- Spitfire List - http://spitfirelist.com -

FTR #155 Nuclear Weapons and the “Underground Reich”

Listen
MP3: Side 1 [1] | Side 2 [2]
NB: This is a recycled broadcast containing updated material, but includes the original broadcast in its entirety.

For some time, Mr. Emory has accessed the work of the remarkable Paul Manning. Part of the CBS news team that covered World War II (along with the late Edward R. Murrow), Manning authored the landmark title Martin Bormann: Nazi in Exile [3] (Lyle Stuart, copyright 1981), detailing the post-war career of Martin Bormann, Hitler’s most important aide.

 Long rumored to have been killed at the end of the war, Bormann escaped to Latin America with all of the liquid wealth of the Third Reich at his disposal. Bormann has used that wealth to finance (literally) an Underground Reich, an institution that wields profound (though largely unrecognized) influence in the contemporary world. Mr. Emory believes that (barring a significant change in political reality) the Bormann group will prove to be the decisive element in human affairs.

 This broadcast details Manning’s last published work: the Bormann organization’s initiation of joint nuclear weapons development between Germany, Argentina and South Africa and its promotion of the Condor II missile project, jointly developed by Iraq, Egypt and Argentina. (It should be noted that Manning’s second book on the Bormann organization was never published. His son Jerry was murdered at that time, in retribution for his work on the Bormann group, according to Manning’s intelligence contacts.) The joint weapons development was intended to give Germany nuclear and intercontinental missile technology that it was officially forbidden from possessing.

 Shortly after World War II, the discovery of uranium in Argentina spurred the clandestine nuclear development program. At the time, Argentina was ruled by Juan Peron, who was very close to Bormann and the Nazi emigre community in Argentina.

Instigated by the Bormann group, the program was greatly assisted by the Siemens Corporation’s development of two nuclear reactors for Argentina. The Condor II missile project would have given Sadam Hussein a greatly expanded missile capability, had the U.S. not secretly intervened with Argentina to interdict the missile’s progress. Much of the information accessed by Manning came from Leon Grunbaum, a Holocaust survivor and nuclear scientist. Grunbaum was subsequently murdered.

 Program highlights include: the close relationship between Nazi Germany and Iraq during World War II; the perpetuation of the Nazi-Iraqi link in the decades after the war; the close links between Egypt and the Bormann group; details of the hierarchical structure of the Bormann group (allegedly headed, in the early 1990s, by Bormann’s son Adolph Martin and his sister Neumi); the rigorous surveillance of and harassment of Leon Grunbaum (culminating in his murder); the theft of Grunbaum’s notes while he was visiting Switzerland; remarkable similarities between the reality of the Bormann group as reported by Manning and the portrayal of the organization in the Nazi tract Serpent’s Walk.