Spitfire List Web site and blog of anti-fascist researcher and radio personality Dave Emory.

For The Record  

FTR #1011 Miscellaneous Articles and Updates

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This broad­cast was record­ed in one, 60-minute seg­ment.

Pad­dock­’s Weapons

Intro­duc­tion: This broad­cast updates and high­lights pre­vi­ous top­ics of dis­cus­sion, focus­ing large­ly on online/Alt-Right/­Nazi fas­cism and some of the malev­o­lent com­mu­ni­ties that coa­lesce around var­i­ous ide­o­log­i­cal man­i­fes­ta­tions of that phe­nom­e­non.

There has been lit­tle pub­lic recog­ni­tion that many of the mass shoot­ers whose activ­i­ties have dom­i­nat­ed much of the news cycle in recent years,have been immersed in one form or extrem­ist far right ide­ol­o­gy or anoth­er.

The release of ~1,200 pages of doc­u­ments relat­ed to the Las Vegas shoot­ing reveals that Stephen Pad­dock appears to have been “a sov­er­eign cit­i­zen.” . . . . In the doc­u­ments, those who encoun­tered gun­man Stephen Pad­dock say he expressed con­spir­a­to­r­i­al, anti-gov­ern­ment beliefs char­ac­ter­is­tic of the far right . . . . But tan­ta­liz­ing­ly, peo­ple who encoun­tered Pad­dock before his shoot­ing say that he expressed con­spir­a­to­r­i­al, anti-gov­ern­ment beliefs, which are char­ac­ter­is­tic of the far right. . . .”

Pad­dock­’s actions are not unex­pect­ed for some­one with his ide­o­log­i­cal mind­set: ” . . . . In sur­veys con­duct­ed in 2014 and 2015, rep­re­sen­ta­tives of US law-enforce­ment ranked the risk of ter­ror­ism from the sov­er­eign-cit­i­zen move­ment high­er than the risk from Islam­ic extrem­ism.”

Naz­i/alt-right cul­ture was a pri­ma­ry influ­ence on accused San­ta Fe (Texas) gun­man Dim­itrios Pagourtzis. ” . . . . Dim­itrios Pagourtzis, the sus­pect­ed gun­man who opened fire at a Texas high school on Fri­day morn­ing, appar­ent­ly post­ed pho­tos of neo-Nazi iconog­ra­phy online, accord­ing to social media accounts flagged by class­mates and reviewed by The Dai­ly Beast. . . . Oth­er images on Pagourtzis’ now-delet­ed Face­book page sug­gest a pos­si­ble inter­est in white suprema­cist groups. Pagourtzis uploaded a num­ber of T‑shirts that fea­ture Vapor­wave-style designs. Vapor­wave, a music and design move­ment, has spawned a relat­ed move­ment called Fash­wave, which bor­rows the same aes­thet­ic but applies them to neo-Nazi sub­jects. Pagourtzis’ Face­book head­er image was the cov­er of an album by musi­cian Per­tur­ba­tor. Perturbator’s music has been co-opt­ed by mem­bers of the Fash­wave move­ment, Buz­zFeed pre­vi­ous­ly report­ed. Neo-Nazi web­site The Dai­ly Stormer fre­quent­ly includes Perturbator’s music in “Fash­wave Fri­days” posts. . . . .”

Ini­tial press reports about the San­ta Fe shoot­ing dis­cuss pos­si­ble accom­plices of Pagourtzis. Was he part of a group of some kind? “. . . . On Fri­day, author­i­ties intend­ed to ques­tion two oth­er peo­ple: One was at the scene and had “sus­pi­cious reac­tions,” accord­ing to the gov­er­nor, and anoth­er had drawn the scruti­ny of inves­ti­ga­tors. . . .”

Pagourtzis, as we saw above, had tak­en to wear­ing a trench coat, even in 90 degree weath­er. Press reports have described him as a “copy-cat” killer, hav­ing imi­tat­ed Dylan Kle­bold and Eric Har­ris of Columbine shoot­ing fame. (Pagourtzis was too young to have mem­o­ries of the inci­dent, though he may well have absorbed infor­ma­tion about the Columbine per­pe­tra­tors.)

Dylan Kle­bold’s Uni­verse

The media have, for the most part, not men­tioned that Har­ris and Kle­bold were heav­i­ly influ­enced by Nazi cul­ture. . . . . Nine­teen days before they were to grad­u­ate, Har­ris and Kle­bold seemed insep­a­ra­ble and trou­ble­some. In Columbine’s hall­ways, they spoke bro­ken Ger­man and referred often to ‘4–20,’ Hitler’s birth­day and the day they chose for their assault. . . . Some Columbine stu­dents said the vio­lent side of Har­ris and Kle­bold became more obvi­ous in recent months. They became obses­sive­ly inter­est­ed in World War II, Nazi imagery, Adolf Hitler. John House, 17, a Columbine senior, told reporters that when he went bowl­ing with Kle­bold, ‘when he would do some­thing good, he would shout ‘Heil Hitler’ and throw up his hand. It just made every­one mad.’ . . . .”

In FTR #995, we exam­ined the Atom­waf­fen Neo-Nazi group. Atom­waf­fen mem­ber Andrew Oneschuk was about to join Ukraine’s neo-Nazi Azov Bat­tal­ion. ” . . . . . . . Andrew, who was one-eighth Ukrain­ian, took to the cause, chat­ting with fight­ers and their allies. He began for­mu­lat­ing a plan to join the Azov Bat­tal­ion, a noto­ri­ous­ly bru­tal band of inter­na­tion­al fight­ers help­ing in the resis­tance against the Rus­sians. . . . Andrew took it fur­ther, even­tu­al­ly adopt­ing the online han­dle “Borovikov,” after a famous Russ­ian neo-Nazi gang leader. That spring, he hung an SS flag in his bed­room as well as a giant swasti­ka. . . .”

Online net­work­ing between resent­ful, sex-deprived men who call them­selves “incels” (a con­trac­tion of  “invol­un­tary celi­bates”) over­lap Naz­i/Alt-Right ele­ments. The ide­o­log­i­cal col­li­sion of the online “incels” and the #MeToo move­ment may well gen­er­ate some tru­ly patho­log­i­cal vio­lence. . . . . The alt-right, right-wing pop­ulism, men’s rights groups and a renewed white suprema­cist move­ment have cap­i­tal­ized on many white men’s feel­ing of loss in recent years. The groups vary in how they diag­nose society’s ills and whom they blame, but they pro­vide a sense of mean­ing and place for their fol­low­ers. And as dif­fer­ent extrem­ist groups con­nect online, they draw on one another’s mem­ber­ship bases, tac­tics and world­views, allow­ing mem­ber­ship in one group to become a gate­way to oth­er extrem­ist ide­olo­gies as well. Today, for exam­ple, posts on Incel.me, an incel forum, debate join­ing forces with the alt-right and argue that Jews are to blame for incels’ oppres­sion. On one thread, users fan­ta­sized that if they were dic­ta­tors, they would not only cre­ate harems and enslave women, but also ‘gas the Jews.’ . . . . By divid­ing the world into us-ver­sus-them and describ­ing vast injus­tice at the hands of the sup­pos­ed­ly pow­er­ful, these groups, experts say, can prime adher­ents for vio­lence. . . .”

Com­bat hel­mets of the Azov Bat­tal­ion.

Incel cul­ture is metas­ta­siz­ing into “lone-wolf”/leaderless resis­tance ter­ror­ism. ” . . . . In 2014, a gam­ing award cer­e­mo­ny set to hon­or the fem­i­nist crit­ic Ani­ta Sar­keesian received a bomb threat; an anony­mous harass­er threat­ened to det­o­nate a device unless her award was rescind­ed. Before Milo Yiannopou­los was a well-known alt-right fig­ure, fem­i­nists knew him as one of the pri­ma­ry archi­tects of Gamer­gate, a move­ment of young men who harassed and threat­ened women in the videogam­ing indus­try. Two fans of Mr. Yiannopou­los were charged with shoot­ing a pro­test­er out­side of one of his speech­es. . . .”

Nazi killer Anders Breivik embod­ied the over­lap between Alt-Right white suprema­cy and insti­tu­tion­al­ized misog­y­ny: ” . . . . On July 22, Breivik slaugh­tered 77 of his coun­try­men, most of them teenagers, in Oslo and at a sum­mer camp on the island of Utøya, because he thought they or their par­ents were the kinds of ‘polit­i­cal­ly cor­rect’ lib­er­als who were enabling Mus­lim immi­gra­tion. But Breivik was almost as vol­u­ble on the sub­jects of fem­i­nism, the fam­i­ly, and fathers’ rights as he was on Islam. ‘The most direct threat to the fam­i­ly is ‘divorce on demand,’ ’ he wrote in the man­i­festo he post­ed just before he began his dead­ly spree. ‘The sys­tem must be reformed so that the father will be award­ed cus­tody rights by default.’ The manos­phere lit up. Said one approv­ing poster at The Spear­head, an online men’s rights mag­a­zine for the ‘defense of our­selves, our fam­i­lies and our fel­low men’: ‘What could be more ‘an eye for an eye’ than to kill the chil­dren of those who were so will­ing to destroy men’s fam­i­lies and destroy the home­land of men?’ . . . .”

The “psy­cho-polit­i­cal” polar­iza­tion of the #MeToo move­ment and the “incels” misog­y­nist com­mu­ni­ty holds dev­as­tat­ing poten­tial.

Pro­gram High­lights Include:

  • Jour­nal­ist Ronan Far­row’s author­ship of the New York­er arti­cle that took down Har­vey Wein­stein. (For more dis­cus­sion of the #MeToo Move­ment and weaponized fem­i­nism, see FTR #‘s 998, 999, 1000, 1001.)
  • Far­row’s State Depart­ment work sug­ges­tive of involve­ment with the intel­li­gence com­mu­ni­ty.  “. . . .  Post-law school: Lands a job at the State Depart­ment, as a spe­cial advi­sor focus­ing on con­flict in Afghanistan and Pak­istan. . . .”
  • Far­row’s co-author­ship of the New York­er arti­cle that took down for­mer New York Attor­ney Gen­er­al Eric Schnei­der­man, a major Trump neme­sis, who was also crit­i­ciz­ing and inves­ti­gat­ing oth­er indi­vid­u­als and insti­tu­tions asso­ci­at­ed with the Trump/GOP pow­er elite.  “. . . . Schnei­der­man had already been declared ‘the man the banks fear most’ by the lib­er­al mag­a­zine ‘The Amer­i­can Prospect.’ . . . . In the days since Novem­ber 9, Schnei­der­man fired off a let­ter warn­ing Trump not to drop White House sup­port of Obama’s Clean Pow­er Plan, intro­duced a bill in the state Leg­is­la­ture to give New York­ers cost-free con­tra­cep­tion if the Afford­able Care Act is dis­man­tled, threat­ened to sue after Trump froze EPA fund­ing of clean air and water pro­grams, and joined a law­suit that argues that Trump’s exec­u­tive order on immi­gra­tion is not just uncon­sti­tu­tion­al and un-Amer­i­can, but it brings pro­found harm to the res­i­dents of New York State. . . . He’s on the oppo­site side of the Clean Pow­er Plan fight from Okla­homa Attor­ney Gen­er­al Scott Pruitt, since named head of the EPA, and who Schnei­der­man labeled a ‘dan­ger­ous and unqual­i­fied choice.’ . . . . ”
  • Schnei­der­man was also inves­ti­gat­ing the pow­er­ful, well-con­nect­ed NXIVM cult, one of whose asso­ciates was Roger Stone, the long-time Trump/GOP dirty trick­ster who sig­naled the #MeToo take­down of Sen­a­tor Al Franken.

1a. There has been lit­tle pub­lic recog­ni­tion that many of the mass shoot­ers whose activ­i­ties have dom­i­nat­ed much of the news cycle in recent years,have been immersed in one form or extrem­ist far right ide­ol­o­gy or anoth­er.

The release of ~1,200 pages of doc­u­ments relat­ed to the Las Vegas shoot­ing reveals that Stephen Pad­dock appears to have been “a sov­er­eign cit­i­zen.”

“New Doc­u­ments Sug­gest Las Vegas Shoot­er Was Con­spir­a­cy The­o­rist – What We Know” by Jason Wil­son; The Guardian; 5/19/2018.

In the doc­u­ments, those who encoun­tered gun­man Stephen Pad­dock say he expressed con­spir­a­to­r­i­al, anti-gov­ern­ment beliefs char­ac­ter­is­tic of the far right . . . .

. . . . But tan­ta­liz­ing­ly, peo­ple who encoun­tered Pad­dock before his shoot­ing say that he expressed con­spir­a­to­r­i­al, anti-gov­ern­ment beliefs, which are char­ac­ter­is­tic of the far right.

In a hand­writ­ten state­ment, one woman says she sat near Pad­dock in a din­er just a few days before the shoot­ing, while out with her son. She said she heard him and a com­pan­ion dis­cussing the 25th anniver­sary of the Ruby Ridge stand­off and the Waco siege. (Each of these inci­dents became touch­stones for a ris­ing anti-gov­ern­ment mili­tia move­ment in the 1990s.)

She says she heard him and his com­pan­ion say­ing that court­room flags with gold­en fringes are not real flags. The belief that gold-fringed flags are those of a for­eign juris­dic­tion, or “admi­ral­ty flags”, is char­ac­ter­is­tic of so-called “sov­er­eign cit­i­zens”, who believe, among oth­er things, that the cur­rent US gov­ern­ment, and its laws, are ille­git­i­mate.

“At the time,” her state­ment says, “I thought, ‘Strange guys’ and want­ed to leave.”

Anoth­er man, him­self cur­rent­ly in jail, says he met Pad­dock three weeks before the shoot­ing for an abortive firearms trans­ac­tion, in the carpark of a Bass Pro Shop. The man was sell­ing schemat­ic dia­grams for an auto sear, a device that would con­vert semi-auto­mat­ic weapons to full auto­mat­ic fire. Pad­dock asked him to make the device for him, and the man refused.

At this point Pad­dock launched into a rant about “anti-gov­ern­ment stuff … Fema camps”. Pad­dock said that the evac­u­a­tion of peo­ple by the Fed­er­al Emer­gency Man­age­ment Agency (Fema) after Hur­ri­cane Kat­ri­na was a a “dry run for law enforce­ment and mil­i­tary to start kickin’ down doors and … con­fis­cat­ing guns”.

“Some­body has to wake up the Amer­i­can pub­lic and get them to arm them­selves,” the man says Pad­dock told him. “Some­times sac­ri­fices have to be made.”

Why would some­one be wor­ried about Fema camps? Isn’t Fema there to help in emer­gen­cies?

Yes, but for decades Fema has been incor­po­rat­ed into con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries pro­mul­gat­ed by the anti-gov­ern­ment far right.

Some con­spir­a­cy-mind­ed Amer­i­cans believe that Fema’s emer­gency mis­sion is a cov­er sto­ry. The real pur­pose of the agency is to build and main­tain con­cen­tra­tion camps, which will house dis­si­dent “patri­ots” after a dec­la­ra­tion of mar­tial law. The sup­po­si­tion is that the US gov­ern­ment will turn on its cit­i­zens under the direc­tion of the “New World Order”.

This sounds implau­si­ble. Where did this idea come from?

The short answer is that it has been a sta­ple of the rad­i­cal right for per­haps three decades.

The first ver­sion of the Fema camp con­spir­a­cy the­o­ry was in the newslet­ters of the far right “Posse Comi­ta­tus” move­ment in the ear­ly 1980s. It was an update, or an adap­ta­tion, of the fears of for­eign sub­ver­sion that have ani­mat­ed the Amer­i­can pop­ulist right since the high tide of nine­teenth-cen­tu­ry nativism.

Posse Comi­ta­tus, active espe­cial­ly in west­ern states from the late 1960s, believed that the US was con­trolled by a Jew­ish con­spir­a­cy, which it referred to as ZOG (Zion­ist Occu­pa­tion Gov­ern­ment). It also pro­mot­ed “Chris­t­ian iden­ti­ty” the­ol­o­gy, which held that the white race was the lost tribe of Israel, and that Jews were in league with Satan. At some point, they thought, America’s imposter gov­ern­ment would round up and imprison white men.

Apart from devel­op­ing anti-gov­ern­ment beliefs, Posse Comitatus’s crank legal the­o­ries laid the ground­work for a still-flour­ish­ing “sov­er­eign cit­i­zen” move­ment.

But the FEMA the­o­ry real­ly took off dur­ing the rise of the mili­tia move­ment in the 1990s. Move­ment entre­pre­neurs like John Trochmann of the Mili­tia of Mon­tana elab­o­rat­ed the sto­ry in newslet­ters and in his infa­mous “Blue Book”, which was filled with pic­tures alleged­ly show­ing camps, trains loaded with Russ­ian tanks and the arrival of “black heli­copters” in prepa­ra­tion for the sup­pos­ed­ly immi­nent New World Order takeover.

Trochmann and oth­ers also claimed to have pic­tures of the facil­i­ties which would be used as con­cen­tra­tion camps. These turned out to be army train­ing grounds, fed­er­al pris­ons or as-yet unoc­cu­pied bases.

These the­o­ries were nev­er­the­less preva­lent in a move­ment that some schol­ars say had up to 5 mil­lion sym­pa­thiz­ers at its height. Tim­o­thy McVeigh, who killed 168 peo­ple when he bombed a fed­er­al build­ing in 1995, also emerged from this anti-gov­ern­ment milieu. . . . .

1b. Note that mem­bers of the sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment are seen as domes­tic ter­ror­ists:

“Sov­er­eign Cit­i­zen Move­ment;” wikipedia.org

. . . . Many mem­bers of the sov­er­eign cit­i­zen move­ment believe that the Unit­ed States gov­ern­ment is ille­git­i­mate.[11] JJ Mac­Nab, who writes for Forbes about anti-gov­ern­ment extrem­ism, has described the sov­er­eign-cit­i­zen move­ment as con­sist­ing of indi­vid­u­als who believe that the coun­ty sher­iff is the most pow­er­ful law-enforce­ment offi­cer in the coun­try, with author­i­ty supe­ri­or to that of any fed­er­al agent, elect­ed offi­cial, or local law-enforce­ment offi­cial.[12] This belief comes from the move­men­t’s ori­gins in the white-extrem­ist group Posse Comi­ta­tus.[13][cita­tion need­ed]

The Fed­er­al Bureau of Inves­ti­ga­tion (FBI) clas­si­fies some sov­er­eign cit­i­zens (“sov­er­eign cit­i­zen extrem­ists”) as domes­tic ter­ror­ists.[14] In 2010 the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter (SPLC) esti­mat­ed that approx­i­mate­ly 100,000 Amer­i­cans were “hard-core sov­er­eign believ­ers”, with anoth­er 200,000 “just start­ing out by test­ing sov­er­eign tech­niques for resist­ing every­thing from speed­ing tick­ets to drug charges”.[15]

In sur­veys con­duct­ed in 2014 and 2015, rep­re­sen­ta­tives of US law-enforce­ment ranked the risk of ter­ror­ism from the sov­er­eign-cit­i­zen move­ment high­er than the risk from Islam­ic extrem­ism. 

2a. Naz­i/alt-right cul­ture was a pri­ma­ry influ­ence on accused San­ta Fe (Texas) gun­man Dim­itrios Pagourtzis.

“Dim­itrios Pagourtzis, Texas Shoot­ing Sus­pect, Post­ed Neo-Nazi Imagery Online” by Kathy Weill; The Dai­ly Beast; 5/18/2018.

Before alleged­ly killing at least eight peo­ple, he appar­ent­ly post­ed online images of a Nazi medal, a musi­cian favored by the alt-right, and a ‘born to kill’ T‑shirt.

Dim­itrios Pagourtzis, the sus­pect­ed gun­man who opened fire at a Texas high school on Fri­day morn­ing, appar­ent­ly post­ed pho­tos of neo-Nazi iconog­ra­phy online, accord­ing to social media accounts flagged by class­mates and reviewed by The Dai­ly Beast. . . .

. . . . On April 30, Pagourtzis appar­ent­ly post­ed a T‑shirt with “born to kill” print­ed on the front, boast­ing that it was cus­tom-made.

That same day, Pagourtzis post­ed mul­ti­ple pic­tures of a duster jack­et embla­zoned with a vari­ety of sym­bols includ­ing the Iron Cross, a Ger­man mil­i­tary award last giv­en by the Nazis, and oth­er pins. He said he equat­ed the Iron Cross with “brav­ery.” Pagourtzis said a ham­mer and sick­le meant “rebel­lion,” a ris­ing sun meant “kamikaze tac­tics,” and a baphomet meant “evil.” . . . .

. . . . “The sketchy thing is, he wore a full-on black trench coat to school every day,” Thur­man said, adding she hadn’t had a class with him since eighth grade. Mon­temay­or said that in ret­ro­spect, Pagourtzis’ trench coat was odd.

“Why would you wear a trench coat when it’s 100 degrees out­side? When he first start­ed wear­ing that trench coat, it was dur­ing the win­ter.” But in the hot­ter months, Pagourtzis didn’t take it off.

Pagourtzis began wear­ing the coat at the begin­ning of the year.

“It’s like 90 degrees out­side and this guy is still wear­ing a trench coat,” Thur­man said. “It should have been not­ed. That’s a red flag right there.”

Oth­er images on Pagourtzis’ now-delet­ed Face­book page sug­gest a pos­si­ble inter­est in white suprema­cist groups. Pagourtzis uploaded a num­ber of T‑shirts that fea­ture Vapor­wave-style designs. Vapor­wave, a music and design move­ment, has spawned a relat­ed move­ment called Fash­wave, which bor­rows the same aes­thet­ic but applies them to neo-Nazi sub­jects.

Pagourtzis’ Face­book head­er image was the cov­er of an album by musi­cian Per­tur­ba­tor. Perturbator’s music has been co-opt­ed by mem­bers of the Fash­wave move­ment, Buz­zFeed pre­vi­ous­ly report­ed. Neo-Nazi web­site The Dai­ly Stormer fre­quent­ly includes Perturbator’s music in “Fash­wave Fri­days” posts. . . .

2b. Ini­tial press reports about the San­ta Fe shoot­ing dis­cuss pos­si­ble accom­plices of Pagourtzis. Was he part of a group of some kind?

“Look­ing for Motives in a Shoot­ing Sus­pect Whose Past Is a ‘Pret­ty Clean Slate” by Julie Turke­witz and Jess Bid­good; The New York Times; 5/19/2018; p. A12 [West­ern Edi­tion].

 . . . . By Fri­day after­noon, the sus­pect was in cus­tody at the Galve­ston Coun­ty jail, where he is being held for cap­i­tal mur­der. Fed­er­al author­i­ties are seek­ing search war­rants to find explo­sive devices at two res­i­dences. . . . Police said the gun­man brought sev­er­al of these devices into the school. It was unclear whether any went off. . . .

. . . . On Fri­day, author­i­ties intend­ed to ques­tion two oth­er peo­ple: One was at the scene and had “sus­pi­cious reac­tions,” accord­ing to the gov­er­nor, and anoth­er had drawn the scruti­ny of inves­ti­ga­tors. . . .

3. Pagourtzis, as we saw above, had tak­en to wear­ing a trench coat, even in 90 degree weath­er. Press reports have described him as a “copy-cat” killer, hav­ing imi­tat­ed Dylan Kle­bold and Eric Har­ris of Columbine shoot­ing fame. (Pagourtzis was too young to have mem­o­ries of the inci­dent, though he may well have absorbed infor­ma­tion about the Columbine per­pe­tra­tors.)

The media, for the most part, have not men­tioned that Har­ris and Kle­bold were heav­i­ly influ­enced by Nazi cul­ture.

“Shoot­ing Pair Mixed Fan­ta­sy, Real­i­ty” by Paul Dug­gan, Michael D. Shear and Marc Fish­er; Wash­ing­ton Post; 4/22/1999.

They hat­ed jocks, admired Nazis and scorned nor­mal­cy. They fan­cied them­selves devo­tees of the Goth­ic sub­cul­ture, even though they thrilled to the vio­lence denounced by much of that fan­ta­sy world. They were white suprema­cists, but loved music by anti-racist rock bands.

Eric Har­ris and Dylan Kle­bold were bright young men who became social out­casts at their sub­ur­ban Den­ver high school, and then built their own inter­nal soci­ety by pluck­ing strands from the pop whirl­wind of cyber­space and fan­ta­sy games, the sound­track of Amer­i­can youth, and a nether­world that glam­or­izes Nazi sym­bols and ter­ror­ist vio­lence. . . .

.  . . . An ini­tial sketch of Har­ris and Kle­bold and the Trench­coat Mafia to which they claimed mem­ber­ship emerged yes­ter­day from inter­views with friends, fel­low stu­dents and neigh­bors, and from police and school offi­cials. If the boys left behind any detailed expla­na­tion of their hor­rif­ic final cries, no one has found it yet. . . .

. . . . Nine­teen days before they were to grad­u­ate, Har­ris and Kle­bold seemed insep­a­ra­ble and trou­ble­some. In Columbine’s hall­ways, they spoke bro­ken Ger­man and referred often to “4–20,” Hitler’s birth­day and the day they chose for their assault. . . .

. . . . Some Columbine stu­dents said the vio­lent side of Har­ris and Kle­bold became more obvi­ous in recent months. They became obses­sive­ly inter­est­ed in World War II, Nazi imagery, Adolf Hitler.

John House, 17, a Columbine senior, told reporters that when he went bowl­ing with Kle­bold, “when he would do some­thing good, he would shout ‘Heil Hitler’ and throw up his hand. It just made every­one mad.” . . . .

4. In FTR #995, we exam­ined the Atom­waf­fen Neo-Nazi group. Atom­waf­fen mem­ber Andrew Oneschuk was about to join Ukraine’s neo-Nazi Azov Bat­tal­ion.

“All-Amer­i­can Nazis” by Janet Reit­man; Rolling Stone; 05/02/2018

How a sense­less dou­ble mur­der in Flori­da exposed the rise of an orga­nized fas­cist youth move­ment in the Unit­ed States

Andrew Oneschuk and Jere­my Him­mel­man had been liv­ing in Tam­pa, Flori­da, for two weeks when, on Fri­day, May 19th, 2017, their room­mate Devon Arthurs picked up an AK-47 rifle and shot them at close range. Oneschuk had just turned 18. Him­mel­man was 22. They’d been stay­ing in a lush gat­ed com­mu­ni­ty near the Uni­ver­si­ty of South Flori­da, in a two-bed­room, ter­ra-cot­ta con­do rent­ed by their fourth room­mate, 21-year-old Bran­don Rus­sell, a rich kid from the Bahamas who worked at a gun shop and served in the Flori­da Nation­al Guard. Oneschuk, a prep-school dropout, was hop­ing to become a Navy SEAL. Him­mel­man also con­sid­ered the mil­i­tary, though he was more of a drifter. Eigh­teen-year-old Arthurs, a pale, freck­led kid who some­times called him­self “Khalid,” was unem­ployed and spent most of his time play­ing video games. All four had met one anoth­er online, in forums and chat rooms pop­u­lar with the more extreme seg­ment of the so-called alt-right. . . .

. . . . Increas­ing­ly, Andrew obsessed over issues like cli­mate change and the Syr­i­an refugee cri­sis. He’d also embraced an apoc­a­lyp­tic and con­spir­a­to­r­i­al world­view in which West­ern civ­i­liza­tion was doomed, and he, a white male, was a vic­tim. He was amazed at his par­ents’ com­pla­cen­cy. Didn’t they real­ize blacks were respon­si­ble for 80 per­cent of the crime in Amer­i­ca? he’d false­ly claim, using sta­tis­tics that seemed drawn from nowhere. “Amer­i­ca is shit,” he said. “My gen­er­a­tion is fail­ing.” . . . .

. . . . Andrew, who was one-eighth Ukrain­ian, took to the cause, chat­ting with fight­ers and their allies. He began for­mu­lat­ing a plan to join the Azov Bat­tal­ion, a noto­ri­ous­ly bru­tal band of inter­na­tion­al fight­ers help­ing in the resis­tance against the Rus­sians. In Jan­u­ary 2015, Andrew bought a fake pass­port and a one-way tick­et to Kiev. The day before he was set to leave, hav­ing packed his camp­ing gear and arranged for a lim­ou­sine to Logan Air­port, he casu­al­ly told his moth­er on the way home from school, “I think I’m going to go to Ukraine.” . . . . 

Emi­ly had been con­cerned when Andrew went through his Ger­man-army phase, though some of her friends told her that they’d also thought the SS was cool when they were younger. “I don’t think they under­stood they were actu­al­ly bad guys,” says Emi­ly. “It’s more like the bad guys in Indi­ana Jones with the cool car.” But Andrew took it fur­ther, even­tu­al­ly adopt­ing the online han­dle “Borovikov,” after a famous Russ­ian neo-Nazi gang leader. That spring, he hung an SS flag in his bed­room as well as a giant swasti­ka. . . . 

5. Online net­work­ing between resent­ful, sex-deprived men who call them­selves “incels” (a con­trac­tion of  “invol­un­tary celi­bates”) over­lap Naz­i/Alt-Right ele­ments. The ide­o­log­i­cal col­li­sion of the online “incels” and the #MeToo move­ment may well gen­er­ate some tru­ly patho­log­i­cal vio­lence.

” ‘Incels’ Aren’t Alone In Online Har­vest­ing of Men’s Sense of Loss” by Aman­da Taub; The New York Times; 5/11/2018; p. A5 [West­ern Edi­tion].

. . . . . ‘Aggriev­ed Enti­tle­ment’

For white men across the West­ern world, spe­cial rights and priv­i­leges once came as a birthright. Even those who lacked wealth or pow­er were assured a sta­tus above women and minori­ties.

Though they still enjoy pref­er­en­tial sta­tus in vir­tu­al­ly every realm, from the board­room to the cour­t­house, social forces like the Me Too move­ment are chal­leng­ing that sta­tus. To some, any steps toward equal­i­ty, how­ev­er mod­est, feel like a threat.

“There’s just this sense that ‘we used to be in charge, and now we’re not the only ones in charge, so we’ve been attacked,’” said Lil­liana Mason, a Uni­ver­si­ty of Mary­land social sci­en­tist who stud­ies group iden­ti­ty and pol­i­tics.

“If you have a sense that you’re owed, that your deserved sta­tus is being threat­ened, then you start to fight for it,” Ms. Mason said.

Often that takes the form of lash­ing out at mem­bers of what­ev­er social group dared to chal­lenge the estab­lished hier­ar­chy.

“You’d think that young men would be treat­ed nice­ly by soci­ety because we are the builders and pro­tec­tors of civ­i­liza­tion,” wrote a user named connorWM1996 on r/MGTOW, a Red­dit mes­sage board for men try­ing to escape what they see as oppres­sion by female-dom­i­nat­ed soci­ety. “But no of course not. We are treat­ed like idiots who aren’t good for any­thing.”

Some of these men may go in search of more extreme ide­olo­gies that make sense of their feel­ings of anger and loss, and seem to pro­vide a solu­tion. Oth­ers mere­ly stum­ble into them.

“Plen­ty of peo­ple feel like they don’t have sta­tus and don’t revolt about it,” Ms. Mason said. “But the peo­ple who do revolt are peo­ple who feel that they are owed sta­tus, and they’re not being giv­en the sta­tus that tra­di­tion­al soci­ety should give them.”

The incel move­ment tells its adher­ents that society’s rules are engi­neered to unfair­ly deprive them of sex. That world­view lets them see them­selves as both vic­tims, made lone­ly by a vast con­spir­a­cy, and as supe­ri­or, for their unique under­stand­ing of the truth.

Greasing Extremism’s Rails

Extrem­ism has always exist­ed, but until recent­ly its spread was lim­it­ed. To begin with, there was the basic chal­lenge to any col­lec­tive action: how to find and gath­er like-mind­ed peo­ple dis­persed across great dis­tances. Beyond that, there was the social stig­ma against any ideas per­ceived as out­side the mainstream.Social media has low­ered both of those bar­ri­ers.

Now, men look­ing for a way to explain — and jus­ti­fy — their anger need only a few clicks to encounter entire com­mu­ni­ties built up around promis­es to restore male pow­er and con­trol. In the past, those might have been rel­e­gat­ed to a few bars or liv­ing rooms, but now they exist in dark­er cor­ners of some of the most pop­u­lar social net­work­ing sites. . . .

. . . . The alt-right, right-wing pop­ulism, men’s rights groups and a renewed white suprema­cist move­ment have cap­i­tal­ized on many white men’s feel­ing of loss in recent years. The groups vary in how they diag­nose society’s ills and whom they blame, but they pro­vide a sense of mean­ing and place for their fol­low­ers.

And as dif­fer­ent extrem­ist groups con­nect online, they draw on one another’s mem­ber­ship bases, tac­tics and world­views, allow­ing mem­ber­ship in one group to become a gate­way to oth­er extrem­ist ide­olo­gies as well.

Today, for exam­ple, posts on Incel.me, an incel forum, debate join­ing forces with the alt-right and argue that Jews are to blame for incels’ oppres­sion. On one thread, users fan­ta­sized that if they were dic­ta­tors, they would not only cre­ate harems and enslave women, but also “gas the Jews.”

By divid­ing the world into us-ver­sus-them and describ­ing vast injus­tice at the hands of the sup­pos­ed­ly pow­er­ful, these groups, experts say, can prime adher­ents for vio­lence. . . .

6. Incel cul­ture is metas­ta­siz­ing into “lone-wolf”/leaderless resis­tance ter­ror­ism.

“When Misog­y­nists Become Ter­ror­ists” by Jes­si­ca Valen­ti; The New York Times; 4/26/2018.

. . . . Lat­er, after Mr. Rodger’s 140-page man­i­festo was released — out­lin­ing his fury over still being a “kiss­less vir­gin” — his name became syn­ony­mous on misog­y­nist forums with revenge on women who reject men. Chris Harp­er-Mer­cer, who shot and killed nine peo­ple at Umpqua Com­mu­ni­ty Col­lege in Ore­gon in 2015, men­tioned Mr. Rodger by name in a man­i­festo he wrote in which he com­plained about being 26 years old with “no girl­friend, a vir­gin.”

And now, in the after­math of the attack in Toron­to, men on incel com­mu­ni­ties are hail­ing the killer as a “new saint,” with com­menters chang­ing their avatars to Mr. Minassian’s pic­ture in trib­ute.

Fem­i­nists have been warn­ing against these online hate groups and their propen­si­ty for real-life vio­lence for over a decade. I know because I’m one of the peo­ple who has been issu­ing increas­ing­ly dire warn­ings. After I start­ed a fem­i­nist blog in 2004, I became a tar­get of men’s‑rights groups who were angry with women about every­thing from cus­tody bat­tles to the false notion that most women lie about rape. In 2011, I had to flee my house with my young daugh­ter on the advice of law enforce­ment, because one of these groups put me on a “reg­istry” of women to tar­get.

I was far from the only one. In 2014, a gam­ing award cer­e­mo­ny set to hon­or the fem­i­nist crit­ic Ani­ta Sar­keesian received a bomb threat; an anony­mous harass­er threat­ened to det­o­nate a device unless her award was rescind­ed. Before Milo Yiannopou­los was a well-known alt-right fig­ure, fem­i­nists knew him as one of the pri­ma­ry archi­tects of Gamer­gate, a move­ment of young men who harassed and threat­ened women in the videogam­ing indus­try. Two fans of Mr. Yiannopou­los were charged with shoot­ing a pro­test­er out­side of one of his speech­es.

Part of the prob­lem is that Amer­i­can cul­ture still large­ly sees men’s sex­ism as some­thing innate rather than deviant. And in a world where sex­ism is deemed nat­ur­al, the misog­y­nist ten­den­cies of mass shoot­ers become after­thoughts rather than pre­dictable and stark warn­ings.

The truth is that in addi­tion to not pro­tect­ing women, we are fail­ing boys: fail­ing to raise them to believe they can be men with­out inflict­ing pain on oth­ers, fail­ing to teach them that they are not enti­tled to women’s sex­u­al atten­tion and fail­ing to allow them an out­let for under­stand­able human fear and foibles that will not label them “weak” or unwor­thy.

Not every attack is pre­ventable, but the misog­y­ny that dri­ves them is. To stop all of this, we must trust women when they point out that receiv­ing streams of death threats on Twit­ter is not nor­mal and that online com­mu­ni­ties strate­giz­ing about how to rape women are much more than just idle chat­ter. There is no rea­son anoth­er mas­sacre should hap­pen.

7. Nazi killer Anders Breivik embod­ied the over­lap between Alt-Right white suprema­cy and insti­tu­tion­al­ized misog­y­ny:

“Lead­er’s Sui­cide Brings Atten­tion to Men’s Rights Move­ment” by Arthur Gold­wag; Intel­li­gence Report [South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter]; 3/1/2012.

A lit­tle-noticed sui­cide last year focused atten­tion on the hard-lined fringe of the men’s right move­ment. It’s not a pret­ty pic­ture.

After 10 years of cus­tody bat­tles, court-ordered coun­sel­ing and immi­nent impris­on­ment for non-pay­ment of child sup­port, Thomas James Ball, a leader of the Worces­ter branch of the Mass­a­chu­setts-based Father­hood Coali­tion, had reached his lim­it. On June 15, 2011, he doused him­self with gaso­line and set him­self on fire just out­side the Cheshire Coun­ty, N.H., Cour­t­house. He was dead with­in min­utes.

In a lengthy “Last State­ment,” which arrived posthu­mous­ly at the Keene Sen­tinel, Tom Ball told his sto­ry. All he had done, he said, was smack his 4‑year-old daugh­ter and bloody her mouth after she licked his hand as he was putting her to bed. Fem­i­nist-craft­ed anti-domes­tic vio­lence leg­is­la­tion did the rest. “Twen­ty-five years ago,” he wrote, “the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment declared war on men. It is time to see how com­mit­ted they are to their cause. It is time, boys, to give them a taste of war.” Call­ing for all-out insur­rec­tion, he offered tips on mak­ing Molo­tov cock­tails and urged his read­ers to use them against cour­t­hous­es and police sta­tions. “There will be some casu­al­ties in this war,” he pre­dict­ed. “Some killed, some wound­ed, some cap­tured. Some of them will be theirs. Some of the casu­al­ties will be ours.”

For peo­ple who asso­ciate the men’s and fathers’ rights move­ments with New Age drum cir­cles in the woods, the feroc­i­ty of Ball’s rhetoric, the hor­ror of his act, and, in par­tic­u­lar, the wide­spread and bla­tant­ly misog­y­nis­tic reac­tion to it may come as some­thing of a rev­e­la­tion. When the fem­i­nist Aman­da Mar­cotte, a bête noire of the men’s rights move­ment, remarked that “set­ting your­self on fire is an extreme­ly effec­tive tool if your goal is to make your ex-wife’s life a liv­ing hell,” a poster at the blog Misandry.com went bal­lis­tic. “Talk about the pot call­ing the ket­tle black,” he raged. “She is evil and such a vile evil that she is a dis­ease that needs to be cut out of the human [con­scious­ness] just like the rest of the fem­anazi ass harpies.”

Ball’s sui­cide brought atten­tion to an under­world of misog­y­nists, woman-haters whose fury goes well beyond crit­i­cism of the fam­i­ly court sys­tem, domes­tic vio­lence laws, and false rape accu­sa­tions. There are lit­er­al­ly hun­dreds of web­sites, blogs and forums devot­ed to attack­ing vir­tu­al­ly all women (or, at least, West­ern­ized ones) — the so-called “manos­phere,” which now also includes a trib­ute page for Tom Ball (“He Died For Our Chil­dren”). While some of them voice legit­i­mate and some­times dis­turb­ing com­plaints about the treat­ment of men, what is most remark­able is the misog­y­nis­tic tone that per­vades so many. Women are rou­tine­ly maligned as sluts, gold-dig­gers, temptress­es and worse; over­ly sym­pa­thet­ic men are dubbed “mang­i­nas”; and police and oth­er offi­cials are called their armed enablers. Even Ball — who did not direct­ly blame his ex-wife for his trou­bles, but instead depict­ed her and their three chil­dren as co-vic­tims of the author­i­ties — vil­i­fied “man-hat­ing fem­i­nists” as evil destroy­ers of all that is good.

This kind of woman-hatred is increas­ing­ly vis­i­ble in most West­ern soci­eties, and it tends to be allied with oth­er anti-mod­ern emo­tions — oppo­si­tion to same-sex mar­riage, to non-Chris­t­ian immi­gra­tion, to women in the work­place, and even, in some cas­es, to the advance­ment of African Amer­i­cans. Just a few weeks after Ball’s death, while scorch marks were still vis­i­ble on the side­walk in Keene, N.H., that was made clear once more by a Nor­we­gian named Anders Behring Breivik.

On July 22, Breivik slaugh­tered 77 of his coun­try­men, most of them teenagers, in Oslo and at a sum­mer camp on the island of Utøya, because he thought they or their par­ents were the kinds of “polit­i­cal­ly cor­rect” lib­er­als who were enabling Mus­lim immi­gra­tion. But Breivik was almost as vol­u­ble on the sub­jects of fem­i­nism, the fam­i­ly, and fathers’ rights as he was on Islam. “The most direct threat to the fam­i­ly is ‘divorce on demand,’” he wrote in the man­i­festo he post­ed just before he began his dead­ly spree. “The sys­tem must be reformed so that the father will be award­ed cus­tody rights by default.”

The manos­phere lit up. Said one approv­ing poster at The Spear­head, an online men’s rights mag­a­zine for the “defense of our­selves, our fam­i­lies and our fel­low men”: “What could be more ‘an eye for an eye’ than to kill the chil­dren of those who were so will­ing to destroy men’s fam­i­lies and destroy the home­land of men?”

‘The Home­land of Men’

The men’s rights move­ment, also referred to as the fathers’ rights move­ment, is made up of a num­ber of dis­parate, often over­lap­ping, types of groups and indi­vid­u­als. Some most cer­tain­ly do have legit­i­mate griev­ances, hav­ing endured prison, impov­er­ish­ment or heartrend­ing sep­a­ra­tions from gen­uine­ly loved chil­dren.

Joce­lyn Crow­ley, a Rut­gers polit­i­cal sci­en­tist and the author of Defi­ant Dads: Fathers’ Rights Activists in Amer­i­ca, says that most men who join real (as opposed to vir­tu­al) men’s rights groups aren’t seek­ing to attack the fam­i­ly court sys­tem so much as they are sim­ply strug­gling to nav­i­gate it. What they talk most about when they meet face to face, she says, are strate­gies to deal with their ex-part­ners and have bet­ter rela­tion­ships with their chil­dren.

But Mol­ly Dragiewicz, a crim­i­nol­o­gist at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Ontario Insti­tute of Tech­nol­o­gy and the author of Equal­i­ty With a Vengeance: Men’s Rights Groups, Bat­tered Women, and Antifem­i­nist Back­lash, argues that cas­es in which fathers are bad­ly treat­ed by courts and oth­er offi­cials are not remote­ly the norm. The small per­cent­age of divorces that end up in lit­i­ga­tion are dis­pro­por­tion­ate­ly those where abuse and oth­er issues make joint cus­tody a dubi­ous propo­si­tion. Even when a woman can sat­is­fac­to­ri­ly doc­u­ment her ex-husband’s abuse, Dragiewicz says, she is no more like­ly to receive full cus­tody of her chil­dren than if she couldn’t.

The men’s move­ment also includes mail-order-bride shop­pers, unre­gen­er­ate bat­ter­ers, and wannabe pick­up artists who are eager to learn the secrets of “game”—the psy­cho­log­i­cal tricks that sup­pos­ed­ly make it easy to seduce women. George Sodi­ni, who con­fid­ed his seething rage at women to his blog before shoot­ing 12 women, three of them fatal­ly, was one of the lat­ter. Before his 2009 mur­der spree at a Pitts­burgh-area gym, he was a stu­dent — though clear­ly not a very apt one — of R. Don Steele, the author of How to Date Young Women: For Men Over 35. “I dress good, am clean-shaven, bathe, touch of cologne — yet 30 mil­lion women reject­ed me over an 18 or 25-year peri­od,” Sodi­ni wrote with the kind of pathos pre­sum­ably typ­i­cal of Steele’s read­ers.

Some take an inor­di­nate inter­est in extreme­ly young women, or fetishize what they see as the ultra-fem­i­nine (read: docile) char­ac­ter­is­tics of South Amer­i­can and Asian women. Oth­ers, who have inter­nal­ized Chris­t­ian “head­ship” doc­trine, are des­per­ate­ly seek­ing the “sub­mis­sive” women such doc­trine cel­e­brates. Still oth­ers are sim­ply sex­u­al­ly awk­ward, and non­plussed and befud­dled by society’s chang­ing mores. The com­mon denom­i­na­tor is their resent­ment of fem­i­nism and of females in gen­er­al.

“It’s iron­ic,” the fem­i­nist writer Aman­da Mar­cotte observes. “These [misog­y­nist Web] sites owe their exis­tence to feminism’s suc­cess­es. At some point in the last cou­ple of years, the zeit­geist hit a tip­ping point where female pow­er — Hillary Clinton’s, Rachel Maddow’s, even Sarah Palin’s — stopped being ques­tioned. Being sex­ist has become less accept­able than it used to be. This makes some men par­tic­u­lar­ly anx­ious.” At the same time, of course, domes­tic vio­lence and sex crimes are much more like­ly to be pros­e­cut­ed than they were even a decade ago. Shel­ters, social ser­vices and legal aid are more avail­able to most bat­tered women than in the past.

But some experts argue that men’s rights groups have been remark­ably suc­cess­ful. The groups, says Rita Smith, direc­tor of the Nation­al Coali­tion Against Domes­tic Vio­lence, “have tak­en over the way courts deal with cus­tody issues, par­tic­u­lar­ly when there are alle­ga­tions of abuse,” large­ly by con­vinc­ing them that there is such a thing as “Parental Alien­ation Syn­drome” (PAS). (PAS is a sup­posed clin­i­cal dis­or­der in which a child com­pul­sive­ly belit­tles one par­ent due to indoc­tri­na­tion by the oth­er — fre­quent­ly lev­el­ing false alle­ga­tions of abuse. It is not rec­og­nized as a clin­i­cal dis­or­der by either the Amer­i­can Psy­chi­atric Asso­ci­a­tion or the World Health Orga­ni­za­tion.) Cit­ing stud­ies that show that false domes­tic abuse accu­sa­tions against men are far less com­mon than men’s groups and PAS enthu­si­asts claim, Smith says the groups nev­er­the­less have “been able to get cus­tody eval­u­a­tors, medi­a­tors, guardians ad litem and child pro­tec­tive ser­vice work­ers to believe that women and chil­dren lie about abuse.”

Threats and Abuse

One kind of abuse that is unde­ni­able is the vil­i­fi­ca­tion of indi­vid­ual women on cer­tain men’s group web­sites. The best exam­ple of that may be Reg­is­ter-Her, a reg­istry of women who “have caused sig­nif­i­cant harm to inno­cent indi­vid­u­als either by the direct action of crimes like rape, assault, child molesta­tion and mur­der, or by the false accu­sa­tion of crimes against oth­ers.” The site was set up by Paul Elam, the blog­ger behind A Voice for Men, less than two weeks after Ball’s sui­cide. “If Mary Jane Rot­ten­crotch decides to false­ly accuse her hus­band of domes­tic vio­lence in order to get the upper hand in a divorce,” Elam boast­ed on his Inter­net radio show, “we can pub­lish all her per­son­al infor­ma­tion on the web­site, includ­ing her name, address, phone num­ber … even her routes to and from work.”

Under a head­line read­ing, “Why are these women not in prison?” the site fea­tures pho­tos and infor­ma­tion about some 250 alleged male­fac­tors, includ­ing noto­ri­ous women like Lore­na Bob­bitt and Tonya Hard­ing, although Elam hasn’t made good on his threat to pub­lish home address­es or phone num­bers. Many of those list­ed received prison sen­tences for var­i­ous crimes, but large num­bers were acquit­ted in court, while oth­ers were nev­er accused of any law­break­ing. A well-known fem­i­nist, for exam­ple, is list­ed for “anti-male big­otry,” which is com­pared to racism.

Elam’s site can be fright­en­ing to its tar­gets. In one case, he offered a cash reward to the first read­er to fer­ret out a pseu­do­ny­mous fem­i­nist blogger’s real name. In anoth­er, Elam sin­gled out a part-time blog­ger at ChicagoNow who describes her­self as a “veg­e­tar­i­an park activist with two baby girls.” The woman’s mis­take was to write about her dis­com­fort with male adults help­ing female tod­dlers in the bath­room at her daughter’s preschool. The blog­ger con­ced­ed that she was being sex­ist, but wrote that “I’d rather be wrong than find out if I’m right.”

After the woman was list­ed, she was wide­ly attacked on men’s move­ment sites. “I don’t always use the word ‘cunt’ to describe a woman,” one poster raged, “but when I do it’s because of rea­sons like these.” Shocked, the “Mom­my blog­ger” took down her orig­i­nal post and apol­o­gized for her “demo­niza­tion of men.”

It wasn’t enough. “You tar­get­ed fathers, and just fathers,” Elam rebuked her. “It strikes me that you have nev­er real­ly been held to account for any of your actions in life. It is quite like­ly that the con­cept of com­plete, self­less account­abil­i­ty is just com­plete­ly for­eign to you.” Over at the Red­dit Mens Rights forum, anoth­er poster fumed: “This entire episode should be a warn­ing to all those male hat­ing fem­i­nists out there who believe that they are safe scream­ing their hate mes­sages on the web. Final­ly, they are held account­able for their hate mes­sages and final­ly the rest of the world will find out exact­ly what type of depraved peo­ple they real­ly are.”

“I don’t know if Thomas James Ball ever vis­it­ed this site,” Elam wrote on his blog when he start­ed Reg­is­ter-Her. “What I do believe is, though, that he, if con­vinced to stay alive, would have been a hell of a sol­dier in this war.”

Sol­diers in the War

The first shots in this so-called war on fem­i­nism were fired 22 years before Tom Ball’s sui­cide. On Dec. 6, 1989, Marc Lépine, a trou­bled 25-year-old com­put­er stu­dent, strolled into the Ecole Poly­tech­nique in Mon­tre­al, Cana­da, car­ry­ing a Ruger Mini-14 semi-auto­mat­ic rifle and a hunt­ing knife. He walked into a class­room, ordered the men to leave, and lined the women up against a wall.

“I am fight­ing fem­i­nism,” he announced before open­ing fire. “You’re women, you’re going to be engi­neers. You’re all a bunch of fem­i­nists. I hate fem­i­nists.”

By the time he turned the gun on him­self, 14 women were dead and 10 were wound­ed; four men were hurt as well. The sui­cide note in Lépine’s pock­et con­tained a list of 19 “rad­i­cal fem­i­nists” he hoped to kill, and this: “I have decid­ed to send the fem­i­nists, who have always ruined my life, to their Mak­er. … They want to keep the advan­tages of women … while seiz­ing for them­selves those of men.”

Today, that kind of rage is often direct­ed at all women, not only per­ceived fem­i­nists. “Women don’t need the pow­ers-that-be to get them to hate and use men,” the blog­ger Alcuin wrote recent­ly. “They have always used men; maybe they have always hat­ed us too.” Added anoth­er blog­ger, Angry Har­ry: “There are now, lit­er­al­ly, bil­lions of dol­lars, numer­ous empires, and mil­lions of jobs that depend on the pub­lic swal­low­ing the idea that women need to be defend­ed from men.”

“A word to the wise,” offered the blog­ger known as Rebuk­ing Fem­i­nism. “The ani­mals women have become want one thing, resources and genes. … See them as the ani­mals they have become and plan … accord­ing­ly.”

And many are quick to endorse vio­lence against women. “There are women, and plen­ty of them, for which [sic] a sol­id ass kick­ing would be the least they deserve,” Paul Elam wrote in an essay with the provoca­tive title, “When is it OK to Punch Your Wife?” “The real ques­tion here is not whether these women deserve the busi­ness end of a right hook, they obvi­ous­ly do, and some of them deserve one hard enough to leave them in an uncon­scious, innocu­ous pile on the ground if it serves to pro­tect the inno­cent from immi­nent harm. The real ques­tion is whether men deserve to be able to phys­i­cal­ly defend them­selves from assault … from a woman.”

For some, it’s more than just talk. In 2006, Dar­ren Mack, a mem­ber of a fathers’ rights group in Reno, Nev., stabbed his estranged wife to death and then shot and wound­ed the fam­i­ly court judge who was han­dling his divorce.

That kind of vio­lence con­tin­ues right up to the present.

In Seal Beach, Calif. last Oct. 12, a day after Scott Evans Dekraai and his ex-wife had been in court to fight over cus­tody of their 8‑year-old son (Dekraai had 56% cus­tody but want­ed full cus­tody and “final deci­sion mak­ing author­i­ty” on mat­ters of the child’s edu­ca­tion and med­ical treat­ment), Dekraai walked into the hair salon where his ex-wife worked armed with three hand­guns. There, he alleged­ly shot sev­en women, six of them fatal­ly; he also is accused of killing two men — the salon’s own­er, as he attempt­ed to flee, and a man in a car out­side.

8a. Ronan Far­row wrote the New York­er piece that launched the Har­vey Wein­stein take­down.

From  Aggres­sive Over­tures to Sex­u­al Aggres­sion: Har­vey Weinstein’s Accusers Tell Their Sto­ries” by Ronan Far­row; The New York­er; 10/23/2017.

8b. An impor­tant detail about Ronan Far­row, who played a fun­da­men­tal role in break­ing the Har­vey Wein­stein case, con­cerns his back­ground in the State Depart­ment, spe­cial­iz­ing in Afghanistan and Pak­istan. Far­row is the son of Mia Far­row and Woody Allen.  ” . . . .  Post-law school: Lands a job at the State Depart­ment, as a spe­cial advi­sor focus­ing on con­flict in Afghanistan and Pak­istan. . . .”

Far­row’s back­ground strong­ly sug­gests intel­li­gence com­mu­ni­ty involve­ment.

“Ronan Far­row: From State Depart­ment to Twit­ter Leg­end to MSNBC Host (a Time­line)” by Emi­ly Yahr; The Wash­ing­ton Post; 2/24/2014.

 . . . .  Post-law school: Lands a job at the State Depart­ment, as a spe­cial advi­sor focus­ing on con­flict in Afghanistan and Pak­istan. . . .

8c. Far­row con­tin­ued his work for State in 2011. ” . . . . 2011: Starts work­ing along­side Hillary Clin­ton with a lengthy title: Spe­cial Advi­sor to the Sec­re­tary of State for Glob­al Youth Issues and direc­tor of the State Department’s Glob­al Youth Issues office. . . .”

Har­vey Wein­stein was a major donor to the Democ­rats, includ­ing Hillary Clin­ton. Might Far­row have been doing oppo­si­tion research on Clin­ton while  work­ing for her State Depart­ment?

“Ronan Far­row: From State Depart­ment to Twit­ter Leg­end to MSNBC Host (a Time­line)” by Emi­ly Yahr; The Wash­ing­ton Post; 2/24/2014.

. . . . 2011: Starts work­ing along­side Hillary Clin­ton with a lengthy title: Spe­cial Advi­sor to the Sec­re­tary of State for Glob­al Youth Issues and direc­tor of the State Department’s Glob­al Youth Issues office. . . .

8d. Far­row also co-wrote the New York­er arti­cle that took down New York Attor­ney Gen­er­al Eric Schnei­der­man, a major Trump oppo­nent who presided over the law­suit against Trump Uni­ver­si­ty.

“Four Women Accuse New York’s Attor­ney Gen­er­al of Phys­i­cal Abuse” by Ronan Far­row and Jane May­er; The New York­er; 5/7/2018.

8e. Schnei­der­man was active­ly going after oth­er mem­bers of the oli­garchy as well.

“Will This Man Take Down Don­ald Trump?” by David Freed­lan­der; Politi­co; 2/3/2017.

. . . . Schnei­der­man took up the state’s exist­ing case against Trump University—New York want­ed the school to drop the “uni­ver­si­ty” from its name, since it was not char­tered as an insti­tu­tion of high­er learn­ing and lacked a license to offer instruction—and as he pur­sued it over the next five years, he became the tar­get of a relent­less series of per­son­al attacks from the Trump camp. Trump filed an ethics com­plaint alleg­ing that Schnei­der­man offered to drop the suit in exchange for dona­tions; he went on tele­vi­sion to denounce Schnei­der­man as a hack and a light­weight, and said he was wast­ing mil­lions of tax­pay­er dol­lars when he should have been going after Wall Street. (Nev­er mind that Schnei­der­man had already been declared “the man the banks fear most” by the lib­er­al mag­a­zine “The Amer­i­can Prospect.”) “The whole scorched-earth strat­e­gy towards those who would chal­lenge him, we got a pre­view of,” says Schnei­der­man.

The Trump Uni­ver­si­ty suit even­tu­al­ly was set­tled for $25 mil­lion days after the elec­tion, despite the then president-elect’s repeat­ed pledges nev­er to set­tle. Schnei­der­man could have left it at that. But Schnei­der­man has let it be known that Trump is still in his crosshairs. In the days since Novem­ber 9, Schnei­der­man fired off a let­ter warn­ing Trump not to drop White House sup­port of Obama’s Clean Pow­er Plan, intro­duced a bill in the state Leg­is­la­ture to give New York­ers cost-free con­tra­cep­tion if the Afford­able Care Act is dis­man­tled, threat­ened to sue after Trump froze EPA fund­ing of clean air and water pro­grams, and joined a law­suit that argues that Trump’s exec­u­tive order on immi­gra­tion is not just uncon­sti­tu­tion­al and un-Amer­i­can, but it brings pro­found harm to the res­i­dents of New York State.

He has a record of going not only after Trump, but going after peo­ple now in Trump­world. He’s on the oppo­site side of the Clean Pow­er Plan fight from Okla­homa Attor­ney Gen­er­al Scott Pruitt, since named head of the EPA, and who Schnei­der­man labeled a “dan­ger­ous and unqual­i­fied choice.” He’s gone after Rex Tiller­son, who as CEO of Exxon­Mo­bil defend­ed his com­pa­ny from a Schnei­der­man inves­ti­ga­tion; since the elec­tion he’s begun inves­ti­gat­ing a reverse-mort­gage busi­ness once led by Steven Mnuchin, the nom­i­nee to be the next Trea­sury sec­re­tary. . . .

8f. Pri­or to his pro­fes­sion­al demise, Schnei­der­man was inves­ti­gat­ing the NXIVM cult, with its many con­nec­tions to pow­er­ful peo­ple, includ­ing Trump/GOP dirty trick­ster Roger Stone, who sig­naled the #MeToo take­down of Sen­a­tor Al Franken. Might he have been linked to the take­down of Schnei­der­man?

“Faces of NXIVM: An Alleged Cult’s Inner Cir­cle and Beyond” by Joyce Bas­sett; Time­sUnion; 4/24/2018.

. . . The Times Union report­ed on March 25 that New York Attor­ney Gen­er­al Eric Schnei­der­man’s office was con­duct­ing a sep­a­rate inves­ti­ga­tion of a non­prof­it foun­da­tion asso­ci­at­ed with NXIVM that alleged­ly spon­sored brain-activ­i­ty and oth­er human behav­ioral stud­ies with­out any appar­ent over­sight, accord­ing to court records. That inves­ti­ga­tion has been sus­pend­ed due to the fed­er­al crim­i­nal inves­ti­ga­tion, offi­cials said. . . .

. . . . The for-prof­it cor­po­ra­tion NXIVM is based on a self-improve­ment cur­ricu­lum called “Ratio­nal Inquiry.” Oth­er high-pro­file names — includ­ing Repub­li­can cam­paign strate­gist and self-described polit­i­cal “dirty trick­ster” Roger Stone. . . .  have tak­en NXIVM’s exec­u­tive suc­cess cours­es or were found to have ties to the orga­ni­za­tion, accord­ing to Times Union report­ing. . . .

Discussion

10 comments for “FTR #1011 Miscellaneous Articles and Updates”

  1. Well look at that: It turns out the guy charged with inten­tion­al­ly start­ing the mas­sive “Holy Fire” wild­fire on the Cleve­land Nation­al For­est in South­ern Cal­i­for­nia last week is a self-declared sov­er­eign cit­i­zen. Sur­prise!:

    Kansas City Star

    Man accused of ignit­ing CA wild­fire is sov­er­eign cit­i­zen with pos­si­ble KS con­nec­tion

    By Judy L. Thomas

    August 13, 2018 09:49 AM
    Updat­ed

    The man accused of set­ting the South­ern Cal­i­for­nia fire last week that has scorched thou­sands of acres of nation­al for­est is a sov­er­eign cit­i­zen who appears to have a Kansas con­nec­tion.

    For­rest Gor­don Clark has described him­self on social media as an “inter­im con­gress­man for Repub­lic for Kansas” and has been involved in an orga­ni­za­tion that believes the U.S. gov­ern­ment is not legit­i­mate, accord­ing to J.J. Mac­Nab, an expert on anti-gov­ern­ment extrem­ists.

    Clark, 51, was arrest­ed Aug. 7 and is charged with aggra­vat­ed arson, arson of inhab­it­ed prop­er­ty, arson of for­est, mak­ing crim­i­nal threats and resist­ing arrest. He is being held on $1 mil­lion bond and faces a life sen­tence if con­vict­ed.

    The blaze, called Holy Fire, start­ed Aug. 6 in Holy Jim Canyon. It has burned more than 22,000 acres of Cleve­land Nation­al For­est and forced tens of thou­sands of res­i­dents to flee their homes, mak­ing it one of the most destruc­tive wild­fires of 2018. As of Sun­day night, the fire was about 52 per­cent con­tained.

    The area’s vol­un­teer fire chief said that the week before the fire start­ed, Clark had sent him text mes­sages threat­en­ing to start a fire and that Clark had run scream­ing through the area. He’d also been involved in a long­stand­ing feud with a neigh­bor and oth­er cab­in own­ers in the area, the fire chief said.

    Mac­Nab exam­ined eight years of Clark’s social media posts and deter­mined he’d been pro­mot­ing sov­er­eign cit­i­zen argu­ments since at least 2010.

    Sov­er­eign cit­i­zens say the gov­ern­ment is cor­rupt and out of con­trol, so they do not rec­og­nize local, state or fed­er­al author­i­ty or tax sys­tems. Not all are vio­lent, but in recent years the FBI and oth­er gov­ern­ment agen­cies have come to con­sid­er them a top domes­tic ter­ror­ism threat.

    Mac­Nab, a fel­low with the Pro­gram on Extrem­ism at George Wash­ing­ton Uni­ver­si­ty, said that in 2010, Clark was active in the Restore Amer­i­ca Plan, which she said lat­er became the Repub­lic for the unit­ed States of Amer­i­ca (RuSA). The RuSA, she said, is an alter­na­tive-gov­ern­ment orga­ni­za­tion that believes the real U.S. gov­ern­ment ceased to exist in 1871 and that an “imposter” or “de fac­to” gov­ern­ment has been in pow­er ever since.

    To rem­e­dy this sit­u­a­tion, Mac­Nab said, RuSA cre­at­ed a sub­sti­tute gov­ern­ment and is wait­ing until the cur­rent gov­ern­ment col­laps­es so it can step in and take con­trol.

    Clark was such an enthu­si­as­tic sup­port­er of the RuSA, Mac­Nab said, that in 2010 he trav­eled to the first real gath­er­ing of the group in Col­orado. His Face­book page con­tains a pho­to of a grin­ning Clark wear­ing a shirt with a large sun­flower on it and a nametag that says, “For­rest Clark Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Kansas.”

    In a notice dat­ed Sept. 16, 2011, and post­ed on his Face­book page, Clark says “I Am A Sov­er­eign Man” and calls him­self a “Kansas free state — Inter­im Rep­re­sen­ta­tive” and “DeJure grand Juror in ser­vice for the Lord, you, our repub­lic, our nation.”

    In anoth­er post, he describes him­self as “a gen­er­al contractor/builder, a med­ical mis­sion­ary, and a inter­im con­gress­man for Repub­lic for Kansas, try­ing to save Amer­i­ca for those who are wor­thy & take the time to learn of free­dom. Free­dom is not free.”

    It’s unclear why Clark was rep­re­sent­ing Kansas in the alter­na­tive-gov­ern­ment orga­ni­za­tion. Online search­es show he has lived in Ohio and Cal­i­for­nia.

    ...

    His Face­book posts include push­ing such con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries as 9/11 was an inside job and insist­ing the FBI has mur­dered wit­ness­es in the 2017 Las Vegas sniper shoot­ing that killed 58. The site also con­tains posts about cannabis, reli­gion and numer­ous close-up pho­tos of what he says is skin can­cer on his face and leg. It also sug­gests that he was involved in a dis­pute with a neigh­bor who he says was cook­ing meth.

    “Based on his social media pages,” Mac­Nab said in a Twit­ter post, “Clark is a sov­er­eign cit­i­zen who believes in just about every kooky con­spir­a­cy out there, includ­ing QAnon, Piz­za­gate, Jade Helm 15, flat earth the­o­ries, NESARA, Jesuit con­ser­van­cies, shape-shift­ing lizard over­lords. You name it, he believes it.”

    Clark appears to have a his­to­ry of finan­cial and per­son­al trou­bles, accord­ing to the Palm Springs Desert Sun. In addi­tion to mul­ti­ple cred­it card col­lec­tion cas­es, he was a defen­dant in a civ­il breach of con­tract case, accused of defraud­ing an employ­er of about $85,000. The law­suit claimed that Clark and his co-work­ers were paid for land­scap­ing work that his com­pa­ny nev­er com­plet­ed, the Desert Sun said.

    ...

    ———-

    “Man accused of ignit­ing CA wild­fire is sov­er­eign cit­i­zen with pos­si­ble KS con­nec­tion” by Judy L. Thomas; Kansas City Star; 08/13/2018

    “For­rest Gor­don Clark has described him­self on social media as an “inter­im con­gress­man for Repub­lic for Kansas” and has been involved in an orga­ni­za­tion that believes the U.S. gov­ern­ment is not legit­i­mate, accord­ing to J.J. Mac­Nab, an expert on anti-gov­ern­ment extrem­ists.”

    Yep, the guy who start­ed the fire is a self-declared con­gress­man for one of the many fake gov­ern­ments the sov­er­eigns set up. In par­tic­u­lar, Clark appears to be part of the “Restore Amer­i­ca Plan” alter­na­tive gov­ern­ment. Clark was even at its first gath­er­ing in 2010:

    ...
    Mac­Nab exam­ined eight years of Clark’s social media posts and deter­mined he’d been pro­mot­ing sov­er­eign cit­i­zen argu­ments since at least 2010.

    Sov­er­eign cit­i­zens say the gov­ern­ment is cor­rupt and out of con­trol, so they do not rec­og­nize local, state or fed­er­al author­i­ty or tax sys­tems. Not all are vio­lent, but in recent years the FBI and oth­er gov­ern­ment agen­cies have come to con­sid­er them a top domes­tic ter­ror­ism threat.

    Mac­Nab, a fel­low with the Pro­gram on Extrem­ism at George Wash­ing­ton Uni­ver­si­ty, said that in 2010, Clark was active in the Restore Amer­i­ca Plan, which she said lat­er became the Repub­lic for the unit­ed States of Amer­i­ca (RuSA). The RuSA, she said, is an alter­na­tive-gov­ern­ment orga­ni­za­tion that believes the real U.S. gov­ern­ment ceased to exist in 1871 and that an “imposter” or “de fac­to” gov­ern­ment has been in pow­er ever since.

    To rem­e­dy this sit­u­a­tion, Mac­Nab said, RuSA cre­at­ed a sub­sti­tute gov­ern­ment and is wait­ing until the cur­rent gov­ern­ment col­laps­es so it can step in and take con­trol.

    Clark was such an enthu­si­as­tic sup­port­er of the RuSA, Mac­Nab said, that in 2010 he trav­eled to the first real gath­er­ing of the group in Col­orado. His Face­book page con­tains a pho­to of a grin­ning Clark wear­ing a shirt with a large sun­flower on it and a nametag that says, “For­rest Clark Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Kansas.”

    In a notice dat­ed Sept. 16, 2011, and post­ed on his Face­book page, Clark says “I Am A Sov­er­eign Man” and calls him­self a “Kansas free state — Inter­im Rep­re­sen­ta­tive” and “DeJure grand Juror in ser­vice for the Lord, you, our repub­lic, our nation.”

    In anoth­er post, he describes him­self as “a gen­er­al contractor/builder, a med­ical mis­sion­ary, and a inter­im con­gress­man for Repub­lic for Kansas, try­ing to save Amer­i­ca for those who are wor­thy & take the time to learn of free­dom. Free­dom is not free.”

    It’s unclear why Clark was rep­re­sent­ing Kansas in the alter­na­tive-gov­ern­ment orga­ni­za­tion. Online search­es show he has lived in Ohio and Cal­i­for­nia.
    ...

    And while the pre­cise motive for set­ting this fire isn’t quite clear, the fact that Clark actu­al­ly sent a text mes­sages to the area’s vol­un­teer fire chief the week before the fires start­ed threat­en­ing to start a fire makes it pret­ty clear that he want­ed to get caught (or was just out of his mind):

    ...
    Clark, 51, was arrest­ed Aug. 7 and is charged with aggra­vat­ed arson, arson of inhab­it­ed prop­er­ty, arson of for­est, mak­ing crim­i­nal threats and resist­ing arrest. He is being held on $1 mil­lion bond and faces a life sen­tence if con­vict­ed.

    The blaze, called Holy Fire, start­ed Aug. 6 in Holy Jim Canyon. It has burned more than 22,000 acres of Cleve­land Nation­al For­est and forced tens of thou­sands of res­i­dents to flee their homes, mak­ing it one of the most destruc­tive wild­fires of 2018. As of Sun­day night, the fire was about 52 per­cent con­tained.

    The area’s vol­un­teer fire chief said that the week before the fire start­ed, Clark had sent him text mes­sages threat­en­ing to start a fire and that Clark had run scream­ing through the area. He’d also been involved in a long­stand­ing feud with a neigh­bor and oth­er cab­in own­ers in the area, the fire chief said.
    ...

    And when try­ing to deter­mine a motive, it’s worth not­ing that, as is typ­i­cal­ly the case with sov­er­eign cit­i­zens, Clark’s beliefs went includ­ed just about any whacky con­spir­a­cy the­o­ry out there, includ­ing the QAnon/Pizzagate hoax. He is also con­vinced that the FBI mur­dered wit­ness­es to the 2017 Las Vegas domes­tic ter­ror attack by Stephen Pad­dock:

    ...
    His Face­book posts include push­ing such con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries as 9/11 was an inside job and insist­ing the FBI has mur­dered wit­ness­es in the 2017 Las Vegas sniper shoot­ing that killed 58. The site also con­tains posts about cannabis, reli­gion and numer­ous close-up pho­tos of what he says is skin can­cer on his face and leg. It also sug­gests that he was involved in a dis­pute with a neigh­bor who he says was cook­ing meth.

    “Based on his social media pages,” Mac­Nab said in a Twit­ter post, “Clark is a sov­er­eign cit­i­zen who believes in just about every kooky con­spir­a­cy out there, includ­ing QAnon, Piz­za­gate, Jade Helm 15, flat earth the­o­ries, NESARA, Jesuit con­ser­van­cies, shape-shift­ing lizard over­lords. You name it, he believes it.”

    Clark appears to have a his­to­ry of finan­cial and per­son­al trou­bles, accord­ing to the Palm Springs Desert Sun. In addi­tion to mul­ti­ple cred­it card col­lec­tion cas­es, he was a defen­dant in a civ­il breach of con­tract case, accused of defraud­ing an employ­er of about $85,000. The law­suit claimed that Clark and his co-work­ers were paid for land­scap­ing work that his com­pa­ny nev­er com­plet­ed, the Desert Sun said.
    ...

    Once again, don’t for­get that Stephen Pad­dock, him­self, appears to have been a sov­er­eign cit­i­zen who was ter­ri­fied of gov­ern­ment FEMA camps and was con­vinced that “some­body has to wake up the Amer­i­can pub­lic and get them to arm them­selves”.

    So, as with the case of Stephen Pad­dock, we once again are fac­ing an act by a sov­er­eign cit­i­zen that could be the action of a lunatic but also fits the pro­file of the far right strat­e­gy of ‘lead­er­less resis­tance’ and cal­cu­lat­ed ran­dom acts of domes­tic ter­ror.

    It’s one of the sig­na­ture char­ac­ter­is­tics of the sov­er­eign move­ment: the mem­bers are so overt­ly detached from real­i­ty that it’s hard to deter­mine if there’s any strat­e­gy behind their seem­ing­ly ran­dom and insane acts of vio­lence or this just the man­i­fes­ta­tion of the insan­i­ty that infests the move­ment.

    It’s also a good time to recall that one of the key strate­gies of far right orga­ni­za­tions for seiz­ing pow­er is to cre­ate one hor­ri­ble event after anoth­er for the pur­pose of effec­tive­ly dri­ving a soci­ety insane and tak­ing advan­tage of vul­ner­a­bil­i­ties that col­lec­tive insan­i­ty cre­ates. It’s some­thing that’s going to be increas­ing­ly impor­tant to keep in mind as the sov­er­eigns and oth­er far right indi­vid­u­als con­tin­ue their domes­tic ter­ror cam­paigns: their overt insan­i­ty is intend­ed to be infec­tious. Maybe bul­lets are intend­ed to be the infec­tious vec­tors or maybe fire. Either way, the vio­lence and may­hem is meant to spread. It’s the under­ly­ing method to the mad­ness.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | August 13, 2018, 11:25 am
  2. It looks like the FBI inves­ti­ga­tion into the motive behind Stephen Pad­dock­’s mas­sacre in Las Vegas is offi­cial­ly end­ed with a “we have no idea what his motives were” con­clu­sion. The FBI did con­clude that Pad­dock was like­ly seek­ing some form of infamy and may have been inspire to fol­low in foot­steps of his bank rob­ber father. But beyond that, the FBI found no indi­ca­tion of par­tic­u­lar motive and con­clud­ed that the gun­man was not direct­ed or inspired by any group and was not seek­ing to fur­ther any agen­da.

    This con­clu­sion of no inspi­ra­tion by any group or agen­da of course is com­plete­ly con­tra­dict­ed by the wit­ness­es who claim to have over­heard Pad­dock in the days before the shoot­ing express­ing views in line with the Sov­er­eign Cit­i­zens. Recall the account of a woman claimed she sat near Pad­dock in a din­er days before the attack where he talked about with a com­pan­ion about the 25th anniver­sary of the Ruby Ridge stand­off and the Waco siege and heard him and his com­pan­ion say­ing that court­room flags with gold­en fringes are not real flags, in keep­ing with the Sov­er­eign Cit­i­zen belief that gold-fringed flags are those of a for­eign juris­dic­tion, or “admi­ral­ty flags”. And recall the accounts of a man who claimed he Pad­dock tried to buy from him a device that would con­vert semi-auto­mat­ic rifles to ful­ly auto­mat­ic weapons. The man claimed that Pad­dock launched into a rant about “anti-gov­ern­ment stuff … Fema camps”. The man claims that Pad­dock told him that the evac­u­a­tion of peo­ple by the Fed­er­al Emer­gency Man­age­ment Agency (Fema) after Hur­ri­cane Kat­ri­na was a a “dry run for law enforce­ment and mil­i­tary to start kickin’ down doors and … con­fis­cat­ing guns”. And he says Pad­dock told him, “Some­body has to wake up the Amer­i­can pub­lic and get them to arm themselves...Sometimes sac­ri­fices have to be made.”

    So not only are there mul­ti­ple inde­pen­dent accounts that point strong­ly towards Pad­dock being a fol­low­er of Sov­er­eign Cit­i­zen ide­olo­gies, but if that account about Pad­dock say­ing “Some­body has to wake up the Amer­i­can pub­lic and get them to arm themselves...Sometimes sac­ri­fices have to be made” is accu­rate, that strong­ly implies that Pad­dock would want to car­ry­ing out his polit­i­cal­ly moti­vat­ed attack while hid­ing his polit­i­cal motive. After all, if some­one who is con­cerned about the gov­ern­ment con­fis­cat­ing guns and wants to “wake up the Amer­i­can pub­lic and get them to arm them­selves” pro­ceeds to car­ry out a mass slaugh­ter of the nature Pad­dock did (where he was found sur­round­ed by an arse­nal of guns in his hotel room), there is one very twist­ed obvi­ous log­ic behind that kind of ter­ror­ism: car­ry­ing out an unprece­dent­ed mas­sacre in order to prompt a wave of gov­ern­ment gun con­fis­ca­tions with the hope of see­ing the Amer­i­can far right back­lash.

    In oth­er words, based on the cir­cum­stan­tial evi­dence, it looks like Pad­dock was mak­ing the bet that if he car­ried out an attack so hor­rif­ic that the Amer­i­can gov­ern­ment could­n’t resist some degree of gun con­fis­ca­tions, the mass armed insur­rec­tion that the Amer­i­can far right has long pined for would final­ly hap­pen in response. And if that was indeed Pad­dock­’s plan, of course he would­n’t want to make his ide­ol­o­gy clear. So based on the cir­cum­stan­tial pub­licly avail­able evi­dence, not only does it look like Pad­dock had a polit­i­cal motive inspired by Sov­er­eign Cit­i­zen beliefs but he also had a motive to hide those beliefs and for some rea­son the FBI has a motive to ignore this in its final report

    Asso­ci­at­ed Press

    FBI finds no spe­cif­ic motive in Vegas attack that killed 58

    By KEN RITTER and MICHAEL BALSAMO
    1/29/2019

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — The high-stakes gam­bler respon­si­ble for the dead­liest mass shoot­ing in mod­ern U.S. his­to­ry sought noto­ri­ety in the attack but left his spe­cif­ic motive a mys­tery, the FBI said Tues­day as it con­clud­ed the inves­ti­ga­tion of the 2017 mas­sacre that killed 58 coun­try music fans.

    While the agency found no “sin­gle or clear moti­vat­ing fac­tor” to explain to explain why Stephen Pad­dock opened fire from his suite in a high-rise casi­no hotel, Pad­dock may have been seek­ing to fol­low in his father’s crim­i­nal foot­steps, the FBI said.

    “It wasn’t about MGM, Man­dalay Bay or a spe­cif­ic casi­no or venue,” Aaron Rouse, the agent in charge of the FBI’s Las Vegas office, told The Asso­ci­at­ed Press. “It was all about doing the max­i­mum amount of dam­age and him obtain­ing some form of infamy.”

    Paddock’s phys­i­cal and men­tal health was declin­ing. The 64-year-old’s wealth had dimin­ished, and he strug­gled with aging, fed­er­al agents said. The find­ings were con­tained in a long-await­ed report com­piled by the FBI’s Behav­ior Analy­sis Unit, a group of experts who spent months exam­in­ing sev­er­al fac­tors that might have led to the ram­page.

    “This report comes as close to under­stand­ing the why as we’re ever going to get,” Rouse said.

    Pad­dock, who act­ed alone, fatal­ly shot him­self as police closed in. Almost 900 peo­ple were hurt dur­ing the Oct. 1, 2017, attack on an out­door con­cert.

    The gun­man was inspired in part by his father’s rep­u­ta­tion as a bank rob­ber who was once on the FBI’s most want­ed list, the report said. In many ways, he was sim­i­lar to oth­er active shoot­ers the FBI has stud­ied — moti­vat­ed by a com­plex merg­ing of devel­op­ment issues, stress and inter­per­son­al rela­tion­ships.

    His “deci­sion to mur­der peo­ple while they were being enter­tained was con­sis­tent with his per­son­al­i­ty,” the report said.

    The gun­man was not direct­ed or inspired by any group and was not seek­ing to fur­ther any agen­da. He did not leave a man­i­festo or sui­cide note, and fed­er­al agents believe he had planned to fatal­ly shoot him­self after the attack, accord­ing to the report.

    Kim­ber­ly King, who along with her hus­band was hurt at the con­cert, said Pad­dock was “just a sick per­son.” She doesn’t care why he car­ried out the attack.

    “How did he get the chance to do it? That’s what upsets me the most,” the Las Vegas woman said. “How could this have hap­pened and how could we have let this hap­pen?”

    Pad­dock was a retired postal ser­vice work­er, accoun­tant and real estate investor who owned rental prop­er­ties and homes in Reno and in a retire­ment com­mu­ni­ty more than an hour’s dri­ve from Las Vegas. He also held a pri­vate pilot’s license and liked to gam­ble tens of thou­sands of dol­lars at a time play­ing video pok­er.

    His younger broth­er, Eric Pad­dock, called him the “king of micro-aggres­sion” — nar­cis­sis­tic, detail-ori­ent­ed and maybe bored enough with life to plan an attack that would make him famous. His ex-wife told inves­ti­ga­tors that he grew up with a sin­gle mom in a finan­cial­ly unsta­ble home and he felt a need to be self-reliant.

    Police char­ac­ter­ized him as a lon­er with no reli­gious or polit­i­cal affil­i­a­tions who began stock­pil­ing weapons about a year before the attack. He spent more than $1.5 mil­lion in the two years before the shoot­ing and dis­tanced him­self from his girl­friend and fam­i­ly.

    He sent his girl­friend, Mar­ilou Dan­ley, to vis­it her fam­i­ly in the Philip­pines two weeks before the attack and wired her $150,000 while she was there. Dan­ley, a for­mer casi­no work­er in Reno, returned to the U.S. after the shoot­ing and told author­i­ties that Pad­dock had com­plained that he was sick and that doc­tors told him he had a “chem­i­cal imbal­ance” and could not cure him.

    Dan­ley, who is Catholic, told inves­ti­ga­tors that Pad­dock often told her, “Your God doesn’t love me.”

    A Reno car sales­man told police that in the months before the shoot­ing Pad­dock told him he was depressed and had rela­tion­ship trou­bles. Paddock’s doc­tor offered him anti­de­pres­sants, but told inves­ti­ga­tors that Pad­dock would only accept a pre­scrip­tion for anx­i­ety med­ica­tion.

    Paddock’s gam­bling habits made him a sought-after casi­no patron. Man­dalay Bay employ­ees read­i­ly let him use a ser­vice ele­va­tor to take mul­ti­ple suit­cas­es to the $590-per-night suite he had been pro­vid­ed for free. Author­i­ties said he asked for the room, which had a com­mand­ing view of the Strip and the Route 91 Har­vest Fes­ti­val con­cert grounds across the street.

    The night of the mas­sacre, Pad­dock used assault-style rifles to fire more than 1,000 rounds in 11 min­utes into the crowd of 22,000 music fans. Most of the rifles were fit­ted with rapid-fire “bump stock” devices and high-capac­i­ty mag­a­zines. Some had bipod braces and scopes. Author­i­ties said Paddock’s guns had been legal­ly pur­chased.

    Las Vegas police closed their inves­ti­ga­tion last August, and Clark Coun­ty Sher­iff Joe Lom­bar­do declared the police work com­plete after hun­dreds of inter­views and thou­sands of hours of inves­tiga­tive work. Lom­bar­do vowed nev­er to speak Paddock’s name again in pub­lic. A Las Vegas police spokesman declined to com­ment on the FBI’s report.

    A sep­a­rate report made pub­lic in August involv­ing the Fed­er­al Emer­gency Man­age­ment Agency found that com­mu­ni­ca­tions were snarled dur­ing and after the shoot­ing. It said police, fire and med­ical respon­ders were over­whelmed by 911 calls, false reports of oth­er shoot­ings at Las Vegas casi­nos and the num­ber of vic­tims.

    ...

    He left behind noth­ing that offered an expla­na­tion.

    “He act­ed alone. He com­mit­ted a heinous act. He died by his own hand,” Rouse said. “If he want­ed to leave a mes­sage, he would have left a mes­sage. Bot­tom line is he didn’t want peo­ple to know.”

    ———

    “FBI finds no spe­cif­ic motive in Vegas attack that killed 58” by KEN RITTER and MICHAEL BALSAMO; Asso­ci­at­ed Press; 1/29/2019

    The gun­man was not direct­ed or inspired by any group and was not seek­ing to fur­ther any agen­da.” He did not leave a man­i­festo or sui­cide note, and fed­er­al agents believe he had planned to fatal­ly shoot him­self after the attack, accord­ing to the report.

    Pad­dock was­n’t direct­ed or inspired by any group and was­n’t seek­ing to fur­ther any agen­da. Those were the final find­ings of the FBI, which appears to com­plete­ly ignore the wit­ness­es accounts that point towards a heav­i­ly rad­i­cal­ized and deeply polit­i­cal indi­vid­ual who want­ed to “wake up” Amer­i­ca about the threat of gov­ern­ment gun seizures.

    The Las Vegas police also con­clud­ed that Pad­dock was a lon­er with no reli­gious or polit­i­cal affil­i­a­tions:

    ...
    Police char­ac­ter­ized him as a lon­er with no reli­gious or polit­i­cal affil­i­a­tions who began stock­pil­ing weapons about a year before the attack. He spent more than $1.5 mil­lion in the two years before the shoot­ing and dis­tanced him­self from his girl­friend and fam­i­ly.
    ...

    So we’ll see what, if any, addi­tion­al infor­ma­tion is even­tu­al­ly dis­cov­ered about Pad­dock, his pol­i­tics, and motive behind the attack. It’s hard to imag­ine that the FBI’s final report is real­ly going to be the final exam­i­na­tion of this case, espe­cial­ly giv­en the “we have no idea” nature of their con­clu­sions. But for now, for what­ev­er rea­son, Pad­dock­’s rad­i­cal­ized polit­i­cal beliefs appear to be such a sen­si­tive sub­ject by inves­ti­ga­tors that they’re act­ing like he did­n’t have any.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | January 30, 2019, 2:42 pm
  3. Oh look, anoth­er Amer­i­can neo-Nazi domes­tic ter­ror­ist: a lieu­tenant in the US Coast Guard, Christophe Has­son, was arrest­ed for plot­ting to a mass ter­ror cam­paign mod­eled after Anders Breivik’s man­i­festo, with the idea of spark­ing a domes­tic con­flict for the pur­pose of cre­at­ing a white home­land. In addi­tion to find­ing a stock­pile of guns, Has­son appeared to have an inter­est in bio­log­i­cal weapons and tar­get­ing the US food sup­ply. In a 2017 let­ter, Has­son wrote, “I think a plague would be most suc­cess­ful but how do I acquire the needed/Spanish flu, bot­u­lism, anthrax not sure yet but will find some­thing.” He also said in the let­ter that he would start with the bio­log­i­cal attacks tar­get­ing the food sup­ply and then would begin a “bombing/sniper cam­paign.”

    There’s a par­al­lel with the bizarre case of Cesar Say­oc, the Trump super-fan who mailed fake pipe-bombs to a Demo­c­ra­t­ic politi­cians and media per­son­al­i­ties: In addi­tion to being a big Trump fan, Has­son had a long assas­si­na­tion tar­get list of a num­ber of Demo­c­ra­t­ic politi­cians and left-lean­ing cable news per­son­al­i­ties like Chris Hayes and Don Lemon. His web search his­to­ry indi­cates that he’s done a num­ber of search­es about the kind of phys­i­cal pro­tec­tion these indi­vid­u­als have and their home address­es. So the guy was very inter­est­ed in caus­ing both mass casu­al­ties but also tar­get­ed killings. The par­tic­u­lar hit list inves­ti­ga­tors found was appar­ent­ly cre­at­ed on Jan­u­ary 19th of this year.

    There’s also a big par­al­lel with what appears to have been Stephen Pad­dock­’s motive for the Las Vegas mas­sacre: com­mit­ting a hor­rif­ic crime for the pur­pose of trig­ger­ing a gov­ern­ment crack­down that will fuel a ‘white back­lash’ and hope­ful­ly trig­ger a civ­il war. Recall how Pad­dock was over­heard by mul­ti­ple wit­ness­es short­ly before the Vegas attack using sov­er­eign cit­i­zen ter­mi­nol­o­gy, rant­i­ng about ‘FEMA camps’, and say­ing things like “Some­body has to wake up the Amer­i­can pub­lic and get them to arm themselves...Sometimes sac­ri­fices have to be made.” In the case of Has­son, he wrote that the “liberalist/globalist ide­ol­o­gy is destroy­ing tra­di­tion­al peo­ples (espe­cial­ly) white,” amd, “No way to coun­ter­act with­out vio­lence. It should push for more crack down bring­ing more peo­ple to our side. Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch. For some no amount of blood will be enough. They will die as will the trai­tors who active­ly work toward our demise. Look­ing to Rus­sia with hope­ful eyes or any land that despis­es the west’s lib­er­al­ism. Exclud­ing, of course, the Mus­lim scum. Who right­ful­ly despite the west’s lib­er­al degen­er­a­cy.”

    Has­son wrote about his plans to increase the planned unrest by tar­get­ing both law enforce­ment and pro­tes­tors: “Dur­ing unrest tar­get both sides to increase ten­sion...In oth­er words pro­voke gov/police to over react which should help to esca­late vio­lence. BLM protests or oth­er left crap would be ide­al to incite to vio­lence.” He also wrote, “Food/fuel may be the key, if I can dis­rupt two or three weeks. When (peo­ple) start to loot steal protest dress as cop and shoot them. Burn down Apt com­plex, bar the doors first. Ther­mite on gas sta­tion tank.

    It’s also note­wor­thy that Has­son wrote a let­ter in Sep­tem­ber of 2017 to some­one described as a “known Amer­i­can neo-Nazi leader” where he express­es his desires to do some­thing to spark the fight for a white home­land. The let­ter was appar­ent­ly sent sev­en weeks after the Char­lottesville “Unite the Right” neo-Nazi march. The Vegas shoot­ing was on Octo­ber 1, 2017, which is right around sev­en weeks after Char­lottesville. So right around the same time Pad­dock com­mits the Vegas mas­sacre, Has­son is writ­ing to an Amer­i­can neo-Nazi leader about his desires to more or less do the same thing, but on an even larg­er scale.

    So Has­son was explic­it­ly plan­ning on doing some­thing that would bring a “crack down” of some sort that would bring “more peo­ple to our side” because “Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch.” And he had a long list of left-wing assas­si­na­tion tar­gets and want­ed to become the Amer­i­can Anders Breivik. So it sounds like, once again, we have an Amer­i­can neo-Nazi domes­tic ter­ror plot designed to cat­alyze a “crack down” (like­ly gun con­trol leg­is­la­tion) that will “get whitey off the couch”. But in this case, the ‘get­ting whitey off the couch’ plans involve biowar­fare:

    Heavy.com

    Christo­pher Has­son: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

    By Tom Cleary
    Updat­ed Feb 20, 2019 at 7:01pm

    A 49-year-old active duty U.S. Coast Guard lieu­tenant arrest­ed on gun and drug charges has been accused by fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors of being a “domes­tic ter­ror­ist, bent on com­mit­ting acts dan­ger­ous to human life that are intend­ed to affect gov­ern­men­tal con­duct.” In a court fil­ing, pros­e­cu­tors showed the lieu­tenant was inspired by far-right Nor­we­gian ter­ror­ist Anders Breivik has cor­re­spond­ed with known white suprema­cists and iden­ti­fied him­self as a “white nation­al­ist” who has advo­cat­ed for “focused vio­lence” in order to estab­lish a “white home­land.”

    Christo­pher Has­son, of Sil­ver Spring, Mary­land, was charged with pos­ses­sion of firearms and ammu­ni­tion by an unlaw­ful user or addict of con­trolled sub­stances, and with pos­ses­sion of tra­madol, but pros­e­cu­tors in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Dis­trict of Mary­land called those alleged offens­es the “prover­bial tip of the ice­berg.”

    In a chill­ing court doc­u­ment, fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors explain how Has­son appeared to be research­ing the Nor­we­gian ter­ror­ist, study­ing the mass killer’s man­i­festo and gath­er­ing weapons, ammu­ni­tion and oth­er sup­plies with the inten­tion of car­ry­ing out a sim­i­lar attack in the Unit­ed States in an effort to become the Amer­i­can Anders Breivik. The Nor­we­gian killed 77 peo­ple in his 2011 attack. Pros­e­cu­tors did not reveal if Has­son had a spe­cif­ic date in mind for an attack and also didn’t say how he was dis­cov­ered.

    Pros­e­cu­tors said in court doc­u­ments that Has­son stock­piled weapons and was plan­ning a domes­tic ter­ror attack tar­get­ing Demo­c­ra­t­ic politi­cians and jour­nal­ists. He wrote in a let­ter to a Neo-Nazi leader that he had been dream­ing of ways to “kill almost every last per­son on earth,” pros­e­cu­tors said. Assis­tant U.S. Attor­ney Thomas Wis­dom wrote, “the defen­dant intends to mur­der inno­cent civil­ians on a scale rarely seen in this coun­try.”

    The case was first uncov­ered by Sea­mus Hugh­es, a for­mer Sen­ate coun­tert­er­ror­ism advi­sor who now works with the George Wash­ing­ton Uni­ver­si­ty Pro­gram on Extrem­ism, which pro­vides “analy­sis and pol­i­cy solu­tions on rad­i­cal­iza­tion, ter­ror­ism and extrem­ism.” You can learn more about the GWUPoE and Hugh­es’ work here.. Hugh­es, the program’s deputy direc­tor, has revealed details on sev­er­al cas­es involv­ing Amer­i­can extrem­ism and ter­ror­ism cas­es, often find­ing the infor­ma­tion in fed­er­al court doc­u­ments before the media.

    Has­son remains in fed­er­al cus­tody and has been held on a tem­po­rary deten­tion order since his arrest on Feb­ru­ary 15. The explo­sive details found by Hugh­es and the Pro­gram on Extrem­ism were detailed in a motion by fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors for ask­ing the judge to con­tin­ue Hasson’s deten­tion pri­or to tri­al.

    U.S. Attor­ney for the Dis­trict of Mary­land Robert Hur and his office have declined fur­ther com­ment on the case beyond con­firm­ing Hasson’s arrest. The FBI has also not com­ment­ed fur­ther. It is not clear if Has­son has hired an attor­ney who could speak on his behalf and his wife and oth­er fam­i­ly mem­bers did not imme­di­ate­ly return requests for com­ment from Heavy.

    Has­son is a sup­port­er of Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump and wrote that “liberalist/globalist ide­ol­o­gy is destroy­ing tra­di­tion­al peo­ples (espe­cial­ly) white,” accord­ing to pros­e­cu­tors. Has­son added, “No way to coun­ter­act with­out vio­lence. It should push for more crack down bring­ing more peo­ple to our side. Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch. For some no amount of blood will be enough. They will die as will the trai­tors who active­ly work toward our demise. Look­ing to Rus­sia with hope­ful eyes or any land that despis­es the west’s lib­er­al­ism. Exclud­ing, of course, the Mus­lim scum. Who right­ful­ly despite the west’s lib­er­al degen­er­a­cy.”

    Pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son had also “con­duct­ed online search­es” for “pro-Russ­ian, neo-fas­cist and neo-Nazi lit­er­a­ture,” and made “thou­sands of vis­its,” to sites with that infor­ma­tion.

    Here’s what you need to know about Lt. Christo­pher Has­son:

    1. Has­son Has Worked at the Coast Guard Head­quar­ters in D.C. Since 2016 & Served in the Marines From 1988 to 1993

    Lieu­tenant Christo­pher Paul Has­son has been sta­tioned at the U.S. Coast Guard Head­quar­ters in Wash­ing­ton D.C. since 2016, accord­ing to court doc­u­ments. He was pro­mot­ed to lieu­tenant in June 2016, records show. He was com­mis­sioned into the Coast Guard on June 1, 2012.

    Accord­ing to court doc­u­ments, Has­son worked in “Nation­al Secu­ri­ty Cut­ter Acqui­si­tion.”

    Fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1988 to 1993 and was in the Army Nation­al Guard for two years in the mid-1990s.

    Pros­e­cu­tors have not said what led to the inves­ti­ga­tion into Has­son on the drug and gun charges.

    Has­son is mar­ried and has chil­dren, includ­ing a son who also served in the Marine Corps, accord­ing to social media pro­files. He has pre­vi­ous­ly lived in Cal­i­for­nia, Vir­ginia, South Car­oli­na, Neva­da, Ari­zona, North Car­oli­na, New Jer­sey and has been in Sil­ver Spring, Mary­land, since 2017.

    A crim­i­nal com­plaint was filed against Has­son on Feb­ru­ary 14, 2019, along with an affi­davit from FBI Spe­cial Agent Alexan­dria Thoman. The case was sealed until Hasson’s arrest on Feb­ru­ary 15.

    Thoman obtained emails in which Has­son wrote about own­ing and try­ing to buy guns, along with talk­ing about going to gun ranges and shoot­ing clubs in Mary­land and Vir­ginia, includ­ing the “NRA Range” at the Nation­al Rifle Asso­ci­a­tion head­quar­ters in Vir­ginia. He bought guns at the NRA range, accord­ing to court doc­u­ments.

    Thoman wrote in her affi­davit that Has­son had been buy­ing Tra­madol, a pre­scrip­tion painkiller, from an uniden­ti­fied per­son like­ly locat­ed in Mex­i­co, since Octo­ber 2016. The drugs were being sent from loca­tions in Cal­i­for­nia to address­es in Mary­land and North Car­oli­na, includ­ing Hasson’s home.

    “Oth­er evi­dence sug­gests that Has­son is a user, rather than a dis­trib­u­tor, of the Tra­madol her pur­chas­es,” Thoman wrote.

    You can read the full crim­i­nal com­plaint below or or here:
    [see crim­i­nal com­plaint]

    2. Pros­e­cu­tors Say Has­son Wrote in a Let­ter, ‘Send Me Your Vio­lence So I May Unleash It Onto Their Heads … Guide My Hate to Make a Last­ing Impres­sion on the World’

    LT. Christo­pher Has­son wrote a draft let­ter to a well known Amer­i­can neo nazi advo­cat­ing for a white state. pic.twitter.com/WhUlcnBFJQ

    — Sea­mus Hugh­es (@SeamusHughes) Feb­ru­ary 20, 2019

    Pros­e­cu­tors said in court doc­u­ments that Has­son appeared to have been study­ing the 1,500-page man­i­festo writ­ten by Anders Behring Breivik pri­or to his attacks in Nor­way. Breivik killed eight peo­ple in a bomb­ing in Oslo before fatal­ly shoot­ing 69 peo­ple on the island of Utoya.

    Breivik had embraced “cru­sad­er nation­al­ism,” which he believed would coun­ter­act the “Islamiza­tion” of Europe, and believed Europe was being destroyed by “cul­tur­al Marx­ism and polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness,” accord­ing to pros­e­cu­tors. Pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son was fol­low­ing Breivik’s manifesto’s instruc­tions to amass firearms, food, dis­guis­es and sur­vival sup­plies.

    He had also searched in recent weeks for, “what if Trump ille­gal­ly impeached,” “best place in DC to see con­gress peo­ple,” “where in dc to [sic] con­gress live,” “civ­il war if trump impeached,” and “social democ­rats usa.”

    In Sep­tem­ber 2017, he wrote a let­ter direct­ed to a “known Amer­i­can neo-Nazi leader,” pros­e­cu­tors said. He iden­ti­fied him­self as a white nation­al­ist for more than 30 years. The let­ter was sent sev­en weeks after the Char­lottesville ral­ly:

    In the let­ter, he said he has “been a skin­head,” before his time in the mil­i­tary. He wrote, that he ful­ly sup­ports a “white home­land.”

    “I nev­er saw a rea­son for mass protest or wear­ing uni­forms march­ing around pro­vok­ing peo­ple with swastikas etc.,” Has­son wrote. “I was and am a man of action you can­not change minds protest­ing like that. How­ev­er you can make change with a lit­tle focused vio­lence.”

    You can read the full let­ter below:

    I am writ­ing you regards to your ideas behind North West migra­tion. To date I have read most of your books and briefly looked at your web­site. I am a long time White Nation­al­ist, hav­ing been a skin­head 30 plus years ago before my time in the mil­i­tary. I have served in 3 branch­es cur­rent­ly serv­ing as an Offi­cer (nev­er attend­ed col­lege) with 2 years till I hit manda­to­ry retire­ment at 30. . . While I ful­ly sup­port the idea of a white home­land, my friends who still play at being a skin­head at 40 plus years old say that you are an infor­mant. That is nei­ther here nor there it is not an accu­sa­tion the per­son who told me this served a 12 year prison sen­tence and nev­er rat­ted me out so I will not dis­pute him nor will I accuse you. I nev­er saw a rea­son for mass protest or wear­ing uni­forms march­ing around pro­vok­ing peo­ple with swastikas etc. I was and am a man of action you can­not change minds protest­ing like that. How­ev­er you can make change with a lit­tle focused vio­lence. . . The gov­ern­ment has expert­ly infil­trat­ed and destroyed from with­in most if not all Pro White orga­ni­za­tions. . . . We need a white home­land as Europe seems lost. How long we can hold out there and pre­vent nig­ger­iza­tion of the North­west until whites wake up on their own or are forcibly made to make a deci­sion whether to roll over and die or to stand up remains to be seen. But I know a few younger ones that are tired of wait­ing and I feel we need them to reset­tle and build a com­mu­ni­ty before they throw their life away with some des­per­ate mea­sure like shoot­ing up a mosque in an area that doesn’t want us. They need a Home­land to fight for as Amer­i­ca has turned its back on them. I know more than a few that went this path and it’s a f*cking waste.

    In a let­ter writ­ten in 2017 recov­ered from his email drafts, Has­son wrote, “Please send me your vio­lence that I may unleash it onto their heads … Guide my hate to make a last­ing impres­sion on this world.”

    It is not clear who the let­ter was meant to be sent to. It was addressed,” dear friends, maybe that’s a bit of a mis­nomer. Acquain­tances more like­ly.”

    In court doc­u­ments, pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son wrote in the 2017 let­ter that he was think­ing about bio­log­i­cal attacks and tar­get­ing food sup­plies.

    He wrote, “I think a plague would be most suc­cess­ful but how do I acquire the needed/Spanish flu, bot­u­lism, anthrax not sure yet but will find some­thing.”

    He said he would start with the bio­log­i­cal attacks tar­get­ing the food sup­ply and then would begin a “bombing/sniper cam­paign.”

    Has­son wrote, “What can I do, I will not do nothing…It seems inevitable that we are doomed. I don’t think I can cause com­plete destruc­tion on my own, how­ev­er if I could enlist the unwit­ting help of anoth­er power/country would be best. Who and how to pro­voke???”

    He also list­ed things he want­ed to accom­plish in the next four years, includ­ing, get­ting out of debt, buy­ing a van to con­vert it to diesel, buy land for fam­i­ly out west or in the North Car­oli­na moun­tains.”

    “Dur­ing unrest tar­get both sides to increase ten­sion,” he wrote. “In oth­er words pro­voke gov/police to over react which should help to esca­late vio­lence. BLM protests or oth­er left crap would be ide­al to incite to vio­lence.”

    You can read the motion for a deten­tion order below:
    [see motion for deten­tion]

    3. Has­son Had a List of Tar­gets Includ­ing Demo­c­ra­t­ic Con­gres­sion­al Lead­ers & Media Per­son­al­i­ties & Searched for the ‘Best Place in DC to See Con­gress Peo­ple’ & Are Supreme Court Jus­tices Pro­tect­ed’

    Christo­pher Has­son had a list of poten­tial tar­gets that was sim­i­lar to Anders Breivik’s list of trai­tors. The spread­sheet found by fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors includ­ed sev­er­al promi­nent Demo­c­ra­t­ic mem­bers of Con­gress and media per­son­al­i­ties.

    Pros­e­cu­tors said he built the list while “review­ing the MSNBC, CNN and Fox News web­sites,” as well as oth­er web­sites, on his work com­put­er. It was cre­at­ed on Jan­u­ary 19.

    The list includ­ed:

    -“Joey,” who pros­e­cu­tors said is believed to be MSNBC’s Joe Scar­bor­ough

    – MSNBC’s Chris Hayes

    – “pelosi,” pre­sum­ably House Speak­er Nan­cy Pelosi

    – “Sen Blu­men Jew,” who pros­e­cu­tors believe to be U.S. Sen­a­tor Richard Blu­men­thal of Con­necti­cut.

    – “Sen kaine,” believed to be U.S. Sen­a­tor Tim Kaine of Vir­ginia

    – “Shumer,” pre­sumed to be U.S. Sen­a­tor Chuck Schumer of New York

    – CNN’s Don Lemon

    – “gilli­bran,” pre­sum­ably U.S. Sen­a­tor Kirsten Gilli­brand

    – “poca war­ren,” pre­sum­ably U.S. Sen­a­tor Eliz­a­beth War­ren of Mass­a­chu­setts

    – “cortez,” believed to be Rep. Alexan­dria Oca­sio-Cortez of New York

    – “book­er,” believed to be U.S. Sen­a­tor Cory Book­er of New Jer­sey

    – For­mer U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, of Texas

    – U.S. Rep. Max­ine Waters, of Cal­i­for­nia

    – U.S. Rep. Sheila Jack­son, of Texas

    – “iihan omar,” pre­sumed to be U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar, of Min­neso­ta

    – CNN’s Chris Cuo­mo

    – Demo­c­ra­t­ic Social­ists of Amer­i­ca

    – CNN’s Van Jones

    – “podes­ta,” pre­sumed to be for­mer Hillary Clin­ton cam­paign chair­man John Podes­ta

    Accord­ing to pros­e­cu­tors, the list is “con­sis­tent with the direc­tions in the Breivik man­i­festo,” which divid­ed tar­gets into cat­e­gories A, B or C:

    This clas­si­fi­ca­tion sys­tem is used to iden­ti­fy var­i­ous indi­vid­ual cul­tur­al Marxist/multiculturalist trai­tors. The inten­tion of the sys­tem is to eas­i­er iden­ti­fy pri­or­i­ty tar­gets and will also serve as the foun­da­tion for the future ‘Nurem­berg tri­als’ once the Euro­pean cul­tur­al con­ser­v­a­tives reassert polit­i­cal and mil­i­tary con­trol of any giv­en coun­try. Any cat­e­go­ry A, B or C trai­tor is an indi­vid­ual who has delib­er­ate­ly used his or her influ­ence in a way which makes him or her indi­rect­ly or direct­ly guilty of the charges spec­i­fied in this doc­u­ment: 1–8. Many of these indi­vid­u­als will attempt to claim ‘igno­rance’ of the crimes they are accused of

    Accord­ing to Breivik’s sys­tem, cat­e­go­ry A was the “most influ­en­tial and high pro­file trai­tors,” includ­ing polit­i­cal lead­ers, media lead­ers and cul­tur­al lead­ers.

    Has­son had searched for “most lib­er­al sen­a­tors,” “do sen­a­tors have [secret ser­vice] pro­tec­tion,” and searched for Scar­bor­ough after see­ing a head­line in which the MSNBC host claimed Trump to be “the worst ever” pres­i­dent. He also looked up where the host’s show, “Morn­ing Joe,” is filmed, along with his home, pros­e­cu­tors said.

    Has­son made many anti-Semit­ic remarks in emails obtained by the FBI, includ­ing writ­ing, “I don’t know if there tru­ly is a ‘con­spir­a­cy’ of ((((Peo­ple)))) out to destroy me and mine, but there is an attack none the less. For that rea­son I will strike, I can’t just strike to wound I must find a way to deliv­er a blow that can­not be shak­en off. Maybe many blows that will cause the need­ed tur­moil.”

    The “(((Peo­ple)))” is a cod­ed ref­er­ence to Jew­ish peo­ple.

    4. Police Seized 15 Firearms, Includ­ing Long Guns & Rifles, From Hasson’s Home Along With More Than 1,000 Rounds of Ammu­ni­tion, Nar­cotics & What Appeared to Be Human Growth Hor­mones

    Accord­ing to court doc­u­ments, inves­ti­ga­tors seized 15 firearms, includ­ing long guns and rifles, from Christo­pher Hasson’s home in Sil­ver Spring, Mary­land. They also seized more than 1,000 rounds of ammu­ni­tion. And pros­e­cu­tors said he made near­ly two dozen pur­chas­es of firearms or relat­ed equip­ment over the last two years.

    Police also seized nar­cotics, includ­ing the pre­scrip­tion painkiller Tra­madol, along with what appeared to be vials of human growth hor­mones and syn­thet­ic urine that can be used to bypass ran­dom drug screen­ings, accord­ing to court doc­u­ments.

    The FBI affi­davit states that Has­son made two pur­chas­es from “Alter­na­tive Lifestyle” in 2018 for “Gold­en Flask Syn­thet­ic Urine,” and “The Clean Kit,” which inves­ti­ga­tors said are used to avoid a pos­i­tive uri­nal­y­sis test. The FBI said Has­son would be sub­ject to ran­dom tests as part of his job. He had one such test in Jan­u­ary 2018 and test­ed neg­a­tive for drugs.

    Accord­ing to court doc­u­ments, Tra­madol pills were also found at Hasson’s desk at the Coast Guard head­quar­ters in D.C., hid­den inside a bot­tle labeled “Fish Flox.”

    He wrote about drug use in a let­ter uncov­ered by inves­ti­ga­tors, say­ing he need­ed to “come off TDL [Tra­madol], clear my head.” He said he want­ed to “move to friend­ly area and start to orga­nize. Get lead­er­ship with­in the com­mu­ni­ty, sher­iff, city man­ag­er, may­or, lawyer? Not sure but start now. Be ready.”

    Accord­ing to pros­e­cu­tors, Anders Breivik used nar­cotics and steroids pri­or to his 2011 attack because he believed it height­ened his abil­i­ties. On Jan­u­ary 3, 2019, Has­son searched Breivik’s man­i­festo for “steroids,” and read his diary entry on the top­ic, pros­e­cu­tors said.

    Has­son encour­aged recip­i­ents of his let­ter to “stock­pile” in five loca­tions, pack­ing food, guns, cloth­ing, gear,” while learn­ing basic chem­istry. “[Buy] land put 3 home sand mul­ti­ple hides. Have way to get out and start hit­ting back.”

    He also cit­ed Eric Rudolph, the Olympic Park Bomber, as an inspi­ra­tion.

    He wrote, “Food/fuel may be the key, if I can dis­rupt two or three weeks. When (peo­ple) start to loot steal protest dress as cop and shoot them. Burn down Apt com­plex, bar the doors first. Ther­mite on gas sta­tion tank.”

    5. Has­son Is Sched­uled for a Deten­tion Hear­ing in Fed­er­al Court on Thurs­day

    Lieu­tenant Christo­pher Has­son is sched­uled to appear in court on Thurs­day, Feb­ru­ary 21, accord­ing to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. His hear­ing is sched­uled for 1 p.m. in the U.S. Dis­trict Court in Mary­land before U.S. Mag­is­trate Judge Charles B. Day.

    ...

    ———–

    “Christo­pher Has­son: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know” by Tom Cleary; Heavy.com; 02/20/2019

    In a chill­ing court doc­u­ment, fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors explain how Has­son appeared to be research­ing the Nor­we­gian ter­ror­ist, study­ing the mass killer’s man­i­festo and gath­er­ing weapons, ammu­ni­tion and oth­er sup­plies with the inten­tion of car­ry­ing out a sim­i­lar attack in the Unit­ed States in an effort to become the Amer­i­can Anders Breivik. The Nor­we­gian killed 77 peo­ple in his 2011 attack. Pros­e­cu­tors did not reveal if Has­son had a spe­cif­ic date in mind for an attack and also didn’t say how he was dis­cov­ered.”

    An aspir­ing Amer­i­can Anders Breivik. That appears to be the pri­ma­ry tem­plate Christo­pher Has­son was work­ing off of in his plans to “kill almost every last per­son on earth.” And cen­tral to his strat­e­gy is to com­mit a ter­ror cam­paign that will pro­voke a gov­ern­ment response which will “get whitey off the couch” and spark the kind of civ­il war that can exploit­ed by the neo-Nazis to cre­ate a new ‘white home­land’. It also sounds quite a bit like Stephen Pad­dock­’s motive:

    ...
    Pros­e­cu­tors said in court doc­u­ments that Has­son stock­piled weapons and was plan­ning a domes­tic ter­ror attack tar­get­ing Demo­c­ra­t­ic politi­cians and jour­nal­ists. He wrote in a let­ter to a Neo-Nazi leader that he had been dream­ing of ways to “kill almost every last per­son on earth,” pros­e­cu­tors said. Assis­tant U.S. Attor­ney Thomas Wis­dom wrote, “the defen­dant intends to mur­der inno­cent civil­ians on a scale rarely seen in this coun­try.”

    ...

    Has­son is a sup­port­er of Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump and wrote that “liberalist/globalist ide­ol­o­gy is destroy­ing tra­di­tion­al peo­ples (espe­cial­ly) white,” accord­ing to pros­e­cu­tors. Has­son added, “No way to coun­ter­act with­out vio­lence. It should push for more crack down bring­ing more peo­ple to our side. Much blood will have to be spilled to get whitey off the couch. For some no amount of blood will be enough. They will die as will the trai­tors who active­ly work toward our demise. Look­ing to Rus­sia with hope­ful eyes or any land that despis­es the west’s lib­er­al­ism. Exclud­ing, of course, the Mus­lim scum. Who right­ful­ly despite the west’s lib­er­al degen­er­a­cy.”

    Pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son had also “con­duct­ed online search­es” for “pro-Russ­ian, neo-fas­cist and neo-Nazi lit­er­a­ture,” and made “thou­sands of vis­its,” to sites with that infor­ma­tion.

    ...

    Pros­e­cu­tors said in court doc­u­ments that Has­son appeared to have been study­ing the 1,500-page man­i­festo writ­ten by Anders Behring Breivik pri­or to his attacks in Nor­way. Breivik killed eight peo­ple in a bomb­ing in Oslo before fatal­ly shoot­ing 69 peo­ple on the island of Utoya.

    Breivik had embraced “cru­sad­er nation­al­ism,” which he believed would coun­ter­act the “Islamiza­tion” of Europe, and believed Europe was being destroyed by “cul­tur­al Marx­ism and polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness,” accord­ing to pros­e­cu­tors. Pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son was fol­low­ing Breivik’s manifesto’s instruc­tions to amass firearms, food, dis­guis­es and sur­vival sup­plies.

    He had also searched in recent weeks for, “what if Trump ille­gal­ly impeached,” “best place in DC to see con­gress peo­ple,” “where in dc to [sic] con­gress live,” “civ­il war if trump impeached,” and “social democ­rats usa.”
    ...

    Inter­est­ing­ly, it was in Sep­tem­ber 2017, sev­en weeks after the Char­lottesville ral­ly (so right before the Stephen Pad­dock Vegas mas­sacre of Octo­ber 1, 2017), Has­son sends a let­ter to an Amer­i­can neo-Nazi leader explain­ing how he was a skin­head before join­ing the mil­i­tary and his desire to use “focused vio­lence” to “change minds” in the pur­suit of a white home­land:

    ...
    In Sep­tem­ber 2017, he wrote a let­ter direct­ed to a “known Amer­i­can neo-Nazi leader,” pros­e­cu­tors said. He iden­ti­fied him­self as a white nation­al­ist for more than 30 years. The let­ter was sent sev­en weeks after the Char­lottesville ral­ly:

    In the let­ter, he said he has “been a skin­head,” before his time in the mil­i­tary. He wrote, that he ful­ly sup­ports a “white home­land.”

    “I nev­er saw a rea­son for mass protest or wear­ing uni­forms march­ing around pro­vok­ing peo­ple with swastikas etc.,” Has­son wrote. “I was and am a man of action you can­not change minds protest­ing like that. How­ev­er you can make change with a lit­tle focused vio­lence.”
    ...

    He also wrote anoth­er let­ter in Sep­tem­ber 2017 to unknown recip­i­ents about his use bio­log­i­cal war­fare and tar­get the food sup­plies before start­ing a bombing/sniper cam­paign that would tar­get both law enforce­ment and pro­tes­tors for the pur­pose of incit­ing gen­er­al vio­lence:

    ...
    In court doc­u­ments, pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son wrote in the 2017 let­ter that he was think­ing about bio­log­i­cal attacks and tar­get­ing food sup­plies.

    He wrote, “I think a plague would be most suc­cess­ful but how do I acquire the needed/Spanish flu, bot­u­lism, anthrax not sure yet but will find some­thing.”

    He said he would start with the bio­log­i­cal attacks tar­get­ing the food sup­ply and then would begin a “bombing/sniper cam­paign.”

    Has­son wrote, “What can I do, I will not do nothing…It seems inevitable that we are doomed. I don’t think I can cause com­plete destruc­tion on my own, how­ev­er if I could enlist the unwit­ting help of anoth­er power/country would be best. Who and how to pro­voke???”

    He also list­ed things he want­ed to accom­plish in the next four years, includ­ing, get­ting out of debt, buy­ing a van to con­vert it to diesel, buy land for fam­i­ly out west or in the North Car­oli­na moun­tains.”

    “Dur­ing unrest tar­get both sides to increase ten­sion,” he wrote. “In oth­er words pro­voke gov/police to over react which should help to esca­late vio­lence. BLM protests or oth­er left crap would be ide­al to incite to vio­lence.”

    ...

    Has­son encour­aged recip­i­ents of his let­ter to “stock­pile” in five loca­tions, pack­ing food, guns, cloth­ing, gear,” while learn­ing basic chem­istry. “[Buy] land put 3 home sand mul­ti­ple hides. Have way to get out and start hit­ting back.”

    He also cit­ed Eric Rudolph, the Olympic Park Bomber, as an inspi­ra­tion.

    He wrote, “Food/fuel may be the key, if I can dis­rupt two or three weeks. When (peo­ple) start to loot steal protest dress as cop and shoot them. Burn down Apt com­plex, bar the doors first. Ther­mite on gas sta­tion tank.”
    ...

    Then there’s his long left-lean­ing assas­si­na­tion tar­get list. It was appar­ent­ly cre­at­ed on Jan­u­ary 19th, under­scor­ing that this plan was active­ly being worked on by Has­son very recent­ly:

    ...
    3. Has­son Had a List of Tar­gets Includ­ing Demo­c­ra­t­ic Con­gres­sion­al Lead­ers & Media Per­son­al­i­ties & Searched for the ‘Best Place in DC to See Con­gress Peo­ple’ & Are Supreme Court Jus­tices Pro­tect­ed’

    Christo­pher Has­son had a list of poten­tial tar­gets that was sim­i­lar to Anders Breivik’s list of trai­tors. The spread­sheet found by fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors includ­ed sev­er­al promi­nent Demo­c­ra­t­ic mem­bers of Con­gress and media per­son­al­i­ties.

    Pros­e­cu­tors said he built the list while “review­ing the MSNBC, CNN and Fox News web­sites,” as well as oth­er web­sites, on his work com­put­er. It was cre­at­ed on Jan­u­ary 19.

    ...

    Accord­ing to pros­e­cu­tors, the list is “con­sis­tent with the direc­tions in the Breivik man­i­festo,” which divid­ed tar­gets into cat­e­gories A, B or C:

    This clas­si­fi­ca­tion sys­tem is used to iden­ti­fy var­i­ous indi­vid­ual cul­tur­al Marxist/multiculturalist trai­tors. The inten­tion of the sys­tem is to eas­i­er iden­ti­fy pri­or­i­ty tar­gets and will also serve as the foun­da­tion for the future ‘Nurem­berg tri­als’ once the Euro­pean cul­tur­al con­ser­v­a­tives reassert polit­i­cal and mil­i­tary con­trol of any giv­en coun­try. Any cat­e­go­ry A, B or C trai­tor is an indi­vid­ual who has delib­er­ate­ly used his or her influ­ence in a way which makes hm or her indi­rect­ly or direct­ly guilty of the charges spec­i­fied in this doc­u­ment: 1–8. Many of these indi­vid­u­als will attempt to claim ‘igno­rance’ of the crimes they are accused of

    Accord­ing to Breivik’s sys­tem, cat­e­go­ry A was the “most influ­en­tial and high pro­file trai­tors,” includ­ing polit­i­cal lead­ers, media lead­ers and cul­tur­al lead­ers.

    Has­son had searched for “most lib­er­al sen­a­tors,” “do sen­a­tors have [secret ser­vice] pro­tec­tion,” and searched for Scar­bor­ough after see­ing a head­line in which the MSNBC host claimed Trump to be “the worst ever” pres­i­dent. He also looked up where the host’s show, “Morn­ing Joe,” is filmed, along with his home, pros­e­cu­tors said.
    ...

    And, of course, there’s the anti-Semi­tism:

    ...
    Has­son made many anti-Semit­ic remarks in emails obtained by the FBI, includ­ing writ­ing, “I don’t know if there tru­ly is a ‘con­spir­a­cy’ of ((((Peo­ple)))) out to destroy me and mine, but there is an attack none the less. For that rea­son I will strike, I can’t just strike to wound I must find a way to deliv­er a blow that can­not be shak­en off. Maybe many blows that will cause the need­ed tur­moil.”

    The “(((Peo­ple)))” is a cod­ed ref­er­ence to Jew­ish peo­ple.
    ...

    It’s also note­wor­thy that Has­son worked at the Coast Guard’s DC head­quar­ters since 2016. Before that he was in the Marines and Nation­al Guard. So despite being a skin­head before join­ing the mil­i­tary he man­aged to join three dif­fer­ent branch­es and end­ed up at the Coast Guard’s DC head­quar­ters. It high­lights how far up the chain of com­mand a mur­der­ous neo-Nazi can appar­ent­ly get with­out peo­ple notic­ing:

    ...
    1. Has­son Has Worked at the Coast Guard Head­quar­ters in D.C. Since 2016 & Served in the Marines From 1988 to 1993

    Lieu­tenant Christo­pher Paul Has­son has been sta­tioned at the U.S. Coast Guard Head­quar­ters in Wash­ing­ton D.C. since 2016, accord­ing to court doc­u­ments. He was pro­mot­ed to lieu­tenant in June 2016, records show. He was com­mis­sioned into the Coast Guard on June 1, 2012.

    Accord­ing to court doc­u­ments, Has­son worked in “Nation­al Secu­ri­ty Cut­ter Acqui­si­tion.”

    Fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors said Has­son served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1988 to 1993 and was in the Army Nation­al Guard for two years in the mid-1990s.
    ...

    So we’re see­ing shades of quite a few past neo-Nazi ter­ror­ist plots in Has­son’s scheme, which is no sur­prise giv­en that he appears to have been inspired by a num­ber of dif­fer­ent neo-Nazi ter­ror­ists. And the com­mon theme is a des­per­ate desire to strate­gi­cal­ly inflict vio­lence for the pur­pose of caus­ing more vio­lence and gen­er­al may­hem for the ulti­mate pur­pose of facil­i­tat­ing some sort of neo-Nazi rev­o­lu­tion and an even­tu­al ‘white home­land’. And for the goal of killing off almost every­one on earth. It’s a reminder that when you hear neo-Nazis express a desire for a ‘white home­land’, the home­land they invari­ably have in mind is the entire plan­et and it will be achieved by killing off vir­tu­al­ly every­one else.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | February 21, 2019, 3:26 pm
  4. In light of the recent­ly dis­cov­ered neo-Nazi plot by US coast guard lieu­tenant Christo­pher Has­son to car­ry out some sort of series of mass ter­ror attacks designed to kill as many peo­ple as pos­si­ble and inspired by the “lead­er­less resis­tance” mod­el and the fact that Stephen Pad­dock­’s attack on Las Vegas appears to have fol­low­ing the same “lead­er­less resis­tance” mod­el, here’s an arti­cle that reminds us that “lead­er­less resis­tance” is becom­ing increas­ing­ly pop­u­lar on the far right, which each new attack inspir­ing future attacks. Which is, of course, exact­ly how the strat­e­gy is sup­posed to work.

    And it also makes a point that’s going to have grim fas­ci­nat­ing polit­i­cal reper­cus­sions over the next cou­ple of years as the calls for impeach­ing Pres­i­dent Trump increase: the fact that the Trump admin­is­tra­tion is so friend­ly to the neo-Nazis actu­al­ly fuels this lead­er­less resis­tance strat­e­gy in two key ways. First, the overt sym­pa­thy the Trump admin­is­tra­tion has for the far right sends the sig­nal that the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment won’t be crack­ing down on the move­ments if they act. Sec­ond­ly, the neo-Nazis are sym­pa­thet­ic for Trump and so the per­se­cu­tion nar­ra­tive Trump has cre­at­ed for him­self where every­thing is a ‘witch hunt’ by the deep state out to get him can actu­al­ly fuel some of this neo-Nazi vio­lence, either because the neo-Nazis legit­i­mate­ly want revenge or because they sim­ply feel the polit­i­cal cli­mate would make it a great recruit­ment oppor­tu­ni­ty. Has­son, for instance, was a major Trump fan and had been doing online search­es for terms like “civ­il war if trump impeached” in the weeks before his arrest. And that rais­es the ques­tion of whether or not the US is in store for a wave of neo-Nazi domes­tic ter­ror attacks should the inves­ti­ga­tions into Trump start lead­ing towards impeach­ment:

    The Guardian

    The neo-Nazi plot against Amer­i­ca is much big­ger than we real­ize

    Lt Christo­pher Has­son is the prod­uct of tra­di­tions in white suprema­cist cir­cles, and experts say there are ‘thou­sands like him’

    Vegas Tenold

    Sun 3 Mar 2019 00.00 EST
    Last mod­i­fied on Mon 4 Mar 2019 04.41 EST

    In the ear­ly sum­mer of 2017, US coast guard lieu­tenant Christo­pher Has­son had an idea. He had been try­ing to fig­ure out an effec­tive way of killing bil­lions of peo­ple – “almost every last per­son on Earth” – but found him­self com­ing up against the daunt­ing logis­tics of such a task.

    He sus­pect­ed “a plague would be most suc­cess­ful”, but didn’t know how to get his hands on enough Span­ish flu, bot­u­lism or anthrax. His idea, he wrote in a draft email from 2 June of that year, would be to “start with bio­log­i­cal attacks fol­lowed by attack on food sup­ply”. He acknowl­edged the plan need­ed more research.

    While hor­ri­fy­ing in their ambi­tion, Hasson’s plans, gleaned from email drafts, are scat­ter­brained and bear the hall­marks of a per­son still try­ing to fig­ure things out. His ten­ta­tive plans, out­lined most­ly in emails to him­self, were thwart­ed when he was arrest­ed last month on firearms and drugs charges and inves­ti­ga­tors dis­cov­ered his inner life as a neo-Nazi and his plans for mass mur­der – along with a huge cache of weapons and a hit list of promi­nent Democ­rats and media fig­ures.

    What is clear, how­ev­er, is that Has­son was inspired by oth­ers who came before him, and that he is like­ly very far from alone.

    Has­son is the prod­uct of both estab­lished tra­di­tions with­in white suprema­cist cir­cles as well as new devel­op­ments. He was at once inspired by old ideas and deter­mined to go beyond them to cre­ate more hav­oc than any who had come before him.

    The year and a half since the Unite the Right far-right ral­ly in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia, end­ed in may­hem, the death of a pro­test­er and polit­i­cal tur­moil, has been a rough time for the pub­lic fac­ing and osten­si­bly polit­i­cal arm of the white suprema­cist move­ment in Amer­i­ca. Those who marched in Char­lottesville have to a large degree retreat­ed, flee­ing law­suits, doxxing and per­son­al scan­dal. Still, while pub­lic march­es appear to be few­er and few­er, the peri­od since Char­lottesville has also been marred by indi­vid­ual episodes of extreme vio­lence, sug­gest­ing that the wave of white suprema­cy that seemed to crest in Char­lottesville is not so much reced­ing as just chang­ing in nature.

    “I think what we’re start­ing to see now is peo­ple becom­ing more dis­heart­ened and dis­con­nect­ed from main­stream pol­i­tics,” said Kee­gan Han­kes.

    Han­kes is a researcher at the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter mon­i­tor­ing group, and he says they have been fol­low­ing a spike in far-right vio­lence. “We believe we can expect more vio­lence as peo­ple become increas­ing­ly frus­trat­ed and unmoored,” he said.

    Increased vio­lence from far-right activists at a time when the admin­is­tra­tion is friend­lier toward their goals is not with­out his­tor­i­cal prece­dent, said the Uni­ver­si­ty of Chica­go his­to­ri­an Kath­leen Belew, the author of Bring the War Home: the White Pow­er Move­ment and Para­mil­i­tary Amer­i­ca. Belew explained that the far right’s affin­i­ty for Don­ald Trump might mean more vio­lence dur­ing his time in the White House, not less.

    “The last time the move­ment under­went a major rev­o­lu­tion­ary turn was under the Rea­gan admin­is­tra­tion, dur­ing a moment of sup­pos­ed­ly friend­ly state pow­er,” she said.

    “That means that what­ev­er peo­ple think about the Trump administration’s reluc­tance to dis­avow cer­tain types of white pow­er orga­niz­ing, this is not a moment when we’d expect to see hap­pi­ness in the fringe. We’re talk­ing about a move­ment in which many activists want the over­throw of the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment, the rein­state­ment of slav­ery, the geno­cide of all peo­ple of col­or and a white home­land. These aren’t things that can be pur­sued polit­i­cal­ly, even with a sym­pa­thet­ic admin­is­tra­tion.

    A report pub­lished by the Anti-Defama­tion League (ADL) in Jan­u­ary sup­ports Belew and Han­kes’ asser­tions. Accord­ing to the study, every sin­gle extrem­ist mur­der in the US in 2018 had links to far-right ide­ol­o­gy, mak­ing it one of the dead­liest years in recent his­to­ry. While some of these links were ten­u­ous – the shoot­er behind the mas­sacre at Mar­jo­ry Stone­man Dou­glas school had no direct con­tact with extrem­ist groups but had been known to make racist, white suprema­cist state­ments – the num­bers paint a pic­ture of a move­ment that is find­ing new, vio­lent out­lets for its extrem­ism. Some of the inci­dents – such as a mass shoot­ing at a Pitts­burgh syn­a­gogue – sent shock­waves through the whole coun­try.

    “It’s clear­ly gath­er­ing steam,” said JM Berg­er, an expert on extrem­ism and research schol­ar at Vox-Pol. “Suc­cess breeds suc­cess, and we’re see­ing peo­ple oper­a­tional­ize the self-edu­ca­tion process. Peo­ple are begin­ning to under­stand that they can emu­late the actions of some­one who went before them to work out what­ev­er they want to work out.”

    Accord­ing to doc­u­ments filed in the inves­ti­ga­tion of Has­son, he was not only inspired by ter­ror­ists who came before him – he is deeply influ­enced by Nor­we­gian mass-mur­der­er Anders Behring Breivikbut also dri­ven by a loathing for what he per­ceives as Trump’s ene­mies as well as a para­noid fear that Trump will be removed from pow­er.

    This cer­tain­ty that evil forces are work­ing against Trump has become preva­lent with­in the far right, breed­ing con­spir­a­cies such as QAnon, which posits Trump is fight­ing a “deep state” con­spir­a­cy that seeks to thwart his patri­ot­ic agen­da. As such, Trump plays a dual role with­in the world of rightwing vio­lence: while a “sym­pa­thet­ic” admin­is­tra­tion can spur a rise in vio­lence, the per­ceived per­se­cu­tion of Trump – in large part an image cre­at­ed by the pres­i­dent him­self – can fuel the para­noid and vio­lent fan­tasies of peo­ple like Has­son.

    Both ideas can breed vio­lence, espe­cial­ly if Trump is defeat­ed in the 2020 elec­tions.

    “What we’ve seen in the Trump-era is that a lot of the peo­ple on the fringes see oppor­tu­ni­ties for polit­i­cal engage­ment where they didn’t see it before,” said Berg­er. “The ques­tion is: what hap­pens when that win­dow clos­es?”

    Cou­pled with increased frus­tra­tion by the lim­i­ta­tions of polit­i­cal engage­ment comes the rise of more ter­ror­is­tic groups such as Atom­waf­fen Divi­sion, a mil­i­tant neo-Nazi group linked to sev­er­al mur­ders. They and oth­ers have brought a less hier­ar­chi­cal and more dis­or­der­ly struc­ture to white suprema­cist activism, which makes them both hard­er to track and to con­trol. Known as “lead­er­less resis­tance”, it has been a tac­tic of white suprema­cists for decades and lead to events such as the 1995 Okla­homa City bomb­ing, but has been made expo­nen­tial­ly eas­i­er by the inter­net.

    “Lead­er­less resis­tance total­ly changes recruit­ment strat­e­gy,” said Belew.

    “No longer is the move­ment try­ing to gen­er­ate a mass protest of uni­formed mem­bers. This move­ment isn’t inter­est­ed in a crowd but in a ded­i­cat­ed cell of 12 peo­ple that are going to devote their lives to guer­ril­la war­fare.”

    His­tor­i­cal­ly the strat­e­gy of lead­er­less resis­tance was once con­fined to the extreme fringes of the white pow­er move­ment, attract­ing ter­ror­ists such as Okla­homa City bomber Tim­o­thy McVeigh, Breivik, Charleston church shoot­er Dylann Roof and oth­ers, but recent­ly parts of the move­ment who have been con­sid­ered mod­er­ate have also embraced the idea.

    “Lead­er­less resis­tance is becom­ing ubiq­ui­tous on the far right,” says Han­kes. “Nor­mal­ly these things come from the extreme parts of the move­ment and the fact that it is show­ing up else­where shows how deep set these ideas are and how dis­il­lu­sioned the move­ment is with the White House.”

    ...

    Michael Ger­man, a for­mer FBI agent who went under­cov­er with white suprema­cist groups in the 1990s and who now works as a fel­low at the Bren­nan Cen­ter for Jus­tice, agreed. “We real­ly don’t know much about [Has­son], since there is very lit­tle in the pub­lic record. The key will be if he had co-con­spir­a­tors or asso­ci­a­tions with peo­ple out­side and if they were aware of his inten­tions,” he said.

    Still, Ger­man was not sur­prised by Hasson’s plot or that he had been con­coct­ing it while on active duty. “We know that there’s sig­nif­i­cant ille­gal activ­i­ty hap­pen­ing that the gov­ern­ment needs to be aware of, the prob­lem is that the gov­ern­ment isn’t col­lect­ing infor­ma­tion about it in a way that lets us assess how wide­spread the prob­lem is. The FBI has had con­cerns about white suprema­cist activ­i­ty with­in the mil­i­tary and law enforce­ment for a long time, but there’s lit­tle evi­dence of inves­ti­ga­tions into it.

    What remains an almost cer­tain­ty is that Has­son is not alone in his desire to com­mit atroc­i­ties for white suprema­cist objec­tives. Oth­ers are still out there: armed, dan­ger­ous and plot­ting. Some will like­ly turn their thoughts into actions.

    “My guess is that there are thou­sands like him,” said Belew. “These peo­ple are ide­o­log­i­cal­ly con­nect­ed and prepar­ing sim­i­lar acts of vio­lence.”

    ———-

    “The neo-Nazi plot against Amer­i­ca is much big­ger than we real­ize” by Vegas Tenold; The Guardian; 03/03/2019

    “The year and a half since the Unite the Right far-right ral­ly in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia, end­ed in may­hem, the death of a pro­test­er and polit­i­cal tur­moil, has been a rough time for the pub­lic fac­ing and osten­si­bly polit­i­cal arm of the white suprema­cist move­ment in Amer­i­ca. Those who marched in Char­lottesville have to a large degree retreat­ed, flee­ing law­suits, doxxing and per­son­al scan­dal. Still, while pub­lic march­es appear to be few­er and few­er, the peri­od since Char­lottesville has also been marred by indi­vid­ual episodes of extreme vio­lence, sug­gest­ing that the wave of white suprema­cy that seemed to crest in Char­lottesville is not so much reced­ing as just chang­ing in nature.

    It’s a ghast­ly pos­si­bil­i­ty: the polit­i­cal fail­ure of Char­lottesville, which was sup­posed to be a kind of ‘com­ing out’ moment for the far right, was fol­lowed by a peri­od of extreme vio­lence by indi­vid­u­als, sug­gest­ing that we’re see­ing a change in tac­tics. The hope that Trump would main­stream the neo-Nazis (instead of just play­ing foot­sie with them in pub­lic) dis­si­pat­ed and now the far right is more vio­lent than it has been in years, despite hav­ing one of the most sym­pa­thet­ic admin­is­tra­tions they could have hoped for. The far right’s affin­i­ty for Trump appears to be fuel­ing vio­lence, which is not unprece­dent­ed. It’s what hap­pened under Rea­gan:

    ...
    Increased vio­lence from far-right activists at a time when the admin­is­tra­tion is friend­lier toward their goals is not with­out his­tor­i­cal prece­dent, said the Uni­ver­si­ty of Chica­go his­to­ri­an Kath­leen Belew, the author of Bring the War Home: the White Pow­er Move­ment and Para­mil­i­tary Amer­i­ca. Belew explained that the far right’s affin­i­ty for Don­ald Trump might mean more vio­lence dur­ing his time in the White House, not less.

    “The last time the move­ment under­went a major rev­o­lu­tion­ary turn was under the Rea­gan admin­is­tra­tion, dur­ing a moment of sup­pos­ed­ly friend­ly state pow­er,” she said.

    “That means that what­ev­er peo­ple think about the Trump administration’s reluc­tance to dis­avow cer­tain types of white pow­er orga­niz­ing, this is not a moment when we’d expect to see hap­pi­ness in the fringe. We’re talk­ing about a move­ment in which many activists want the over­throw of the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment, the rein­state­ment of slav­ery, the geno­cide of all peo­ple of col­or and a white home­land. These aren’t things that can be pur­sued polit­i­cal­ly, even with a sym­pa­thet­ic admin­is­tra­tion.
    ...

    And that affin­i­ty for Trump appears to be mak­ing the neo-Nazis espe­cial­ly vio­lent in response to the threat of remov­ing Trump from office. Or the threat of Trump sim­ply not win­ning reelec­tion in 2020:

    ...
    Accord­ing to doc­u­ments filed in the inves­ti­ga­tion of Has­son, he was not only inspired by ter­ror­ists who came before him – he is deeply influ­enced by Nor­we­gian mass-mur­der­er Anders Behring Breivikbut also dri­ven by a loathing for what he per­ceives as Trump’s ene­mies as well as a para­noid fear that Trump will be removed from pow­er.

    This cer­tain­ty that evil forces are work­ing against Trump has become preva­lent with­in the far right, breed­ing con­spir­a­cies such as QAnon, which posits Trump is fight­ing a “deep state” con­spir­a­cy that seeks to thwart his patri­ot­ic agen­da. As such, Trump plays a dual role with­in the world of rightwing vio­lence: while a “sym­pa­thet­ic” admin­is­tra­tion can spur a rise in vio­lence, the per­ceived per­se­cu­tion of Trump – in large part an image cre­at­ed by the pres­i­dent him­self – can fuel the para­noid and vio­lent fan­tasies of peo­ple like Has­son.

    Both ideas can breed vio­lence, espe­cial­ly if Trump is defeat­ed in the 2020 elec­tions.

    “What we’ve seen in the Trump-era is that a lot of the peo­ple on the fringes see oppor­tu­ni­ties for polit­i­cal engage­ment where they didn’t see it before,” said Berg­er. “The ques­tion is: what hap­pens when that win­dow clos­es?”
    ...

    And then there’s the fact that neo-Nazi groups ded­i­cat­ed to ter­ror­ist “lead­er­less resis­tance” and mass casu­al­ty attacks already exist, like Attomwaf­fen:

    ...
    Cou­pled with increased frus­tra­tion by the lim­i­ta­tions of polit­i­cal engage­ment comes the rise of more ter­ror­is­tic groups such as Atom­waf­fen Divi­sion, a mil­i­tant neo-Nazi group linked to sev­er­al mur­ders. They and oth­ers have brought a less hier­ar­chi­cal and more dis­or­der­ly struc­ture to white suprema­cist activism, which makes them both hard­er to track and to con­trol. Known as “lead­er­less resis­tance”, it has been a tac­tic of white suprema­cists for decades and lead to events such as the 1995 Okla­homa City bomb­ing, but has been made expo­nen­tial­ly eas­i­er by the inter­net.

    “Lead­er­less resis­tance total­ly changes recruit­ment strat­e­gy,” said Belew.

    “No longer is the move­ment try­ing to gen­er­ate a mass protest of uni­formed mem­bers. This move­ment isn’t inter­est­ed in a crowd but in a ded­i­cat­ed cell of 12 peo­ple that are going to devote their lives to guer­ril­la war­fare.”
    ...

    And accord­ing to Kee­gan Han­kes, of the SPLC, the ideas of lead­er­less resis­tance have become ubiq­ui­tous on the far right. Even the ‘mod­er­ate’ parts of the far right are embrac­ing the idea. And that means the poten­tial pool of can­di­dates for the kind of sui­cide ter­ror attacks that Has­son was plot­ting and Pad­dock car­ried out is prob­a­bly a lot big­ger than it used to be:

    ...
    His­tor­i­cal­ly the strat­e­gy of lead­er­less resis­tance was once con­fined to the extreme fringes of the white pow­er move­ment, attract­ing ter­ror­ists such as Okla­homa City bomber Tim­o­thy McVeigh, Breivik, Charleston church shoot­er Dylann Roof and oth­ers, but recent­ly parts of the move­ment who have been con­sid­ered mod­er­ate have also embraced the idea.

    “Lead­er­less resis­tance is becom­ing ubiq­ui­tous on the far right,” says Han­kes. “Nor­mal­ly these things come from the extreme parts of the move­ment and the fact that it is show­ing up else­where shows how deep set these ideas are and how dis­il­lu­sioned the move­ment is with the White House.”

    ...

    What remains an almost cer­tain­ty is that Has­son is not alone in his desire to com­mit atroc­i­ties for white suprema­cist objec­tives. Oth­ers are still out there: armed, dan­ger­ous and plot­ting. Some will like­ly turn their thoughts into actions.

    “My guess is that there are thou­sands like him,” said Belew. “These peo­ple are ide­o­log­i­cal­ly con­nect­ed and prepar­ing sim­i­lar acts of vio­lence.”

    So that’s all some­thing to keep in mind as we enter into the pos­si­ble impeach­ment phase of the Trump era. The US obvi­ous­ly can’t allow the threat of neo-Nazi vio­lence to effec­tive­ly black­mail the nation into not impeach­ing a pres­i­dent who should be removed from office, but it does­n’t hurt to be aware of the fact that most ‘deplorable’ ele­ments of Trump’s base hap­pen to be neo-Nazis who increas­ing­ly fol­low the ‘leader resis­tance’ domes­tic ter­ror mod­el and gen­er­al­ly view Trump as their dear leader.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | March 4, 2019, 4:58 pm
  5. The white suprema­cist strat­e­gy ‘lead­er­less resis­tance’ involv­ing the mass slaugh­ter of civil­ians made its way to New Zealand yes­ter­day with the twin ter­ror attacks on two mosques, killing at least 49 peo­ple and injur­ing dozens of oth­ers. And, sur­prise!, it appears that the attack­er was inspired by Anders Breivik. That’s accord­ing to his man­i­festo the 28 year old Aus­tralian born attack­er, Bren­ton Tar­rant, put online just before the attack. He also livestreamed the attack on Face­book, adopt­ing an ISIS-style approach of using the griz­zly images of the attack to essen­tial­ly cel­e­brate and pro­mote it to his tar­get audi­ence of fel­low white suprema­cists.

    It’s also worth not­ing that, at this time, it’s still not entire­ly clear if Tar­rant was work­ing alone or had help and police have not yet said if he was respon­si­ble for the shoot­ing at both mosques. So it’s pos­si­ble this was done by neo-Nazi team and Tar­rant is essen­tial­ly play­ing a role as the ‘lone gun­man’. Two oth­er armed peo­ple were arrest­ed but the nature of their involve­ment remains a mys­tery.

    Tar­ran­t’s man­i­festo large­ly echoes the same ‘whites are being replaced by non-whites’ argu­ments found in Breiviks’ man­i­festo and most white nation­al­ist con­tent these days. Tar­rant stat­ed the intent of the attack was to intim­i­date Mus­lims and gen­er­al and make them less inclined to immi­grate to West­ern nations. He also framed it as revenge for Mus­lim ter­ror attacks in Europe, with a spe­cif­ic ref­er­ence to a 2017 attack in Stock­holm. Inter­est­ing­ly, Tar­ran­t’s man­i­festo also claims that he got approval for the attack from the same “Knights Tem­plar” group that Breivik also claimed he was in con­tact with.

    Tar­rant describes him­self as a white nation­al­ist and fas­cist and cov­ered his rifle with Nazi sym­bol­ism (like a “14”). His man­i­festo includ­ed a “black sun”. In keep­ing with a theme we see over and over with these ‘lead­er­less resis­tance’ attacks, Tar­rant claims that one of the goals of the attack was to fur­ther polar­ize and desta­bi­lize the West with the hope of spark­ing a civ­il war in the Unit­ed States that will result in a sep­a­rate eth­nos­tates:

    Asso­ci­at­ed Press

    Mosque shoot­er a white suprema­cist angry at immi­grants

    By KRISTEN GELINEAU
    03/15/2019

    SYDNEY (AP) — The gun­man behind at least one of the mosque shoot­ings in New Zealand that left 49 peo­ple dead on Fri­day tried to make a few things clear in the man­i­festo he left behind: He is a 28-year-old Aus­tralian white nation­al­ist who hates immi­grants. He was angry about attacks in Europe that were per­pe­trat­ed by Mus­lims. He want­ed revenge, and he want­ed to cre­ate fear.

    He also, quite clear­ly, want­ed atten­tion.

    Though he claimed not to cov­et fame, the gun­man — whose name was not imme­di­ate­ly released by police — left behind a 74-page doc­u­ment post­ed on social media under the name Bren­ton Tar­rant in which he said he hoped to sur­vive the attack to bet­ter spread his views in the media.

    He also livestreamed to the world in graph­ic detail his assault on the wor­ship­pers at Christchurch’s Al Noor Mosque.

    That ram­page killed at least 41 peo­ple, while an attack on a sec­ond mosque in the city not long after killed sev­er­al more. Police did not say whether the same per­son was respon­si­ble for both shoot­ings.

    While his man­i­festo and video were an obvi­ous and con­temp­tu­ous ploy for infamy, they do con­tain impor­tant clues for a pub­lic try­ing to under­stand why any­one would tar­get dozens of inno­cent peo­ple who were sim­ply spend­ing an after­noon engaged in prayer.

    There could be no more per­plex­ing a set­ting for a mass slaugh­ter than New Zealand, a nation so placid and so iso­lat­ed from the mass shoot­ings that plague the U.S. that police offi­cers rarely car­ry guns.

    Yet the gun­man him­self high­light­ed New Zealand’s remote­ness as a rea­son he chose it. He wrote that an attack in New Zealand would show that no place on earth was safe and that even a coun­try as far away as New Zealand is sub­ject to mass immi­gra­tion.

    He said he grew up in a work­ing-class Aus­tralian fam­i­ly, had a typ­i­cal child­hood and was a poor stu­dent. A woman who said she was a col­league of his when he worked as a per­son­al train­er in the Aus­tralian city of Grafton said she was shocked by the alle­ga­tions against him.

    ...

    The ram­bling man­i­festo is filled with con­fus­ing and seem­ing­ly con­tra­dic­to­ry asser­tions about his beliefs.

    Beyond his white nation­al­is­tic views, he claimed to be an envi­ron­men­tal­ist and said he is a fas­cist who believes Chi­na is the nation that most aligns with his polit­i­cal and social val­ues. He said he has con­tempt for the wealth­i­est 1 per­cent. And he sin­gled out Amer­i­can con­ser­v­a­tive com­men­ta­tor Can­dace Owens as the per­son who had influ­enced him the most, while say­ing “the extreme actions she calls for are too much, even for my tastes.”

    In a tweet, Owens respond­ed by say­ing that if the media por­trayed her as the inspi­ra­tion for the attack, it had bet­ter hire lawyers.

    The man­i­festo also includ­ed a sin­gle ref­er­ence to Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump in which the author asked and answered the ques­tion of whether he was a Trump sup­port­er: “As a sym­bol of renewed white iden­ti­ty and com­mon pur­pose? Sure. As a pol­i­cy mak­er and leader? Dear god no.”

    Through­out the man­i­festo, the theme he returns to most often is con­flict between peo­ple of Euro­pean descent and Mus­lims, often fram­ing it in terms of the Cru­sades.

    Among his hate-filled state­ments is a claim that he was moti­vat­ed toward vio­lence by an episode that occurred in 2017 while he was tour­ing through West­ern Europe. That was when an Uzbek man drove a truck into a crowd of peo­ple in Stock­holm, killing five.

    He said his desire for vio­lence grew when he arrived in France, where he said he was offend­ed by the sight of immi­grants in the cities and towns he vis­it­ed.

    Three months ago, he said, he start­ed plan­ning to tar­get Christchurch. He said he has donat­ed to many nation­al­ist groups, but claimed not to be a direct mem­ber of any orga­ni­za­tion. How­ev­er, he admit­ted con­tacts with an anti-immi­gra­tion group called the reborn Knights Tem­plar and said he got the approval of Anders Breivik for the attack, a claim that has not been ver­i­fied.

    Breivik is a right-wing Nor­we­gian extrem­ist who killed 77 peo­ple in Oslo and a near­by island in 2011. Breivik’s lawyer Oeystein Stor­rvik told Norway’s VG news­pa­per that his client, who is in prison, has “very lim­it­ed con­tacts with the sur­round­ing world, so it seems very unlike­ly that he has had con­tact” with the New Zealand gun­man.

    The gun­man ram­bled on about the sup­posed aims for the attack, which includ­ed reduc­ing immi­gra­tion by intim­i­dat­ing immi­grants and dri­ving a wedge between NATO and the Turk­ish peo­ple. He also said he hoped to fur­ther polar­ize and desta­bi­lize the West, and spark a civ­il war in the Unit­ed States that would ulti­mate­ly result in a sep­a­ra­tion of races. The attack has had the oppo­site impact, with con­dem­na­tion of the blood­shed pour­ing in from all quar­ters of the globe, and calls for uni­ty against hatred and vio­lence.

    The gun­man used var­i­ous hate sym­bols asso­ci­at­ed with the Nazis and white suprema­cy. For instance, the num­ber 14 is seen on his rifle, a pos­si­ble ref­er­ence to the “14 Words,” a white suprema­cist slo­gan attrib­uted in part to Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf,” accord­ing to the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter. He also used the sym­bol of the Schwarze Sonne, or black sun, which “has become syn­ony­mous with myr­i­ad far-right groups who traf­fic in neo-Nazi,” accord­ing to the cen­ter.

    His vic­tims, he wrote, were cho­sen because he saw them as invaders who would replace the white race. He pre­dict­ed he would feel no remorse for their deaths. And in the video he livestreamed of his shoot­ing, no remorse can be seen or heard as he sprays ter­ri­fied wor­ship­pers with bul­lets again and again, some­times fir­ing at peo­ple he has already cut down.

    ...

    ———-

    “Mosque shoot­er a white suprema­cist angry at immi­grants” by KRISTEN GELINEAU; Asso­ci­at­ed Press; 03/15/2019

    “The gun­man ram­bled on about the sup­posed aims for the attack, which includ­ed reduc­ing immi­gra­tion by intim­i­dat­ing immi­grants and dri­ving a wedge between NATO and the Turk­ish peo­ple. He also said he hoped to fur­ther polar­ize and desta­bi­lize the West, and spark a civ­il war in the Unit­ed States that would ulti­mate­ly result in a sep­a­ra­tion of races. The attack has had the oppo­site impact, with con­dem­na­tion of the blood­shed pour­ing in from all quar­ters of the globe, and calls for uni­ty against hatred and vio­lence.”

    Neo-nazi ter­ror attacks intend­ed to pro­voke back­lash­es and spark civ­il wars. It’s an increas­ing­ly promi­nent theme in the age of Trump. So it’s par­tic­u­lar­ly appro­pri­ate that Tar­rant specif­i­cal­ly named Trump as “a sym­bol of renewed white iden­ti­ty and com­mon pur­pose”:

    ...
    The ram­bling man­i­festo is filled with con­fus­ing and seem­ing­ly con­tra­dic­to­ry asser­tions about his beliefs.

    Beyond his white nation­al­is­tic views, he claimed to be an envi­ron­men­tal­ist and said he is a fas­cist who believes Chi­na is the nation that most aligns with his polit­i­cal and social val­ues. He said he has con­tempt for the wealth­i­est 1 per­cent. And he sin­gled out Amer­i­can con­ser­v­a­tive com­men­ta­tor Can­dace Owens as the per­son who had influ­enced him the most, while say­ing “the extreme actions she calls for are too much, even for my tastes.”

    In a tweet, Owens respond­ed by say­ing that if the media por­trayed her as the inspi­ra­tion for the attack, it had bet­ter hire lawyers.

    The man­i­festo also includ­ed a sin­gle ref­er­ence to Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump in which the author asked and answered the ques­tion of whether he was a Trump sup­port­er: “As a sym­bol of renewed white iden­ti­ty and com­mon pur­pose? Sure. As a pol­i­cy mak­er and leader? Dear god no.”

    ...

    The gun­man used var­i­ous hate sym­bols asso­ci­at­ed with the Nazis and white suprema­cy. For instance, the num­ber 14 is seen on his rifle, a pos­si­ble ref­er­ence to the “14 Words,” a white suprema­cist slo­gan attrib­uted in part to Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf,” accord­ing to the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter. He also used the sym­bol of the Schwarze Sonne, or black sun, which “has become syn­ony­mous with myr­i­ad far-right groups who traf­fic in neo-Nazi,” accord­ing to the cen­ter.
    ...

    But it appears to be Anders Breivik in par­tic­u­lar who most direct­ly inspired the attack. And he even claimed to be in con­tact with the same Knights Tem­plar orga­ni­za­tion Breivik also claimed to have been in con­tact with before his ter­ror­ist attack in Oslo:

    ...
    Through­out the man­i­festo, the theme he returns to most often is con­flict between peo­ple of Euro­pean descent and Mus­lims, often fram­ing it in terms of the Cru­sades.

    Among his hate-filled state­ments is a claim that he was moti­vat­ed toward vio­lence by an episode that occurred in 2017 while he was tour­ing through West­ern Europe. That was when an Uzbek man drove a truck into a crowd of peo­ple in Stock­holm, killing five.

    He said his desire for vio­lence grew when he arrived in France, where he said he was offend­ed by the sight of immi­grants in the cities and towns he vis­it­ed.

    Three months ago, he said, he start­ed plan­ning to tar­get Christchurch. He said he has donat­ed to many nation­al­ist groups, but claimed not to be a direct mem­ber of any orga­ni­za­tion. How­ev­er, he admit­ted con­tacts with an anti-immi­gra­tion group called the reborn Knights Tem­plar and said he got the approval of Anders Breivik for the attack, a claim that has not been ver­i­fied.

    Breivik is a right-wing Nor­we­gian extrem­ist who killed 77 peo­ple in Oslo and a near­by island in 2011. Breivik’s lawyer Oeystein Stor­rvik told Norway’s VG news­pa­per that his client, who is in prison, has “very lim­it­ed con­tacts with the sur­round­ing world, so it seems very unlike­ly that he has had con­tact” with the New Zealand gun­man.
    ...

    So it will be quite inter­est­ing to see what help Tar­rant actu­al­ly had. Espe­cial­ly since two oth­er peo­ple were arrest­ed at the scene of the crime and were armed and police have yet to deter­mine whether or not Tar­rant was respon­si­ble for both mosque attacks:

    ...
    That ram­page killed at least 41 peo­ple, while an attack on a sec­ond mosque in the city not long after killed sev­er­al more. Police did not say whether the same per­son was respon­si­ble for both shoot­ings.

    While his man­i­festo and video were an obvi­ous and con­temp­tu­ous ploy for infamy, they do con­tain impor­tant clues for a pub­lic try­ing to under­stand why any­one would tar­get dozens of inno­cent peo­ple who were sim­ply spend­ing an after­noon engaged in prayer.
    ...

    So there’s an abun­dance of over­lap with past neo-Nazi ter­ror attacks. Which, of course, is by design since the ‘lead­er­less resis­tance’ ter­ror par­a­digm is intend­ed to inspire copy­cats. It’s part of what makes the stream­ing video of the attack so dis­turb­ing: it’s exact­ly the kind of con­tent that the most socio­path­ic mem­bers of soci­ety will grav­i­tate towards and that is the tar­get audi­ence for neo-Nazi recruit­ment.

    And as the fol­low­ing piece by Josh Mar­shall reminds us, the gen­er­al world­view expressed by Tar­rant in his man­i­festo — a fix­a­tion on ‘white geno­cide’, ‘replace­ment’, and hys­te­ria over non-white immi­gra­tion — are now basi­cal­ly main­stream ideas for the con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can right-wing:

    Talk­ing Points Memo
    Edi­tor’s Brief

    Vio­lent Far-Right White Rad­i­cal­ism

    Josh Mar­shall
    03.15.19. 11:38 am

    We’re dig­ging into the details of this hor­rif­ic mas­sacre that unfold­ed overnight (US time) in New Zealand. There is a 74 page man­i­festo in which the alleged killer described his aims, moti­va­tions, etc. There are some odd­i­ties to the doc­u­ment in that it com­bines explic­it dec­la­ra­tions of sup­port for some of the most noto­ri­ous racist, anti-immi­grant mur­der­ers of the ear­ly 21st cen­tu­ry. It is also filled with some of what we might com­mon­ly on social media call trolling, sar­cas­ti­cal­ly or provoca­tive­ly over­stat­ed com­ments. We shouldn’t see this as in con­flict. It’s a mode of expres­sion deeply root­ed in the sub­cul­ture. But I want to take some time to describe how deeply tied this killer’s world­view, pol­i­tics and aims are root­ed in the right­ist anti-immi­grant pol­i­tics which are now main­streamed in the Unit­ed States

    This shoot­er is some­one who is immersed in the great arc of anti-immi­grant, racist hyper-nation­al­ist dis­course and para­mil­i­tary vio­lence rang­ing from the right­ist par­ties of Europe, var­i­ous mass mur­der­ers like Nor­we­gian ter­ror­ist Anders Breivik to the white suprema­cist and neo-Nazi sub­cul­ture we have come to know so well in the US. Char­lottesville, Pitts­burgh, Charleston. Dylann Roof’s mas­sacre gets explic­it ref­er­ence as an inspi­ra­tion and antecedent for this mas­sacre.

    The lan­guage of ‘replace­ment’ is the cen­ter­piece – the idea that white Chris­tians with low birthrates are being replaced by non-white immi­grants with high­er birthrates. This is lit­er­al­ly the lan­guage of Steve King. He’s allud­ed to it and dis­cussed it numer­ous times, both explic­it­ly and implic­it­ly. He dis­cussed it at length in this inter­view with a far-right news­pa­per in Aus­tria. Oth­er far-right Repub­li­can office­hold­ers do the same.

    If you look at the Pitts­burgh syn­a­gogue mas­sacre shoot­er, he was of course attack­ing Jews. But his actu­al the­o­ry (not his alone of course but the one he embraced) was that Jews were a non-Chris­t­ian force orga­niz­ing the impor­ta­tion of non-white immi­grants into the Unit­ed States. He focused in the imme­di­ate sense on the car­a­vans the right wing media was then whip­ping up hys­te­ria about and con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries about George Soros fund­ing them. But the con­cept is wide­spread. Jews want to destroy “white civ­i­liza­tion” and they are doing so by import­ing immi­grants of col­or to over­whelm native whites with high­er birthrates.

    Anti-Semit­ic attacks were a major part of the Char­lottesville ‘Unite The Right’ march. But we should remem­ber that it was anti-Semi­tism inter­wo­ven with ‘Great Replace­men­tism’. Remem­ber the chant at Char­lottesville: “Jews will not replace us“.

    ...

    ———-

    “Vio­lent Far-Right White Rad­i­cal­ism” by Josh Mar­shall; Talk­ing Points Memo; 03/15/2019

    “We’re dig­ging into the details of this hor­rif­ic mas­sacre that unfold­ed overnight (US time) in New Zealand. There is a 74 page man­i­festo in which the alleged killer described his aims, moti­va­tions, etc. There are some odd­i­ties to the doc­u­ment in that it com­bines explic­it dec­la­ra­tions of sup­port for some of the most noto­ri­ous racist, anti-immi­grant mur­der­ers of the ear­ly 21st cen­tu­ry. It is also filled with some of what we might com­mon­ly on social media call trolling, sar­cas­ti­cal­ly or provoca­tive­ly over­stat­ed com­ments. We shouldn’t see this as in con­flict. It’s a mode of expres­sion deeply root­ed in the sub­cul­ture. But I want to take some time to describe how deeply tied this killer’s world­view, pol­i­tics and aims are root­ed in the right­ist anti-immi­grant pol­i­tics which are now main­streamed in the Unit­ed States

    Whether it’s the Unite the Right march in Char­lottesville, Dylan Roof’s mas­sacre, the slaugh­ter in Pitts­burgh, the far right hys­te­ria over ‘white geno­cide’ and ‘replace­ment’ is one of the defin­ing fea­tures of today’s Amer­i­can far right. And that includes far right Repub­li­cans in con­gress like Steve King:

    ...
    The lan­guage of ‘replace­ment’ is the cen­ter­piece – the idea that white Chris­tians with low birthrates are being replaced by non-white immi­grants with high­er birthrates. This is lit­er­al­ly the lan­guage of Steve King. He’s allud­ed to it and dis­cussed it numer­ous times, both explic­it­ly and implic­it­ly. He dis­cussed it at length in this inter­view with a far-right news­pa­per in Aus­tria. Oth­er far-right Repub­li­can office­hold­ers do the same.
    ...

    So, with all that in mind, check out the response Pres­i­dent Trump had to a ques­tion about the attacks and his views on the dan­gers of white nation­al­ism: Trump is, of course, not very con­cerned about it because “I think it’s a small group of peo­ple that have very, very seri­ous prob­lems”:

    Talk­ing Points Memo
    Edi­tor’s Blog

    Look at the Exact Words

    By Josh Mar­shall
    March 15, 2019 4:50 pm

    I felt it was impor­tant to tran­scribe Pres­i­dent Trump’s exact words in which he dis­miss­es the prob­lem of “white nation­al­ism” and sug­gests it’s unclear whether the Christchurch gun­man is even part of the white nation­al­ist or suprema­cist move­ment.

    REPORTER: “Do you see today white nation­al­ism as a ris­ing threat around the world?”

    TRUMP: “I don’t real­ly. I think it’s a small group of peo­ple that have very, very seri­ous prob­lems. I guess if you look at what hap­pened in New Zealand per­haps that’s the case. I don’t know enough about it yet. They’re just learn­ing about the per­son and the peo­ple involved. But it’s cer­tain­ly a ter­ri­ble thing, a ter­ri­ble thing.”

    ...

    ———-

    “Look at the Exact Words” by Josh Mar­shall; Talk­ing Points Memo; 03/15/2019

    ““I don’t real­ly. I think it’s a small group of peo­ple that have very, very seri­ous prob­lems. I guess if you look at what hap­pened in New Zealand per­haps that’s the case. I don’t know enough about it yet. They’re just learn­ing about the per­son and the peo­ple involved. But it’s cer­tain­ly a ter­ri­ble thing, a ter­ri­ble thing.””

    It’s just a small group of peo­ple. Right.

    And notice how Trump says “they’re just learn­ing about the per­son and the peo­ple involved” which implic­it­ly leaves open the pos­si­bil­i­ty that the Tar­rant and his pos­si­ble accom­plices aren’t actu­al­ly neo-Nazis. And, lo and behold, that is exact­ly the the­o­ry being pushed by Rush Lim­baugh. Accord­ing to Lim­baugh, the shoot­er is a “left­ist who writes the man­i­festo and then goes out and per­forms the deed pur­pose­ly to smear his polit­i­cal ene­mies, know­ing he’s going to get shot in the process”:

    Talk­ing Points Memo
    News

    Lim­baugh Stokes Con­spir­a­cy That NZ Killer Is Left­ist Out To Smear ‘Ene­mies’

    By Sum­mer Con­cep­cion
    March 15, 2019 2:33 pm

    Radio host Rush Lim­baugh weighed in on the New Zealand mosque attacks Fri­day by sug­gest­ing that the Aus­tralian man alleged­ly behind them — whose man­i­festo out­lined his white suprema­cist world­view — is a left­ist out to smear his “polit­i­cal ene­mies.”

    Cit­ing how “crazy” the left is, Lim­baugh added that there is an “ongo­ing the­o­ry” that the shoot­er is a “left­ist who writes the man­i­festo and then goes out and per­forms the deed pur­pose­ly to smear his polit­i­cal ene­mies, know­ing he’s going to get shot in the process.”

    “If that’s exact­ly what the guy is try­ing to do then he’s hit a home run, because right there on Fox News: ‘Shoot­er is an admit­ted white nation­al­ist who hates immi­grants,’” Lim­baugh said.

    Lim­baugh also dis­missed the idea that there is “far more crazed right-wing ter­ror­ism in Amer­i­ca than there is any oth­er kind,” call­ing the claim “noth­ing more than a media nar­ra­tive man­u­fac­tured out of whole cloth.”

    “You real­ize you’re going to face a whole day of Don­ald Trump being blamed for it, or you being blamed for it, or things you believe in being blamed for it,” Lim­baugh said.

    ...

    ———-

    “Lim­baugh Stokes Con­spir­a­cy That NZ Killer Is Left­ist Out To Smear ‘Ene­mies’” by Sum­mer Con­cep­cion; Talk­ing Points Memo; 03/15/2019

    “Cit­ing how “crazy” the left is, Lim­baugh added that there is an “ongo­ing the­o­ry” that the shoot­er is a “left­ist who writes the man­i­festo and then goes out and per­forms the deed pur­pose­ly to smear his polit­i­cal ene­mies, know­ing he’s going to get shot in the process.”

    Keep in mind that a cen­tral part of the strat­e­gy employed by Tar­rant, Roof, and the rest of these neo-Nazi ter­ror­ists is to car­ry out an attack that is so hor­rif­ic that it pro­vokes some sort of back­lash like new gun con­trol laws. And then that back­lash is sup­posed to cat­alyze a far right counter-back­lash of whites lead­ing to a civ­il war. And a key ingre­di­ent for that counter-back­lash is the sense that the ini­tial back­lash is unjus­ti­fied and tar­get­ing white con­ser­v­a­tives. So by push­ing the meme that this attack was actu­al­ly part of some sort of dia­bol­i­cal left-wing attack designed to smear right-wingers, Lim­baugh is actu­al­ly play­ing a crit­i­cal role in this entire ‘lead­er­less resis­tance-to-civ­il-war’ strat­e­gy.

    So as we can see, the peo­ple behind the attack in New Zealand intend­ed to be part of a glob­al neo-Nazi disinformation/propaganda cam­paign intend­ed to divide the West and spark civ­il wars. And with­in that broad­er disinformation/propaganda cam­paign and they have A LOT of glob­al accom­plices.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | March 15, 2019, 1:47 pm
  6. Here’s a pair of sto­ries that should be viewed in the con­text of the much larg­er sto­ry of the sys­tem­at­ic man­ner US law enforce­ment down­plays the domes­tic ter­ror threats pre­sent­ed by the US far right:

    First, here’s a sto­ry from back in Novem­ber about a Wash­ing­ton State elect­ed rep­re­sen­ta­tive, Matt Shea, who was found to be dis­trib­ut­ing a rather dis­turb­ing man­u­al. It was a four-page doc­u­ment out­lin­ing the “Bib­li­cal Basis for War”, and includes a point-by-point descrip­tion of how a Chris­t­ian theoc­ra­cy could be estab­lished by wag­ing a hypo­thet­i­cal holy war. Oh, and Shea has been reelect­ed four times:

    Talk­ing Points Memo
    Muck­rak­er

    State Rep’s Out­line For Killing Non-Believ­ers In Holy War Is Referred To FBI

    By Josh Koven­sky
    Novem­ber 2, 2018 11:31 am

    A Wash­ing­ton state law­mak­er who moon­lights as a wannabe theo­crat has stum­bled into FBI scruti­ny over a how-to guide he wrote on killing non-believ­ers and estab­lish­ing a Chris­t­ian theoc­ra­cy.

    Five-term Wash­ing­ton state Rep. Matt Shea has been cir­cu­lat­ing a man­u­al for holy war in the Unit­ed States, the Seat­tle Times report­ed.

    The four-page doc­u­ment, titled “Bib­li­cal Basis for War,” goes point-by-point over how a Chris­t­ian theo­crat­ic move­ment could – and should – exter­mi­nate its oppo­si­tion in a bat­tle to win a hypo­thet­i­cal holy war.

    At the out­set, Shea’s holy army would issue terms of sur­ren­der to its ene­mies. The demands include “stop all abor­tions,” “no same-sex mar­riage,” “no idol­a­try or occultism,” “no com­mu­nism,” and “must obey Bib­li­cal law.”

    If the rest of the coun­try refus­es to “yield” to these terms, the doc­u­ment advo­cates a final solu­tion: “kill all males.”

    ...

    Under “Things for a Holy Army,” Shea remem­bers to include “Circumcision/Saved,” after Sacrifice/Worship/Prayer.

    Ref­er­enc­ing the last Civ­il War, Shea writes in the holy war how-to-man­u­al that “war is not waged against nations but against man (no scorched earth or Sherman’s march to the sea).”

    The doc­u­ment was leaked to the press by a local lib­er­tar­i­an activist named Tan­ner Rowe, who in a Face­book video called the plan “theo­crat­ic bull­shit.”

    Shea replied to Rowe and the Seat­tle Times in a Face­book video of his own, furi­ous­ly claim­ing that he wasn’t angry over the inci­dent while show­ing off his his­tor­i­cal knowl­edge by claim­ing that the Mayflower com­pact was “a covenant with God to advance Chris­tian­i­ty.”

    “The counter-state is work­ing over­time,” he said, adding that “there are two main counter-states in Amer­i­ca: Marx­ists and Islamists.”

    He went on to crit­i­cize a recent Rolling Stone pro­file of him as an exam­ple of a “Maoist insur­gency mod­el.”

    “In fact, I’ve been want­i­ng to do this video for a long time,” Shea said, repeat­ing angri­ly that he wasn’t upset. “Yes­ter­day, the Rolling Stone [sic] post­ed an 8,000 word arti­cle that was essen­tial­ly a slan­der smear piece – a hit piece – against me.”

    The Rolling Stone arti­cle – pub­lished last week – details Shea’s fan­ta­sy of cre­at­ing a “51st state” with free­dom for guns and rule by God. The sto­ry goes into depth on Shea’s ties to local white nation­al­ist move­ments

    Shea has used his time online to pro­mote far-right con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries, includ­ing the idea that glob­al warm­ing is a con­spir­a­cy to “manip­u­late the pub­lic mind.”

    He also fre­quent­ly met with and sup­port­ed ranch­er Cliv­en Bundy’s upris­ing against the Bureau of Land Man­age­ment, which he oppos­es for the despot­ic act of charg­ing fees for graz­ing on fed­er­al­ly main­tained land.

    The holy war man­u­al made its way to Spokane Coun­ty Sher­iff Ozzie Kne­zovich.

    “I gave it straight to the FBI,” Kne­zovich told the Seat­tle Times.

    ———-

    “State Rep’s Out­line For Killing Non-Believ­ers In Holy War Is Referred To FBI” by Josh Koven­sky; Talk­ing Points Memo; 11/02/2018

    Five-term Wash­ing­ton state Rep. Matt Shea has been cir­cu­lat­ing a man­u­al for holy war in the Unit­ed States, the Seat­tle Times report­ed.”

    A five-term state rep­re­sen­ta­tive was dis­trib­ut­ing this man­u­al. A man­u­al that advo­cat­ed killing all males who don’t sub­mit to Shea’s planned Bib­li­cal theoc­ra­cy:

    ...
    The four-page doc­u­ment, titled “Bib­li­cal Basis for War,” goes point-by-point over how a Chris­t­ian theo­crat­ic move­ment could – and should – exter­mi­nate its oppo­si­tion in a bat­tle to win a hypo­thet­i­cal holy war.

    At the out­set, Shea’s holy army would issue terms of sur­ren­der to its ene­mies. The demands include “stop all abor­tions,” “no same-sex mar­riage,” “no idol­a­try or occultism,” “no com­mu­nism,” and “must obey Bib­li­cal law.”

    If the rest of the coun­try refus­es to “yield” to these terms, the doc­u­ment advo­cates a final solu­tion: “kill all males.”
    ...

    And Shea does­n’t just have ties to white nation­al­ists. He’s also a big Cliv­en Bundy fan. Of course:

    ...
    The Rolling Stone arti­cle – pub­lished last week – details Shea’s fan­ta­sy of cre­at­ing a “51st state” with free­dom for guns and rule by God. The sto­ry goes into depth on Shea’s ties to local white nation­al­ist move­ments

    Shea has used his time online to pro­mote far-right con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries, includ­ing the idea that glob­al warm­ing is a con­spir­a­cy to “manip­u­late the pub­lic mind.”

    He also fre­quent­ly met with and sup­port­ed ranch­er Cliv­en Bundy’s upris­ing against the Bureau of Land Man­age­ment, which he oppos­es for the despot­ic act of charg­ing fees for graz­ing on fed­er­al­ly main­tained land.

    The holy war man­u­al made its way to Spokane Coun­ty Sher­iff Ozzie Kne­zovich.

    “I gave it straight to the FBI,” Kne­zovich told the Seat­tle Times.
    ...

    And note how Shea did­n’t appear to refute any of the con­tent of this how-to man­u­al after it was leaked. He dou­bled-down:

    ...
    The doc­u­ment was leaked to the press by a local lib­er­tar­i­an activist named Tan­ner Rowe, who in a Face­book video called the plan “theo­crat­ic bull­shit.”

    Shea replied to Rowe and the Seat­tle Times in a Face­book video of his own, furi­ous­ly claim­ing that he wasn’t angry over the inci­dent while show­ing off his his­tor­i­cal knowl­edge by claim­ing that the Mayflower com­pact was “a covenant with God to advance Chris­tian­i­ty.”

    “The counter-state is work­ing over­time,” he said, adding that “there are two main counter-states in Amer­i­ca: Marx­ists and Islamists.”

    He went on to crit­i­cize a recent Rolling Stone pro­file of him as an exam­ple of a “Maoist insur­gency mod­el.”

    “In fact, I’ve been want­i­ng to do this video for a long time,” Shea said, repeat­ing angri­ly that he wasn’t upset. “Yes­ter­day, the Rolling Stone [sic] post­ed an 8,000 word arti­cle that was essen­tial­ly a slan­der smear piece – a hit piece – against me.”
    ...

    So that all got referred to the FBI, where is was pre­sum­ably it was con­sid­ered just harm­less puffery by a bunch of harm­less good ‘ol boys.

    And here’s an update on the kinds of activ­i­ties Rep. Shea has been up to with three fel­low far right schemers: accord­ing to leaked chats between Shea and a group of asso­ciates, they were seri­ous­ly plot­ting survielling, harass­ing, and vio­lent­ly attack­ing mem­bers of Antifa. This was appar­ent­ly all prompt­ed by the right-wing hoax about ‘Antifa super­sol­diers’ plan­ning vio­lent attacks Novem­ber 4th, 2017. Recall how even DHS appeared to be tak­en in by this bla­tant hoax. Shea and his asso­ciates also took this seri­ous­ly, or at least pre­tend­ed to. And in their antic­i­pa­tion of this antifa super­sol­dier attack they planned on con­duct­ing psy-ops that includ­ed stalk­ing the homes, cars, work­places, and even child day­care loca­tions of local Antifa mem­bers. The schem­ing went beyond survielling to talk of actu­al vio­lence and wag­ing some sort of false flag psy­cho­log­i­cal war­fare oper­a­tion using the sym­bols of Russ­ian anti-com­mu­nist groups as a way of spread­ing para­noia:

    The Guardian

    Repub­li­can dis­cussed vio­lent attacks and sur­veil­lance with rightwingers

    Wash­ing­ton state rep­re­sen­ta­tive Matt Shea exchanged mes­sages with far-right fig­ures, chat records obtained by the Guardian reveal

    Jason Wil­son

    Sat 20 Apr 2019 02.00 EDT
    Last mod­i­fied on Sat 20 Apr 2019 02.02 EDT

    A Wash­ing­ton state Repub­li­can politi­cian took part in pri­vate dis­cus­sions with rightwing fig­ures about car­ry­ing out sur­veil­lance, “psy­ops” and even vio­lent attacks on per­ceived polit­i­cal ene­mies, accord­ing to chat records obtained by the Guardian.

    State rep­re­sen­ta­tive Matt Shea, who rep­re­sents Spokane Val­ley in the Wash­ing­ton state house, par­tic­i­pat­ed in the chats with three oth­er men. All of the men used screen alias­es – Shea’s was “Verum Bel­la­tor”, Latin for true war­rior. The Guardian con­firmed the iden­ti­ty of those in the chat by cross-check­ing phone num­bers attached to the Sig­nal accounts.

    The group includ­ed Jack Robert­son, who broad­casts a far-right radio show, Radio Free Redoubt, under the alias “John Jacob Schmidt”. The chat also includ­ed Antho­ny Bosworth, whose his­to­ry includes a pub­lic alter­ca­tion with his own daugh­ter and bring­ing guns to a court house. Bosworth par­tic­i­pat­ed in the 2016 occu­pa­tion of the Mal­heur nation­al wildlife refuge, report­ed­ly at Shea’s request.

    The name of anoth­er par­tic­i­pant, who pro­vid­ed the chat records to the Guardian, has been with­held due to con­cerns about per­son­al safe­ty.

    The chats on the mes­sag­ing app Sig­nal took place in the days lead­ing up to a sup­posed “Antifa revolt” on 4 Novem­ber 2017. Through­out late Octo­ber, far-right media out­lets had been stok­ing fears of polit­i­cal con­flict on the basis of planned peace­ful protests by a small left­ist group.

    The men pro­posed to con­front left­ists – whom they repeat­ed­ly refer to as “com­mu­nists” and “Antifa” – with a suite of tac­tics, includ­ing vio­lence.

    Antho­ny Bosworth

    When we locate antifa mem­bers we can con­front their par­ents their work­places their land­lords. We can hit them in there safe spaces
    Oct 29, 2017 5:22PM

    This should become a Pure psy­ops oper­a­tion
    Oct 29, 2017 5:23PM

    If we can catch a few of them alone and work him over a lit­tle bit
    Oct 29, 2017 5:25PM

    Oth­er acts of extreme vio­lence were also sug­gest­ed. When a spe­cif­ic female Spokane res­i­dent was nom­i­nat­ed for sur­veil­lance in the chat group, Robert­son sug­gest­ed:

    Jack Robert­son

    Fist full of hair, and face slam, to a Jer­sey bar­ri­er. Treat em like com­mu­nist rev­o­lu­tion­ar­ies. Then shave her bald with a K‑Bar USMC field knife.
    Nov 3, 2017 11:32PM

    Would make good attach­ment points for hoist­ing com­mu­nists up flag poles. Espe­cial­ly the ones with nip­ple rings
    Nov 4, 2017 9:48PM

    But… if you cinch up zip ties enough, you don’t even NEED nip­ple rings for hoist­ing.
    Nov 4, 2017 9:52PM

    Apart from vio­lence, the men exten­sive­ly dis­cussed tac­tics of sur­veil­lance and intim­i­da­tion.

    Antho­ny Bosworth

    Anoth­er use­ful tac­tic is locat­ing the provo­ca­teurs lead­ers in the mouth pieces and then tar­get­ing there safe spaces while they’re out on the streets riot­ing
    Nov 3, 2017 1:35PM

    Jack Robert­son

    Yes. Homes, cars, work­places, etc.
    Nov 3, 2017 5:51PM

    Child’s day­care loca­tion.
    Nov 3, 2017 5:51PM

    Shea, the elect­ed Repub­li­can leg­is­la­tor, did not demur from any of these sug­ges­tions. He also appeared will­ing to par­tic­i­pate direct­ly in sur­veil­lance of activists.

    In response to a request in the chat for back­ground checks on Spokane res­i­dents, Shea vol­un­teered to help, going on to name three indi­vid­u­als – includ­ing an orga­niz­er for the lib­er­al group Indi­vis­i­ble, and a col­lege pro­fes­sor.

    Matt Shea

    Ok. What BG checks need to be done. Give me the list.
    Nov 6, 2017 9:49PM

    All I have sev­er­al names that have come up... Any info out there?
    Nov 6, 2017 2:54PM

    The men talked about the broad out­lines of what they appeared to con­sid­er to be a loom­ing civ­il war. They also dis­cussed using sym­bols from what they under­stood to be Russ­ian anti-com­mu­nist groups as a way of spread­ing para­noia among their adver­saries.

    The group talked about mak­ing stick­ers and cards using skull and cross­bones images from post-rev­o­lu­tion­ary Russ­ian nation­al­ist groups. After post­ing an image of a white army sol­dier hold­ing such a ban­ner, Bosworth remarked:

    Antho­ny Bosworth

    When we locate their homes we can tag the side­walks and their mail­box­es with the sym­bol
    Oct 29, 2017 5:20PM

    Leave the sym­bol as a call­ing card
    Oct 29, 2017 5:20PM

    We can waste their resources and make them Tar­get some­thing that does­n’t exist
    Oct 29, 2017 5:21PM

    When the left­ist revolt failed to mate­ri­al­ize, Shea did not rethink his con­spir­a­to­r­i­al views and instead blamed the weath­er.

    Matt Shea

    Noth­ing ruins a good com­mu­nist rev­o­lu­tion like snow. Snowflakes afraid of snowflakes
    Nov 6, 2017 9:49PM

    Shea, a six-term leg­is­la­tor and mil­i­tary vet­er­an, came to inter­na­tion­al atten­tion in 2018 after a doc­u­ment he authored sur­faced lay­ing out a“bib­li­cal basis for war”, which appeared to be a plan for an apoc­a­lyp­tic bat­tle with peo­ple who prac­ticed “same sex mar­riage” and “abor­tion”, and instruct­ed: “If they do not yield, kill all males.”

    Shea denied that the doc­u­ment meant what it appeared to say.

    At that time, Shea lost donors, and he was stripped of his role as chair of the Repub­li­can cau­cus – though he was serv­ing in this posi­tion at the time of the leaked chat.

    But Shea has since regrouped, intro­duc­ing bills to crim­i­nal­ize abor­tion and roll back gun laws, which oth­er Repub­li­cans in Wash­ing­ton have sup­port­ed. He has also con­tin­ued push­ing a plan for east­ern Wash­ing­ton to secede and recon­sti­tute as Lib­er­ty State. Robert­son has also been a key archi­tect of this cam­paign, and he and Shea have been reg­u­lar guests on each other’s broad­casts.

    Shea has long pro­mot­ed con­spir­a­to­r­i­al views about the coop­er­a­tion of left­ists and Mus­lims in cre­at­ing “counter-states” in the US. He has asso­ci­at­ed with con­spir­a­cy-mind­ed far-right groups, and lat­er this month will emcee a din­ner for the anti-com­mu­nist John Birch soci­ety in Couer D’Alene, Ida­ho.

    In a tele­phone con­ver­sa­tion with the Guardian, Robert­son said: “I remem­ber a dis­cus­sion in response to Indi­vis­i­ble and Antifa groups that were plan­ning to take to the streets,” but “I don’t recall the details”.

    He denied sur­veilling his polit­i­cal oppo­nents, but added: “If some­one is in my com­mu­ni­ty and they are threat­en­ing vio­lence, I want to know more about them. That just makes sense.”

    He also claimed that the appar­ent threats of vio­lence were not authen­tic.

    “A lot of peo­ple in pri­vate con­ver­sa­tions say things tongue in cheek about what they would like to see hap­pen to these peo­ple, but that is not set­ting a pol­i­cy or estab­lish­ing a pro­to­col for peo­ple to car­ry things out.”

    Some of Shea’s most promi­nent crit­ics have been polit­i­cal con­ser­v­a­tives. Spokane county’s Repub­li­can sher­iff, Ozzie Kne­zovich, has repeat­ed­ly crit­i­cized Shea’s far-right ties.

    “It’s part and par­cel of what this group has been say­ing for years. I think if a state rep­re­sen­ta­tive is con­don­ing vio­lence against his con­stituents then that per­son needs to be removed from office, and I hope the vot­ers will do that at the next elec­tion.

    “Matt Shea is a poor rep­re­sen­ta­tive for the Repub­li­can par­ty. Extrem­ism on both sides is tear­ing this coun­try apart,” Kne­zovich added.

    Asked if the peo­ple around Shea were dan­ger­ous, Kne­zovich said: “Yes.”

    The West­ern States Cen­ter, a pro­gres­sive orga­ni­za­tion, has also pre­vi­ous­ly crit­i­cized Shea. Its exec­u­tive direc­tor, Eric Ward, said via email: “The vio­lent extrem­ism that Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Matt Shea espous­es is a clear threat to our demo­c­ra­t­ic insti­tu­tions and has no place in main­stream polit­i­cal dis­course.

    “We call on Wash­ing­ton State Repub­li­can Par­ty lead­ers to cen­sure Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Shea if these alle­ga­tions are true.”

    ...

    After the Guardian con­tact­ed Robert­son and Shea for com­ment Robert­son spoke on Thurs­day night on the Spokane Chris­t­ian radio sta­tion on which he and Shea broad­cast week­ly pro­grams.

    In a ram­bling broad­cast, Robert­son con­firmed the exis­tence of the chats, called the Guardian a “pro­pa­gan­dist”, read bib­li­cal accounts of war and fol­lowed with: “If it comes time for war and it’s forced upon you, do you not want a leader who is going to sur­round him­self with war­riors? I do.

    “There was talk about doing sur­veil­lance on some of these Antifa peo­ple. Not sur­veil­lance but just start copy­ing and past­ing their com­ments, keep­ing track of who’s who, keep track of where they live, where they work, but that nev­er came to fruition,” he added.

    ———-

    “Repub­li­can dis­cussed vio­lent attacks and sur­veil­lance with rightwingers” by Jason Wil­son; The Guardian; 04/20/2019

    The men talked about the broad out­lines of what they appeared to con­sid­er to be a loom­ing civ­il war. They also dis­cussed using sym­bols from what they under­stood to be Russ­ian anti-com­mu­nist groups as a way of spread­ing para­noia among their adver­saries.”

    A loom­ing civ­il war. That’s how Shea and his co-con­spir­a­tors appeared to inter­pret the inter­net joke about an “Antifa revolt” on Novem­ber 4th. And note how one of the four co-con­spir­a­tors, Antho­ny Bosworth, par­tic­i­pat­ed in the Bundy stand­off at Mal­heur nation­al wildlife refuge appar­ent­ly at Shea’s request. So Shea is quite active in the area of stok­ing armed insur­rec­tions:

    ...
    The group includ­ed Jack Robert­son, who broad­casts a far-right radio show, Radio Free Redoubt, under the alias “John Jacob Schmidt”. The chat also includ­ed Antho­ny Bosworth, whose his­to­ry includes a pub­lic alter­ca­tion with his own daugh­ter and bring­ing guns to a court house. Bosworth par­tic­i­pat­ed in the 2016 occu­pa­tion of the Mal­heur nation­al wildlife refuge, report­ed­ly at Shea’s request.

    The name of anoth­er par­tic­i­pant, who pro­vid­ed the chat records to the Guardian, has been with­held due to con­cerns about per­son­al safe­ty.

    The chats on the mes­sag­ing app Sig­nal took place in the days lead­ing up to a sup­posed “Antifa revolt” on 4 Novem­ber 2017. Through­out late Octo­ber, far-right media out­lets had been stok­ing fears of polit­i­cal con­flict on the basis of planned peace­ful protests by a small left­ist group.
    ...

    And in addi­tion to ideas like stalk­ing their tar­gets’ chil­dren’s day­care cen­ters there were a num­ber of sug­ges­tions of vio­lence. And Shea nev­er protest­ed:

    ...
    The men pro­posed to con­front left­ists – whom they repeat­ed­ly refer to as “com­mu­nists” and “Antifa” – with a suite of tac­tics, includ­ing vio­lence.

    Antho­ny Bosworth

    When we locate antifa mem­bers we can con­front their par­ents their work­places their land­lords. We can hit them in there safe spaces
    Oct 29, 2017 5:22PM

    This should become a Pure psy­ops oper­a­tion
    Oct 29, 2017 5:23PM

    If we can catch a few of them alone and work him over a lit­tle bit
    Oct 29, 2017 5:25PM

    Oth­er acts of extreme vio­lence were also sug­gest­ed. When a spe­cif­ic female Spokane res­i­dent was nom­i­nat­ed for sur­veil­lance in the chat group, Robert­son sug­gest­ed:

    Jack Robert­son

    Fist full of hair, and face slam, to a Jer­sey bar­ri­er. Treat em like com­mu­nist rev­o­lu­tion­ar­ies. Then shave her bald with a K‑Bar USMC field knife.
    Nov 3, 2017 11:32PM

    Would make good attach­ment points for hoist­ing com­mu­nists up flag poles. Espe­cial­ly the ones with nip­ple rings
    Nov 4, 2017 9:48PM

    But… if you cinch up zip ties enough, you don’t even NEED nip­ple rings for hoist­ing.
    Nov 4, 2017 9:52PM

    Apart from vio­lence, the men exten­sive­ly dis­cussed tac­tics of sur­veil­lance and intim­i­da­tion.

    Antho­ny Bosworth

    Anoth­er use­ful tac­tic is locat­ing the provo­ca­teurs lead­ers in the mouth pieces and then tar­get­ing there safe spaces while they’re out on the streets riot­ing
    Nov 3, 2017 1:35PM

    Jack Robert­son

    Yes. Homes, cars, work­places, etc.
    Nov 3, 2017 5:51PM

    Child’s day­care loca­tion.
    Nov 3, 2017 5:51PM

    Shea, the elect­ed Repub­li­can leg­is­la­tor, did not demur from any of these sug­ges­tions. He also appeared will­ing to par­tic­i­pate direct­ly in sur­veil­lance of activists.
    ...

    The plans also includ­ed using the sym­bols of a Russ­ian anti-com­mu­nist group to sow para­noia. Keep in mind, if they had pulled this part off it’s entire­ly pos­si­ble we would have seen a nation­al freak­out over Rus­sia anti-com­mu­nist groups oper­at­ing in the US:

    ...
    The group talked about mak­ing stick­ers and cards using skull and cross­bones images from post-rev­o­lu­tion­ary Russ­ian nation­al­ist groups. After post­ing an image of a white army sol­dier hold­ing such a ban­ner, Bosworth remarked:

    Antho­ny Bosworth

    When we locate their homes we can tag the side­walks and their mail­box­es with the sym­bol
    Oct 29, 2017 5:20PM

    Leave the sym­bol as a call­ing card
    Oct 29, 2017 5:20PM

    We can waste their resources and make them Tar­get some­thing that does­n’t exist
    Oct 29, 2017 5:21PM

    ...

    And note how, despite FBI inves­ti­ga­tion into Shea’s dis­tri­b­u­tion of the holy war pam­phlet back in Novem­ber, that does­n’t appear to have had any reper­cus­sions for Shea in the Wash­ing­ton state leg­is­la­ture oth­er than los­ing some donors. He’s still a rep­re­sen­ta­tive in good stand­ing and intro­duced bills that get Repub­li­can sup­port:

    ...
    Shea, a six-term leg­is­la­tor and mil­i­tary vet­er­an, came to inter­na­tion­al atten­tion in 2018 after a doc­u­ment he authored sur­faced lay­ing out a“bib­li­cal basis for war”, which appeared to be a plan for an apoc­a­lyp­tic bat­tle with peo­ple who prac­ticed “same sex mar­riage” and “abor­tion”, and instruct­ed: “If they do not yield, kill all males.”

    Shea denied that the doc­u­ment meant what it appeared to say.

    At that time, Shea lost donors, and he was stripped of his role as chair of the Repub­li­can cau­cus – though he was serv­ing in this posi­tion at the time of the leaked chat.

    But Shea has since regrouped, intro­duc­ing bills to crim­i­nal­ize abor­tion and roll back gun laws, which oth­er Repub­li­cans in Wash­ing­ton have sup­port­ed. He has also con­tin­ued push­ing a plan for east­ern Wash­ing­ton to secede and recon­sti­tute as Lib­er­ty State. Robert­son has also been a key archi­tect of this cam­paign, and he and Shea have been reg­u­lar guests on each other’s broad­casts.
    ...

    While Shea denies there were any real plans for vio­lence, the Repub­li­can sher­iff of Spokane coun­ty comes right out and calls Shea’s asso­ciates dan­ger­ous. And when one of the co-con­spir­a­tor, Jack Robert­son, is asked about the leak­ing of these plans, he makes a ref­er­ence to want­i­ng a war­rior leader if you’re head­ing into war, which isn’t a very com­pelling denial of the charges:

    ...
    He also claimed that the appar­ent threats of vio­lence were not authen­tic.

    “A lot of peo­ple in pri­vate con­ver­sa­tions say things tongue in cheek about what they would like to see hap­pen to these peo­ple, but that is not set­ting a pol­i­cy or estab­lish­ing a pro­to­col for peo­ple to car­ry things out.”

    Some of Shea’s most promi­nent crit­ics have been polit­i­cal con­ser­v­a­tives. Spokane county’s Repub­li­can sher­iff, Ozzie Kne­zovich, has repeat­ed­ly crit­i­cized Shea’s far-right ties.

    “It’s part and par­cel of what this group has been say­ing for years. I think if a state rep­re­sen­ta­tive is con­don­ing vio­lence against his con­stituents then that per­son needs to be removed from office, and I hope the vot­ers will do that at the next elec­tion.

    “Matt Shea is a poor rep­re­sen­ta­tive for the Repub­li­can par­ty. Extrem­ism on both sides is tear­ing this coun­try apart,” Kne­zovich added.

    Asked if the peo­ple around Shea were dan­ger­ous, Kne­zovich said: “Yes.”

    ...

    After the Guardian con­tact­ed Robert­son and Shea for com­ment Robert­son spoke on Thurs­day night on the Spokane Chris­t­ian radio sta­tion on which he and Shea broad­cast week­ly pro­grams.

    In a ram­bling broad­cast, Robert­son con­firmed the exis­tence of the chats, called the Guardian a “pro­pa­gan­dist”, read bib­li­cal accounts of war and fol­lowed with: “If it comes time for war and it’s forced upon you, do you not want a leader who is going to sur­round him­self with war­riors? I do.
    ...

    So that’s anoth­er exam­ple of the kind of far right domes­tic ter­ror threat that the FBI and DHS appar­ent­ly view as not a real threat.

    And in relat­ed news, remem­ber Christo­pher Has­son, the neo-Nazi mem­ber of the Coast Guard who was found plot­ting mass ter­ror attacks and a list of tar­gets? Yeah, it turns out the gov­ern­ment has­n’t actu­al­ly charged Has­son with any ter­ror-relat­ed charges so his pub­lic defend­er is try­ing to get him released. Yep.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | April 22, 2019, 12:30 pm
  7. Here’s a fol­lowup on the sto­ry of Matt Shea, the far right Wash­ing­ton State rep­re­sen­ta­tive who pub­lished a man­u­al on wag­ing Bib­li­cal Holy war and was dis­cov­ered to have tak­en part in a chat group where they plot­ted survielling, harass­ing, and poten­tial­ly assault­ing antifa mem­bers: Shea con­tin­ues to issue no denials that he took part in the plot but asserts that he per­son­al­ly nev­er advo­cat­ed vio­lence and was just try­ing to pro­tect his com­mu­ni­ty from dan­ger­ous antifa mem­bers.

    Now Shea is try­ing to dis­cred­it Jason Wil­son, the author of the Guardian arti­cle that revealed Shea’s secret plot. What is Shea doing to dis­cred­it Wil­son? By link­ing to an arti­cle crit­i­cal of Wil­son from the Aus­tralian web­site XYZ.net.au. Oh, and it turns out XYZ is white nation­al­ist web­site:

    The Spokesman-Review

    Rep. Matt Shea links to white nation­al­ist web­site, defends run­ning back­ground checks on polit­i­cal oppo­nents

    By Chad Sokol
    Wed., April 24, 2019, 6:43 a.m.

    Fum­ing after a new round of head­lines about his inter­ac­tions with far-right activists, state Rep. Matt Shea direct­ed his 4,600 Face­book fol­low­ers to an obscure Aus­tralian web­site that traf­fics in white nation­al­ist memes and Holo­caust revi­sion­ism.

    Specif­i­cal­ly, the Spokane Val­ley leg­is­la­tor shared a link to an arti­cle on XYZ.net.au that attempts to dis­cred­it Guardian jour­nal­ist Jason Wil­son, who revealed on Sat­ur­day that Shea took part in a 2017 text chat that dis­cussed attack­ing and spy­ing on polit­i­cal ene­mies.

    It’s unclear if Shea vis­its the site reg­u­lar­ly. He doesn’t appear to have shared any XYZ arti­cles before Mon­day night, and he didn’t respond to mul­ti­ple mes­sages seek­ing com­ment on Tues­day, in keep­ing with his usu­al prac­tice of ignor­ing media inquiries.

    XYZ is akin to a slight­ly more extreme Aus­tralian ver­sion of Bre­it­bart News that reg­u­lar­ly takes aim at main­stream out­lets such as the Guardian and the Aus­tralian Broad­cast­ing Cor­po­ra­tion.

    “They’re a white nation­al­ist source, and that’s a new lev­el for Shea,” said Jac Archer, the vice chair of the Spokane Coun­ty Democ­rats and a mem­ber of Spokane Com­mu­ni­ty Against Racism. “And I think it rais­es the ques­tion: Is this reg­u­lar read­ing mate­r­i­al for Shea? Is he get­ting sent this stuff and not vet­ting it?”

    If Shea had scrolled through the XYZ home­page, he might have spot­ted an arti­cle that men­tions “how the can­cer­ous sys­tem is crack­ing down on White Nation­al­ism.”

    Or he might have noticed this head­line: “Alt-Christ: The emerg­ing Chris­t­ian revolt against Satan­ic globo­ho­mo dis­or­der.”

    That post cit­ed a tweet by Mike Cer­novich, an alt-right provo­ca­teur who pro­mot­ed the hoax known as Piz­za­gate, which result­ed in gun­fire at a Wash­ing­ton, D.C., piz­za par­lor.

    If Shea had clicked around to see some old­er XYZ con­tent, he might have found numer­ous anti-Semit­ic ref­er­ences to the financier George Soros.

    Or he might have come across a review of a book titled “The Myth of Ger­man Vil­lainy,” which pur­ports to “destroy the offi­cial nar­ra­tive” of the Holo­caust and ques­tions the inno­cence of mil­lions of mur­dered Jews.

    Shea ear­li­er this month vot­ed for a new law encour­ag­ing Holo­caust edu­ca­tion in pub­lic schools.

    In an April 12 speech on the House floor, Shea said teach­ing about the Holo­caust “is not just about the Jew­ish peo­ple. It’s about all peo­ple, of every eth­nic­i­ty and every reli­gion. When human beings do that to one anoth­er, nobody wins, and we allow it to hap­pen, we allow evil into the world. And we can stand here on this floor today and say that the Holo­caust was evil.”

    How­ev­er, Shea has been accused of reli­gious big­otry before, includ­ing when he found­ed a local chap­ter of the anti-Mus­lim group ACT for Amer­i­ca.

    The arti­cle that Shea shared Mon­day was pub­lished in Jan­u­ary 2018 and makes a num­ber of exag­ger­at­ed claims and ten­u­ous con­nec­tions to paint Wil­son, the Guardian writer, as an anar­chist sym­pa­thiz­er.

    It wasn’t the first time XYZ had com­plained about Wil­son, an Aus­tralia native liv­ing in Port­land who has report­ed exten­sive­ly on polit­i­cal extrem­ism in both coun­tries.

    In his Face­book post Mon­day night, Shea called the Guardian sto­ry “an extreme­ly mis­lead­ing hit-piece.”

    But nei­ther he nor two oth­er men who par­tic­i­pat­ed in the 2017 group chat, Antho­ny Bosworth and Jack Robert­son, have dis­put­ed any fac­tu­al details of the sto­ry, which was based on copies of the chat obtained from an anony­mous source.

    Accord­ing to the Guardian, Bosworth, who took part in the 2016 armed occu­pa­tion of an Ore­gon wildlife refuge, talked of con­fronting antifa, or anti-fas­cists, in their homes and work­places.

    Robert­son, who hosts the show Radio Free Redoubt using the pseu­do­nym John Jacob Schmidt, added child day care cen­ters to the list of sug­gest­ed tar­gets, and described assault­ing a woman by slam­ming her face into a traf­fic bar­ri­er.

    There was no indi­ca­tion that Shea made threats of vio­lence him­self, though he did not attempt to dis­suade the oth­ers. At one point, the Guardian report­ed, he vol­un­teered to run “BG checks” on at least three indi­vid­u­als, includ­ing a col­lege pro­fes­sor and an orga­niz­er for Indi­vis­i­ble, a local lib­er­al group.

    In Monday’s Face­book post, Shea wrote: “Of course I have done back­ground checks to pro­tect my fam­i­ly and my com­mu­ni­ty, but that was only in response to threats already com­ing from the left. I will con­tin­ue to fight to pro­tect the Con­sti­tu­tion, my fam­i­ly, and my com­mu­ni­ty. I will not back down. I will not quit. I will not give in. Ever.”

    Mean­while on Tues­day, the Wash­ing­ton State Demo­c­ra­t­ic Par­ty and the West­ern States Cen­ter, a pro­gres­sive group based in Port­land, con­tin­ued call­ing for Shea to be expelled from the GOP cau­cus.

    ...

    On Tues­day, House Repub­li­can Leader J.T. Wilcox, of Yelm, said he had talked to Shea about the 2017 mes­sages and was aware of the web­site that Shea had shared on Face­book. But Wilcox said he had no imme­di­ate plans to expel Shea from the cau­cus.

    “He can link to what­ev­er he wants,” Wilcox said. “Every­body has their own Face­book page.”

    Rebekah Mason, a Demo­c­ra­t­ic orga­niz­er in the 4th Leg­isla­tive Dis­trict that Shea rep­re­sents, said the shar­ing of racist pro­pa­gan­da can’t go unchal­lenged.

    “It’s embar­rass­ing to have an elect­ed rep­re­sen­ta­tive who throws around con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries and racism like that,” Mason said. “When you’re an elect­ed offi­cial, you have to be held account­able, and that includes social media posts.”

    As of Mon­day evening, the post remained on Shea’s Face­book page.

    ———-

    “Rep. Matt Shea links to white nation­al­ist web­site, defends run­ning back­ground checks on polit­i­cal oppo­nents” by Chad Sokol; The Spokesman-Review; 04/24/2019

    “XYZ is akin to a slight­ly more extreme Aus­tralian ver­sion of Bre­it­bart News that reg­u­lar­ly takes aim at main­stream out­lets such as the Guardian and the Aus­tralian Broad­cast­ing Cor­po­ra­tion.”

    A slight­ly more extreme Aus­tralian ver­sion of Bre­it­bart News. In oth­er words, the kind of site that laments oppo­si­tion to White Nation­al­ism and ques­tions the Holo­caust. That’s the site that wrote the arti­cle Shea used to defend him­self:

    ...
    “They’re a white nation­al­ist source, and that’s a new lev­el for Shea,” said Jac Archer, the vice chair of the Spokane Coun­ty Democ­rats and a mem­ber of Spokane Com­mu­ni­ty Against Racism. “And I think it rais­es the ques­tion: Is this reg­u­lar read­ing mate­r­i­al for Shea? Is he get­ting sent this stuff and not vet­ting it?”

    If Shea had scrolled through the XYZ home­page, he might have spot­ted an arti­cle that men­tions “how the can­cer­ous sys­tem is crack­ing down on White Nation­al­ism.”

    Or he might have noticed this head­line: “Alt-Christ: The emerg­ing Chris­t­ian revolt against Satan­ic globo­ho­mo dis­or­der.”

    That post cit­ed a tweet by Mike Cer­novich, an alt-right provo­ca­teur who pro­mot­ed the hoax known as Piz­za­gate, which result­ed in gun­fire at a Wash­ing­ton, D.C., piz­za par­lor.

    If Shea had clicked around to see some old­er XYZ con­tent, he might have found numer­ous anti-Semit­ic ref­er­ences to the financier George Soros.

    Or he might have come across a review of a book titled “The Myth of Ger­man Vil­lainy,” which pur­ports to “destroy the offi­cial nar­ra­tive” of the Holo­caust and ques­tions the inno­cence of mil­lions of mur­dered Jews.
    ...

    And, again, note how Shea con­tin­ues to not dis­pute any of the facts regard­ing his par­tic­i­pa­tion in the chat group where they plot­ting their spying/psyop/violence cam­paign against antifa mem­bers:

    ...
    The arti­cle that Shea shared Mon­day was pub­lished in Jan­u­ary 2018 and makes a num­ber of exag­ger­at­ed claims and ten­u­ous con­nec­tions to paint Wil­son, the Guardian writer, as an anar­chist sym­pa­thiz­er.

    It wasn’t the first time XYZ had com­plained about Wil­son, an Aus­tralia native liv­ing in Port­land who has report­ed exten­sive­ly on polit­i­cal extrem­ism in both coun­tries.

    In his Face­book post Mon­day night, Shea called the Guardian sto­ry “an extreme­ly mis­lead­ing hit-piece.”

    But nei­ther he nor two oth­er men who par­tic­i­pat­ed in the 2017 group chat, Antho­ny Bosworth and Jack Robert­son, have dis­put­ed any fac­tu­al details of the sto­ry, which was based on copies of the chat obtained from an anony­mous source.

    Accord­ing to the Guardian, Bosworth, who took part in the 2016 armed occu­pa­tion of an Ore­gon wildlife refuge, talked of con­fronting antifa, or anti-fas­cists, in their homes and work­places.

    Robert­son, who hosts the show Radio Free Redoubt using the pseu­do­nym John Jacob Schmidt, added child day care cen­ters to the list of sug­gest­ed tar­gets, and described assault­ing a woman by slam­ming her face into a traf­fic bar­ri­er.

    There was no indi­ca­tion that Shea made threats of vio­lence him­self, though he did not attempt to dis­suade the oth­ers. At one point, the Guardian report­ed, he vol­un­teered to run “BG checks” on at least three indi­vid­u­als, includ­ing a col­lege pro­fes­sor and an orga­niz­er for Indi­vis­i­ble, a local lib­er­al group.
    ...

    And note the Wash­ing­ton State Repub­li­cans’ response to Shea’s link­ing to a white nation­al­ist web­site to defend him­self against accu­sa­tions that he’s a white nation­al­ist: House minor­i­ty leader J.T. Wilcox explains he talked to Shea about it and that was it. As Wilcox put it, “He can link to what­ev­er he wants...Everybody has their own Face­book page”. In oth­er words, it’s no big deal:

    ...
    Mean­while on Tues­day, the Wash­ing­ton State Demo­c­ra­t­ic Par­ty and the West­ern States Cen­ter, a pro­gres­sive group based in Port­land, con­tin­ued call­ing for Shea to be expelled from the GOP cau­cus.

    ...

    On Tues­day, House Repub­li­can Leader J.T. Wilcox, of Yelm, said he had talked to Shea about the 2017 mes­sages and was aware of the web­site that Shea had shared on Face­book. But Wilcox said he had no imme­di­ate plans to expel Shea from the cau­cus.

    “He can link to what­ev­er he wants,” Wilcox said. “Every­body has their own Face­book page.”
    ...

    So it appears the Wash­ing­ton State Repub­li­cans have a bit of a ‘Steve King’ prob­lem on their hands. Recall how Iowa Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Steve King has been open­ly flirt­ing with white nation­al­ism for years with­out any sort of rebuke from his Repub­li­can col­leagues. King’s antics kept get­ting more and more overt until he final­ly crossed some sort of white-suprema­cist-love thresh­old that even the GOP could no longer ignore when he ques­tioned whey terms like “white suprema­cy” and “white nation­al­ism” are con­sid­ered neg­a­tive now. But even though King was stripped of his com­mit­tee assign­ments after all that, the GOP still has­n’t kicked him out of the par­ty.

    Will Matt Shea ever final­ly cross the kind of line that gets him seri­ous­ly rebuked by his fel­low Wash­ing­ton State Repub­li­cans? We’ll see, but at this point it’s clear that dis­trib­ut­ing a man­u­al on wag­ing Holy War and engag­ing in a secret far right plot to stalk, harass, and beat up antifa mem­bers does­n’t actu­al­ly cross that line for Wash­ing­ton State’s GOP.

    And in relat­ed news, Steve King just claimed that the expe­ri­ence of being stripped of his com­mit­tee assign­ments gave him insight into how Jesus felt after get­ting cru­ci­fied.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | April 24, 2019, 2:22 pm
  8. Here’s a pro­found­ly dis­turb­ing update to the case of Christo­pher Has­son, the neo-Nazi Coast Guard offi­cer who was caught stock­pil­ing weapons, com­piled a hit-list of promi­nent left-wing media per­son­al­i­ties and politi­cians, and report­ed­ly dreams of killing off almost every­one on the plan­et using bio­log­i­cal weapons:

    For starters, the guy was just ordered to be released on bail, albeit under super­vi­sion. This is due to the fact that pros­e­cu­tors have yet to bring ter­ror­ism charges against him. He was called a “domes­tic ter­ror­ist” in the ini­tial court fil­ings but he did­n’t face actu­al ter­ror­ism charges. When Has­son was detained in Feb­ru­ary the judge agreed to keep Has­son in cus­tody but said he was will­ing to revis­it his deci­sion if pros­e­cu­tors didn’t bring more seri­ous charges with­in two weeks. Those new charges had­n’t hap­pened and Has­son’s defense attor­ney has been push­ing to get him released from cus­tody while await­ing tri­al. Has­son’s attor­ney also wrote in a court fil­ing last week that pros­e­cu­tors recent­ly dis­closed that they don’t expect to seek any addi­tion­al charges. So it remains to be seen if ter­ror­ism charges, or any­thing more than the exist­ing weapons and drug pos­ses­sion charges, will be brought for­ward but in a new court fil­ing this week pros­e­cu­tors urged the judge to keep him in cus­tody pend­ing tri­al on firearms and weapons charges and the judge clear­ly dis­agreed.

    The sec­ond high­ly dis­turb­ing update to this case is in the new court fil­ing pros­e­cu­tors issued they made a chill­ing alle­ga­tion: Has­san planned on assas­si­nat­ing Supreme Court jus­tices. Specif­i­cal­ly, Has­son did an inter­net search for ‘are supreme court jus­tices pro­tect­ed’ about two weeks before he searched for the home address­es of two Supreme Court jus­tices “with­in min­utes before and after search­ing firearm sales web­sites.” Pros­e­cu­tors also note he was in ille­gal pos­ses­sion of unreg­is­tered and unmarked silencers. So the neo-Nazi Coast Guard lieu­tenant who appears to have been plot­ting a tar­get­ed assas­si­na­tion cam­paign with the goal of trig­ger­ing a race war and mass mur­der on a much larg­er scale just got release on bail.

    First, here’s an arti­cle about the new court fil­ing that men­tions Has­son’s plans for assas­si­nat­ing Supreme Court jus­tices, his pos­ses­sion of silencers, and the then-ongo­ing fight for Has­son’s release due to a lack of ter­ror­ism charges:

    Asso­ci­at­ed Press

    Feds: Coast Guard offi­cer tar­get­ed Supreme Court jus­tices

    By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
    04/24/2019

    ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) — A Coast Guard lieu­tenant accused of stock­pil­ing guns and com­pil­ing a hit list of promi­nent Democ­rats and net­work TV jour­nal­ists looked at oth­er tar­gets: two Supreme Court jus­tices and two exec­u­tives of social media com­pa­nies, accord­ing to fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors.

    Those new alle­ga­tions are con­tained in a court fil­ing Tues­day in which pros­e­cu­tors urge a mag­is­trate judge to keep Christo­pher Has­son, 49, detained in cus­tody pend­ing tri­al on firearms and weapons charges.

    The fil­ing doesn’t name the two jus­tices and two com­pa­ny exec­u­tives but says Has­son searched online for their home address­es in March 2018, with­in min­utes before and after search­ing firearm sales web­sites.

    “The defen­dant con­duct­ed an inter­net search for ‘are supreme court jus­tices pro­tect­ed’ approx­i­mate­ly two weeks pri­or to search­ing for the home address­es of the two Supreme Court jus­tices,” Assis­tant U.S. Attor­ney Thomas Win­dom wrote in a foot­note.

    Has­son, who is due back in court Thurs­day for a deten­tion hear­ing, is renew­ing his request to be released from cus­tody while await­ing tri­al. A lawyer who rep­re­sent­ed Has­son at a Feb. 21 deten­tion hear­ing accused pros­e­cu­tors of mak­ing inflam­ma­to­ry accu­sa­tions against Has­son with­out pro­vid­ing evi­dence to back them up.

    Pros­e­cu­tors haven’t charged him with any ter­ror­ism-relat­ed offens­es since his Feb. 15 arrest and sub­se­quent indict­ment in Mary­land. Hasson’s attor­ney, Liz Oyer, wrote in a court fil­ing last week that pros­e­cu­tors recent­ly dis­closed that they don’t expect to seek any addi­tion­al charges.

    ...

    In a Feb­ru­ary court fil­ing, pros­e­cu­tors called Has­son a “domes­tic ter­ror­ist” and said he “intends to mur­der inno­cent civil­ians on a scale rarely seen in this coun­try.” They also said he is a self-described white nation­al­ist who espoused extrem­ist views for years and draft­ed an email in which he said he was “dream­ing of a way to kill almost every last per­son on the earth.”

    Hasson’s inter­net search his­to­ry “lays bare his views on race, which in turn inform his crim­i­nal con­duct,” Win­dom wrote.

    In Novem­ber 2017, accord­ing to the pros­e­cu­tor, Has­son searched for “please god let there be a race war.” And the defen­dant did an inter­net search for guns with a search term that used a racial slur for blacks in March 2018 before vis­it­ing firearm sales web­sites.

    Pros­e­cu­tors have said Has­son appeared to be plan­ning attacks inspired by the man­i­festo of Anders Behring Breivik, the Nor­we­gian right-wing extrem­ist who killed 77 peo­ple in a 2011 bomb-and-shoot­ing ram­page. Win­dom said “it can­not go unno­ticed” that the ter­ror­ist who per­pe­trat­ed the dead­ly New Zealand mosque attacks in March also was a “devo­tee” of Breivik.

    In 2017, Has­son sent him­self a draft let­ter he had writ­ten to a neo-Nazi leader and “iden­ti­fied him­self as a White Nation­al­ist for over 30 years and advo­cat­ed for ‘focused vio­lence’ in order to estab­lish a white home­land,” pros­e­cu­tors said.

    That let­ter also refers to “Mis­souri,” a per­son with whom Has­son has a “long his­to­ry,” Win­dom wrote. In 1995, accord­ing to fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors, Has­son and “Mis­souri” went to a home in Hamp­ton, Vir­ginia, where the home­own­er arrived by car and asked them why they were there. The vic­tim iden­ti­fied Has­son and Mis­souri as “skin­heads.”

    “Mis­souri,” wear­ing a black jack­et with Swasti­ka patch­es, aimed a hand­gun at the victim’s face and pulled the trig­ger, accord­ing to a police report cit­ed by pros­e­cu­tors. When the gun didn’t fire, “Mis­souri” beat the vic­tim with it.

    “Chris Has­son was stand­ing there with the sus­pect when this occurred,” Win­dom wrote.

    Inves­ti­ga­tors found 15 guns, includ­ing sev­en rifles, and over 1,000 rounds of ammu­ni­tion at Hasson’s base­ment apart­ment in Sil­ver Spring, Mary­land, pros­e­cu­tors said. Hasson’s Feb. 27 indict­ment also accus­es him of ille­gal pos­ses­sion of tra­madol, an opi­oid painkiller.

    Pros­e­cu­tors claim Has­son drew up what appeared to be a com­put­er-spread­sheet hit list that includ­ed House Speak­er Nan­cy Pelosi, Sen­ate Demo­c­ra­t­ic Leader Chuck Schumer and pres­i­den­tial hope­fuls Sens. Kirsten Gilli­brand, Eliz­a­beth War­ren, Cory Book­er and Kamala Har­ris. Sev­er­al net­work TV jour­nal­ists — MSNBC’s Chris Hayes and Joe Scar­bor­ough and CNN’s Chris Cuo­mo and Van Jones — also were men­tioned.

    Dur­ing the Feb­ru­ary deten­tion hear­ing, U.S. Mag­is­trate Judge Charles Day agreed to keep Has­son held in cus­tody but said he was will­ing to revis­it his deci­sion if pros­e­cu­tors didn’t bring more seri­ous charges with­in two weeks.

    Has­son plead­ed not guilty last month to charges of ille­gal pos­ses­sion of firearm silencers, pos­ses­sion of firearms by a drug addict and unlaw­ful user, and pos­ses­sion of a con­trolled sub­stance. He faces a max­i­mum of 31 years in prison if con­vict­ed of all four counts in his indict­ment.

    “The silencers serve one pur­pose: to mur­der qui­et­ly. The defen­dant intend­ed to do so on a mass scale, and his deten­tion has thwart­ed his unlaw­ful desire,” Win­dom wrote.

    Has­son, a for­mer Marine, worked at Coast Guard head­quar­ters in Wash­ing­ton on a pro­gram to acquire advanced new cut­ters for the agency. A Coast Guard spokesman has said Has­son will remain on active duty until the case against him is resolved.

    ———-

    “Feds: Coast Guard offi­cer tar­get­ed Supreme Court jus­tices” by MICHAEL KUNZELMAN; Asso­ci­at­ed Press; 04/24/2019

    “Dur­ing the Feb­ru­ary deten­tion hear­ing, U.S. Mag­is­trate Judge Charles Day agreed to keep Has­son held in cus­tody but said he was will­ing to revis­it his deci­sion if pros­e­cu­tors didn’t bring more seri­ous charges with­in two weeks.

    All they need­ed to do was bring ter­ror­ism charges to pre­vent Has­son from being released pend­ing tri­al. But some­how, despite the abun­dance of evi­dence, those charges were nev­er brought for­ward. And accord­ing to Has­son’s attor­ney, the pros­e­cu­tors told her last week that there were be no addi­tion­al charges beyond the exist­ing weapons and drug charges. Pros­e­cu­tors did label Has­son a “domes­tic ter­ror­ist” in their Feb­ru­ary court fil­ing but nev­er actu­al­ly charged him with plot­ting ter­ror:

    ...
    Has­son, who is due back in court Thurs­day for a deten­tion hear­ing, is renew­ing his request to be released from cus­tody while await­ing tri­al. A lawyer who rep­re­sent­ed Has­son at a Feb. 21 deten­tion hear­ing accused pros­e­cu­tors of mak­ing inflam­ma­to­ry accu­sa­tions against Has­son with­out pro­vid­ing evi­dence to back them up.

    Pros­e­cu­tors haven’t charged him with any ter­ror­ism-relat­ed offens­es since his Feb. 15 arrest and sub­se­quent indict­ment in Mary­land. Hasson’s attor­ney, Liz Oyer, wrote in a court fil­ing last week that pros­e­cu­tors recent­ly dis­closed that they don’t expect to seek any addi­tion­al charges.

    ...

    In a Feb­ru­ary court fil­ing, pros­e­cu­tors called Has­son a “domes­tic ter­ror­ist” and said he “intends to mur­der inno­cent civil­ians on a scale rarely seen in this coun­try.” They also said he is a self-described white nation­al­ist who espoused extrem­ist views for years and draft­ed an email in which he said he was “dream­ing of a way to kill almost every last per­son on the earth.”
    ...

    And this lack of ter­ror charges took place despite the fact that Has­son’s search his­to­ry demon­strates an inter­est in assas­si­nat­ing two Supreme Court jus­tices:

    ...
    The fil­ing doesn’t name the two jus­tices and two com­pa­ny exec­u­tives but says Has­son searched online for their home address­es in March 2018, with­in min­utes before and after search­ing firearm sales web­sites.

    “The defen­dant con­duct­ed an inter­net search for ‘are supreme court jus­tices pro­tect­ed’ approx­i­mate­ly two weeks pri­or to search­ing for the home address­es of the two Supreme Court jus­tices,” Assis­tant U.S. Attor­ney Thomas Win­dom wrote in a foot­note.
    ...

    And then there’s the fact that Has­son sent him­self a draft of let­ter he was send­ing to a neo-Nazi leader were Has­son advo­cat­ed for “focused vio­lence”, which is exact­ly what assas­si­nat­ing Supreme Court jus­tices should be con­sid­ered: strate­gic focused neo-Nazi vio­lence:

    ...
    Hasson’s inter­net search his­to­ry “lays bare his views on race, which in turn inform his crim­i­nal con­duct,” Win­dom wrote.

    In Novem­ber 2017, accord­ing to the pros­e­cu­tor, Has­son searched for “please god let there be a race war.” And the defen­dant did an inter­net search for guns with a search term that used a racial slur for blacks in March 2018 before vis­it­ing firearm sales web­sites.

    Pros­e­cu­tors have said Has­son appeared to be plan­ning attacks inspired by the man­i­festo of Anders Behring Breivik, the Nor­we­gian right-wing extrem­ist who killed 77 peo­ple in a 2011 bomb-and-shoot­ing ram­page. Win­dom said “it can­not go unno­ticed” that the ter­ror­ist who per­pe­trat­ed the dead­ly New Zealand mosque attacks in March also was a “devo­tee” of Breivik.

    In 2017, Has­son sent him­self a draft let­ter he had writ­ten to a neo-Nazi leader and “iden­ti­fied him­self as a White Nation­al­ist for over 30 years and advo­cat­ed for ‘focused vio­lence’ in order to estab­lish a white home­land,” pros­e­cu­tors said.

    ...

    Now we’re learn­ing that he head ille­gal silencers too:

    ...
    Has­son plead­ed not guilty last month to charges of ille­gal pos­ses­sion of firearm silencers, pos­ses­sion of firearms by a drug addict and unlaw­ful user, and pos­ses­sion of a con­trolled sub­stance. He faces a max­i­mum of 31 years in prison if con­vict­ed of all four counts in his indict­ment.

    “The silencers serve one pur­pose: to mur­der qui­et­ly. The defen­dant intend­ed to do so on a mass scale, and his deten­tion has thwart­ed his unlaw­ful desire,” Win­dom wrote.
    ...

    And none of that was enough to keep Has­son detained because he was nev­er actu­al­ly charged with any ter­ror­ism-relat­ed offens­es:

    Asso­ci­at­ed Press

    Release approved for Coast Guard offi­cer accused of ter­ror

    By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
    4/25/2019

    GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — A fed­er­al mag­is­trate says a Coast Guard lieu­tenant accused of being a domes­tic ter­ror­ist is enti­tled to be released from cus­tody before his tri­al.

    U.S. Mag­is­trate Judge Charles Day not­ed on Thurs­day that 50-year-old Christo­pher Has­son hasn’t been charged with any ter­ror­ism relat­ed offens­es. Has­son was arrest­ed Feb. 15 and is await­ing tri­al on firearms and drug charges. Pros­e­cu­tors say he cre­at­ed a hit list of promi­nent Democ­rats, two Supreme Court jus­tices, net­work TV jour­nal­ists and social media com­pa­ny exec­u­tives.

    Day says he still has “grave con­cerns” about Has­son based on infor­ma­tion pros­e­cu­tors have pre­sent­ed. The mag­is­trate says Has­son is “going to have to have a whole lot of super­vi­sion.”

    Day didn’t order Has­son to be imme­di­ate­ly released. The mag­is­trate gave Hasson’s defense attor­ney a few days to arrange con­di­tions of release that would be accept­able to the court.

    ———-

    “Release approved for Coast Guard offi­cer accused of ter­ror” by MICHAEL KUNZELMAN; Asso­ci­at­ed Press; 4/25/2019

    U.S. Mag­is­trate Judge Charles Day not­ed on Thurs­day that 50-year-old Christo­pher Has­son hasn’t been charged with any ter­ror­ism relat­ed offens­es. Has­son was arrest­ed Feb. 15 and is await­ing tri­al on firearms and drug charges. Pros­e­cu­tors say he cre­at­ed a hit list of promi­nent Democ­rats, two Supreme Court jus­tices, net­work TV jour­nal­ists and social media com­pa­ny exec­u­tives.”

    So it’s going to be quite inter­est­ing to see what the con­di­tions are for Has­son’s even­tu­al release. What’s the safe and appro­pri­ate way to release some­one who was plot­ting both mass casu­al­ty ter­ror attacks and tar­get­ed assas­si­na­tions? We’ll see what the court decides.

    It’s also worth ask­ing the ques­tion of what would have hap­pened to Has­son if he was­n’t fac­ing gun and drug charges? What if his guns were all legal and he did­n’t have all that ille­gal tra­madol. Would he be fac­ing any charges at all at this point?

    Final­ly, it’s worth ask­ing the ques­tion of what kind of con­sti­tu­tion­al cri­sis could be sparked if a neo-Nazi kills off one of the left-lean­ing Supreme Court jus­tices only to have Pres­i­dent Trump — a pres­i­dent who has made stok­ing sto­chas­tic white nation­al­ist ter­ror one of his spe­cial­ties — nom­i­nates anoth­er far right nut job as a replace­ment. What kind of dam­age what that do to the long-term cred­i­bil­i­ty of the court? Let’s hope that ques­tion remains a hypo­thet­i­cal. Espe­cial­ly now that the US gov­ern­ment just sent a sig­nal to every neo-Nazi in the US that they’ll get kid glove treat­ment. Or, rather, anoth­er sig­nal to every neo-Nazi in the US that they’ll get kid glove treat­ment.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | April 25, 2019, 1:52 pm
  9. Oh look, anoth­er neo-Nazi was caught prepar­ing a series of domes­tic ter­ror attacks. This time in Las Vegas. Again.

    First, recall that mul­ti­ple wit­ness­es recount­ed Steven Pad­dock express­ing far right ‘sov­er­eign cit­i­zen’ views before his attack on a Las Vegas and rant­ed about how “Some­body has to wake up the Amer­i­can pub­lic and get them to arm them­selves,” and “Some­times sac­ri­fices have to be made.” So this lat­est report of a new­ly dis­cov­ered neo-Nazi ter­ror attack on Las Vegas is real­ly the dis­cov­ery of a fol­lowup neo-Nazi attack on Vegas fol­low­ing Pad­dock­’s attack, despite the fact that there appears to be a deep offi­cial reluc­tance to acknowl­edge that Pad­dock was a far right domes­tic ter­ror­ist.

    The new­ly dis­cov­ered planned attack involves a 23 year old man, Conor Climo, found to be using encrypt­ed mes­sag­ing apps to com­mu­ni­cate with var­i­ous neo-Nazis to plan attacks on sny­a­gogues and an gay bar in the Las Vegas area. The spe­cif­ic neo-Nazi group was the Feuerkrieg Divi­sion, an off­shoot of Atom­waf­fen. Climo was briefly in the news in 2016 after he was found to be patrolling his neigh­bor­hood with an AR-style rifle. He stopped the armed patrols fol­low­ing the media expo­sure.

    Climo report­ed­ly used Dis­cord for his encrypt­ed com­mu­ni­ca­tions. Recall how Dis­cord has been exten­sive used by neo-Nazis includ­ing plan­ning the August 2017 Unite the Right march in Char­lottesville, VA.

    The FBI was tipped off about these com­mu­ni­ca­tions with Feuerkrieg Divi­sion from an FBI source in April of this year. Climo dis­cussed a plan to burn down a Vegas-area syn­a­gogue on May 10 with the source. 13 days lat­er, the FBI’s own under­cov­er employ­ee began chat­ting with Climo. When the FBI raid­ed Climo’s home a few days ago they found the com­po­nents for build­ing a bomb, includ­ing ther­mite. Dur­ing the raid, Climo report­ed­ly told the FBI he start­ed com­mu­ni­cat­ing with the neo-Nazis in late 2017. So his com­mu­ni­ca­tions with fel­low neo-Nazis went on for a near­ly a year and a half.

    Climo also told agents that dur­ing this time he attempt­ed to recruit a home­less per­son to help him sur­veil a syn­a­gogue, which did­n’t pan out. That appar­ent­ly start­ed in Octo­ber of 2017. Recall that Pad­dock­’s attack was on Octo­ber 1, 2017. So right after Pad­dock­’s attack, this neo-Nazi starts recruit­ing home­less peo­ple for his own attack.

    His envi­sioned attack on the LGBTQ bar was­n’t just a ‘lone wolf’ attack. He want­ed mul­ti­ple teams of neo-Nazis to oper­ate all at once. So Climo was inter­est­ed in drop­ping the ‘lone wolf’ pre­tense gen­er­al­ly favored by the neo-Nazis.

    Climo also told agents that he even­tu­al­ly left the Feuerkrieg Divi­sion because he was bored with the lack of action. Yep, an Atom­waf­fen off­shoot was­n’t extreme enough for the guy:

    The Dai­ly Beast

    Las Vegas White Suprema­cist Arrest­ed After Threat­en­ing to Attack Syn­a­gogue, LGBTQ Bar: DOJ
    Secu­ri­ty guard Conor Climo, who was found with bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als in his home, pro­fessed his hatred online for African-Amer­i­cans, Jews, and gay peo­ple, fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors said.

    Dani­ka Fears
    Break­ing News Edi­tor
    Pub­lished 08.09.19 8:52PM ET

    Las Vegas secu­ri­ty guard who dis­cussed attacks on a syn­a­gogue and gay bar has been arrest­ed after author­i­ties found bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als inside his home, fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors announced Fri­day.

    Conor Climo, 23, was charged with one count of pos­ses­sion of an unreg­is­tered firearm, which fed­er­al pros­e­cu­tors described as “the com­po­nent parts of a destruc­tive device.”

    He alleged­ly com­mu­ni­cat­ed with mem­bers of a neo-Nazi group and told law enforce­ment that he’s con­sid­ered “var­i­ous” ways to attack Jew­ish peo­ple over the past two years, includ­ing a plan to “mobi­lize an eight man sniper pla­toon to con­duct a shoot­ing attack on Jew­ish peo­ple either at a Las Vegas syn­a­gogue or any oth­er area of oppor­tu­ni­ty.”

    ...

    In May, Climo talked about “set­ting fire to a syn­a­gogue and mak­ing Molo­tov cock­tails and urea nitrate impro­vised explo­sive devices” dur­ing an online con­ver­sa­tion with an under­cov­er agent, accord­ing to a crim­i­nal com­plaint.

    “Climo stat­ed that in Octo­ber 2017, he tried to recruit a home­less per­son to con­duct sur­veil­lance on a Las Vegas area syn­a­gogue, but ulti­mate­ly failed,” the com­plaint states.

    On August 8, author­i­ties searched Climo’s home, find­ing an AR-15 rifle, bolt action rifle, bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als, and a jour­nal in his room with a hand-drawn pic­ture of an attack on a Las Vegas bar that he thought was fre­quent­ed by gay peo­ple, pros­e­cu­tors said.

    Dur­ing the search, Climo alleged­ly told a law-enforce­ment offi­cer that he began com­mu­ni­cat­ing with mem­bers of the neo-Nazi group the Feuerkrieg Divi­sion using the encrypt­ed chat plat­form Dis­cord at the end of 2017.

    He said he “want­ed to be a part of FKD because he want­ed to do some­thing ‘gen­er­al­ly dif­fer­ent’ relat­ed to his hatred of African-Amer­i­cans, Jews, and Homo­sex­u­als,” accord­ing to the com­plaint.

    “Climo fur­ther dis­cussed draw­ing a plan and design­ing a bomb he intend­ed to build to assist in a race war on behalf of FKD,” the court papers state.

    The 23-year-old alleged­ly said that he left the neo-Nazi group after becom­ing “bored” with “their inac­tion.” He told author­i­ties that around the same time that he was active with the Feuerkrieg Divi­sion, he recruit­ed a home­less per­son to help him car­ry out sur­veil­lance on a syn­a­gogue that he was plot­ting to attack, the com­plaint says.

    Ulti­mate­ly, that plan “did not come to fruition because he need­ed more time to cre­ate a bet­ter method of attack,” he alleged­ly said.

    ———-

    “Las Vegas White Suprema­cist Arrest­ed After Threat­en­ing to Attack Syn­a­gogue, LGBTQ Bar: DOJ” by Dani­ka Fears; The Dai­ly Beast; 08/09/2019

    “Dur­ing the search, Climo alleged­ly told a law-enforce­ment offi­cer that he began com­mu­ni­cat­ing with mem­bers of the neo-Nazi group the Feuerkrieg Divi­sion using the encrypt­ed chat plat­form Dis­cord at the end of 2017.

    So Climo basi­cal­ly joined the Feuerkrieg Divi­sion at the end of 2017, but then left because he was “bored” with “their inac­tion”:

    ...
    He said he “want­ed to be a part of FKD because he want­ed to do some­thing ‘gen­er­al­ly dif­fer­ent’ relat­ed to his hatred of African-Amer­i­cans, Jews, and Homo­sex­u­als,” accord­ing to the com­plaint.

    “Climo fur­ther dis­cussed draw­ing a plan and design­ing a bomb he intend­ed to build to assist in a race war on behalf of FKD,” the court papers state.

    The 23-year-old alleged­ly said that he left the neo-Nazi group after becom­ing “bored” with “their inac­tion.” He told author­i­ties that around the same time that he was active with the Feuerkrieg Divi­sion, he recruit­ed a home­less per­son to help him car­ry out sur­veil­lance on a syn­a­gogue that he was plot­ting to attack, the com­plaint says.

    Ulti­mate­ly, that plan “did not come to fruition because he need­ed more time to cre­ate a bet­ter method of attack,” he alleged­ly said.
    ...

    And accord­ing to the fol­low­ing arti­cle, when the FBI raid­ed his home, they did­n’t sim­ply find the cir­cuit­ry that could be used to build a bomb. They found ther­mite. Recall how inves­ti­ga­tors found radioac­tive mate­ri­als and explo­sives at the apart­ment of the Atom­waf­fen cell in Flori­da that was plan­ning an attack on a nuclear pow­er plant. So this is the sec­ond Atom­waf­fen-affil­i­at­ed group found to be plan­ning a ter­ror attack and in pos­ses­sion of with explo­sives:

    ABC News

    Las Vegas neo-Nazi charged with plot to bomb gay club, syn­a­gogue

    By Mark Osborne
    Aug 10, 2019, 1:48 AM ET

    The FBI arrest­ed and charged an alleged Las Vegas neo-Nazi with plot­ting to bomb a syn­a­gogue and gay club in the city on Thurs­day.

    Conor Climo, 23, who worked as a secu­ri­ty guard, alleged­ly was found to be in pos­ses­sion of bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als and was “com­mu­ni­cat­ing with indi­vid­u­als who iden­ti­fied with a white suprema­cist extrem­ist orga­ni­za­tion using the Nation­al Social­ist Move­ment to pro­mote their ide­ol­o­gy,” accord­ing to the FBI.

    The Las Vegas Joint Ter­ror­ism Task Force began inves­ti­gat­ing Climo in April, accord­ing to the crim­i­nal com­plaint, after it learned he was com­mu­ni­cat­ing with Atom­waf­fen Divi­sion, a white suprema­cist neo-Nazi group.

    “AWD encour­ages attacks on the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment, includ­ing crit­i­cal infra­struc­ture, minori­ties, homo­sex­u­als, and Jews,” the com­plaint states. “AWD works to recruit like-mind­ed mem­bers to the orga­ni­za­tion, train them in mil­i­tary tac­tics, hand to hand com­bat, bomb mak­ing, and oth­er tech­niques in prepa­ra­tion for an ‘ulti­mate and uncom­pro­mis­ing vic­to­ry’ in a race war.”

    The FBI used a con­fi­den­tial infor­mant to begin dis­cussing weapons and explo­sives on an encrypt­ed chat app and even­tu­al­ly quot­ed Climo “reg­u­lar­ly us[ing] deroga­to­ry racial, anti-Semit­ic, and homo­sex­u­al slurs.”

    He also dis­cussed a plan to burn down a Las Vegas-area syn­a­gogue on May 10, the com­plaint says. Then, 13 days lat­er, the FBI began using their own under­cov­er employ­ee to talk online with Climo, dur­ing which he dis­cussed build­ing explo­sives and being “more inter­est­ed in action than online s—.”

    In late June and ear­ly July, Climo dis­cussed prepar­ing for an attack and doing sur­veil­lance “in great detail” of a bar on Fre­mont Street in down­town Las Vegas he claimed “catered to homo­sex­u­als.”

    The com­plaint also makes men­tion of Climo’s Quo­ra account, a ques­tion-and-answer social media site, where he once quot­ed Adolf Hitler in dis­cussing the “down­sides of mul­ti­cul­tur­al­ism.”

    The FBI exe­cut­ed a search war­rant at his home on Aug. 8 and found ther­mite, sul­fu­ric acid, a sol­der­ing iron, cir­cuit boards and oth­er bomb-mak­ing com­po­nents, accord­ing to the com­plaint.

    He was arrest­ed and admit­ted to agents he hat­ed “African-Amer­i­cans, Jews, and Homo­sex­u­als” and was plan­ning on build­ing an impro­vised explo­sive device.

    “Threats of vio­lence moti­vat­ed by hate and intend­ed to intim­i­date or coerce our faith-based and LGBTQ com­mu­ni­ties have no place in this Coun­try,” U.S. Attor­ney for the Dis­trict of Neva­da Nicholas A. Tru­tanich said in a state­ment. “Law enforce­ment in Neva­da remains deter­mined to use the full weight of our inves­tiga­tive resources to pre­vent bias-moti­vat­ed vio­lence before it hap­pens. I com­mend our part­ners who iden­ti­fied the threat and took swift and appro­pri­ate action to ensure jus­tice and pro­tect the com­mu­ni­ty.”

    Author­i­ties also found a sketch out­lin­ing two “infantry squads” attack­ing the Fre­mont Street bar with firearms, the com­plaint says.

    ...

    ———-

    “Las Vegas neo-Nazi charged with plot to bomb gay club, syn­a­gogue” by Mark Osborne; ABC News; 08/10/2019

    “The FBI exe­cut­ed a search war­rant at his home on Aug. 8 and found ther­mite, sul­fu­ric acid, a sol­der­ing iron, cir­cuit boards and oth­er bomb-mak­ing com­po­nents, accord­ing to the com­plaint.”

    It sounds like there were a lot more than just hype behind Climo’s plans.

    It’s also worth not­ing that the con­fi­den­tial FBI infor­mant and the FBI’s own under­cov­er agents were appar­ent­ly on this Dis­cord chat ser­vice. So you have to won­der whether or not these kinds of sto­ries about the FBI infil­trat­ing these encrypt­ed groups will have much of an impact the will­ing­ness of neo-Nazi groups to use these plat­forms to remote­ly com­mu­ni­cate and coor­di­nate. At the same time, the fact that Climo was appar­ent­ly in con­tact with this Atom­waf­fen off­shoot and plan­ning var­i­ous attacks for a year and a half before this FBI infor­mant tipped off the FBI about his plans demon­strates the util­i­ty of these plat­forms for ter­ror­ists even know­ing they might be infil­trat­ed:

    ...
    The FBI used a con­fi­den­tial infor­mant to begin dis­cussing weapons and explo­sives on an encrypt­ed chat app and even­tu­al­ly quot­ed Climo “reg­u­lar­ly us[ing] deroga­to­ry racial, anti-Semit­ic, and homo­sex­u­al slurs.”

    He also dis­cussed a plan to burn down a Las Vegas-area syn­a­gogue on May 10, the com­plaint says. Then, 13 days lat­er, the FBI began using their own under­cov­er employ­ee to talk online with Climo, dur­ing which he dis­cussed build­ing explo­sives and being “more inter­est­ed in action than online s—.”
    ...

    Final­ly, here’s an arti­cle from May of 2018 that points to anoth­er way Climo may have been in con­tact with Atom­waf­fen affil­i­ates: author­i­ties learned about an Atom­waf­fen train­ing camp that had been oper­at­ing in South­ern Neva­da ear­li­er in 2018. The group spent a cou­ple of days camp­ing in rur­al Nye Coun­ty, train­ing with weapons and mak­ing pro­pa­gan­da videos to recruit more mem­bers:

    Fox5

    Inves­ti­gat­ing a hate group prepar­ing for a ‘race war’ in South­ern Neva­da

    Writ­ten by Kath­leen Jacob
    Post­ed May 7, 2018

    A vio­lent hate group held a train­ing camp out­side of Pahrump ear­li­er this year. The group is called Atom­waf­fen Divi­sion and they’re a small white suprema­cist group that claims to be prepar­ing for a race war.

    Law enforce­ment said the group spent a cou­ple of days camp­ing in rur­al Nye Coun­ty, train­ing with weapons and mak­ing pro­pa­gan­da videos to recruit more mem­bers.

    Police have con­nect­ed this group to at least five mur­ders around the coun­try. The group is not very large. The Anti-Defama­tion League esti­mat­ed they have about 20 dif­fer­ent cells in the U.S., includ­ing a small one in Neva­da.

    Robert Futrell is the chair of UNLV’s soci­ol­o­gy depart­ment. He also co-authored the book “Amer­i­can Swasti­ka: Inside the White Pow­er Move­men­t’s Hid­den Spaces of Hate.”

    “Atom­waf­fen is Ger­man for ‘nuclear weapon’ or ‘to go nuclear,’” Dr. Futrell explained. “They are one of many neo-Nazi groups that have formed since the 1980s. They’re par­tic­u­lar­ly on the extrem­ist side. They fol­low writ­ings of James Mason, who, in the 1970s, was part of the Amer­i­can Nazi Par­ty.”

    He said the group idol­izes peo­ple like Charles Man­son, Tim­o­thy McVeigh and Dylan Roof.

    “They advo­cat­ed for lead­er­less resis­tance, anti-gov­ern­ment atti­tude, estab­lish­ment of a fas­cist state,” Dr. Futrell said.

    He said Atom­waf­fen Divi­sion, like many oth­er cur­rent day white suprema­cist groups, are less up front about who they are.

    “White suprema­cists; they car­ry a stig­ma in wider soci­ety and lead­ers have, over the last two decades, talked about grow­ing hair out if you’re neo-Nazi, skin head, cov­er­ing up tat­toos, get­ting edu­ca­tion, get­ting good jobs, infil­trat­ing insti­tu­tions, not being out about who one is,” Dr. Futrell said.

    He said they oper­ate large­ly under­ground and talk about grand plans of destroy­ing infra­struc­ture and gov­ern­ment.

    “They con­nect on the inter­net, they con­nect across states, they have ways they con­nect face-to-face in local­i­ties of course, but their main pub­lic face was YouTube and the pro­pa­gan­da videos, they also start­ed leaflet­ing at var­i­ous col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties,” Dr. Futrell said.

    He said “hate camps,” like one that took place in rur­al Nye Coun­ty, are a way for the group to bond. He said what draws peo­ple to join groups like this, in part, is the need for belong­ing.

    ...

    The Nye Coun­ty Sher­if­f’s Office said they became aware of the train­ing camp that took place after the fact. They said they got no calls from civil­ians about the group and law enforce­ment had no run-ins with them.

    One of the mem­bers had a mem­ber­ship at Front Sight, which is a firearms train­ing insti­tute in Pahrump. The own­er said as soon as he found out about the man’s affil­i­a­tion with the group, his mem­ber­ship was revoked for life.

    ...

    ———-

    “Inves­ti­gat­ing a hate group prepar­ing for a ‘race war’ in South­ern Neva­da” by Kath­leen Jacob; Fox5; 05/07/2018

    “Law enforce­ment said the group spent a cou­ple of days camp­ing in rur­al Nye Coun­ty, train­ing with weapons and mak­ing pro­pa­gan­da videos to recruit more mem­bers.”

    Did Climo make any trips out to those Atom­waf­fen train­ing camps in Las Vegas area last year? At that point we don’t know. But, again, he did­n’t actu­al­ly need to meet them in per­son. That’s what the inter­net is for these days: Cat videos and neo-Nazis pro­pa­gan­da.

    So Las Vegas just avoid­ed anoth­er domes­tic ter­ror attack by a neo-Nazi, mak­ing this a great time for author­i­ties and the media to final­ly acknowl­edge that Stephen Pad­dock was a far right domes­tic ter­ror­ist. Or we can just wait for the next neo-Nazi plot against Las Vegas to final­ly acknowl­edge that.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | August 10, 2019, 4:16 pm
  10. A woman, Michelle Kolts, was arrest­ed in Flori­da today after her par­ents noti­fied author­i­ties that she had two dozen pipe bombs in her room. It sounds like she’s a white suprema­cist. Sur­prise! A num­ber of books relat­ed to domes­tic ter­ror­ism and mur­der were found in her home, includ­ing “The Turn­er Diaries”, along with an “aston­ish­ing” num­ber of weapons.

    This was­n’t the first time author­i­ties got a tip about Kolts. In August of 2018, a book pub­lish­er raised con­cerns about Kolts order mul­ti­ple ter­ror­ist man­i­festos. Accord­ing the Hills­bor­ough Coun­ty Sher­iff, Kolts had become “con­sumed” with the Columbine mas­sacre and the Okla­homa City bomb­ing:

    Heavy.com

    Michelle Kolts: Woman Had 24 Pipe Bombs, ‘Con­sumed by Columbine,’ Cops Say

    By Paul Far­rell
    Updat­ed Oct 4, 2019 at 1:55pm

    Michelle Kolts is the Flori­da woman who is accused of build­ing and pos­sess­ing 24 pipe bombs that could have claimed “sig­nif­i­cant lives” and done “cat­a­stroph­ic dam­age,” the Hills­bor­ough Coun­ty Sheriff’s Office has said. Kolts, 27, is a res­i­dent of Wimau­ma, Flori­da, a com­mu­ni­ty just south of Tam­pa.

    Online records show that Kolts was arrest­ed at her job. Kolts was then tak­en to her home where she admit­ted to mak­ing the bombs, accord­ing to Hills­bor­ough Coun­ty Sher­iff Chad Chro­nis­ter. Her home is locat­ed along the 5000 block of Jagged Cloud Dri­ve. Kolts was tak­en into cus­tody just before mid­night on Octo­ber 3. Those records show that Kolts is being held on a bond of $180,000. Among her pos­ses­sions was a copy of the white suprema­cist book, “The Turn­er Diaries.”

    ...

    1. The Amount of Weapon­ry Recov­ered at Kolts’ Home Was ‘Aston­ish­ing,’ the Sher­iff Said

    In a press con­fer­ence announc­ing Kolts’ arrest, Hills­bor­ough Coun­ty Sher­iff Chad Chro­nis­ter said Kolts’ par­ents found pipe bombs in their daughter’s room. Chro­nis­ter said that Kolts’ par­ents called the police imme­di­ate­ly. The sher­iff described the num­ber of weapons recov­ered at the home as “aston­ish­ing.” The sher­iff said that books regard­ing domes­tic ter­ror­ism and mur­der were found at the home. Kolts is suf­fer­ing from men­tal ill­ness and is “a lit­tle bit on the autism spec­trum,” accord­ing to the sher­iff. The sus­pect did not have a spe­cif­ic list of peo­ple to harm or places to attack, the sher­iff also said.

    2. Kolts Was ‘Con­sumed’ by the Columbine Shoot­ing & the Okla­homa City Bomb­ing

    The sher­iff told the media that offi­cers received a call about Kolts in August 2018 after a pub­lish­er raised con­cerns about Kolts’ order­ing mul­ti­ple ter­ror­ist and murderer’s man­i­fests. The sher­iff said that Kolts had become “con­sumed” with the Columbine High School mas­sacre and the Okla­homa City bomb­ing.

    The sheriff’s office lat­er tweet­ed pho­tos show­ing a bow-and-arrow, mul­ti­ple hand­guns and long guns, knives and an axe, all of which inves­ti­ga­tors say was found in Kolts’ home.

    ...

    ———-

    “Michelle Kolts: Woman Had 24 Pipe Bombs, ‘Con­sumed by Columbine,’ Cops Say” by Paul Far­rell; Heavy.com
    ; 10/04/2019

    Online records show that Kolts was arrest­ed at her job. Kolts was then tak­en to her home where she admit­ted to mak­ing the bombs, accord­ing to Hills­bor­ough Coun­ty Sher­iff Chad Chro­nis­ter. Her home is locat­ed along the 5000 block of Jagged Cloud Dri­ve. Kolts was tak­en into cus­tody just before mid­night on Octo­ber 3. Those records show that Kolts is being held on a bond of $180,000. Among her pos­ses­sions was a copy of the white suprema­cist book, “The Turn­er Diaries.”

    Yeah, find­ing pipe bombs and copies of the The Turn­er Diaries in some­one’s home is a pret­ty big red flag right. And as the fol­low­ing arti­cle describes, these pipe bombs were clear­ly built for max­i­mum casu­al­ties, con­tain­ing nails and metal­lic pel­lets. The arti­cle states she had “dozens of books and DVDs about mur­der, mass killing, domes­tic ter­ror­ism and bomb mak­ing,” and describes the par­tic­u­lar books she ordered last year that cause a pub­lish­er to noti­fy author­i­ties: books on bomb-mak­ing instruc­tions. She was inter­viewed by author­i­ties at the time and said she did­n’t intend on harm­ing any­one, so she was deemed not to be a threat to her­self or any­one else:

    CNN

    A Flori­da woman made dozens of pipe bombs and intend­ed to hurt peo­ple, sher­iff says

    By Dakin Andone,
    Updat­ed 2:13 PM ET, Fri Octo­ber 4, 2019

    (CNN)A Flori­da woman has been arrest­ed for alleged­ly mak­ing two dozen pipe bombs with the intent of using them to hurt peo­ple, the Hills­bor­ough Coun­ty Sher­iff said Fri­day.

    Michelle Kolts, 27, faces 24 counts of mak­ing a destruc­tive device with intent to harm, Sher­iff Chad Chro­nis­ter told reporters in a news con­fer­ence.

    It was Kolts’ par­ents who noti­fied deputies Thurs­day evening after they dis­cov­ered “what appeared to be a sig­nif­i­cant amount of pipe bombs, oth­er bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als and numer­ous weapons” in her bed­room, Chro­nis­ter said.

    A bomb squad respond­ed and ren­dered the home safe, the sher­iff said. Each pipe bomb con­tained nails, metal­lic pel­lets or a com­bi­na­tion of both, he said. It would have tak­en “less than 60 sec­onds per device to add the pow­der and fuse mate­ri­als she already pos­sessed to det­o­nate each bomb.”

    Inves­ti­ga­tors also found smoke­less pis­tol pow­der, 23 knives, nunchucks and “dozens of books and DVDs about mur­der, mass killing, domes­tic ter­ror­ism and bomb mak­ing,” Chro­nis­ter said.

    Kolts admit­ted to mak­ing the devices and told detec­tives they were meant to hurt peo­ple, although inves­ti­ga­tors did not find evi­dence of any con­crete plans to use the bombs, the sher­iff said.

    The only pri­or con­tact author­i­ties had with Kolts occurred last August, Chro­nis­ter said, when an online print­ing com­pa­ny said she ordered anar­chist and bomb-mak­ing instruc­tions. She dis­played an “infat­u­a­tion” with mass killings like the Columbine shoot­ing and the Okla­homa City bomb­ing, he said.

    At the time, Kolts said she did not intend to harm any­one. Author­i­ties ulti­mate­ly did not feel she was a threat to her­self or any­one else, Chro­nis­ter said.

    The sher­iff com­mend­ed Kolts’ par­ents for call­ing author­i­ties.

    “Her par­ents did exact­ly what we ask peo­ple to do: If you see some­thing sus­pi­cious, please say some­thing,” Chro­nis­ter said.

    “Who knows the amount of harm that could’ve been done or how many lives could have been lost,” he said, “had these par­ents not found the courage to call the sher­if­f’s office and seek help.”

    ...

    ———-

    “A Flori­da woman made dozens of pipe bombs and intend­ed to hurt peo­ple, sher­iff says” by Dakin Andone; CNN; 10/04/2019

    “A bomb squad respond­ed and ren­dered the home safe, the sher­iff said. Each pipe bomb con­tained nails, metal­lic pel­lets or a com­bi­na­tion of both, he said. It would have tak­en “less than 60 sec­onds per device to add the pow­der and fuse mate­ri­als she already pos­sessed to det­o­nate each bomb.”

    All of the mate­ri­als required to det­o­nate these bombs were in her pos­ses­sion, includ­ing the pow­der and fuse mate­ri­als. That’s how close she poten­tial­ly was to using these things. And she even admit­ted to detec­tive they were meant to hurt peo­ple (which is kind of unde­ni­able but she admit­ted it). So she appears to have had the intent to use them.

    And note that, while the con­tent she ordered from the online pub­lish­er last year is described as “anar­chist and bomb-mak­ing instruc­tions”, keep in mind that anar­chist books (like the Anar­chist Cook­book) are a known place white suprema­cists can go to learn how to make all sorts of bombs and oth­er lethal devices. So the fact that she was order­ing con­tent that could be described as ‘anar­chist’ prob­a­bly isn’t real­ly indica­tive of her polit­i­cal lean­ings:

    ...
    Inves­ti­ga­tors also found smoke­less pis­tol pow­der, 23 knives, nunchucks and “dozens of books and DVDs about mur­der, mass killing, domes­tic ter­ror­ism and bomb mak­ing,” Chro­nis­ter said.

    ...

    The only pri­or con­tact author­i­ties had with Kolts occurred last August, Chro­nis­ter said, when an online print­ing com­pa­ny said she ordered anar­chist and bomb-mak­ing instruc­tions. She dis­played an “infat­u­a­tion” with mass killings like the Columbine shoot­ing and the Okla­homa City bomb­ing, he said.

    At the time, Kolts said she did not intend to harm any­one. Author­i­ties ulti­mate­ly did not feel she was a threat to her­self or any­one else, Chro­nis­ter said.
    ...

    The fact that she was infat­u­at­ed with the Columbine shoot­ing and the Okla­homa City bomb­ing (both car­ried out by far right ide­o­logues) and pos­sessed a copy of The Turn­er Diaries is, on the oth­er hand, much more indica­tive of her polit­i­cal lean­ings. Nazi lean­ings in this case.

    At this point there’s no infor­ma­tion on whether or not Kolts was in con­tact with oth­er extrem­ists, but it’s worth recall­ing the numer­ous Flori­da-based instances of far right ter­ror­ism in recent years. Hills­bor­ough Coun­ty, where Kolts lived, is where Tam­pa is locat­ed. Tam­pa also hap­pens to be the loca­tion of Atom­waf­fen cell that was dis­cov­ered after Devon Arthurs killed his roommates/cellmates and told author­i­ties he did it because they were plan­ning on attack­ing a nuclear pow­er plant in order to cause a melt­down (with the long-term goal of set­ting up a Fourth Reich in Flori­da). Might Kolts have been in con­tact with Atom­waf­fen affil­i­ates in the area? Then there was the Park­land school shoot­ing car­ried about by Nicholas Cruz and the strange trolling of jour­nal­ists con­duct­ed imme­di­ate­ly after the attack that appeared to be designed to pre­emp­tive­ly dis­cred­it Cruz’s asso­ci­a­tions with the “Repub­lic of Flori­da” neo-Nazi mili­tia. But we also can’t for­get that, in the age of strong­ly encrypt­ed com­mu­ni­ca­tions apps and the explo­sion of online neo-Nazi recruit­ment activ­i­ty, there’s no rea­son to assume Kolts was nec­es­sar­i­ly net­work with local neo-Nazis.

    At the same time, 24 pipe bombs seems like a lot of bombs for one per­son to plan to use. And that rais­es anoth­er ques­tion: was Kolts mak­ing these bombs on behalf of a larg­er domes­tic ter­ror­ist net­work? Per­haps, but let’s also recall the Flori­da-based Trump super-fan Cesar Say­oc, who was arrest­ed and con­vict­ed for send­ing non-func­tion­ing pipebombs to Demo­c­ra­t­ic law­mak­ers and cable news chan­nels. So it’s pos­si­ble Kolts was plan­ning a sim­i­lar mail pipe bomb cam­paign, but this time with ful­ly func­tion­ing bombs.

    We’ll see what, if any, addi­tion­al infor­ma­tion is learned about who Kolts was, what her moti­va­tions were, and who she may have been inter­act­ing with when for­mu­lat­ing these plans. But at this point, giv­en the exten­sive and grow­ing under­ground net­work­ing of extrem­ists, it would be pret­ty sur­pris­ing if she was actu­al­ly work­ing alone.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | October 4, 2019, 11:54 am

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