Spitfire List Web site and blog of anti-fascist researcher and radio personality Dave Emory.

For The Record  

FTR #437 Counter-Culture Fascism

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Introduction: Detailing the phenomenon of counter-culture fascism, this broadcast is a supplement to FTRs 211, 222. In its pursuit of becoming a mass movement, fascism has traditionally turned to alienated and leftist elements in order to recruit street soldiers. (The “Northern” or “Strasserite” branch of the Nazi SA was such an element in the early Nazi party under Hitler.) Today, counterculture fascists are utilizing the alternative music and publishing scenes to recruit alienated individuals to their cause. The major focal point of the program is the book Lords of Chaos, published by Feral House. Co-authored by Michael Moynihan, a Satanist, blood fetishist and Nazi and fascist fellow traveler, the book is an expose of the black metal music scene. (Moynihan is pictured below, left.) At a deeper level, however, the work is something of a fascist recruiting/promoting mechanism–projecting Moynihan’s own far-right political ideology onto the black metal music scene as a whole. (Many—perhaps most– black metal fans are merely “party-on” types, and not necessarily fascists or rightists at all.)

The broadcast sets forth Moynihan’s associations with, and promotion of, some truly evil, murderous fascists and Nazi/racists. Another central point of discussion is Moynihan’s long time friend, professional associate and political fellow traveler Adam Parfrey, the owner of Feral House and a significant presence on the alternative publishing scene. Coalescing in the Abraxas Foundation, an alternative music/occult/fascist/Social Darwinist think tank (their description), Parfrey, Moynihan and Boyd Rice have intertwined musical and political cultures with a counterculture fascist ideology. (Rice is pictured at right and above, with Nazi associate Robert Heick.)

Parfrey’s significant and growing presence in the conspiracy publishing field is worth noting. Feral House political books–much of their inventory deals with cultural, not political, subjects–tend to be uneven: many volumes have excellent material mixed in with drivel, some of the books are quite good and others ludicrous and insane.

What is important about the use of conspiracy theories in the context of a proto-fascist political view is the confusion that can result for those who come to realize that in fact, Lee Harvey Oswald did not kill Kennedy. This awareness may leave some in a relativistic political/intellectual universe. “Maybe the Holocaust didn’t happen!” In the era of the big lie, Parfrey and others who market some political truth mixed in with the vilest of fascist ideologies are truly dangerous and are sowing the seeds of doom.

Although Parfrey and company have deep connections to fascist and Nazi elements and have worked extensively to further some of those elements’ projects, one should not be too quick to label Parfrey a fascist himself. Rather, he might be termed a “fellow traveler,” whose efforts on behalf of, and association with, Nazi/fascist elements may be due to Parfrey’s devotion to the promulgation of “extreme culture.”

Defying easy definition, “extreme culture” could be said to be defined by anything that is edgy, over-the-top and, more often than not, offensive and/or unbelievable.

Constantine Agonistes: magnets are not visible in this frame

Exemplifying the cognitive parameters of the “extreme culture” disseminated by Parfrey and company are the pronouncements of a severely disturbed individual named Dan Rightmyer, published by Feral House under the nom de plume “Alex Constantine.” (Rightmyer/Constantine is pictured at right, being tortured by his demons). In addition to claiming that he has repelled magnets from his “cranium” and “knocked out a light bulb and a new CD player,” Rightmyer has stated that he has been tortured by “pulsed audiograms.” (An audiogram is a pictorial representation of a sound wave, the worst thing one can get from an audiogram is a paper cut. )

Program Highlights Include: Parfrey/Moynihan/Rice’s professional and ideological association with (and promotion of) current and former American Nazis including James Mason, Michael Murray, Joseph Franklin, the wife of convicted murderer David Lane and convicted murderer Perry “Red” Warthan; the Abraxas contingent’s glorification of Charles Manson; the association between elements of Satanic religion and the Abraxas milieu; the association between elements of Odinist religion and the Abraxas/Feral House network; the overt glorification of murder and violence by the Abraxas/Feral House milieu; connections between the Moynihan/Parfrey/Rice milieu and paramilitary right-wingers such as Robert N. Taylor; the genesis of counterculture fascism in the period between the World Wars; the effort on the part of these counterculture fascists to enlist the aid of leftists and people of color as “hommes de mains.” Parfrey’s recruitment of Liberty Lobby Holocaust denier Keith Stimely to write Feral House press releases; verbatim reproduction of the bizarre statements (lies? hallucinations?) of Feral House author Dan Rightmyer (aka “Alex Constantine”); statements by associates of Rightmyer/Constantine that his bizarre pronouncements are due to the effects of drug abuse; contradictions in the identity of the “witnesses” Rightmyer/Constantine claim can verify his statments (he has never produced such “witnesses”).

1. The discussion begins with the frightening and terrifying situation of the late Joe Ferguson, whose posthumous admiration of neo-Nazis, Charles Manson and Timothy McVeigh motivated his mass-murder/ suicide. It was while watching the recounting of the ghastly events of 9/11 that Mr. Emory absorbed the account of this smaller horror. Indeed, Ferguson’s psychological projection of his personality into a posthumous conception is, in certain respects, like the behavior of the 9/11 attackers. Like James Cagney, in the movie “White Heat”, the hijackers and Ferguson imagined that their fiery demise would imbue them with a combination of notoriety and physical transcendence. By disseminating a poisonous adulation of Manson and his ilk, the purveyors of counter-culture fascism, quite deliberately in most cases, set others on their course toward oblivion. The unmitigated evil propagated by Michael Moynihan, Boyd Rice, publishing guru Adam Parfrey and their fellow travelers is set forth in this program.

“Agitated, shirtless under his body armor and holding a 9mm semiautomatic pistol, disgruntled security guard Joseph Ferguson stared straight into the video camera held by a man who would shortly become the fifth life snuffed out in Ferguson’s 24-hour killing spree. ‘I’ve taken four victims,’ Ferguson said from the Rancho Cordova home where he held a Burns International Security colleague and his wife hostage for nearly 18 hours before shooting himself to death in a gunbattle with officers. ‘That should be enough to last a week in the news. . . . He was fascinated with neo-Nazism, Timothy McVeigh and Charles Manson. . . . .”

“Sacramento Killer Vowed Not to Be Taken Alive” by Michelle Guido; San Jose Mercury News; 9/11/2001; pp. 1A-14A.

2. Introducing the book that is at the center of this discussion, author Kevin Coogan encapsulates the story of Black Metal musician Varg Vikernes and his victim, Oystein Aarseth. This story is the centerpiece of Lords of Chaos, co-authored by Moynihan and Didrik Soderlind.

Lords of Chaos, a recent book-length examination of the Satanic black metal music scene is less concerned with sound than fury. Authors Michael Moynihan and Didrik Soderlind zero in on Norway, where a tiny clique of black metal musicians torched some churches in 1992. The church burners’ own price of worship was a small Oslo record store called Helvete (Hell). Helvete was run by the godfather of Norwegian black metal, Oystein Aarseth (‘Euronymous’, or ‘Prince of Death’), who first brought black metal to Norway with his group Mayhem and his Deathlike Silence record label. . . .”

“How Black is Black Metal?” by Kevin Coogan; Hitlist; February/March 1999 [Volume One, Number One]; p. 1. 

3. Reflecting the mythologizing of what is, in reality (for most creatures who pursue this type of music and culture), a mediocre, inglorious existence, Vikernes named himself after a figure from Lord of the Rings.

” . . . Lords of Chaos, however, is far less interested in Euronymous than in the man who killed him, Varg Vikernes, a church burner who dubbed himself ‘Count Grishnackh’ after an evil ogre in Lord of the Rings. Vikernes is now serving a 21-year sentence—Norway’s toughest penalty—in a maximum security prison for brutally stabbing Euronymous to death on August 10, 1993. After his arrest just seven days later, the Count justified himself by claiming that Euronymous was a communist ‘queer’ who had cheated him out of Burzum royalties. He also claimed that Euronymous was plotting to kill him. After being ostracized from the black metal community, Vikernes announced that he was now no longer a black metal Satanist, but rather a Nazi Odinist because the Jews had ‘killed my father Odin.'”

(Idem.)

4. Coogan notes that Moynihan infers from the behavior of Vikernes a growing trend among Black Metal aficionados toward murder and violence. As will be seen, this inference is itself a projection of Moynihan’s own political orientation and not necessarily a reflection of the bulk of black metal musicians and fans.

“If Lords of Chaos were only about the antics of the most extreme wing of black metal, it would be an informative and entertaining look at pop culture Grand Guignol. The book, however, suggests that the events in Norway reflect a growing tendency among alienated youth from Miami to Moscow, who are now allegedly blending black metal, Satanism, and currents of fascism into a culturally explosive Molotov cocktail. Vikernes, however, is really famous for murder, not music, while the overwhelming majority of black metal musicians and fans are not, and are not likely to become, church burners, murderers, or Nazi Odinists.”

(Idem.)

5.

“To buttress its thesis, LORDS OF CHAOS points to metalheads turned murderers, including ‘Balfagor’ from the Swedish Satanic band Nefandus, who attacked a black man in a self-described ‘niggerhunt’; Bard Eithun (‘Faust’) from the Norwegian group Emperor, who murdered a gay man that sought to seduce him; and Jon Nodveidt from the Swedish group Dissection, who butchered an Algerian immigrant. LORDS OF CHAOS even devotes an entire chapter to an obscure two-man German band called Absurd, who coldly executed an annoying fellow high school student. Although the members of Absurd are self-proclaimed Nazis and Vikernes fans, even they reported that they committed the crime for personal, not political, motives.”

(Ibid.; p. 2.)

6.

“LORDS OF CHAOS also dwells on the activity of otherwise highly obscure fascist propagandists with no direct ties to black metal who are nevertheless trying to recruit its followers into their cause. It even adopts a far right spin on Jungian theory when it suggests that Vikernes may have tapped into an anti-Christian racial/cultural archetype that is allegedly still aglow in the Norwegian collective unconscious. The book also profiles racist killers with no known ties to black metal, such as the Florida youth clique called the Lords of Chaos. Before being dethroned by local police, the Lords burnt down a church, murdered a gay teacher, and were planning to slaughter black visitors to Disney World with silencer-equipped automatic weapons.”

(Idem.)

7.

“LORDS OF CHAOS culminates with a paean to the ‘fire, which, it claims, burns bright inside the black metal under-ground despite the attempts of mysterious unnamed ‘forces of finance and materialism’ to ‘root it out and stamp it out.'”

8. Feral House, the publisher of Lords of Chaos, distributes one of Vikernes’ CD’s. In this context, it is significant that Feral House owner Adam Parfrey is part of a counterculture, Social Darwinist/fascist milieu that overlaps both the alternative music and publishing fields.

” . . . Lords of Chaos’s publisher, Feral House, itself distributes one of Vikernes’ Burzum CD’s ‘Filosfem’. . . LORDS OF CHAOS has generally been perceived as an expose of a colorful music sub-culture, and it does indeed provide much valuable information about an otherwise inaccessible scene. Yet what really makes the book fascinating is that its main author, Michael Moynihan, is himself an extreme rightist whose fusion of politics with aesthetic violence shapes a not-so-hidden sub current that runs throughout LORDS OF CHAOS. The book itself, however, is not a ‘fascist’ tract in the strict sense of the term, in part because Moynihan co-wrote the book with Didrik Soderlind, a former music critic for a mainstream Norwegian paper who is now an editor at Playboy. Moreover, Feral House editor Adam Parfrey clearly wanted to publish a popular book on the strange universe of black metal rather than a political polemic. Nor does Moynihan himself fit easily into the more conventional definitions of fascism. LORDS OF CHAOS is best characterized as a palimpsest with the author’s own political ideology at work just below the surface of a text ostensibly devoted solely to analyzing an extremist musical sub-culture.”

(Idem.)

9. One of the points of action and association between Moynihan, and his publisher Adam Parfrey is the Abraxas Foundation, which united both of them with Satanist and fascist Boyd Rice. Abraxas is described by Moynihan as an ‘occultist-fascist think tank’—it is linked to the Church of Satan, about which more will be said later.

“Michael Moynihan is an interesting fellow. . . In 1989, the youthful Bostonian joined forces with the San Francisco-based Abraxas Foundation, which he described as an ‘occultist-fascist think tank’ linked to the Church of Satan. Moynihan dubbed his own wing of the Abraxas Foundation ‘Axis Sanguinaries’ [Blood Axis] because: Blood can be seen as LIFE, and at the same time it can be equated to DEATH. It is essential to violence in almost all instances. It has powerful sexual connotations. It is the key fluid of history . . . [Axis] highlights the genetic aspect of blood, bound together in the will of a people or race. It describes allies of mind and blood, mobilized for total warfare. It also reiterates the pivotal nature of blood in human existence, both personal and world-historic.'”

(Ibid.; pp. 2-3.)

10.

“According to some reports, Moynihan’s blood fetish included drinking (non AIDS-infected) blood. He was also suspected of setting fire to a manger scene on the Cambridge Commons, just across from Harvard University, in 1987, A note left by the firebug at the smoky scene the day after Christmas asked: ‘How many more fires before you realize your gods are dead? DEAD!'”

(Ibid.; p. 3.)

11. Further developing the ideology of Abraxas, the program highlights its fascistic undertones and its emphasis on disseminating this philosophy to youth. (Note the picture of Rice and his American Front protégé Robert Heick, in full Nazi uniform and brandishing daggers for the camera: http://www.canuck.com/Srl/rice.html .)

“As for the Abraxas foundation, it was founded by another blood fetishist named Boyd Rice in 1984. The name came from Abraxas, a Gnostic deity that combined within itself the forces of light and darkness, good and evil. Rice hoped that his foundation would help create ‘a new demographic of people who are into the occult, Fascism, and Social Darwinism. It’s out there as an alternative for kids who are growing up and need that information.’ Both Rice and Moynihan came out of the ‘industrial’ music scene. . . .”

(Idem.)

12. One of the industrial music acts that helped to break the cultural taboo against utilizing fascist imagery was “Throbbing Gristle” and its chief bard Genesis P. Orridge. (Note that Moynihan, among others, held this group and its successor acts in contempt. In Moynihan’s opinion, the group and its leader lacked true fascist political conviction.)

” . . . ‘Throbbing Gristle’, the linchpin of the post-punk ‘industrial’ turn, dressed in camouflage gear decorated with an SS-looking lightning bolt patch, and issued songs like ‘Zyklon B Zombie’ and ‘Salon Kitty’ (named after an SS-run brothel in Berlin). The cover for the Throbbing Gristle song ‘Discipline’ on Fetish Records showed the group outside the former Nazi Ministry of Propaganda building in Berlin. Throbbing Gristle called their hackney-based recording studio the Death Factory, and its Industrial Records logo was an unidentified picture of Auschwitz. Many punks despised Throbbing Gristle as misogynist ‘death art’ fascists. At a July 6, 1978 concert at the London Film Co-op (where Boyd Rice also appeared), a fight even broke out between Throbbing Gristle and members of the Rock Against Racism-allied bands the Slits and the Raincoats. . . .”

(Ibid.; p. 4.)

13. Coogan explains the fascist aesthetics underlying the culture to which “Throbbing Gristle” belongs.

” . . . The Industrialist fascination with taboo breakers extended to charismatic leaders like Hitler and Manson, who became iconic figures in a world where evil was more real than good, and hate more strong than love. Yet because they, like the Marquis de Sade before them, were also fearless disrupters of middle-class morality, a Hitler or Manson were also, in a sense, perverse role models. The sheer bleakness of industrial culture also provided fertile ground for future misanthropy. If evil was more powerful than good, evil was also more natural. In a truly Hobbesian world the Social Darwinists and the Malthusians were right when they argued that only the strong could and should survive.”

(Idem.)

14. Not unprecedented, this worldview reflects one that became extant during the period leading up to World War II.

“. . . The sense of despair felt by industrial culture was not unique. A similar heroic/pessimistic worldview appeared in Europe after World War I. In the early 1920’s there arose what I shall call ‘counter-cultural fascism.’ More a sensibility than a movement, it fused Friedrich Nietzsche’s idea of the individual will-to-power and his contempt for middle-class morality with Oswald Spengler’s belief in the imminent downfall of the West. Artists like Futurist founder Filippo Marinetti, Ezra Pound, Gabriele D’Annunzio, and Ernst Junger viewed traditional forms of conservatism with the same contempt that they felt for social democracy, rationalism, and the Enlghtenment. While Genesis P. Orridge was not really a countercultural fascist, Throbbing Gristle stood on he cusp of a revival of a ‘counter cultural fascist’ turn in segments of haute Bohemia.”

(Idem.)

15.

“Another set of ides associated with the Abraxas network had earlier been promoted by a radical Italian fascist named Franco Freda. Freda, who advocated a combined right-and-left-wing terrorist assault on the middle class Establishment, first outlined his ideas at a 1969 meeting of the far-right European Revolutionary Front in Regensburg, Bavaria. In his talk, which was later published as La Disintegrazione del Sistema [The Disintegration of the System], Freda argued that the ‘nervous system of the bourgeois world’ had to be disrupted with utmost violence by far right ‘political soldiers’ working in an alliance with the far left.”

(Idem.)

16. One of the political/ideological antecedents of the Abraxas fascist aesthetic is Julius Evola. Evola’s work was financed by the SD—the SS intelligence service. (For more about Evola, see—among other programs—FTR#233.)

“Freda derived essential parts of his strategy from the Italian conservative revolutionary theorist Julius Evola, the ‘Herbert Marcuse’ of the postwar European far right. Evola argued in books like Calvacare la Tigre (Riding the Tiger) that the collapse of modern mass society was something to be welcomed, not resisted. Radical Evolans like Freda believed that violent shocks to the system could only hasten the inevitable collapse of the hated modern order. . . .”

(Idem.)

17. Next, the program sets forth the professional development of Adam Parfrey—a fellow in the Abraxas Foundation and the publisher of Lords of Chaos.

” . . . The new hip regime of mean was exemplified by the infamous Los Angeles Amok catalog. Amok Press’ bestseller Apocalypse Culture, a collection of rants, raves, conspiracy theories and aesthetic terrorist tracts, was another key text. Adam Parfrey, owner of Amok and later Feral House, first entered the scene in 1980 with IDEA, a southern California-based Re/Search-type journal about punk culture. He then moved to New York, where he met the art designer George Petros. . . .In 1984, Parfrey and Petros created Exit, a New York-based journal heavy on graphic design.”

(Ibid.; pp. 5-6.)

18. Far from benign and aloof, Parfrey’s literary efforts have served to disseminate the views and efforts of some of the very worst Nazis and fascists.

“Parfrey worked with Petros on the first three issues of Exit, before leaving to create Amok Press. Once a success de scandale, Exit’s increasing fascination with fascism doomed it to just six issues. Issue Five, for example, featured a particularly rancid piece of anti-Semitism entitled ‘The Execution of Carl Jung’, which was ‘conceived by George Petros’ with ‘text researched by Robert N. Taylor,’ a former paramilitary Minuteman leader turned racial Odinist. The final 1994 Exit included contributions from Michael Moynihan and James Mason, an American Nazi whose book Siege was published by Moynihan. While producing Exit, Petros also served as an editor at Seconds, an eclectic New York-based music magazine that Moynihan, Rice, and Parfrey regularly write for.”

(Ibid.; p. 6.)

19. One of the organizations with a philosophical affinity for Abraxas, Genesis P. Orridge, etc., is the Church of Satan and its late founder, Anton LaVey. (Both Moynihan and Boyd Rice are members of this organization.)

“The new glorification of the instinctual and the barbaric, the belief in the survival of the fittest, and the hatred of both Christian morality and liberal humanism were all music to the ears of Anton LaVey, the founder and head of the San Francisco-based Church of Satan. Not surprisingly, Boyd Rice developed close ties with LaVey in the early 1980’s. In 1984, Rice set up the Abraxas Foundation as a ‘social Darwinist think tank.’ An Abraxas tract called WAKE pro-claimed ‘Long Live Death!’ and hailed Malthusianism as ‘Nature’s Eternal Fascism.’ (The Church of Satan also maintained close ties to Genesis P. Orridge.) Today Rice is himself a member of the Church’s governing inner circle, the Council of Nine. . . .”

(Idem.)

20. Among the fellow travellers of LaVey are people who espouse Odinist religion. Within that milieu, in turn, are people of a truly murderous bent. Note the presence in this Satanist/Nazi milieu of the wife of convicted Order murderer David Lane. (For more about The Order, see—among other programs—FTR#’s 89, 386, 399, and the various programs discussing the topics of OJ Simpson case, the Oklahoma City bombing, and Serpent’s Walk. Important background information on The Order can be obtained from RFA’s 10-13—available from Spitfire.)

” . . . LaVey, who is often only seen as a libertarian maverick, called for a new kind of fascism in a 1994 interview with Michael Moynihan in Seconds. Moynihan’s essay, ‘The Faustian Spirit of Fascism,’ was also published in the Church of Satan’s magazine, The Black Flame. LaVey even contributed an introduction to a new edition of ‘Ragnar Redbeard’s Might is Right, a Nietzschean and Social Darwinist tract first published in 1896 which LaVey had liberally plagiarized in his own book, The Satanic Bible. The editor of the new edition of Might is Right is listed as Katia Lane. She is the wife of David Lane, an Odinist leader of the high-profile far right paramilitary group called the Order, who is now serving a life sentence for conspiring to murder a Denver radio personality named Alan Berg.”

(Idem.)

21. The afterword of Might is Right (edited by the wife of convicted Order killer David Lane) was penned by George Hawthorne, head of the Ra Ho Wa racist musical group. Afterword author George Hawthorne is also the founder of Resistance Records, now owned by the National Alliance. (For more about Resistance Records and the National Alliance, see FTR#211.) Before being appropriated by the National Alliance, Resistance Records was distributed by the fascist Liberty Lobby. In charge of this distribution was Todd Blodgett, a former Reagan White House staff member. (For more about the Nazi underpinnings of the Reagan administration, see—among other programs—FTR#’s 180, 332, 421.)

“The author of Might is Right‘s afterword is, arguably, even more; ‘devilish’ than LaVey. He is none other than George Hawthorne, head of the white racist musical group Ra Ho Wa (Racial Holy War) and founder of Resistance Records, whom Michael Moynihan interviewed for Seconds and The Black Flame, Moynihan is also thanked in the new edition of Might is Right for helping make the book possible.”

(Idem.)

22. Promoting and extolling Charles Manson, the Abraxas milieu came into contact with James Mason, among other members of the American Nazi Party.) “In the mid-1980’s, Adam Parfrey formed Amok Press, the precursor to Feral House, with Ken Swezey of the Amok catalog. Amok’s first book, Michael, was an English translation of Nazi Prpaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels’ sole novel. Parfrey’s next book, Apocalypse Culture was followed in 1988 by The Manson File, which was edited by Nikolas Schreck (the boyfriend of LaVey’s daughter Zeena) in collaboration with Boyd Rice and others. Rice regularly visited Manson, and even campaigned to get him released from jail through an Abraxas spin-off called the Friends of Justice.” (Idem.)

23. A pivot point in the development of the Abraxas Foundation’s professional relationship with members and alumni of the American Nazi Party was convicted murderer Perry ‘Red’ Warthan. Warthan catalyzed the relationship between ANP member James Mason and the Abraxas configuration. Among the ranks of the Nazis associated with the Abraxas milieu is Robert Heick, seen here in Nazi uniform with Abraxas/Moynihan/Parfrey colleague Boyd Rice: http://www.canuck.com/Srl/rice.html .)

“Via Manson, the Abraxas circle came into contact with James Mason, a former member of George Lincoln Rockwell’s American Nazi Party (ANP) and the eccentric head of the National Socialist Liberation Front (NSLF). Mason had established contact with Manson in the early 1980’s through an NSLF member named Perry ‘Red’ Warthan. Warthan later murdered a 17-year-old high school student in Oroville, California, because the boy told police that Warthan had been distributing racist literature. In the late 1980’s, Rice got into hot water due to his friendship with Robert Heick is the leader of a skin-head group called American Front that once attacked the San Francisco anarchist bookstore “Bound Together.” Although he denied having any political ties to Heick, the growing unpopularity of Abraxas in San Francisco led Rice to decamp to Denver, Colorado.”

(Ibid.; pp. 6-7.)

24. Next, the program highlights the relationship between Abraxas fellow Adam Parfrey and the late Keith Stimely, the former editor of the Liberty Lobby’s Journal of Historical Review (the leading Holocaust denial publication.) Parfrey hired Stimely to write press releases for Feral House (publisher of Lords of Chaos).

“As for Parfrey, he first moved his publishing operation from New York to Los Angeles. After the LA riots, he relocated to Portland and then returned south to Venice, California. While in Portland, Parfrey (whose own mother is Jewish) hired the late Keith Stimely, an openly gay former editor of The Journal of Historical Review, the world’s leading Holocaust-denial outfit, to write Feral House press releases. Stimely’s name also appeared on a leaflet, along with that of Moynihan and Portland artist Diabolos Rex, as part of a Boyd Rice/NON ‘Total War’ performance in that city. . . .”

(Ibid.; p. 7.)

25. Moynihan’s Storm Press published American Nazi Party member James Mason’s tract Siege, which glorifies Manson and other mass murderers as exemplars of the chaos that National Socialism should embrace. (Joseph Ferguson embodied the tragic distillate of this philosophy.) Significantly, Mason (and through him, Moynihan) advocate violence against the system by anyone—left, right, white black, brown or otherwise.) In this respect, Mason is an advocate of a stance approximating that of the fascist Third Position. (For more about the Third Position, see, among other programs, FTR#’s 252, 285, 352, as well as Miscellaneous Archive Shows M19 and M21, available from Spitfire.) Note that Feral House guru Adam Parfrey assisted in the publication of Siege.

” . . . One year later, Moynihan was more preoccupied by literary than legal matters. His Denver-based Storm Press published Siege, a 400-page anthology of the writings of James Mason, the Nazi fan of Charles Manson. In his acknowledgements, Moynihan (‘Michael M. Jenkins’) thanked (among others) both Adam Parfrey and Anton LaVey for their help in facilitating Siege’s publication. Mason argued in Siege that National Socialism had lost its violent, revolutionary edge. ‘We want to see crime and chaos rise to such a degree where the System becomes no longer viable and falls apart,’ he wrote. In a tract called ‘Smashing the Pig System,’ he growled: ‘If a bunch of Black Nationalists rob a Brinks truck, if they kill some System Pigs, WHO CARES??!!”

(Idem.)

26. Note Siege‘s glorification of James Franklin, the role model for National Vanguard Books’ tract Hunter. That book (published by the literary wing of the National Alliance that also publishes The Turner Diaries and Serpent’s Walk) glorifies the killing of interracial couples.)

Siege also paid homage to white racist ‘lone wolf’ assassins like Mason’s former American Nazi Party colleague Joseph Franklin, who specialized in shooting interracial couples (‘race traitors’); and James Huberty, who massacred a largely Hispanic clientele at a McDonald’s restaurant in San Diego. Mason felt that the lone wolves mere merely expressing healthy ‘Viking berserker rage’ against ‘Big Brother.’ He especially liked the fact that, since they acted alone, these lone wolves were very difficult to catch. Siege also glorified Charles Manson. Mason even created a Manson-inspired successor group to the NSLF called the Universal Order in an effort to transcend the traditional ‘left-right spectrum.’ In his introduction to Siege, Moynihan also highlighted Mason’s call for a unity of [ideological and behavioral] extremes against the System. . . .”

(Idem.)

27. As bizarrely violent and aberrant as it appears at first glance, the philosophy espoused in Siege and Lords of Chaos reflects the Freda/Evola call the destabilization of the “system.”

” . . . For all its crudeness, Siege echoed Franco Freda’s radical Evolan call for total social disruption in La Disintegrazione del Sistema. Storm also plans to issue the first English translation of Evola’s 1953 book, Gli Uomini e Ie Rovine (Men Among the Ruins). In August 1993, one year after Siege was published, Varg Vikernes murdered Euronymous. Although Moynihan was not a black metalist, the lure of Norway’s new Charles Manson [Vikernes] too much to resist. . . .”

(Idem.)

28. Among the fascist theorists Moynihan relies upon in his book is one “Kadmon”—himself a professional associate of Moynihan’s.

“In Lords of Chaos, Moynihan suggests that Vikernes is an avatar of a long-repressed Odinist archetype analogous to what Jung claimed for Nazi Germany in his famous 1936 essay on Wotan. . . . In Lords of Chaos, Moynihan relies upon ‘Kadmon,’ editor of a Vienna-based journal called Aorta, to bolster the racial archetype thesis. Kadmon argues that Norwegian black metalists are modern day examples of an ancient martial/mystical band of Werewolf-like ‘berserker’ warriors known as the Oskorei. No disinterested scholar, Kadmon is also a political supporter of Vikernes as well as Moynihan’s collaborator. His band Allerseelen, for example, put out a joint CD with Moynihan’s group Blood Axis. A blood fetishist, Kadmon named his journal Aorta because it is ‘a blood-red cycle. In Aorta there is my blood. The blood of the poet, the blood of the magician, the blood of the warrior.’ Kadmon also devoted one issue of Aorta to ‘the Odinist Norwegian composer Varg Vikernes . . .who is currently in prison due to his Viking ethics.'”

(Ibid.; p. 8.)

28. Lords of Chaos neglects to mention that its glorified protagonist Euronymous was planning to dynamite a punk anti-fascist house.

” . . . Given how much valuable information Lords of Chaos does present, it is somewhat incredible that the book fails to note that at the time that Vikernes murdered Euronymous, he was also planning to destroy an Oslo-based punk anti-fascist squat called Blitz House. After his arrest for murder, the police discovered that he had about 330 pounds of stolen dynamite in his possession. . . .”

(Idem.)

29. An even more significant omission is the failure Lords of Chaos to note that among the apparent influences on Vikernes’ murder of Euronymous was the ideology of the Abraxas milieu itself!

Lords of Chaos also ignores another obvious cultural influence on Vikernes, the Abraxas network’s glorification of killers like Charles Manson! Vikernes’ home town, Bergen, is also home to Jan Bruun’s Hypertonia World Enterprises. Bruun is a major distributor of Charles Manson memorabilia like ‘Watching Satan—the Legacy of Charles Manson.’ He knows Moynihan and interviewed him for an Italian journal aptly named Helter Skelter. Moynihan also thanks Bruun, an avowed social Darwinist and Malthusian, in the acknowledgements to Lords of Chaos. It seems almost impossible to believe that Vikernes would not have known about Hypertonia World Enterprises, especially since Bruun was in contact with Euronymous and even sold Mayhem LP’s.”

(Idem.)

30. Next, the broadcast highlights Moynihan’s own association with the racist/Odinist organization the Asatru Alliance. As with the rest of the Abraxas political/cultural environment, the Asatru Alliance intersects the milieu of the American Nazi Party and the paramilitary Minutemen.

“Despite his use of Kadmon’s theories, Moynihan claims in Lords of Chaos that ‘there is absolutely no specific connection’ between practitioners of Nordic religion and the black metal scene. ‘In fact,’ he writes, ‘public assumptions that such a link would exist have been a severe liability to these groups.’ Moynihan, however, neglects to mention that he himself is a leading member of a U.S. based racialist ‘Old Norse and Germanic religion’ movement called the Asatru Alliance of Independent Kindreds (AA), which in headquartered in Arizona.”

(Idem.)

31.

“The Asatru Alliance evolved out of a 1960’s Odinist/Nordic revival movement called the Asatril Free Assembly. The Asatru Alliance faction argued that a Norse religious movement should only include people of Northern European descent. It also publishes a journal called Vor Tru which is edited by Robert Ward, the former editor of a rightist music zine called The Fifth Path. He is also almost certainly the ‘R, Ward’ thanked by Moynihan for his typesetting contribution to Siege. Another Asatru Alliance, ‘Valgard’ (Michael Murray), was a former member of Rockwell’s American Nazi Party.”

(Idem.)

32. Robert Taylor is another of the unsavory associates of Moynihan and Feral House’s Adam Parfrey. As of 1999, Moynihan lived in Portland Oregon, where he moved in order to work for Feral House.

“Moynihan’s close friend Robert Nicholas Taylor, who publishes an Odinist journal called The Continuing Clan, is yet another Asatru Alliance bigwig with a far right bio. The rightist music journal Ohm Clock reports that during ‘ a 12-year stint as a national spokesman for the Minutemen, he [Taylor] went on to become Director of Intelligence and set up the first guerilla training schools ever to exist in the United States.’ Taylor’s call for the racial balkanization of America, an argument associated with the late ‘Klanarchist’ leader Robert Miles, was also featured in the last issue of Exit. Moynihan now [1999] lives in Portland, where he moved in order to work for Feral House. . . .”

(Ibid.; pp. 9-10.)

33. Moynihan continues to propagandize on behalf of Vikernes. Note that Vikernes’ CD’s are jointly distributed by Feral House audio.

” . . . True to his principles, Moynihan is quite active in the propaganda support network for Vikernes. He is, for example, a leading contributor to a rightist journal called Filosofem, which is published by a group also called Blood Axis. Filosofem is located at 5 Rue Gabriel Price in Metz, France. This same address is the source of a series of pro-Vikernes leaflets which carry the name Cymophane on them. Filosofem also takes its name from a Burzum CD that Vikernes recorded in 1993 while out on bail. That CD is currently being jointly distributed by Misanthropy Records, Cymophane Productions, and Feral House Audio.”

(Ibid.; p. 10.)

34. Another of the occult fascists associated with Moynihan and the Abraxas network is Kerry Bolton, publisher of Nexus among other periodicals.

Lords of Chaos also contains an interview with Kerry Bolton, a New Zealand-based Satanist who is trying to popularize fascism inside pop culture with a series of small journals like Key of Alocer, The Nexus and The Flaming Sword. His essays have also appeared in The Black Flame and Filosofem. In one of his writings Bolton even calls the Futurist (and later Fascist) Filippo Marinetti a forerunner of ‘Industrial Culture’. His publications also feature Moynihan, R.N. Taylor, Boyd Rice, Kadmon, and others like them. . . .”

(Idem.)

35.

” . . . Bolton also leads an overtly fascist magical sect called the Black Order. The Black Order’s New Zealand address is conveniently reprinted in an illustration in Lords of Chaos. A French far rightist and OTO leader named Christian Bouchet also pops up in Lords of Chaos. Along with publishing his own occult journal Lutte du People he edits. Bouchet advocates an alliance with the far left, applauds Castro for resisting American imperialism, and praises the French nineteenth century anarchist Pierre-Joseph Proudhon. H even offered a eulogy for the German ultra-leftist Ulrike Meinhof, a leader of the terrorist Rote Armee Fraktion, RAF. Nouvelle Resistance is also behind a pro-Vikernes music fanzine called Napalm Rock, whose editor Lords of Chaos interviews. Given his own background and publicly proclaimed political views, it seems fairly obvious that Moynihan would not be terribly distraught if a new wave of ‘berserker youth’ chose to follow in Vikernes’ path—regardless of whether or not he holds the Count’s most extreme political statements in high regard.”

(Idem.)

36. In light of the ideological/cultural propagandizing of Moynihan, Parfrey, Rice, the Abraxas network and the other fascists and Nazi fellow travelers recounted in the text above, the motivation propelling the bloody demise of Joseph Ferguson seems less obscure.

“Agitated, shirtless under his body armor and holding a 9mm semiautomatic pistol, disgruntled security guard Joseph Ferguson stared straight into the video camera held by a man would shortly become the fifth life snuffed out in Ferguson’s 24-hour killing spree. ‘I’ve taken four victims,’ Ferguson said from the Rancho Cordova home where he held a Burns International Security colleague and his wife hostage for nearly 18 hours before shooting himself to death in a gunbattle with officers. ‘That should be enough to last a week in the news. . . . He was fascinated with neo-Nazism, Timothy McVeigh and Charles Manson. [Italics are Mr. Emory’s]”

“Sacramento Killer Vowed Not to Be Taken Alive” by Michelle Guido; San Jose Mercury News; 9/11/2001; pp. 1A-14A.

37a. Obviously, Parfrey and company have deep connections to fascist and Nazi elements and have worked to further some of those elements’ projects. One should not be too quick to label Parfrey a fascist himself. Rather, he might be termed a “fellow traveler,” whose efforts on behalf of, and association with, Nazi/fascist elements may be due to Parfrey’s devotion to the promulgation of “extreme culture.”

Defying easy definition, “extreme culture” could be said to be defined by anything that is edgy, over-the-top and, more often than not, offensive and/or unbelievable.

Exemplifying the cognitive paramaters of the “extreme culture” disseminated by Parfrey and company are the pronouncements of an individual named Dan Rightmyer, published by Feral House under the nom de plume “Alex Constantine.”

Claiming to be an expert on, and victim of, mind control, Rightmyer/Constantine sent a letter to the now-defunct magazine Mondo 2000, in which he made some remarkable statements.

He claims to have been tortured by “pulsed audiograms.” An audiogram is a  graph, constructed  in order to chart a  person’s hearing loss. The worst thing one can suffer at the hands of an audiogram is a paper cut. Rightmyer/Constantine’s statment is not only demonstrably false, but absurd.

The piece de resistance, however, is his claim to have repelled magnets “from his cranium,” an act he claims was witnessed by “two of the leading child psychologists in the country.”

. . . . For five years I have been the victim of a formal torture program at the hands of the CIA. The torture is electromagnetic and difficult to trace, retaliation for my political research. . . . I have been subjected to a gruelling daily regimen of torture rendered from a remote source. I have been burned by microwaves, kept awake for days at a stretch by shrieking noises in my ears, the effect of pulsed audiograms. One evening I was hit by an infra-sound attack . . . on my spine, the most painful experience of my life. I was left crawling and screaming across the floor. For die-hard skeptics, I can offer this proof: Two of the leading child psychologists in the country once witnessed magnets repelled from my cranium. When I wrote a letter to Amnesty International about my plight (it was ignored), friends of mind [sic] were subjected to microwave attack. . . . [Italics are Mine–D.E.]

37b. Yet another of Rightmyer/Constantine’s claims concerning magnets being repelled from his head:

. . . . I have numerous witnesses who will testify on the witness stand that my
head has been so magnetized it repelled magnets. Yet Martin claimed I was
lying. I am not. . . .

“Constantine vs. Canon”; Conspiracy Theory Research List; 3/18/1999.

37c. On a KPFK chat board (KPFK is the Pacifica radio outlet in Los Angeles) Rightmyer/Constantine was challenged to identify the two psychologists who had supposedly witnessed the magnets incident. Miraculously, the identity of the two supposed witnesses changed completely! In addition, Rightmyer/Constantine claims he “knocked out a light bulb and a new CD player”!

Obviously, Rightmyer/Constantine’s account is at fundamental variance with his earlier account. One should not be too ready to brand him a liar, however. He may just be hallucinating (see below.)

I have responded to this question on Internet discussion lists when serious people were interested. Two former colleagues of a well-known KPFK talk show host witnessed the episode. It was the least spectacular event that occurred on the afternoon in question, BTW. I also knocked out a light bulb and a new CD player. [Italics are mine–D.E.] Since you haven’t stooped to flames, I’ll explain … I was targeted by electronic weapons – these are not so obscure these days, after all, and all of the past ridicule on this message board is misplaced, not to mention cruel. I have for 20 years fought as fiercely as anyone for human rights on a number of fronts – and was tortured for it. We know the sort of person who flames torture victims, don’t we? Why would I respond to that sort of lowlife. My focus is on federally-sponsored atrocities, corruption, cover-ups … not idiots who have to struggle with a simple explanation for an event that is not really so far-out, after all. I’ve written about the technology in two books. Read them, check the footnotes, and you’ll understand where I’m coming from.
AC

37d. An alternative explanation for Rightmyer/Constantine’s experiences was provided by a colleague of his. In a Google chat forum, he noted the following (reposted by another participant):

More stuff on Dan Rightmyer – the kook known as pen
name ‘Alex Constantine.’

I’ve responded adequately to Dan Rightmyer and his silly billy pal Brian in another recent thread. But there is something else you good folks really ought to know about Dan ‘Alex ConstantWhine’ Rightmyer. (Sung to the tune of the ‘Beverly Hillbillies’ theme…) Come and listen to my story ‘bout a nut named Dan, Hears voices in his head he says are from ‘The Man.’ He says ‘They filled my noggin full of electronic bugs!’ But he doesn’t let you know that he’s done a lot of DRUGS. (ACID, that is. LSD. ‘Hundreds of trips.’)

‘Hundreds of acid trips’ is the admission Dan made to his former best friend, S.M. Any reasonable person who wants the full story should feel free to write me or call me. I’ll tell ya how to talk to this former best friend for yourself — you’ll hear all sorts of outrageous, hilarious stories about Dan’s history of massive drug abuse, as well his insane behavior.

(Here’s a sample: Once, one of Dan’s inner ‘tormentors’ identified himself by name. Dan found that a gentleman of this name was listed in the phone book. Dan, who owned a firearm, threatened to go to the house of this obviously-innocent party and shoot him!)

Discussion

8 comments for “FTR #437 Counter-Culture Fascism”

  1. If one is keeping track of fascist ideology creeping into mass culture I can suggest following up on associates of Genesis P, Orridge ,Dave Tibet of the group Current 93 professes to be influenced by Francis Parker Yockey and his group released a record titled Emperium as well as a few others with overt Crowley themes.

    Posted by Kent Kritz | June 20, 2009, 3:19 pm
  2. yeah that guys a nazi for sure

    Posted by htrain | June 28, 2010, 1:20 pm
  3. […] FTR #437 Counter-Culture Fascism […]

    Posted by « Thrive »: An example of counter-culture fascism | Lys-d'Or | May 30, 2012, 10:49 am
  4. Adam Parfrey briefly attended an editorial meeting of an alternative newspaper we were involved with in Portland. My impression was that he was mostly working an unexplored corner of the publishing market. However, one of his associates had attended a political discussion group we had and tried to defend the intellectual utility of Yockey’s book “Imperium”. We didn’t buy it. At the time, the owner of Powells Books in Portland thought the book was so dangerous he kept the few copies he had in a locked room.

    In an interesting cultural parallel This story ran today about German counterculture 200 years ago, Grimms Fairy Tales.
    Here’s the link and some commentary:

    “The theory that the Grimms’ tales, particularly the more brutal ones such as How Children Played Butcher With Each Other, in which a whole family massacres itself, had an adverse effect on the German character was expressed frequently after the second world war.
    In his 1978 book Roots of German Nationalism, Louis Snyder argued that the brothers helped to shape certain deleterious traits, such as discipline, obedience, authoritarianism, glorification of violence and nationalism, which became part of the national character. That was the reason allied commanders banned the book in schools after the war, arguing that they had found the roots of Nazism in the Grimms’ world.
    A British major, TJ Leonard, even said the fairytales had helped Germans teach their children “all the varieties of barbarousness”, making it easy for them to fit into the “role of the hangman”.
    The German author Günther Birkenfeld saw in the fairytales the answer to “how the German people were able to perpetrate the atrocities of Belsen and Auschwitz”.
    The book was therefore largely banned from the German nursery – which was simultaneously undergoing its own anti-authoritarian, pro-modernisation reaction to Nazism – for decades. At the same time though, it was becoming increasingly hijacked outside Germany by Disney and Hollywood.
    Matussek and others are calling for a re-think about the place the Grimm tales have in Germany’s cultural identity.”

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/12/20/200th-anniversary-of-grimms-fairy-tales-triggers-a-year-of-celebration-and-cultural-examination/

    Posted by Swamp | December 20, 2012, 9:44 am
  5. Maybe this is just a playful reference to pioneering Colombian black metal band Parabellum. Or at last, that’s about the best scenario we can hope for at this point:

    The GOP Just Named its Hot New Innovation Lab After a Nazi Pistol
    Adam Weinstein on Gawker
    2/4/2014 10:36am

    The Republican National Committee today excitedly announced the launch of a new startup lab to bring techies and creatives together, Silicon Valley-style, to get Republicans elected. Oh, and they named it for a Nazi gun, a type of ammo, and a philosophy that puts war before peace.

    Welcome to Para Bellum Labs, America! “Para Bellum Labs will help create a culture to allow the RNC to innovate faster and recruit more talented people who can build digital platforms to understand public opinion, engage voters and power elections,” RNC Chairman Reince Priebus gushed in a press release this morning. Para Bellum plans to recruit on top engineering school campuses and hold fun hackathons.

    The charm offensive all starts with the video above, which makes Para Bellum look like a much cooler place than DeVry Institute to get your associate’s degree in IT. “I chose to be a part of Para Bellum Labs because this is something that has never been done before,” says new employee Lauren. (By Republicans, no, this has not been done before. Not successfully. But by Democrats, well, um. Yeah.)

    The thing about Para Bellum, though, is that name. In Latin, it literally means “(prepare)* for war.” That’s dumb enough, probably: Hey, idealistic young programmers! Let’s save the world by crushing our enemies, seeing them driven before us, and hearing the lamentation of their women.

    In fact, it’s part of an old Roman cliche, “Si vis pacem, para bellum”—if you seek peace, prepare for war. That’s been quite an inspiring little phrase through history, at least to militarists. It was especially inspiring to Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken, the German government’s arms manufacturer from the late imperial era to World War II.

    DWM started using the “parabellum” phrase as a name for its signature guns—first, the light machine gun used by the Kaiser’s best during World War I, and then its most iconic gun: the Parabellum Pistole, or the Luger pistol. You know, this one:

    Yep, Nazi parabellum! The gun was so popular in the Third Reich that its ammunition—one of the first to use a slug that was 9 millimeters in diameter—became known as “9 mm parabellum,” which you can find now at your local gun store. Assuming, of course, that Obama and FEMA aren’t buying it all up for the upcoming counter-revolution.

    All of which begs the question: Republicans, if you could name your new hip millennial programmer lab anything, why’d you settle on a Latin phrase that carries some serious Hitlerite baggage?

    Sure, sure, you’re trying to separate yourselves from the pack, as new employee Jesse explains in the Para Bellum video: “You could go try to work on the west coast and potentially make a cool app, or you could actually physically change history.”

    Yeah. But Jesse: You know who else actually physically changed history?

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | February 4, 2014, 3:55 pm
  6. https://www.youtube.com/shared?ci=6V2ndbXT2zo

    Tom Metzger interviews boyd rice

    Posted by Christian Yates | November 7, 2016, 7:41 pm
  7. Remember the story about the neo-Nazi-turned-Islamist who murdered two of his neo-Nazi roommates, resulting in the discovery of a fourth neo-Nazi roommate who was planning a morter attack on a Florida nuclear plant who was also and in possession of high-explosives and radioactive material? Well, in case it’s not abundantly obvious that this group poses a serious threat to the public, here’s an article about how members of their particular neo-Nazi group – “Atomwaffen” (German for “Atomic Weapon”) – have been responsible for a number of recent murders around the country and more murders should be expected because Atomwaffen produces ISIS-style videos promoting mass neo-Nazi violence designed to sabotage and implode society:

    Pro-Publica

    California Murder Suspect Said to Have Trained With Extremist Hate Group
    The 20-year-old man charged in Orange County with killing a gay Jewish college student earlier this month is said to have belonged to Atomwaffen Division, a neo-Nazi group.

    by A.C. Thompson, ProPublica, Ali Winston, special to ProPublica, and Jake Hanrahan, special to ProPublica
    Jan. 26, 2018, 7:46 p.m. EST

    The California man accused of killing a 19-year-old University of Pennsylvania student earlier this month is an avowed neo-Nazi and a member of one of the most notorious extremist groups in the country, according to three people with knowledge of the man’s recent activities.

    The man, Samuel Woodward, has been charged in Orange County, California, with murdering Blaze Bernstein, who went missing in early January while visiting his family over winter break. Prosecutors allege that Woodward stabbed Bernstein more than 20 times before burying his body in an Orange County park where it was eventually discovered. The two men had attended high school together.

    Woodward, 20, is set to be arraigned on Feb. 2 and has not yet entered a plea. Orange County prosecutors say they are examining the possibility that the killing was a hate crime — Bernstein was Jewish and openly gay — and some recent news reports have suggested that the alleged killer might hold far-right or even white supremacist political beliefs.

    Now, three people with detailed knowledge of Woodward’s recent past have been able to shed more light on the young man’s extremist activities. They said Woodward was a member of the Atomwaffen Division, an armed Fascist group with the ultimate aim of overthrowing the U.S. government through the use of terrorism and guerrilla warfare.

    The organization, which celebrates Hitler and Charles Manson, has been tied to four other murders and an elaborate bomb plot over the past eight months. Experts who study right-wing extremist movements believe Atomwaffen’s commitment to violence has made it one of the more dangerous groups to emerge from the new wave of white supremacists.

    Two of the three people who described Woodward’s affiliations are friends of his; the other is a former member of Atomwaffen Division.

    ProPublica’s revelations about Woodward’s background add a new element to a murder case that has attracted considerable local and national news coverage. But they also raise fresh concerns about groups like Atomwaffen Division, shadowy outfits of uncertain size that appear capable of genuine harm.

    Woodward joined the organization in early 2016 and later traveled to Texas to attend Atomwaffen meetings and a three-day training camp, which involved instruction in firearms, hand-to-hand combat, camping and survival skills, the former member said. ProPublica has obtained photographs of Woodward at an outdoor Atomwaffen meeting in the scrubby Texas countryside. One of the photos depicts Woodward and other members making straight-armed Nazi salutes while wearing skull masks. In other pictures, Woodward is unmasked and easily identifiable.

    The young man is proficient with both handguns and assault rifles, according to one person who participated in the Texas training and watched him shoot. That person also said that Woodward helped organize a number of Atomwaffen members in California.

    Social media posts and chat logs shared by Woodward’s friends show that he openly described himself as a “National Socialist” or Nazi. He “was as anti-Semitic as you can get,” according to one acquaintance.

    ProPublica contacted Orange County prosecutors regarding Woodward’s alleged neo-Nazi activities. Michelle Van Der Linden, a spokesperson for the District Attorney’s Office, said she couldn’t comment directly on the case, but said the investigation is ongoing, with detectives exploring all possible leads.

    Woodward told police Bernstein had tried to kiss him while they were in the park, according to a sealed affidavit obtained by the Orange County Register.

    Atomwaffen started in 2015 and is estimated to have about 80 members scattered around the country in small cells; the former member said the group’s ranks have grown since the lethal and chaotic “Unite the Right” rally last summer in Charlottesville, Virginia.

    While many of the new white extremist groups have consciously avoided using Nazi imagery, Atomwaffen has done the opposite. The name can mean “Atomic Weapons” in German, and the organization embraces Third Reich iconography, including swastikas, the Totenkopf, or death’s head insignia, and SS lightning bolts. The group frequently produces YouTube videos featuring masked Atomwaffen members hiking through the backcountry and firing weapons. They’ve also filmed themselves burning the U.S. Constitution and setting fire to the American flag at an Atomwaffen “Doomsday Hatecamp.”

    Atomwaffen’s biggest inspiration seems to be James Mason, a long-time fascist who belonged to the American Nazi Party and later, during the 1970s, joined a more militant offshoot. During the 1980s, Mason published a newsletter called SIEGE, in which he eschewed political activism in favor of creating a new fascist regime through murder, small “lone wolf” terror attacks, and all-out war against the government. Mason also struck up a friendship with the late Charles Manson, who has become another hero for Atomwaffen.

    The organization first gained a measure of national attention in May of last year, when 18-year-old Devon Arthurs, one of Atomwaffen’s founding members, was charged in state court in Tampa, Florida, with murdering two of his roommates, Andrew Oneschuk, 18, and Jeremy Himmelman, 22. Both victims were Atomwaffen loyalists.

    The murders allegedly occurred after Arthurs traded Nazism for radical Islam. When police took Arthurs into custody, according to news accounts based on police reports, he claimed he had shot his former comrades because they had taunted him about his Muslim faith and plotted violent attacks to further their fascist agenda. Arthurs told investigators he killed Onsechuk and Himmelman “because they want to build a Fourth Reich.”

    When law enforcement searched the apartment in Tampa, Florida, where Arthurs and the others lived, they found firearms, a framed photograph of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, rifles, ammunition, and a cooler full of a highly volatile explosive called HMTD. Investigators also discovered radioactive material in the home.

    The bomb-making material belonged to a fourth roommate, Atomwaffen leader Brandon Russell, a Florida National Guardsman. Arthurs told authorities that Russell had been planning to blow up a nuclear power plant near Miami. Earlier this month Russell pleaded guilty in federal district court in Tampa to illegal possession of explosives and was sentenced to five years in federal prison.

    Atomwaffen surfaced again in connection with a double homicide in Reston, Virginia, in December 2017. A 17-year-old neo-Nazi allegedly shot to death his girlfriend’s parents, Buckley Kuhn-Fricker and Scott Fricker, who had urged their daughter to break up with him. The accused, who shot himself as well but survived and remains hospitalized, was charged as a juvenile in state court in Virginia with two counts of homicide.

    The 17-year-old was a big fan of Atomwaffen and James Mason, according to reporting by the Huffington Post, which examined his social media trail.

    The former Atomwaffen member in contact with ProPublica said that the teen was more than a fan: He was in direct communication with the group.

    “Their rhetoric is some of the most extreme we have seen,” said Joanna Mendelson, a senior researcher at the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism. The group, she said, views itself as the radical vanguard of the white supremacist movement, the frontline soldiers of an imminent race war.

    ———-

    “California Murder Suspect Said to Have Trained With Extremist Hate Group” by A.C. Thompson, Ali Winston, and Jake Hanrahan; Pro-Publica; 01/26/2018

    ““Their rhetoric is some of the most extreme we have seen,” said Joanna Mendelson, a senior researcher at the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism. The group, she said, views itself as the radical vanguard of the white supremacist movement, the frontline soldiers of an imminent race war.”

    Extreme even by neo-Nazi standards. That’s Atomwaffen. Hence, a celebration of Hitler and Charles Manson:


    The organization, which celebrates Hitler and Charles Manson, has been tied to four other murders and an elaborate bomb plot over the past eight months. Experts who study right-wing extremist movements believe Atomwaffen’s commitment to violence has made it one of the more dangerous groups to emerge from the new wave of white supremacists.

    And in the case of the murder of Blaze Bernstein, it appears that being Jewish and gay was probably enough to precipitate the murder. That’s the kind of people that join Atomwaffen:


    The man, Samuel Woodward, has been charged in Orange County, California, with murdering Blaze Bernstein, who went missing in early January while visiting his family over winter break. Prosecutors allege that Woodward stabbed Bernstein more than 20 times before burying his body in an Orange County park where it was eventually discovered. The two men had attended high school together.

    Woodward, 20, is set to be arraigned on Feb. 2 and has not yet entered a plea. Orange County prosecutors say they are examining the possibility that the killing was a hate crime — Bernstein was Jewish and openly gay — and some recent news reports have suggested that the alleged killer might hold far-right or even white supremacist political beliefs.

    Now, three people with detailed knowledge of Woodward’s recent past have been able to shed more light on the young man’s extremist activities. They said Woodward was a member of the Atomwaffen Division, an armed Fascist group with the ultimate aim of overthrowing the U.S. government through the use of terrorism and guerrilla warfare.

    And this group is estimated to have 80 member scattered around the country in small cell (possibly planning nuke plant attacks?) after starting in 2015. And the man charged with this crime, Samuel Woodward, has reportedly been involved with that recruitment effort:


    Woodward joined the organization in early 2016 and later traveled to Texas to attend Atomwaffen meetings and a three-day training camp, which involved instruction in firearms, hand-to-hand combat, camping and survival skills, the former member said. ProPublica has obtained photographs of Woodward at an outdoor Atomwaffen meeting in the scrubby Texas countryside. One of the photos depicts Woodward and other members making straight-armed Nazi salutes while wearing skull masks. In other pictures, Woodward is unmasked and easily identifiable.

    The young man is proficient with both handguns and assault rifles, according to one person who participated in the Texas training and watched him shoot. That person also said that Woodward helped organize a number of Atomwaffen members in California.

    Social media posts and chat logs shared by Woodward’s friends show that he openly described himself as a “National Socialist” or Nazi. He “was as anti-Semitic as you can get,” according to one acquaintance.

    Atomwaffen started in 2015 and is estimated to have about 80 members scattered around the country in small cells; the former member said the group’s ranks have grown since the lethal and chaotic “Unite the Right” rally last summer in Charlottesville, Virginia.

    And this murder was just the latest Atomwaffen murder. There’s also the murders in Florida that revealed the nuke plant plot, along with a 17 year old Atomwaffen associate who murder his girlfriend’s parents after they objected to their daughter dating a neo-Nazi:


    When law enforcement searched the apartment in Tampa, Florida, where Arthurs and the others lived, they found firearms, a framed photograph of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, rifles, ammunition, and a cooler full of a highly volatile explosive called HMTD. Investigators also discovered radioactive material in the home.

    The bomb-making material belonged to a fourth roommate, Atomwaffen leader Brandon Russell, a Florida National Guardsman. Arthurs told authorities that Russell had been planning to blow up a nuclear power plant near Miami. Earlier this month Russell pleaded guilty in federal district court in Tampa to illegal possession of explosives and was sentenced to five years in federal prison.

    Atomwaffen surfaced again in connection with a double homicide in Reston, Virginia, in December 2017. A 17-year-old neo-Nazi allegedly shot to death his girlfriend’s parents, Buckley Kuhn-Fricker and Scott Fricker, who had urged their daughter to break up with him. The accused, who shot himself as well but survived and remains hospitalized, was charged as a juvenile in state court in Virginia with two counts of homicide.

    The 17-year-old was a big fan of Atomwaffen and James Mason, according to reporting by the Huffington Post, which examined his social media trail.

    The former Atomwaffen member in contact with ProPublica said that the teen was more than a fan: He was in direct communication with the group.

    And the two guiding lights for this new domestic terror threat are none other than James Mason and Charles Manson. This is where we are. Still:

    While many of the new white extremist groups have consciously avoided using Nazi imagery, Atomwaffen has done the opposite. The name can mean “Atomic Weapons” in German, and the organization embraces Third Reich iconography, including swastikas, the Totenkopf, or death’s head insignia, and SS lightning bolts. The group frequently produces YouTube videos featuring masked Atomwaffen members hiking through the backcountry and firing weapons. They’ve also filmed themselves burning the U.S. Constitution and setting fire to the American flag at an Atomwaffen “Doomsday Hatecamp.”

    Atomwaffen’s biggest inspiration seems to be James Mason, a long-time fascist who belonged to the American Nazi Party and later, during the 1970s, joined a more militant offshoot. During the 1980s, Mason published a newsletter called SIEGE, in which he eschewed political activism in favor of creating a new fascist regime through murder, small “lone wolf” terror attacks, and all-out war against the government. Mason also struck up a friendship with the late Charles Manson, who has become another hero for Atomwaffen.

    So this appears to be part of the Manson legacy: inspiring ‘white ISIS’.

    And don’t forget that when Atomwaffen makes ISIS-style videos advocating violence designed to collapse society and trigger a race war, that’s what ‘dropping the mask’ looks like for Nazis and other violent far-right movements. The ‘Alt-Right’ people in suits and ties like Richard Spencer who strive to create an air of respectability for Nazis by not dressing like a Nazi are merely masking what Atomwaffen is putting on full display: that the ‘Alt-Right’ collection of contemporary neo-Nazi thought is heavily overlapping with Charles Manson’s hopes and dreams which is why Atomwaffen openly worships him:

    The Huffington Post

    The Maniac Neo-Nazis Keeping Charles Manson’s Race War Alive
    How Atomwaffen wants to make Helter Skelter real.

    By Luke O’Brien and Christopher Mathias
    11/21/2017 04:28 pm ET Updated Nov 21, 2017

    Charles Manson is dead now, and we are the richer for it. Manson was a thief, a pimp and a murderous cult leader bent on race war. He was true scum.

    No wonder some alt-righters are pouring out drinks for him.

    “A great revolutionary,” said one commenter of Manson on the IronMarch neo-Nazi internet forum.

    “The world really does feel a little emptier,” said another.

    One bereaved bigot simply posted a Celine Dion lyric: “Near, far, wherever you are I believe that the heart does go on …”

    “Hero.” “Champion.” “Warrior of Truth.” Such were the tributes used Monday to describe a demented butcher.

    If you’re wondering who might rhapsodize a psychotic racist in this manner, the answer is other psychotic racists, many of whom belong to Atomwaffen Division, a particularly bloodthirsty and anti-American branch of the so-called alt-right that has made worshipping Manson a part of their cultish devotion to violent insurrection.

    Even within the alt-right — a loose association of white supremacists and fascists — the Atomwaffen Division is considered extreme. The group, whose name translates to “Atomic Weapons Division,” puts out ISIS-style propaganda videos on YouTube that feature members clad in skull masks and camouflage outfits, sometimes on training exercises in the woods, often holding guns and the organization’s distinctive yellow-and-black nuclear-themed flags. In one video, members burn a copy of the U.S. Constitution on a grill.

    pic.twitter.com/20BooyUUr2— SIEGE Culture (@siegeculture_) November 15, 2017

    Atomwaffen is best known for a double homicide in Tampa this May, in which Devon Arthurs, a member of the group who had converted to a violent, fundamentalist version of Islam, shot and killed two of his roommates, who were also Atomwaffen members. A fourth roommate, Brandon Russell, was arrested later for having bomb-making equipment and radioactive material. Russell, too, was part of Atomwaffen. He had a framed photo of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in his bedroom.

    Apocalyptic lunacy has always been part of far-right politics, and a vigorous strain of it runs through today’s alt-right white supremacist movement. It should come as no surprise, then, that Manson, whose once-upon-a-time status as a longhair could never obscure the swastika carved into his forehead, might serve as a new vessel of madness for today’s violent racists. In many ways, he was a forebear of groups like Atomwaffen and a bug-eyed prototype for the modern race warrior.

    Manson’s deranged political teachings were a mish-mash of Scientology, occultism and Nazism, all bundled into an original end-of-days tale. Stay with me, he told his followers, and you’ll be saved from the coming race war.

    “Manson was motivated by an apocalyptic belief in the imminent end of the world through a race war in which the White population was doomed to defeat,” Jeffrey Kaplan wrote in Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. “The victorious Black population would in time realize that the White man is genetically more fit to govern, and would seek in vain for White survivors of the racial Holocaust to assume the reins of power. The Manson family, having survived the apocalypse by hiding in a timeless cave at the center of the world, would then emerge to take power.”

    This worldview led Manson and his followers into an especially desolate part of Death Valley called Barker Ranch in 1969, where Time magazine described them as “holed up in run-down cabins” leading an “indolent, almost savage existence, singing Manson’s songs, dancing, swimming in a small pool, stealing cars for cash and picking through garbage for food.” Here they would dodge the apocalypse.

    By the early 1980s, of course, Manson had failed to dodge his own downfall. He wasn’t in a timeless cave at the center of the world. He was in a cell in San Quentin, serving a life sentence for the gruesome murders of seven people. Manson had led his followers, known as The Family, in the 1969 slayings of actress Sharon Tate and six other people in a two-night killing spree in Los Angeles.

    It was in prison that Manson started a correspondence with a longtime American neo-Nazi named James Mason, who would come to view “Charlie” as a prophet of hate. Mason was the type of man who considered Auschwitz a “damned nice place,” and his wingnut journey would take him from the heart of organized white supremacy to years of inept obscurity and, ultimately, back to a faint relevance in the Trump era thanks to the alt-right and Atomwaffen.

    A fascist since he was 13, when he joined the youth movement of George Lincoln Rockwell’s American Nazi Party, Mason had radicalized himself while watching black people take to the streets during the civil rights era. As a young adult, he set up Nazi booths at county fairs in southern Ohio, where he’d grown up.

    “We should shoot for bringing down the system,” he would later say. “Destroy the system.”

    Mason eventually left the American Nazi Party and joined a splinter group called the National Socialist Liberation Front. Some NSLF members were fans of Manson, which prompted Mason to begin researching the cult leader. In 1980, Mason reached out to the incarcerated Manson. The two began communicating regularly by mail and phone.

    “What I discovered was a revelation equal to the revelation I received when I first found Adolf Hitler,” Mason would later explain.

    Through “Charlie,” Mason came to understand that Hitler’s death had brought about the end of Western civilization. Every government in the world was now part of an anti-white global conspiracy run by “super capitalists” and “super communists.” Nothing about Western culture or its institutions could be salvaged. It would all have to be blown to smithereens.

    “It’s just like a human organism that has ingested a fatal dose of poison,” Mason would explain. “[If] you fall asleep with it and try to ride it out, you’re going to die, but if you become suddenly, violently ill and expel that poison – even though the experience may be rather unpleasant – you at least have a chance to live. Manson called that Helter Skelter.”

    So inspired by “Charlie” was Mason that he took the murderous cult leader’s advice and renamed his neo-Nazi organization Universal Order. Mason began writing a newsletter called “Siege” to promote Manson’s views as a continuation of Hitler’s philosophy. In 1992, Mason would collect these writings into a book that neo-Nazi skinhead leader Tom Metzger called “435 pages of hot revolutionary style white propaganda.”

    For Mason and other white supremacists, Manson was almost a divine being, an atavistic incarnation of hate. The cult leader fit neatly into a strain of fascist magical realism called “Esoteric Hitlerism” that became popular after World War II when the Greek writer Savitri Devi proposed that Hitler was the ninth avatar of Vishnu and racist dupes somehow bought into it.

    This type of crazy remains en vogue among the alt-right today, with notable exponents such as Andrew “weev” Auernheimer, a neo-Nazi hacker and the webmaster for The Daily Stormer, whose charismatic ravings make him the closest thing to a contemporary Manson in the movement. (Auernheimer has ties to Atomwaffen and after the Arthurs murders issued an overloud declamation about how he knew the shooter and the victims but had previously banned Arthurs from a Daily Stormer forum.)

    But the effects of Manson on today’s white supremacist movement – in no small part thanks to Mason’s efforts – go beyond evil juju. Consider white separatism in the modern context. Organized racists in America these days like to call themselves “white nationalists.” This of course is partly a public relations gambit — “white nationalist” is maybe more palatable than “neo-Nazi” or “white supremacist” — but it’s also an accurate description of what they want.

    Groups across the racist political spectrum want a White Nation, an ethno-state, somewhere in America for just the White Race. The three-piece-suit-wearing figurehead of the alt-right, Richard Spencer, is very open about this. So is veteran skinhead Jeff Schoep, the leader of the National Socialist Movement. As is KKK-enthusiast Brad Griffin, aka Hunter Wallace, a leader of the League of the South.

    In 2000, Mason wrote Manson to thank him for this brand of white separatism. In a two-page history of the Universal Order he penned for Kaplan’s The Encyclopedia of White Power, Mason wrote:

    Although few would realize or admit it, the gradual move away from “White Supremacy” toward White Separatism, from any hopes of recovering the U.S. government, toward establishing new, independent regions, is precisely what animated the creation of the Manson enclaves in the Death Valley during the 1960s. At issue is bare survival as a species as the world system begins to crumble and die.

    Mason’s adulation of Manson made him somewhat of an outlier in the American neo-Nazi scene of the 1980s. And Manson veneration remains a prickly subject for current white nationalists. On Stormfront, another neo-Nazi forum, the commentary Monday about Manson’s passing mostly had a “Good riddance and thank God he’s dead” tenor. The Manson Family killed white people, after all. And Manson’s degeneracy reflects poorly on white supremacy.

    But degeneracy has never prevented neo-Nazis from attracting supporters. For years, Mason’s “Charlie”-inspired insights were sought after by other prominent racists, including Metzger, who interviewed Mason for over an hour in 1993 for his “Race and Reason” show. When talk turned to violence, as it often does with far-right extremists, Mason clucked disapprovingly about a 1984 mass shooting in which a survivalist gunman took out his rage at “international bankers” by massacring 21 people in a McDonald’s in San Ysidro, California. “It wouldn’t be such a bad thing if they would pick their targets a little more carefully,” he said.

    Mason faded into relative obscurity for the rest of the ’90s and early aughts, when he was in and out of prison on weapons charges and for an inappropriate relationship with a 14-year-old girl, of whom he had taken nude photographs.

    But in 2017, the year his hero “Charlie” would pass into the astral plane, Mason has found new relevance, and a fawning group of disciples in Atomwaffen.

    Earlier this year Atomwaffen republished Mason’s book “Siege” online, and announced the launch of a new Universal Order website.

    “JAMES MASON IS BACK!” read a July headline on the fascist zine Noose, an Atomwaffen site. After years of trying, the article said, Atomwaffen members had finally tracked down Mason for an exclusive interview!

    And to the violent group’s absolute glee, Mason was still Mason, an unhinged admirer of Manson and mass murderers.

    “My views on Manson have not changed,” he told an Atomwaffen member. “We had a society post-WW2 that was disintegrating, a mile a minute. We had a hippie generation, a country that was heading headlong into national suicide. Manson’s commune was solidly, solidly white.”

    When asked for his thoughts on Anders Breivik, the far-right Norwegian terrorist convicted of killing 77 people in a bombing and mass shooting in 2011, Mason replied that Breivik was “dead-on.”

    “I’m never gonna disown anybody who does something like that,” Mason said.

    Elsewhere in the interview, Mason said he’s “mildly encouraged” by the rise of Donald Trump.

    As recently as Sunday, one day before Manson died, Mason apparently wrote an article on the Universal Order website: a 1,400-word treatise praising Nazi eugenics and euthanasia.

    No word from Siegeculture about Charlie's death until we've completed our surprise. We have a memorial in the works, more on it later this week. Satanspeed. pic.twitter.com/3M0t3qWtNY— SIEGE Culture (@siegeculture_) November 20, 2017

    Mason’s young devotees, meanwhile, have hinted on Twitter – another key radicalization platform – that they’re planning a memorial for “Charlie,” a more elaborate send-off for this proto-alt-right Hitlerian avatar of death and terror.

    ———-

    “The Maniac Neo-Nazis Keeping Charles Manson’s Race War Alive” by Luke O’Brien and Christopher Mathias; The Huffington Post; 11/21/2017

    “If you’re wondering who might rhapsodize a psychotic racist in this manner, the answer is other psychotic racists, many of whom belong to Atomwaffen Division, a particularly bloodthirsty and anti-American branch of the so-called alt-right that has made worshipping Manson a part of their cultish devotion to violent insurrection.”

    Charles Manson: Patron saint of the guys who want to blow up your local nuclear power plant. Because of course.

    And this group makes ISIS-style videos encouraging Americans to declare war on the country through acts of violence in order to make Charles Manson’s visions of race war and the collapse of society a reality:


    Even within the alt-right — a loose association of white supremacists and fascists — the Atomwaffen Division is considered extreme. The group, whose name translates to “Atomic Weapons Division,” puts out ISIS-style propaganda videos on YouTube that feature members clad in skull masks and camouflage outfits, sometimes on training exercises in the woods, often holding guns and the organization’s distinctive yellow-and-black nuclear-themed flags. In one video, members burn a copy of the U.S. Constitution on a grill.

    But let’s not forget that so much of what excites Atomwaffen members with Manson’s race war ramblings is the kind of worldview that excites a lot more than just Attomwaffen. Most far-rightists are just less overt about it in public:


    Apocalyptic lunacy has always been part of far-right politics, and a vigorous strain of it runs through today’s alt-right white supremacist movement. It should come as no surprise, then, that Manson, whose once-upon-a-time status as a longhair could never obscure the swastika carved into his forehead, might serve as a new vessel of madness for today’s violent racists. In many ways, he was a forebear of groups like Atomwaffen and a bug-eyed prototype for the modern race warrior.

    Manson’s deranged political teachings were a mish-mash of Scientology, occultism and Nazism, all bundled into an original end-of-days tale. Stay with me, he told his followers, and you’ll be saved from the coming race war.

    “Manson was motivated by an apocalyptic belief in the imminent end of the world through a race war in which the White population was doomed to defeat,” Jeffrey Kaplan wrote in Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. “The victorious Black population would in time realize that the White man is genetically more fit to govern, and would seek in vain for White survivors of the racial Holocaust to assume the reins of power. The Manson family, having survived the apocalypse by hiding in a timeless cave at the center of the world, would then emerge to take power.”

    Apocalyptic lunacy has always been part of far-right politics, and a vigorous strain of it runs through today’s alt-right white supremacist movement. It should come as no surprise, then, that Manson, whose once-upon-a-time status as a longhair could never obscure the swastika carved into his forehead, might serve as a new vessel of madness for today’s violent racists. In many ways, he was a forebear of groups like Atomwaffen and a bug-eyed prototype for the modern race warrior

    Yep, Manson was indeed a “bug-eyed prototype for the modern race warrior.” And note how American Nazi James Mason’s experiences with Manson led him to conclude that there’s a combined ‘super-capitalist’ and ‘super-communist’ global conspiracy against white people. It’s hard not to notice the overlap with with the general worldview of Steve Bannon or Alex Jones. That’s how unfortunately topical Charles Manson’s ideas are today:


    It was in prison that Manson started a correspondence with a longtime American neo-Nazi named James Mason, who would come to view “Charlie” as a prophet of hate. Mason was the type of man who considered Auschwitz a “damned nice place,” and his wingnut journey would take him from the heart of organized white supremacy to years of inept obscurity and, ultimately, back to a faint relevance in the Trump era thanks to the alt-right and Atomwaffen.

    A fascist since he was 13, when he joined the youth movement of George Lincoln Rockwell’s American Nazi Party, Mason had radicalized himself while watching black people take to the streets during the civil rights era. As a young adult, he set up Nazi booths at county fairs in southern Ohio, where he’d grown up.

    “We should shoot for bringing down the system,” he would later say. “Destroy the system.”

    Mason eventually left the American Nazi Party and joined a splinter group called the National Socialist Liberation Front. Some NSLF members were fans of Manson, which prompted Mason to begin researching the cult leader. In 1980, Mason reached out to the incarcerated Manson. The two began communicating regularly by mail and phone.

    “What I discovered was a revelation equal to the revelation I received when I first found Adolf Hitler,” Mason would later explain.

    Through “Charlie,” Mason came to understand that Hitler’s death had brought about the end of Western civilization. Every government in the world was now part of an anti-white global conspiracy run by “super capitalists” and “super communists.” Nothing about Western culture or its institutions could be salvaged. It would all have to be blown to smithereens.

    “It’s just like a human organism that has ingested a fatal dose of poison,” Mason would explain. “[If] you fall asleep with it and try to ride it out, you’re going to die, but if you become suddenly, violently ill and expel that poison – even though the experience may be rather unpleasant – you at least have a chance to live. Manson called that Helter Skelter.”

    “Through “Charlie,” Mason came to understand that Hitler’s death had brought about the end of Western civilization. Every government in the world was now part of an anti-white global conspiracy run by “super capitalists” and “super communists.” Nothing about Western culture or its institutions could be salvaged. It would all have to be blown to smithereens.

    Isn’t that pretty much the far-right zeitgiest nowadays? There’s a giant global conspiracy against white people perpetrated by left-wing ‘communists’. And when you point out that almost all the wealth and power is held by right-wing capitalists, the far-right throws in ‘super-capitalists’ into the mix of baddies too. Isn’t that more or less the generic ‘angry-white Alt-Right male’ zeitgiest constantly getting pumped out by places like InfoWars and Breitbart? Isn’t contemporary far-right nihilism in the West deeply infused with the spirit of Manson’s Helter Skelter? It sure seems like it, which is why Charles Manson is so tragically topical.

    And given that so much of the Alex Jones/Breitbart worldview wraps itself in an ‘us against Big Brother’ exterior, it’s also worth keeping in mind that the core principle behind Nazism and most far-right ideologies is something very close to the underlying principle behind the ‘Big Brother’ in Orwell’s 1984: power for power’s sake. Achieved and held at any cost, through any means necessary. That is the core of far-right reactionary thought if you strip everything else away. Joy in wielding power mercilessly coupled with a raw terror in losing that power and a willingness to do anything to get it. That, combined with a hefty dose of sadistic hate, is the core of much of these ideologies. It’s why Nazis are so ready and willing to commit acts of terror and propagate Big Lies in order to achieve their objectives: fascism is about the power. That’s pretty much it. Everything else is just window dressing. Just like Big Brother.

    So there really is a group plotting against white people: Nazis and their fascist allies who want to collapse society via terror and hate so they can seize control. That’s who. Because if you look at the collection of far-right movements around the worlds, it’s typically a meta-movement of aspiring Big Brothers who care about little more than having unchecked power and being free to carry out their every sadistic whim. And Helter Skelter, and its contemporary memetic Alt-Right troll-warrior variants, are just a means to that end of seizing complete power. The Nazis are literally trying to become Big Brother by labeling the non-Nazified elements of society Big Brother and declaring war on it and that’s definitely an agenda that qualifies as a plot against white people. And everyone else.

    And that’s all why it’s important to keep in mind that, while Atomwaffen is indeed an outlier the neo-Nazi scene in terms of their extremely open calls for basically ISIS-style domestic terror and sabotage, it’s not like they aren’t just saying what a large fraction of the far-right quietly talks about and plots behind closed doors. So when you read about how Atomwaffen and/or Charles Manson are considered outlier in the neo-Nazi scene, don’t forget about this word of endorsement from none other than Andrew ‘weev’ Auernheimer:


    For Mason and other white supremacists, Manson was almost a divine being, an atavistic incarnation of hate. The cult leader fit neatly into a strain of fascist magical realism called “Esoteric Hitlerism” that became popular after World War II when the Greek writer Savitri Devi proposed that Hitler was the ninth avatar of Vishnu and racist dupes somehow bought into it.

    This type of crazy remains en vogue among the alt-right today, with notable exponents such as Andrew “weev” Auernheimer, a neo-Nazi hacker and the webmaster for The Daily Stormer, whose charismatic ravings make him the closest thing to a contemporary Manson in the movement. (Auernheimer has ties to Atomwaffen and after the Arthurs murders issued an overloud declamation about how he knew the shooter and the victims but had previously banned Arthurs from a Daily Stormer forum.)

    Don’t forget: Auernheimer called Atomwaffen “a good bunch of dudes” following the double-murder in Florida. They’re only “extreme” in terms of how extremely out in the open they are about the kinds of things neo-Nazi movements quietly plot about. But other than that, by neo-Nazi standards they really aren’t all that extreme. And that whole general poisonous mind-set pumped out by right-wing media across the world that white people are under attack by the world really could have been the kind of thing you would hear coming out of Charles Manson’s mouth. In other words, when the far-right drops the mask, you’re going to be looking at Charles Manson. Or one of his admirers wearing a skull mask.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | January 29, 2018, 10:32 pm
  8. @ Pterrafractyl–

    A couple of points:

    With Atomwaffen making ISIS-style videos advocating mayhem, we should not forget that their mediated exhortations, like James Mason’s call for “lone-wolf” violence, gained impunity from civil suits holding them to financial account for violence committed by consumers of their material as a result of Glenn Greenwald’s efforts.

    Also:

    Mason’s “Siege” was published by Adam Parfrey, a degenerate who has shepherded a drug-addled psychopath named Dan Rightmyer, aka Dan Rightuyer aka “Alex Constantine” (the nom de plume under which he publishes). Rightmyer and Parfrey have latched on to my late dear friend Mae Brussell’s material.

    That is why I have counseled that people should steer clear of the vultures that have descended on her grave.

    Mae spent–and gave–her life working against the likes of Charles Manson, James Mason et al.

    Parfrey promotes, and caters to, those elements.

    Best,

    Dave Emory

    Posted by Dave Emory | January 30, 2018, 11:59 pm

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