infiltrated and destroyed from within most if not all Pro White organizations. . . . We need a white homeland as Europe seems lost. How long we can hold out there and prevent niggerization of the Northwest until whites wake up on their own or are forcibly made to make a decision whether to roll over and die or to stand up remains to be seen. But I know a few younger ones that are tired of waiting and I feel we need them to resettle and build a community before they throw their life away with some desperate measure like shooting up a mosque in an area that doesn’t want us. They need a Homeland to fight for as America has turned its back on them. I know more than a few that went this path and it’s a f*cking waste.

    In a letter written in 2017 recovered from his email drafts, Hasson wrote, “Please send me your violence that I may unleash it onto their heads … Guide my hate to make a lasting impression on this world.”

    It is not clear who the letter was meant to be sent to. It was addressed,” dear friends, maybe that’s a bit of a misnomer. Acquaintances more likely.”

    In court documents, prosecutors said Hasson wrote in the 2017 letter that he was thinking about biological attacks and targeting food supplies.

    He wrote, “I think a plague would be most successful but how do I acquire the needed/Spanish flu, botulism, anthrax not sure yet but will find something.”

    He said he would start with the biological attacks targeting the food supply and then would begin a “bombing/sniper campaign.”

    Hasson wrote, “What can I do, I will not do nothing…It seems inevitable that we are doomed. I don’t think I can cause complete destruction on my own, however if I could enlist the unwitting help of another power/country would be best. Who and how to provoke???”

    He also listed things he wanted to accomplish in the next four years, including, getting out of debt, buying a van to convert it to diesel, buy land for family out west or in the North Carolina mountains.”

    “During unrest target both sides to increase tension,” he wrote. “In other words provoke gov/police to over react which should help to escalate violence. BLM protests or other left crap would be ideal to incite to violence.”

    You can read the motion for a detention order below:
    [see motion for detention]

    3. Hasson Had a List of Targets Including Democratic Congressional Leaders & Media Personalities & Searched for the ‘Best Place in DC to See Congress People’ & Are Supreme Court Justices Protected’

    Christopher Hasson had a list of potential targets that was similar to Anders Breivik’s list of traitors. The spreadsheet found by federal prosecutors included several prominent Democratic members of Congress and media personalities.

    Prosecutors said he built the list while “reviewing the MSNBC, CNN and Fox News websites,” as well as other websites, on his work computer. It was created on January 19.

    The list included:

    -“Joey,” who prosecutors said is believed to be MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough

    – MSNBC’s Chris Hayes

    – “pelosi,” presumably House Speaker Nancy Pelosi

    – “Sen Blumen Jew,” who prosecutors believe to be U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut.

    – “Sen kaine,” believed to be U.S. Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia

    – “Shumer,” presumed to be U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer of New York

    – CNN’s Don Lemon

    – “gillibran,” presumably U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand

    – “poca warren,” presumably U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts

    – “cortez,” believed to be Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York

    – “booker,” believed to be U.S. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey

    – Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, of Texas

    – U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, of California

    – U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson, of Texas

    – “iihan omar,” presumed to be U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar, of Minnesota

    – CNN’s Chris Cuomo

    – Democratic Socialists of America

    – CNN’s Van Jones

    – “podesta,” presumed to be former Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta

    According to prosecutors, the list is “consistent with the directions in the Breivik manifesto,” which divided targets into categories A, B or C:

    This classification system is used to identify various individual cultural Marxist/multiculturalist traitors. The intention of the system is to easier identify priority targets and will also serve as the foundation for the future ‘Nuremberg trials’ once the European cultural conservatives reassert political and military control of any given country. Any category A, B or C traitor is an individual who has deliberately used his or her influence in a way which makes him or her indirectly or directly guilty of the charges specified in this document: 1-8. Many of these individuals will attempt to claim ‘ignorance’ of the crimes they are accused of

    According to Breivik’s system, category A was the “most influential and high profile traitors,” including political leaders, media leaders and cultural leaders.

    Hasson had searched for “most liberal senators,” “do senators have [secret service] protection,” and searched for Scarborough after seeing a headline in which the MSNBC host claimed Trump to be “the worst ever” president. He also looked up where the host’s show, “Morning Joe,” is filmed, along with his home, prosecutors said.

    Hasson made many anti-Semitic remarks in emails obtained by the FBI, including writing, “I don’t know if there truly is a ‘conspiracy’ of ((((People)))) out to destroy me and mine, but there is an attack none the less. For that reason I will strike, I can’t just strike to wound I must find a way to deliver a blow that cannot be shaken off. Maybe many blows that will cause the needed turmoil.”

    The “(((People)))” is a coded reference to Jewish people.

    4. Police Seized 15 Firearms, Including Long Guns & Rifles, From Hasson’s Home Along With More Than 1,000 Rounds of Ammunition, Narcotics & What Appeared to Be Human Growth Hormones

    According to court documents, investigators seized 15 firearms, including long guns and rifles, from Christopher Hasson’s home in Silver Spring, Maryland. They also seized more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition. And prosecutors said he made nearly two dozen purchases of firearms or related equipment over the last two years.

    Police also seized narcotics, including the prescription painkiller Tramadol, along with what appeared to be vials of human growth hormones and synthetic urine that can be used to bypass random drug screenings, according to court documents.

    The FBI affidavit states that Hasson made two purchases from “Alternative Lifestyle” in 2018 for “Golden Flask Synthetic Urine,” and “The Clean Kit,” which investigators said are used to avoid a positive urinalysis test. The FBI said Hasson would be subject to random tests as part of his job. He had one such test in January 2018 and tested negative for drugs.

    According to court documents, Tramadol pills were also found at Hasson’s desk at the Coast Guard headquarters in D.C., hidden inside a bottle labeled “Fish Flox.”

    He wrote about drug use in a letter uncovered by investigators, saying he needed to “come off TDL [Tramadol], clear my head.” He said he wanted to “move to friendly area and start to organize. Get leadership within the community, sheriff, city manager, mayor, lawyer? Not sure but start now. Be ready.”

    According to prosecutors, Anders Breivik used narcotics and steroids prior to his 2011 attack because he believed it heightened his abilities. On January 3, 2019, Hasson searched Breivik’s manifesto for “steroids,” and read his diary entry on the topic, prosecutors said.

    Hasson encouraged recipients of his letter to “stockpile” in five locations, packing food, guns, clothing, gear,” while learning basic chemistry. “[Buy] land put 3 home sand multiple hides. Have way to get out and start hitting back.”

    He also cited Eric Rudolph, the Olympic Park Bomber, as an inspiration.

    He wrote, “Food/fuel may be the key, if I can disrupt two or three weeks. When (people) start to loot steal protest dress as cop and shoot them. Burn down Apt complex, bar the doors first. Thermite on gas station tank.”

    5. Hasson Is Scheduled for a Detention Hearing in Federal Court on Thursday

    Lieutenant Christopher Hasson is scheduled to appear in court on Thursday, February 21, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. His hearing is scheduled for 1 p.m. in the U.S. District Court in Maryland before U.S. Magistrate Judge Charles B. Day.

    ———–

    “Christopher Hasson: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know” by Tom Cleary; Heavy.com; 02/20/2019

    In a chilling court document, federal prosecutors explain how Hasson appeared to be researching the Norwegian terrorist, studying the mass killer’s manifesto and gathering weapons, ammunition and other supplies with the intention of carrying out a similar attack in the United States in an effort to become the American Anders Breivik. The Norwegian killed 77 people in his 2011 attack. Prosecutors did not reveal if Hasson had a specific date in mind for an attack and also didn’t say how he was discovered.”

    An aspiring American Anders Breivik. That appears to be the primary template Christopher Hasson was working off of in his plans to “kill almost every last person on earth.” And central to his strategy is to commit a terror campaign that will provoke a government response which will “get whitey off the couch” and spark the kind of civil war that can exploited by the neo-Nazis to create a new ‘white homeland’. It also sounds quite a bit like Stephen Paddock’s motive:


    Prosecutors said in court documents that Hasson stockpiled weapons and was planning a domestic terror attack targeting Democratic politicians and journalists. He wrote in a letter to a Neo-Nazi leader that he had been dreaming of ways to “kill almost every last person on earth,” prosecutors said. Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Wisdom wrote, “the defendant intends to murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country.”

    Hasson is a supporter of President Donald Trump and wrote that “liberalist/globalist ideology is destroying traditional peoples (especially) white,” according to prosecutors. Hasson added, “No way to counteract without violence. It should push for more crack down bringing more people to our side. Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch. For some no amount of blood will be enough. They will die as will the traitors who actively work toward our demise. Looking to Russia with hopeful eyes or any land that despises the west’s liberalism. Excluding, of course, the Muslim scum. Who rightfully despite the west’s liberal degeneracy.”

    Prosecutors said Hasson had also “conducted online searches” for “pro-Russian, neo-fascist and neo-Nazi literature,” and made “thousands of visits,” to sites with that information.

    Prosecutors said in court documents that Hasson appeared to have been studying the 1,500-page manifesto written by Anders Behring Breivik prior to his attacks in Norway. Breivik killed eight people in a bombing in Oslo before fatally shooting 69 people on the island of Utoya.

    Breivik had embraced “crusader nationalism,” which he believed would counteract the “Islamization” of Europe, and believed Europe was being destroyed by “cultural Marxism and political correctness,” according to prosecutors. Prosecutors said Hasson was following Breivik’s manifesto’s instructions to amass firearms, food, disguises and survival supplies.

    He had also searched in recent weeks for, “what if Trump illegally impeached,” “best place in DC to see congress people,” “where in dc to [sic] congress live,” “civil war if trump impeached,” and “social democrats usa.”

    Interestingly, it was in September 2017, seven weeks after the Charlottesville rally (so right before the Stephen Paddock Vegas massacre of October 1, 2017), Hasson sends a letter to an American neo-Nazi leader explaining how he was a skinhead before joining the military and his desire to use “focused violence” to “change minds” in the pursuit of a white homeland:


    In September 2017, he wrote a letter directed to a “known American neo-Nazi leader,” prosecutors said. He identified himself as a white nationalist for more than 30 years. The letter was sent seven weeks after the Charlottesville rally:

    In the letter, he said he has “been a skinhead,” before his time in the military. He wrote, that he fully supports a “white homeland.”

    “I never saw a reason for mass protest or wearing uniforms marching around provoking people with swastikas etc.,” Hasson wrote. “I was and am a man of action you cannot change minds protesting like that. However you can make change with a little focused violence.”

    He also wrote another letter in September 2017 to unknown recipients about his use biological warfare and target the food supplies before starting a bombing/sniper campaign that would target both law enforcement and protestors for the purpose of inciting general violence:


    In court documents, prosecutors said Hasson wrote in the 2017 letter that he was thinking about biological attacks and targeting food supplies.

    He wrote, “I think a plague would be most successful but how do I acquire the needed/Spanish flu, botulism, anthrax not sure yet but will find something.”

    He said he would start with the biological attacks targeting the food supply and then would begin a “bombing/sniper campaign.”

    Hasson wrote, “What can I do, I will not do nothing…It seems inevitable that we are doomed. I don’t think I can cause complete destruction on my own, however if I could enlist the unwitting help of another power/country would be best. Who and how to provoke???”

    He also listed things he wanted to accomplish in the next four years, including, getting out of debt, buying a van to convert it to diesel, buy land for family out west or in the North Carolina mountains.”

    “During unrest target both sides to increase tension,” he wrote. “In other words provoke gov/police to over react which should help to escalate violence. BLM protests or other left crap would be ideal to incite to violence.”

    Hasson encouraged recipients of his letter to “stockpile” in five locations, packing food, guns, clothing, gear,” while learning basic chemistry. “[Buy] land put 3 home sand multiple hides. Have way to get out and start hitting back.”

    He also cited Eric Rudolph, the Olympic Park Bomber, as an inspiration.

    He wrote, “Food/fuel may be the key, if I can disrupt two or three weeks. When (people) start to loot steal protest dress as cop and shoot them. Burn down Apt complex, bar the doors first. Thermite on gas station tank.”

    Then there’s his long left-leaning assassination target list. It was apparently created on January 19th, underscoring that this plan was actively being worked on by Hasson very recently:


    3. Hasson Had a List of Targets Including Democratic Congressional Leaders & Media Personalities & Searched for the ‘Best Place in DC to See Congress People’ & Are Supreme Court Justices Protected’

    Christopher Hasson had a list of potential targets that was similar to Anders Breivik’s list of traitors. The spreadsheet found by federal prosecutors included several prominent Democratic members of Congress and media personalities.

    Prosecutors said he built the list while “reviewing the MSNBC, CNN and Fox News websites,” as well as other websites, on his work computer. It was created on January 19.

    According to prosecutors, the list is “consistent with the directions in the Breivik manifesto,” which divided targets into categories A, B or C:

    This classification system is used to identify various individual cultural Marxist/multiculturalist traitors. The intention of the system is to easier identify priority targets and will also serve as the foundation for the future ‘Nuremberg trials’ once the European cultural conservatives reassert political and military control of any given country. Any category A, B or C traitor is an individual who has deliberately used his or her influence in a way which makes hm or her indirectly or directly guilty of the charges specified in this document: 1-8. Many of these individuals will attempt to claim ‘ignorance’ of the crimes they are accused of

    According to Breivik’s system, category A was the “most influential and high profile traitors,” including political leaders, media leaders and cultural leaders.

    Hasson had searched for “most liberal senators,” “do senators have [secret service] protection,” and searched for Scarborough after seeing a headline in which the MSNBC host claimed Trump to be “the worst ever” president. He also looked up where the host’s show, “Morning Joe,” is filmed, along with his home, prosecutors said.

    And, of course, there’s the anti-Semitism:


    Hasson made many anti-Semitic remarks in emails obtained by the FBI, including writing, “I don’t know if there truly is a ‘conspiracy’ of ((((People)))) out to destroy me and mine, but there is an attack none the less. For that reason I will strike, I can’t just strike to wound I must find a way to deliver a blow that cannot be shaken off. Maybe many blows that will cause the needed turmoil.”

    The “(((People)))” is a coded reference to Jewish people.

    It’s also noteworthy that Hasson worked at the Coast Guard’s DC headquarters since 2016. Before that he was in the Marines and National Guard. So despite being a skinhead before joining the military he managed to join three different branches and ended up at the Coast Guard’s DC headquarters. It highlights how far up the chain of command a murderous neo-Nazi can apparently get without people noticing:


    1. Hasson Has Worked at the Coast Guard Headquarters in D.C. Since 2016 & Served in the Marines From 1988 to 1993

    Lieutenant Christopher Paul Hasson has been stationed at the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington D.C. since 2016, according to court documents. He was promoted to lieutenant in June 2016, records show. He was commissioned into the Coast Guard on June 1, 2012.

    According to court documents, Hasson worked in “National Security Cutter Acquisition.”

    Federal prosecutors said Hasson served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1988 to 1993 and was in the Army National Guard for two years in the mid-1990s.

    So we’re seeing shades of quite a few past neo-Nazi terrorist plots in Hasson’s scheme, which is no surprise given that he appears to have been inspired by a number of different neo-Nazi terrorists. And the common theme is a desperate desire to strategically inflict violence for the purpose of causing more violence and general mayhem for the ultimate purpose of facilitating some sort of neo-Nazi revolution and an eventual ‘white homeland’. And for the goal of killing off almost everyone on earth. It’s a reminder that when you hear neo-Nazis express a desire for a ‘white homeland’, the homeland they invariably have in mind is the entire planet and it will be achieved by killing off virtually everyone else.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | February 21, 2019, 3:26 pm
  4. In light of the recently discovered neo-Nazi plot by US coast guard lieutenant Christopher Hasson to carry out some sort of series of mass terror attacks designed to kill as many people as possible and inspired by the “leaderless resistance” model and the fact that Stephen Paddock’s attack on Las Vegas appears to have following the same “leaderless resistance” model, here’s an article that reminds us that “leaderless resistance” is becoming increasingly popular on the far right, which each new attack inspiring future attacks. Which is, of course, exactly how the strategy is supposed to work.

    And it also makes a point that’s going to have grim fascinating political repercussions over the next couple of years as the calls for impeaching President Trump increase: the fact that the Trump administration is so friendly to the neo-Nazis actually fuels this leaderless resistance strategy in two key ways. First, the overt sympathy the Trump administration has for the far right sends the signal that the federal government won’t be cracking down on the movements if they act. Secondly, the neo-Nazis are sympathetic for Trump and so the persecution narrative Trump has created for himself where everything is a ‘witch hunt’ by the deep state out to get him can actually fuel some of this neo-Nazi violence, either because the neo-Nazis legitimately want revenge or because they simply feel the political climate would make it a great recruitment opportunity. Hasson, for instance, was a major Trump fan and had been doing online searches for terms like “civil war if trump impeached” in the weeks before his arrest. And that raises the question of whether or not the US is in store for a wave of neo-Nazi domestic terror attacks should the investigations into Trump start leading towards impeachment:

    The Guardian

    The neo-Nazi plot against America is much bigger than we realize

    Lt Christopher Hasson is the product of traditions in white supremacist circles, and experts say there are ‘thousands like him’

    Vegas Tenold

    Sun 3 Mar 2019 00.00 EST
    Last modified on Mon 4 Mar 2019 04.41 EST

    In the early summer of 2017, US coast guard lieutenant Christopher Hasson had an idea. He had been trying to figure out an effective way of killing billions of people – “almost every last person on Earth” – but found himself coming up against the daunting logistics of such a task.

    He suspected “a plague would be most successful”, but didn’t know how to get his hands on enough Spanish flu, botulism or anthrax. His idea, he wrote in a draft email from 2 June of that year, would be to “start with biological attacks followed by attack on food supply”. He acknowledged the plan needed more research.

    While horrifying in their ambition, Hasson’s plans, gleaned from email drafts, are scatterbrained and bear the hallmarks of a person still trying to figure things out. His tentative plans, outlined mostly in emails to himself, were thwarted when he was arrested last month on firearms and drugs charges and investigators discovered his inner life as a neo-Nazi and his plans for mass murder – along with a huge cache of weapons and a hit list of prominent Democrats and media figures.

    What is clear, however, is that Hasson was inspired by others who came before him, and that he is likely very far from alone.

    Hasson is the product of both established traditions within white supremacist circles as well as new developments. He was at once inspired by old ideas and determined to go beyond them to create more havoc than any who had come before him.

    The year and a half since the Unite the Right far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, ended in mayhem, the death of a protester and political turmoil, has been a rough time for the public facing and ostensibly political arm of the white supremacist movement in America. Those who marched in Charlottesville have to a large degree retreated, fleeing lawsuits, doxxing and personal scandal. Still, while public marches appear to be fewer and fewer, the period since Charlottesville has also been marred by individual episodes of extreme violence, suggesting that the wave of white supremacy that seemed to crest in Charlottesville is not so much receding as just changing in nature.

    “I think what we’re starting to see now is people becoming more disheartened and disconnected from mainstream politics,” said Keegan Hankes.

    Hankes is a researcher at the Southern Poverty Law Center monitoring group, and he says they have been following a spike in far-right violence. “We believe we can expect more violence as people become increasingly frustrated and unmoored,” he said.

    Increased violence from far-right activists at a time when the administration is friendlier toward their goals is not without historical precedent, said the University of Chicago historian Kathleen Belew, the author of Bring the War Home: the White Power Movement and Paramilitary America. Belew explained that the far right’s affinity for Donald Trump might mean more violence during his time in the White House, not less.

    “The last time the movement underwent a major revolutionary turn was under the Reagan administration, during a moment of supposedly friendly state power,” she said.

    “That means that whatever people think about the Trump administration’s reluctance to disavow certain types of white power organizing, this is not a moment when we’d expect to see happiness in the fringe. We’re talking about a movement in which many activists want the overthrow of the federal government, the reinstatement of slavery, the genocide of all people of color and a white homeland. These aren’t things that can be pursued politically, even with a sympathetic administration.

    A report published by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) in January supports Belew and Hankes’ assertions. According to the study, every single extremist murder in the US in 2018 had links to far-right ideology, making it one of the deadliest years in recent history. While some of these links were tenuous – the shooter behind the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas school had no direct contact with extremist groups but had been known to make racist, white supremacist statements – the numbers paint a picture of a movement that is finding new, violent outlets for its extremism. Some of the incidents – such as a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue – sent shockwaves through the whole country.

    “It’s clearly gathering steam,” said JM Berger, an expert on extremism and research scholar at Vox-Pol. “Success breeds success, and we’re seeing people operationalize the self-education process. People are beginning to understand that they can emulate the actions of someone who went before them to work out whatever they want to work out.”

    According to documents filed in the investigation of Hasson, he was not only inspired by terrorists who came before him – he is deeply influenced by Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Behring Breivikbut also driven by a loathing for what he perceives as Trump’s enemies as well as a paranoid fear that Trump will be removed from power.

    This certainty that evil forces are working against Trump has become prevalent within the far right, breeding conspiracies such as QAnon, which posits Trump is fighting a “deep state” conspiracy that seeks to thwart his patriotic agenda. As such, Trump plays a dual role within the world of rightwing violence: while a “sympathetic” administration can spur a rise in violence, the perceived persecution of Trump – in large part an image created by the president himself – can fuel the paranoid and violent fantasies of people like Hasson.

    Both ideas can breed violence, especially if Trump is defeated in the 2020 elections.

    “What we’ve seen in the Trump-era is that a lot of the people on the fringes see opportunities for political engagement where they didn’t see it before,” said Berger. “The question is: what happens when that window closes?”

    Coupled with increased frustration by the limitations of political engagement comes the rise of more terroristic groups such as Atomwaffen Division, a militant neo-Nazi group linked to several murders. They and others have brought a less hierarchical and more disorderly structure to white supremacist activism, which makes them both harder to track and to control. Known as “leaderless resistance”, it has been a tactic of white supremacists for decades and lead to events such as the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, but has been made exponentially easier by the internet.

    “Leaderless resistance totally changes recruitment strategy,” said Belew.

    “No longer is the movement trying to generate a mass protest of uniformed members. This movement isn’t interested in a crowd but in a dedicated cell of 12 people that are going to devote their lives to guerrilla warfare.”

    Historically the strategy of leaderless resistance was once confined to the extreme fringes of the white power movement, attracting terrorists such as Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, Breivik, Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof and others, but recently parts of the movement who have been considered moderate have also embraced the idea.

    “Leaderless resistance is becoming ubiquitous on the far right,” says Hankes. “Normally these things come from the extreme parts of the movement and the fact that it is showing up elsewhere shows how deep set these ideas are and how disillusioned the movement is with the White House.”

    Michael German, a former FBI agent who went undercover with white supremacist groups in the 1990s and who now works as a fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice, agreed. “We really don’t know much about [Hasson], since there is very little in the public record. The key will be if he had co-conspirators or associations with people outside and if they were aware of his intentions,” he said.

    Still, German was not surprised by Hasson’s plot or that he had been concocting it while on active duty. “We know that there’s significant illegal activity happening that the government needs to be aware of, the problem is that the government isn’t collecting information about it in a way that lets us assess how widespread the problem is. The FBI has had concerns about white supremacist activity within the military and law enforcement for a long time, but there’s little evidence of investigations into it.

    What remains an almost certainty is that Hasson is not alone in his desire to commit atrocities for white supremacist objectives. Others are still out there: armed, dangerous and plotting. Some will likely turn their thoughts into actions.

    “My guess is that there are thousands like him,” said Belew. “These people are ideologically connected and preparing similar acts of violence.”

    ———-

    “The neo-Nazi plot against America is much bigger than we realize” by Vegas Tenold; The Guardian; 03/03/2019

    “The year and a half since the Unite the Right far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, ended in mayhem, the death of a protester and political turmoil, has been a rough time for the public facing and ostensibly political arm of the white supremacist movement in America. Those who marched in Charlottesville have to a large degree retreated, fleeing lawsuits, doxxing and personal scandal. Still, while public marches appear to be fewer and fewer, the period since Charlottesville has also been marred by individual episodes of extreme violence, suggesting that the wave of white supremacy that seemed to crest in Charlottesville is not so much receding as just changing in nature.

    It’s a ghastly possibility: the political failure of Charlottesville, which was supposed to be a kind of ‘coming out’ moment for the far right, was followed by a period of extreme violence by individuals, suggesting that we’re seeing a change in tactics. The hope that Trump would mainstream the neo-Nazis (instead of just playing footsie with them in public) dissipated and now the far right is more violent than it has been in years, despite having one of the most sympathetic administrations they could have hoped for. The far right’s affinity for Trump appears to be fueling violence, which is not unprecedented. It’s what happened under Reagan:


    Increased violence from far-right activists at a time when the administration is friendlier toward their goals is not without historical precedent, said the University of Chicago historian Kathleen Belew, the author of Bring the War Home: the White Power Movement and Paramilitary America. Belew explained that the far right’s affinity for Donald Trump might mean more violence during his time in the White House, not less.

    “The last time the movement underwent a major revolutionary turn was under the Reagan administration, during a moment of supposedly friendly state power,” she said.

    “That means that whatever people think about the Trump administration’s reluctance to disavow certain types of white power organizing, this is not a moment when we’d expect to see happiness in the fringe. We’re talking about a movement in which many activists want the overthrow of the federal government, the reinstatement of slavery, the genocide of all people of color and a white homeland. These aren’t things that can be pursued politically, even with a sympathetic administration.

    And that affinity for Trump appears to be making the neo-Nazis especially violent in response to the threat of removing Trump from office. Or the threat of Trump simply not winning reelection in 2020:


    According to documents filed in the investigation of Hasson, he was not only inspired by terrorists who came before him – he is deeply influenced by Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Behring Breivikbut also driven by a loathing for what he perceives as Trump’s enemies as well as a paranoid fear that Trump will be removed from power.

    This certainty that evil forces are working against Trump has become prevalent within the far right, breeding conspiracies such as QAnon, which posits Trump is fighting a “deep state” conspiracy that seeks to thwart his patriotic agenda. As such, Trump plays a dual role within the world of rightwing violence: while a “sympathetic” administration can spur a rise in violence, the perceived persecution of Trump – in large part an image created by the president himself – can fuel the paranoid and violent fantasies of people like Hasson.

    Both ideas can breed violence, especially if Trump is defeated in the 2020 elections.

    “What we’ve seen in the Trump-era is that a lot of the people on the fringes see opportunities for political engagement where they didn’t see it before,” said Berger. “The question is: what happens when that window closes?”

    And then there’s the fact that neo-Nazi groups dedicated to terrorist “leaderless resistance” and mass casualty attacks already exist, like Attomwaffen:


    Coupled with increased frustration by the limitations of political engagement comes the rise of more terroristic groups such as Atomwaffen Division, a militant neo-Nazi group linked to several murders. They and others have brought a less hierarchical and more disorderly structure to white supremacist activism, which makes them both harder to track and to control. Known as “leaderless resistance”, it has been a tactic of white supremacists for decades and lead to events such as the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, but has been made exponentially easier by the internet.

    “Leaderless resistance totally changes recruitment strategy,” said Belew.

    “No longer is the movement trying to generate a mass protest of uniformed members. This movement isn’t interested in a crowd but in a dedicated cell of 12 people that are going to devote their lives to guerrilla warfare.”

    And according to Keegan Hankes, of the SPLC, the ideas of leaderless resistance have become ubiquitous on the far right. Even the ‘moderate’ parts of the far right are embracing the idea. And that means the potential pool of candidates for the kind of suicide terror attacks that Hasson was plotting and Paddock carried out is probably a lot bigger than it used to be:


    Historically the strategy of leaderless resistance was once confined to the extreme fringes of the white power movement, attracting terrorists such as Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, Breivik, Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof and others, but recently parts of the movement who have been considered moderate have also embraced the idea.

    “Leaderless resistance is becoming ubiquitous on the far right,” says Hankes. “Normally these things come from the extreme parts of the movement and the fact that it is showing up elsewhere shows how deep set these ideas are and how disillusioned the movement is with the White House.”

    What remains an almost certainty is that Hasson is not alone in his desire to commit atrocities for white supremacist objectives. Others are still out there: armed, dangerous and plotting. Some will likely turn their thoughts into actions.

    “My guess is that there are thousands like him,” said Belew. “These people are ideologically connected and preparing similar acts of violence.”

    So that’s all something to keep in mind as we enter into the possible impeachment phase of the Trump era. The US obviously can’t allow the threat of neo-Nazi violence to effectively blackmail the nation into not impeaching a president who should be removed from office, but it doesn’t hurt to be aware of the fact that most ‘deplorable’ elements of Trump’s base happen to be neo-Nazis who increasingly follow the ‘leader resistance’ domestic terror model and generally view Trump as their dear leader.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | March 4, 2019, 4:58 pm
  5. The white supremacist strategy ‘leaderless resistance’ involving the mass slaughter of civilians made its way to New Zealand yesterday with the twin terror attacks on two mosques, killing at least 49 people and injuring dozens of others. And, surprise!, it appears that the attacker was inspired by Anders Breivik. That’s according to his manifesto the 28 year old Australian born attacker, Brenton Tarrant, put online just before the attack. He also livestreamed the attack on Facebook, adopting an ISIS-style approach of using the grizzly images of the attack to essentially celebrate and promote it to his target audience of fellow white supremacists.

    It’s also worth noting that, at this time, it’s still not entirely clear if Tarrant was working alone or had help and police have not yet said if he was responsible for the shooting at both mosques. So it’s possible this was done by neo-Nazi team and Tarrant is essentially playing a role as the ‘lone gunman’. Two other armed people were arrested but the nature of their involvement remains a mystery.

    Tarrant’s manifesto largely echoes the same ‘whites are being replaced by non-whites’ arguments found in Breiviks’ manifesto and most white nationalist content these days. Tarrant stated the intent of the attack was to intimidate Muslims and general and make them less inclined to immigrate to Western nations. He also framed it as revenge for Muslim terror attacks in Europe, with a specific reference to a 2017 attack in Stockholm. Interestingly, Tarrant’s manifesto also claims that he got approval for the attack from the same “Knights Templar” group that Breivik also claimed he was in contact with.

    Tarrant describes himself as a white nationalist and fascist and covered his rifle with Nazi symbolism (like a “14”). His manifesto included a “black sun”. In keeping with a theme we see over and over with these ‘leaderless resistance’ attacks, Tarrant claims that one of the goals of the attack was to further polarize and destabilize the West with the hope of sparking a civil war in the United States that will result in a separate ethnostates:

    Associated Press

    Mosque shooter a white supremacist angry at immigrants

    By KRISTEN GELINEAU
    03/15/2019

    SYDNEY (AP) — The gunman behind at least one of the mosque shootings in New Zealand that left 49 people dead on Friday tried to make a few things clear in the manifesto he left behind: He is a 28-year-old Australian white nationalist who hates immigrants. He was angry about attacks in Europe that were perpetrated by Muslims. He wanted revenge, and he wanted to create fear.

    He also, quite clearly, wanted attention.

    Though he claimed not to covet fame, the gunman — whose name was not immediately released by police — left behind a 74-page document posted on social media under the name Brenton Tarrant in which he said he hoped to survive the attack to better spread his views in the media.

    He also livestreamed to the world in graphic detail his assault on the worshippers at Christchurch’s Al Noor Mosque.

    That rampage killed at least 41 people, while an attack on a second mosque in the city not long after killed several more. Police did not say whether the same person was responsible for both shootings.

    While his manifesto and video were an obvious and contemptuous ploy for infamy, they do contain important clues for a public trying to understand why anyone would target dozens of innocent people who were simply spending an afternoon engaged in prayer.

    There could be no more perplexing a setting for a mass slaughter than New Zealand, a nation so placid and so isolated from the mass shootings that plague the U.S. that police officers rarely carry guns.

    Yet the gunman himself highlighted New Zealand’s remoteness as a reason he chose it. He wrote that an attack in New Zealand would show that no place on earth was safe and that even a country as far away as New Zealand is subject to mass immigration.

    He said he grew up in a working-class Australian family, had a typical childhood and was a poor student. A woman who said she was a colleague of his when he worked as a personal trainer in the Australian city of Grafton said she was shocked by the allegations against him.

    The rambling manifesto is filled with confusing and seemingly contradictory assertions about his beliefs.

    Beyond his white nationalistic views, he claimed to be an environmentalist and said he is a fascist who believes China is the nation that most aligns with his political and social values. He said he has contempt for the wealthiest 1 percent. And he singled out American conservative commentator Candace Owens as the person who had influenced him the most, while saying “the extreme actions she calls for are too much, even for my tastes.”

    In a tweet, Owens responded by saying that if the media portrayed her as the inspiration for the attack, it had better hire lawyers.

    The manifesto also included a single reference to President Donald Trump in which the author asked and answered the question of whether he was a Trump supporter: “As a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose? Sure. As a policy maker and leader? Dear god no.”

    Throughout the manifesto, the theme he returns to most often is conflict between people of European descent and Muslims, often framing it in terms of the Crusades.

    Among his hate-filled statements is a claim that he was motivated toward violence by an episode that occurred in 2017 while he was touring through Western Europe. That was when an Uzbek man drove a truck into a crowd of people in Stockholm, killing five.

    He said his desire for violence grew when he arrived in France, where he said he was offended by the sight of immigrants in the cities and towns he visited.

    Three months ago, he said, he started planning to target Christchurch. He said he has donated to many nationalist groups, but claimed not to be a direct member of any organization. However, he admitted contacts with an anti-immigration group called the reborn Knights Templar and said he got the approval of Anders Breivik for the attack, a claim that has not been verified.

    Breivik is a right-wing Norwegian extremist who killed 77 people in Oslo and a nearby island in 2011. Breivik’s lawyer Oeystein Storrvik told Norway’s VG newspaper that his client, who is in prison, has “very limited contacts with the surrounding world, so it seems very unlikely that he has had contact” with the New Zealand gunman.

    The gunman rambled on about the supposed aims for the attack, which included reducing immigration by intimidating immigrants and driving a wedge between NATO and the Turkish people. He also said he hoped to further polarize and destabilize the West, and spark a civil war in the United States that would ultimately result in a separation of races. The attack has had the opposite impact, with condemnation of the bloodshed pouring in from all quarters of the globe, and calls for unity against hatred and violence.

    The gunman used various hate symbols associated with the Nazis and white supremacy. For instance, the number 14 is seen on his rifle, a possible reference to the “14 Words,” a white supremacist slogan attributed in part to Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf,” according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He also used the symbol of the Schwarze Sonne, or black sun, which “has become synonymous with myriad far-right groups who traffic in neo-Nazi,” according to the center.

    His victims, he wrote, were chosen because he saw them as invaders who would replace the white race. He predicted he would feel no remorse for their deaths. And in the video he livestreamed of his shooting, no remorse can be seen or heard as he sprays terrified worshippers with bullets again and again, sometimes firing at people he has already cut down.

    ———-

    “Mosque shooter a white supremacist angry at immigrants” by KRISTEN GELINEAU; Associated Press; 03/15/2019

    “The gunman rambled on about the supposed aims for the attack, which included reducing immigration by intimidating immigrants and driving a wedge between NATO and the Turkish people. He also said he hoped to further polarize and destabilize the West, and spark a civil war in the United States that would ultimately result in a separation of races. The attack has had the opposite impact, with condemnation of the bloodshed pouring in from all quarters of the globe, and calls for unity against hatred and violence.”

    Neo-nazi terror attacks intended to provoke backlashes and spark civil wars. It’s an increasingly prominent theme in the age of Trump. So it’s particularly appropriate that Tarrant specifically named Trump as “a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose”:


    The rambling manifesto is filled with confusing and seemingly contradictory assertions about his beliefs.

    Beyond his white nationalistic views, he claimed to be an environmentalist and said he is a fascist who believes China is the nation that most aligns with his political and social values. He said he has contempt for the wealthiest 1 percent. And he singled out American conservative commentator Candace Owens as the person who had influenced him the most, while saying “the extreme actions she calls for are too much, even for my tastes.”

    In a tweet, Owens responded by saying that if the media portrayed her as the inspiration for the attack, it had better hire lawyers.

    The manifesto also included a single reference to President Donald Trump in which the author asked and answered the question of whether he was a Trump supporter: “As a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose? Sure. As a policy maker and leader? Dear god no.”

    The gunman used various hate symbols associated with the Nazis and white supremacy. For instance, the number 14 is seen on his rifle, a possible reference to the “14 Words,” a white supremacist slogan attributed in part to Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf,” according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He also used the symbol of the Schwarze Sonne, or black sun, which “has become synonymous with myriad far-right groups who traffic in neo-Nazi,” according to the center.

    But it appears to be Anders Breivik in particular who most directly inspired the attack. And he even claimed to be in contact with the same Knights Templar organization Breivik also claimed to have been in contact with before his terrorist attack in Oslo:


    Throughout the manifesto, the theme he returns to most often is conflict between people of European descent and Muslims, often framing it in terms of the Crusades.

    Among his hate-filled statements is a claim that he was motivated toward violence by an episode that occurred in 2017 while he was touring through Western Europe. That was when an Uzbek man drove a truck into a crowd of people in Stockholm, killing five.

    He said his desire for violence grew when he arrived in France, where he said he was offended by the sight of immigrants in the cities and towns he visited.

    Three months ago, he said, he started planning to target Christchurch. He said he has donated to many nationalist groups, but claimed not to be a direct member of any organization. However, he admitted contacts with an anti-immigration group called the reborn Knights Templar and said he got the approval of Anders Breivik for the attack, a claim that has not been verified.

    Breivik is a right-wing Norwegian extremist who killed 77 people in Oslo and a nearby island in 2011. Breivik’s lawyer Oeystein Storrvik told Norway’s VG newspaper that his client, who is in prison, has “very limited contacts with the surrounding world, so it seems very unlikely that he has had contact” with the New Zealand gunman.

    So it will be quite interesting to see what help Tarrant actually had. Especially since two other people were arrested at the scene of the crime and were armed and police have yet to determine whether or not Tarrant was responsible for both mosque attacks:


    That rampage killed at least 41 people, while an attack on a second mosque in the city not long after killed several more. Police did not say whether the same person was responsible for both shootings.

    While his manifesto and video were an obvious and contemptuous ploy for infamy, they do contain important clues for a public trying to understand why anyone would target dozens of innocent people who were simply spending an afternoon engaged in prayer.

    So there’s an abundance of overlap with past neo-Nazi terror attacks. Which, of course, is by design since the ‘leaderless resistance’ terror paradigm is intended to inspire copycats. It’s part of what makes the streaming video of the attack so disturbing: it’s exactly the kind of content that the most sociopathic members of society will gravitate towards and that is the target audience for neo-Nazi recruitment.

    And as the following piece by Josh Marshall reminds us, the general worldview expressed by Tarrant in his manifesto – a fixation on ‘white genocide’, ‘replacement’, and hysteria over non-white immigration – are now basically mainstream ideas for the contemporary American right-wing:

    Talking Points Memo
    Editor’s Brief

    Violent Far-Right White Radicalism

    Josh Marshall
    03.15.19. 11:38 am

    We’re digging into the details of this horrific massacre that unfolded overnight (US time) in New Zealand. There is a 74 page manifesto in which the alleged killer described his aims, motivations, etc. There are some oddities to the document in that it combines explicit declarations of support for some of the most notorious racist, anti-immigrant murderers of the early 21st century. It is also filled with some of what we might commonly on social media call trolling, sarcastically or provocatively overstated comments. We shouldn’t see this as in conflict. It’s a mode of expression deeply rooted in the subculture. But I want to take some time to describe how deeply tied this killer’s worldview, politics and aims are rooted in the rightist anti-immigrant politics which are now mainstreamed in the United States

    This shooter is someone who is immersed in the great arc of anti-immigrant, racist hyper-nationalist discourse and paramilitary violence ranging from the rightist parties of Europe, various mass murderers like Norwegian terrorist Anders Breivik to the white supremacist and neo-Nazi subculture we have come to know so well in the US. Charlottesville, Pittsburgh, Charleston. Dylann Roof’s massacre gets explicit reference as an inspiration and antecedent for this massacre.

    The language of ‘replacement’ is the centerpiece – the idea that white Christians with low birthrates are being replaced by non-white immigrants with higher birthrates. This is literally the language of Steve King. He’s alluded to it and discussed it numerous times, both explicitly and implicitly. He discussed it at length in this interview with a far-right newspaper in Austria. Other far-right Republican officeholders do the same.

    If you look at the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre shooter, he was of course attacking Jews. But his actual theory (not his alone of course but the one he embraced) was that Jews were a non-Christian force organizing the importation of non-white immigrants into the United States. He focused in the immediate sense on the caravans the right wing media was then whipping up hysteria about and conspiracy theories about George Soros funding them. But the concept is widespread. Jews want to destroy “white civilization” and they are doing so by importing immigrants of color to overwhelm native whites with higher birthrates.

    Anti-Semitic attacks were a major part of the Charlottesville ‘Unite The Right’ march. But we should remember that it was anti-Semitism interwoven with ‘Great Replacementism’. Remember the chant at Charlottesville: “Jews will not replace us“.

    ———-

    “Violent Far-Right White Radicalism” by Josh Marshall; Talking Points Memo; 03/15/2019

    “We’re digging into the details of this horrific massacre that unfolded overnight (US time) in New Zealand. There is a 74 page manifesto in which the alleged killer described his aims, motivations, etc. There are some oddities to the document in that it combines explicit declarations of support for some of the most notorious racist, anti-immigrant murderers of the early 21st century. It is also filled with some of what we might commonly on social media call trolling, sarcastically or provocatively overstated comments. We shouldn’t see this as in conflict. It’s a mode of expression deeply rooted in the subculture. But I want to take some time to describe how deeply tied this killer’s worldview, politics and aims are rooted in the rightist anti-immigrant politics which are now mainstreamed in the United States

    Whether it’s the Unite the Right march in Charlottesville, Dylan Roof’s massacre, the slaughter in Pittsburgh, the far right hysteria over ‘white genocide’ and ‘replacement’ is one of the defining features of today’s American far right. And that includes far right Republicans in congress like Steve King:


    The language of ‘replacement’ is the centerpiece – the idea that white Christians with low birthrates are being replaced by non-white immigrants with higher birthrates. This is literally the language of Steve King. He’s alluded to it and discussed it numerous times, both explicitly and implicitly. He discussed it at length in this interview with a far-right newspaper in Austria. Other far-right Republican officeholders do the same.

    So, with all that in mind, check out the response President Trump had to a question about the attacks and his views on the dangers of white nationalism: Trump is, of course, not very concerned about it because “I think it’s a small group of people that have very, very serious problems”:

    Talking Points Memo
    Editor’s Blog

    Look at the Exact Words

    By Josh Marshall
    March 15, 2019 4:50 pm

    I felt it was important to transcribe President Trump’s exact words in which he dismisses the problem of “white nationalism” and suggests it’s unclear whether the Christchurch gunman is even part of the white nationalist or supremacist movement.

    REPORTER: “Do you see today white nationalism as a rising threat around the world?”

    TRUMP: “I don’t really. I think it’s a small group of people that have very, very serious problems. I guess if you look at what happened in New Zealand perhaps that’s the case. I don’t know enough about it yet. They’re just learning about the person and the people involved. But it’s certainly a terrible thing, a terrible thing.”

    ———-

    “Look at the Exact Words” by Josh Marshall; Talking Points Memo; 03/15/2019

    ““I don’t really. I think it’s a small group of people that have very, very serious problems. I guess if you look at what happened in New Zealand perhaps that’s the case. I don’t know enough about it yet. They’re just learning about the person and the people involved. But it’s certainly a terrible thing, a terrible thing.””

    It’s just a small group of people. Right.

    And notice how Trump says “they’re just learning about the person and the people involved” which implicitly leaves open the possibility that the Tarrant and his possible accomplices aren’t actually neo-Nazis. And, lo and behold, that is exactly the theory being pushed by Rush Limbaugh. According to Limbaugh, the shooter is a “leftist who writes the manifesto and then goes out and performs the deed purposely to smear his political enemies, knowing he’s going to get shot in the process”:

    Talking Points Memo
    News

    Limbaugh Stokes Conspiracy That NZ Killer Is Leftist Out To Smear ‘Enemies’

    By Summer Concepcion
    March 15, 2019 2:33 pm

    Radio host Rush Limbaugh weighed in on the New Zealand mosque attacks Friday by suggesting that the Australian man allegedly behind them — whose manifesto outlined his white supremacist worldview — is a leftist out to smear his “political enemies.”

    Citing how “crazy” the left is, Limbaugh added that there is an “ongoing theory” that the shooter is a “leftist who writes the manifesto and then goes out and performs the deed purposely to smear his political enemies, knowing he’s going to get shot in the process.”

    “If that’s exactly what the guy is trying to do then he’s hit a home run, because right there on Fox News: ‘Shooter is an admitted white nationalist who hates immigrants,’” Limbaugh said.

    Limbaugh also dismissed the idea that there is “far more crazed right-wing terrorism in America than there is any other kind,” calling the claim “nothing more than a media narrative manufactured out of whole cloth.”

    “You realize you’re going to face a whole day of Donald Trump being blamed for it, or you being blamed for it, or things you believe in being blamed for it,” Limbaugh said.

    ———-

    “Limbaugh Stokes Conspiracy That NZ Killer Is Leftist Out To Smear ‘Enemies’” by Summer Concepcion; Talking Points Memo; 03/15/2019

    “Citing how “crazy” the left is, Limbaugh added that there is an “ongoing theory” that the shooter is a “leftist who writes the manifesto and then goes out and performs the deed purposely to smear his political enemies, knowing he’s going to get shot in the process.”

    Keep in mind that a central part of the strategy employed by Tarrant, Roof, and the rest of these neo-Nazi terrorists is to carry out an attack that is so horrific that it provokes some sort of backlash like new gun control laws. And then that backlash is supposed to catalyze a far right counter-backlash of whites leading to a civil war. And a key ingredient for that counter-backlash is the sense that the initial backlash is unjustified and targeting white conservatives. So by pushing the meme that this attack was actually part of some sort of diabolical left-wing attack designed to smear right-wingers, Limbaugh is actually playing a critical role in this entire ‘leaderless resistance-to-civil-war’ strategy.

    So as we can see, the people behind the attack in New Zealand intended to be part of a global neo-Nazi disinformation/propaganda campaign intended to divide the West and spark civil wars. And within that broader disinformation/propaganda campaign and they have A LOT of global accomplices.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | March 15, 2019, 1:47 pm

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