Spitfire List Web site and blog of anti-fascist researcher and radio personality Dave Emory.

For The Record  

FTR #681 Specialized Knowledge and Abilities, Part II

MP3 (One 30-minute seg­ment)
NB: This stream con­tains FTRs 681 and 682 in sequence. Each is a 30-minute seg­ment.

Intro­duc­tion: Not­ing recent devel­op­ments with regard to Ger­man Nazi lawyer Jur­gen Rieger (who coined (pic­tured at right) the term “spe­cial­ized knowl­edge and abil­i­ties”), the pro­gram begins with his recent appoint­ment to become Vice-Pres­i­dent of the NPD, the top Ger­man neo-Nazi par­ty. Rieger advo­cat­ed that Nazis and fas­cists world­wide adopt the tac­tic of infil­trat­ing mil­i­tary and law-enforce­ment estab­lish­ments in order to acquire “spe­cial­ized knowl­edge and abil­i­ties” which they can apply to over­throw­ing their respec­tive gov­ern­ments. (This broad­cast is a fol­low-up to FTR #27.)

The bulk of the pro­gram is devot­ed to an arti­cle from Salon.com. Due to the over-exten­sion of the mil­i­tary result­ing from U.S. involve­ment in two wars, the armed ser­vices have been forced to low­er recruit­ing stan­dards, per­mit­ting white suprema­cists and neo-Nazis to suc­cess­ful­ly enlist and remain in the ranks.

Among the out­growths of this is a grow­ing pres­ence of mem­bers of the Nation­al Alliance, the orga­ni­za­tion whose pub­lish­ing arm issued Ser­pen­t’s Walk. In that book (con­sid­ered by Mr. Emory to be a man­i­festo for the future, rather than the “nov­el” it pur­ports to be), the descen­dants of the SS infil­trate the U.S. mil­i­tary and, after much of the coun­try is destroyed by weapons of mass destruc­tion result­ing in the dec­la­ra­tion of mar­tial law, the Nazis take over.

A num­ber of the white suprema­cist and Nazi infil­tra­tors in the mil­i­tary are quite explic­it about their enlist­ment being for the explic­it pur­pose of apply­ing their skills lat­er, to kill their self-per­ceived ene­mies and over­throw the gov­ern­ment that they see as con­trolled by those self-same “ene­mies.”

Of sig­nif­i­cance, also, are the attempts described below to pro­cure arms for their move­ment. Nazi and fas­cist ele­ments who have exit­ed the mil­i­tary net­work­ing with com­rades still in the ranks could gen­er­ate a tru­ly pow­er­ful Under­ground Reich Fifth Col­umn in this coun­try.

In that con­text, it is impor­tant to remem­ber that the Nation­al Alliance asso­ciate Bob Whitak­er held a key posi­tion with­in the Rea­gan White House, in which he assist­ed with staffing and secu­ri­ty clear­ances. Imag­ine the impli­ca­tions of peo­ple like Whitak­er net­work­ing with like-mind­ed peo­ple in the mil­i­tary and lawen­force­ment!

Pro­gram High­lights Include: The open advo­ca­cy by Nazi and white-suprema­cist lead­ers of the tac­tic of mil­i­tary infil­tra­tion by their mem­bers; review of Jur­gen Rieger’s par­tic­i­pa­tion in the Holo­caust Denial con­fer­ence in Iran in Decem­ber 2006.

NB: This analy­sis should in no size, shape, form or man­ner be con­strued as a blan­ket con­dem­na­tion or char­ac­ter­i­za­tion of the mil­i­tary as a whole. Mr. Emory views our men and women in uni­form as the finest ele­ment in Amer­i­ca.

1. Not­ing recent devel­op­ments with regard to Ger­man Nazi lawyer Jur­gen Rieger (who coined the term “spe­cial­ized knowl­edge and abil­i­ties”), the pro­gram high­lights his recent appoint­ment to become Vice-Pres­i­dent of the NPD, the top Ger­man neo-Nazi par­ty. Rieger advo­cat­ed that Nazis and fas­cists world­wide adopt the tac­tic of infil­trat­ing mil­i­tary and law-enforce­ment estab­lish­ments in order to acquire “spe­cial­ized knowl­edge and abil­i­ties” which they can apply to over­throw­ing their respec­tive gov­ern­ments. (This broad­cast is a fol­low-up to FTR #27.)

Ger­many’s main far-right group, the Nation­al Demo­c­ra­t­ic Par­ty (NPD), embraced a lead­ing extrem­ist Sun­day, May 25 but avoid­ed explic­it expres­sions of neo-Nazi opin­ion which are pro­hib­it­ed under Ger­man law.

Juer­gen Rieger, a lawyer who has advised and defend­ed neo-Nazis, was appoint­ed one of the group’s three vice-pres­i­dents. Rieger has con­vic­tions for Holo­caust denial and assault.

Reporters sug­gest­ed that the overt­ly neo-Nazi fac­tion with­in the NPD was gain­ing a greater voice in the anti-for­eign­er par­ty, which has seats in two of Ger­many’s 16 state assem­blies but has nev­er won par­lia­men­tary rep­re­sen­ta­tion at fed­er­al lev­el.

A par­ty spokesman lat­er wel­comed Rieger’s appoint­ment, say­ing he would ener­gize the NPD.

Under par­ty leader Udo Voigt, the NPD has sought the sup­port of mil­i­tants who praise Adolf Hitler’s Nation­al-Social­ist or Nazi doc­trines, though Voigt insists that the NPD’s nation­al­ist views com­ply with Ger­many’s demo­c­ra­t­ic con­sti­tu­tion.

In a speech to del­e­gates, leader Voigt won applause as he said the par­ty’s pol­i­cy was both nation­al­ist and social­ist, but used Ger­man gram­mar to care­ful­ly sep­a­rate them into two words. He said this had no con­nec­tion what­ev­er to the Nazi era.

More than 2,000 peo­ple demon­strat­ed Sat­ur­day against the annu­al con­ven­tion of the NPD in the Bavar­i­an city of Bam­berg.

Kurt Beck, leader of Ger­many’s co-rul­ing Social Demo­c­ra­t­ic Par­ty SPD, called in Leipzig for the NPD to be com­pul­so­ri­ly dis­solved.

“It ought not to be allowed,” he said. “A robust democ­ra­cy ought not to give state sup­port to peo­ple who want to abol­ish democ­ra­cy.”

“Far-Right NPD Appoints Holo­cause Denier as Vice-Pres­i­dent” [Deutsche Welle]; rickross.com; 5/25/2009.

2. The bulk of the pro­gram is devot­ed to an arti­cle from Salon.com. Due to the over-exten­sion of the mil­i­tary result­ing from U.S. involve­ment in two wars, the armed ser­vices have been forced to low­er recruit­ing stan­dards, per­mit­ting white suprema­cists and neo-Nazis to suc­cess­ful­ly enlist and remain in the ranks.

Among the out­growths of this is a grow­ing pres­ence of mem­bers of the Nation­al Alliance, the orga­ni­za­tion whose pub­lish­ing arm issued Ser­pen­t’s Walk. In that book (con­sid­ered by Mr. Emory to be a man­i­festo for the future, rather than the “nov­el” it pur­ports to be), the descen­dants of the SS infil­trate the U.S. mil­i­tary and, after much of the coun­try is destroyed by weapons of mass destruc­tion result­ing in the dec­la­ra­tion of mar­tial law, the Nazis take over.

A num­ber of the white suprema­cist and Nazi infil­tra­tors in the mil­i­tary are quite explic­it about their enlist­ment being for the explic­it pur­pose of apply­ing their skills lat­er, to kill their self-per­ceived ene­mies and over­throw the gov­ern­ment that they see as con­trolled by those self-same “ene­mies.”

Of sig­nif­i­cance, also, are the attempts described below to pro­cure arms for their move­ment. Nazi and fas­cist ele­ments who have exit­ed the mil­i­tary net­work­ing with com­rades still in the ranks could gen­er­ate a tru­ly pow­er­ful Under­ground Reich Fifth Col­umn in this coun­try.

On a mug­gy Flori­da evening in 2008, I meet Iraq War vet­er­an For­rest Fog­a­r­ty in the Wing­house, a lit­tle bar-restau­rant on the out­skirts of Tam­pa, his favorite hang­out. He told me on the phone I would rec­og­nize him by his skin­head. Sure enough, when I spot a white guy at a table by the door with a shaved head, white tank top and bulging mus­cles, I know it can only be him.

Over a plate of chick­en wings, he tells me about his path into the white-pow­er move­ment. “I was 14 when I decid­ed I want­ed to be a Nazi,” he says. At his first high school, near Los Ange­les, he was bul­lied by black and Lati­no kids. That’s when he first heard Skrew­driv­er, a band he calls “the god­fa­ther of the white pow­er move­ment.” “I became obsessed,” he says. He had an image from one of Skrew­driver’s album cov­ers — a Viking car­ry­ing a staff, an icon among white nation­al­ists — tat­tooed on his left fore­arm. Soon after he had a Celtic cross, an Irish sym­bol appro­pri­at­ed by neo-Nazis, embla­zoned on his stom­ach.

At 15, Fog­a­r­ty moved with his dad to Tam­pa, where he start­ed pick­ing fights with groups of black kids at his new high school. “On the first day, this bunch of nig­gers, they thought I was a racist, so they asked, ‘Are you in the KKK?’ ” he tells me. “I said, ‘Yeah,’ and it was on.” Soon enough, he was expelled.

For the next six years, Fog­a­r­ty flit­ted from land­scap­ing job to con­struc­tion job, nei­ther of which he’d ever want­ed to do. “I was just drink­ing and fight­ing,” he says. He start­ed his own Nazi rock group, Attack, and made friends in the Nation­al Alliance, at the time the biggest neo-Nazi group in the coun­try. It has called for a “a long-term eugen­ics pro­gram involv­ing at least the entire pop­u­la­tions of Europe and Amer­i­ca.”

But the mil­i­tary ran in Fog­a­r­ty’s fam­i­ly. His grand­fa­ther had served dur­ing World War II, Korea and Viet­nam, and his dad had been a Marine in Viet­nam. At 22, Fog­a­r­ty resolved to fol­low in their foot­steps. “I want­ed to serve my coun­try,” he says.

Army reg­u­la­tions pro­hib­it sol­diers from par­tic­i­pat­ing in racist groups, and recruiters are instruct­ed to keep an eye out for sus­pi­cious tat­toos. Before sign­ing on the dot­ted line, enlis­tees are required to explain any tat­toos. At a Tam­pa recruit­ment office, though, Fog­a­r­ty sailed right through the signup process. “They just told me to write an expla­na­tion of each tat­too, and I made up some stuff, and that was that,” he says. Soon he was post­ed to Fort Stew­art in Geor­gia, where he became part of the 3rd Infantry Divi­sion.

Fog­a­r­ty’s ex-girl­friend, intent on destroy­ing his new mil­i­tary career, sent a dossier of pho­tographs to Fort Stew­art. The pho­tos showed Fog­a­r­ty attend­ing white suprema­cist ral­lies and per­form­ing with his band, Attack. “They hauled me before some sort of com­mit­tee and showed me the pic­tures,” Fog­a­r­ty says. “I just denied them and said my girl­friend was a spite­ful bitch.” He adds: “They knew what I was about. But they let it go because I’m a great sol­dier.”

In 2003, Fog­a­r­ty was sent to Iraq. For two years he served in the mil­i­tary police, escort­ing offi­cers, includ­ing gen­er­als, around the hos­tile coun­try. He says he was grant­ed top-secret clear­ance and access to bat­tle plans. Fog­a­r­ty speaks with regret that he “nev­er had any kill counts.” But he says his time in Iraq increased his racist resolve.

“I hate Arabs more than any­body, for the sim­ple fact I’ve served over there and seen how they live,” he tells me. “They’re just a back­ward peo­ple. Them and the Jews are just dis­gust­ing peo­ple as far as I’m con­cerned. Their cus­toms, every­thing to do with the Mid­dle East, is just repug­nant to me.”

Because of his tat­toos and his racist com­ments, most of his bud­dies and his com­mand­ing offi­cers were aware of his Nazism. “They all knew in my unit,” he says. “They would always kid around and say, ‘Hey, you’re that skin­head!’ ” But no one sound­ed an alarm to high­er-ups. “I would vol­un­teer for all the hard­est mis­sions, and they were like, ‘Let Fog­a­r­ty go.’ They did­n’t want to get rid of me.”

Fog­a­r­ty left the Army in 2005 with an hon­or­able dis­charge. He says he was asked to reen­list. He declined. He was sick of the sys­tem.

Since the launch of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the U.S. mil­i­tary has strug­gled to recruit and reen­list troops. As the con­flicts have dragged on, the mil­i­tary has loos­ened reg­u­la­tions, issu­ing “moral waivers” in many cas­es, allow­ing even those with crim­i­nal records to join up. Vet­er­ans suf­fer­ing post-trau­mat­ic stress dis­or­der have been ordered back to the Mid­dle East for sec­ond and third tours of duty.

The lax reg­u­la­tions have also opened the mil­i­tary’s doors to neo-Nazis, white suprema­cists and gang mem­bers — with dras­tic con­se­quences. Some neo-Nazis have been charged with crimes inside the mil­i­tary, and oth­ers have been linked to recruit­ment efforts for the white right. A recent Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty report, “Rightwing Extrem­ism: Cur­rent Eco­nom­ic and Polit­i­cal Cli­mate Fuel­ing Resur­gence in Rad­i­cal­iza­tion and Recruit­ment,” stat­ed: “The will­ing­ness of a small per­cent­age of mil­i­tary per­son­nel to join extrem­ist groups dur­ing the 1990s because they were dis­grun­tled, dis­il­lu­sioned, or suf­fer­ing from the psy­cho­log­i­cal effects of war is being repli­cat­ed today.” Many white suprema­cists join the Army to secure train­ing for, as they see it, a future domes­tic race war. Oth­ers claim to be shoot­ing Iraqis not to pur­sue the mil­i­tary’s strate­gic goals but because killing “hajjis” is their duty as white mil­i­tants.

Sol­diers’ asso­ci­a­tions with extrem­ist groups, and their racist actions, con­tra­vene a host of mil­i­tary statutes insti­tut­ed in the past three decades. But dur­ing the “war on ter­ror,” U.S. armed forces have turned a blind eye on their own reg­u­la­tions. A 2005 Depart­ment of Defense report states, “Effec­tive­ly, the mil­i­tary has a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ pol­i­cy per­tain­ing to extrem­ism. If indi­vid­u­als can per­form sat­is­fac­to­ri­ly, with­out mak­ing their extrem­ist opin­ions overt … they are like­ly to be able to com­plete their con­tracts.”

Carter F. Smith is a for­mer mil­i­tary inves­ti­ga­tor who worked with the U.S. Army Crim­i­nal Inves­ti­ga­tion Com­mand from 2004 to 2006, when he helped to root out gang vio­lence in troops. “When you need more sol­diers, you low­er the stan­dards, whether you say so or not,” he says. “The increase in gangs and extrem­ists is an indi­ca­tor of this.” Mil­i­tary inves­ti­ga­tors may be con­cerned about white suprema­cists, he says. “But they have a war to fight, and they don’t have incen­tive to slow down.”

Tom Met­zger is the for­mer grand wiz­ard of the Ku Klux Klan and cur­rent leader of the White Aryan Resis­tance. He tells me the mil­i­tary has nev­er been more tol­er­ant of racial extrem­ists. “Now they are let­ting every­body in,” he says.

The pres­ence of white suprema­cists in the mil­i­tary first trig­gered con­cern in 1976. At Camp Pendle­ton in Cal­i­for­nia, a group of black Marines attacked white Marines they mis­tak­en­ly believed to be in the KKK. The result­ing inves­ti­ga­tion uncov­ered a KKK chap­ter at the base and led to the jail­ing or trans­fer of 16 Klans­men. Reports of Klan activ­i­ty among sol­diers and Marines sur­faced again in the 1980s, spurring Pres­i­dent Rea­gan’s Defense Sec­re­tary, Cas­par Wein­berg­er, to con­demn mil­i­tary par­tic­i­pa­tion in white suprema­cist orga­ni­za­tions.

Then, in 1995, a black cou­ple was mur­dered by two neo-Nazi para­troop­ers around Fort Bragg in North Car­oli­na. The mur­der inves­ti­ga­tion turned up evi­dence that 22 sol­diers at Fort Bragg were known to be extrem­ists. That year, lan­guage was added to a Depart­ment of Defense direc­tive, explic­it­ly pro­hibit­ing par­tic­i­pa­tion in “orga­ni­za­tions that espouse suprema­cist caus­es” or “advo­cate the use of force or vio­lence.”

Today a com­plete ban on mem­ber­ship in racist orga­ni­za­tions appears to have been lift­ed — though the pro­lif­er­a­tion of white suprema­cists in the mil­i­tary is dif­fi­cult to gauge. The mil­i­tary does not track them as a dis­crete cat­e­go­ry, cou­pling them with gang mem­bers. But one indi­ca­tion of the scope comes from the FBI.

Fol­low­ing an inves­ti­ga­tion of white suprema­cist groups, a 2008 FBI report declared: “Mil­i­tary expe­ri­ence — rang­ing from fail­ure at basic train­ing to suc­cess in spe­cial oper­a­tions forces — is found through­out the white suprema­cist extrem­ist move­ment.” In white suprema­cist inci­dents from 2001 to 2008, the FBI iden­ti­fied 203 vet­er­ans. Most of them were asso­ci­at­ed with the Nation­al Alliance and the Nation­al Social­ist Move­ment, which pro­mote anti-Semi­tism and the over­throw of the U.S. gov­ern­ment, and assort­ed skin­head groups.

Because the FBI focused only on report­ed cas­es, its num­bers don’t include the many extrem­ist sol­diers who have man­aged to stay off the radar. But its report does pin­point why the white suprema­cist move­ments seek to recruit vet­er­ans — they “may exploit their access­es to restrict­ed areas and intel­li­gence or apply spe­cial­ized train­ing in weapons, tac­tics, and orga­ni­za­tion­al skills to ben­e­fit the extrem­ist move­ment.”

In fact, since the move­men­t’s incep­tion, its lead­ers have encour­aged mem­bers to enlist in the U.S. mil­i­tary as a way to receive state-of-the-art com­bat train­ing, cour­tesy of the U.S. tax­pay­er, in prepa­ra­tion for a domes­tic race war. The con­cept of a race war is cen­tral to extrem­ist groups, whose adher­ents imag­ine an erup­tion of vio­lence that pits races against each oth­er and the gov­ern­ment.

That goal comes up often in the chat­ter on white suprema­cist Web sites. On the neo-Nazi Web site Blood and Hon­our, a user called 88Soldier88, wrote in 2008 that he is an active duty sol­dier work­ing in a detainee hold­ing area in Iraq. He com­plained about “how ‘nice’ we have to treat these fuck­ing peo­ple … bet­ter than our own troops.” Then he added, “Hope­ful­ly the train­ing will pre­pare me for what I hope is to come.” Anoth­er poster, AMERICANARYAN.88Soldier88, wrote, “I have the train­ing I need and will pass it on to oth­ers when I get out.”

On NewSaxon.org, a social net­work­ing group for neo-Nazis, a group called White Mil­i­tary Men hosts numer­ous con­trib­u­tors. It was begun by “Fight­ing­for­Whites,” who iden­ti­fied him­self at one point as Lance Cpl. Bur­ton of the 2nd Bat­tal­ion Fox Com­pa­ny, but then removed the infor­ma­tion. The group calls for “All men with mil­i­tary expe­ri­ence, retired or active/reserve” to “join this group to see how many men have expe­ri­ence to build an army. We want to win a war, we need sol­diers.” Fight­ing­for­Whites — whose tagline is “White Suprema­cy will pre­vail! US Mil­i­tary lead­ing the way!” — goes on to write, “I am with an infantry bat­tal­ion in the Marine Corps, I have had the plea­sure of killing four ene­mies that tried to kill me. I have the best train­ing to kill peo­ple.” On his wall, a friend wrote: “THANKS BROTHER!!!! kill a cou­ple tow­el heads for me ok!”

Such atti­tudes come straight from the move­men­t’s lead­ers. “We do encour­age them to sign up for the mil­i­tary,” says Charles Wil­son, spokesman for the Nation­al Social­ist Move­ment. “We can use the train­ing to secure the resis­tance to our gov­ern­ment.” Bil­ly Rop­er, of White Rev­o­lu­tion, says skin­heads join the mil­i­tary for the usu­al rea­sons, such as access to high­er edu­ca­tion, but also “to secure the future for white chil­dren.” “Amer­i­ca began in bloody rev­o­lu­tion,” he reminds me, “and it might end that way.”

When it comes to screen­ing out racists at recruit­ment cen­ters, mil­i­tary reg­u­la­tions appear to have col­lapsed. “We don’t exclude peo­ple from the army based on their thoughts,” says S. Dou­glas Smith, an Army pub­lic affairs offi­cer. “We exclude based on behav­ior.” He says an “offen­sive” or “extrem­ist” tat­too “might be a rea­son for them not to be in the mil­i­tary.” Or it might not. “We try to edu­cate recruiters on extrem­ist tat­toos,” he says, but “the tat­too is a rel­a­tive­ly sub­jec­tive deci­sion” and should­n’t in itself bar enlist­ment.

What about some­thing as obvi­ous as a swasti­ka? “A swasti­ka would trig­ger ques­tions,” Smith says. “But again, if the gen­tle­men said, ‘I like the way the swasti­ka looked,’ and had clean crim­i­nal record, it’s pos­si­ble we would allow that per­son in.” “There are First Amend­ment rights,” he adds.

In the spring, I tele­phoned at ran­dom five Army recruit­ment cen­ters across the coun­try. I said I was inter­est­ed in join­ing up and men­tioned that I had a pair of “SS bolts” tat­tooed on my arm. A 2000 mil­i­tary brochure stat­ed that SS bolts were a tat­too image that should raise sus­pi­cions. But none of the recruiters react­ed neg­a­tive­ly, and when pressed direct­ly about the tat­too, not one said it would be an out­right prob­lem. A recruiter in Hous­ton was typ­i­cal; he said he’d nev­er heard of SS bolts and just encour­aged me to come on in.

It’s in the inter­est of recruiters to inter­pret recruit­ing stan­dards loose­ly. If they fail to meet tar­gets, based on the num­ber of sol­diers they enlist, they may have to attend a puni­tive coun­sel­ing ses­sion, and it could hurt any chance for pro­mo­tion. When, in 2005, the Army relaxed reg­u­la­tions on non-extrem­ist tat­toos, such as body art cov­er­ing the hands, neck and face, this cut recruiters even more slack.

Even the edu­ca­tion of recruiters about how to iden­ti­fy extrem­ists seems to have fall­en by the way­side. The 2005 Depart­ment of Defense report con­clud­ed that recruit­ing per­son­nel “were not aware of hav­ing received sys­tem­at­ic train­ing on rec­og­niz­ing and respond­ing to pos­si­ble ter­ror­ists” — a des­ig­na­tion that includes white suprema­cists — “who try to enlist.” Par­tic­i­pa­tion on white suprema­cist Web sites would be an easy way to screen out extrem­ist recruits, but the report found that the mil­i­tary had not clar­i­fied which Web forums were gath­er­ing places for extrem­ists.

Once white suprema­cists are in the mil­i­tary, it is easy to stay there. An Army Com­mand Pol­i­cy man­u­al devotes more than 100 pages to root­ing them out. But no offi­cer appears to be read­ing it.

Hunter Glass was a para­troop­er in the 1980s and became a gang cop in 1999 in Fayet­teville, North Car­oli­na, near Fort Bragg. “In the ear­ly 1990s, the mil­i­tary was hard on them. They could pick and choose,” he recalls. “They were look­ing for swastikas. They were look­ing for any­thing.” But the reg­u­la­tions on racist extrem­ists got jet­ti­soned with the war on ter­ror.

Glass says white suprema­cists now enjoy an open cul­ture of impuni­ty in the armed forces. “We’re see­ing guys with tat­toos all the time,” he says. “As far as hunt­ing them down, I don’t see it. I’m see­ing the oppo­site, where if a white suprema­cist has com­mit­ted a crime, the mil­i­tary stance will be, ‘He did­n’t com­mit a race-relat­ed crime.’ ”

In fact, a 2006 report by the Army’s Crim­i­nal Inves­ti­ga­tion Com­mand shows that mil­i­tary brass con­sis­tent­ly ignored evi­dence of extrem­ism. One case, at Fort Hood, reveals that a sol­dier was mak­ing Inter­net post­ings on the white suprema­cist site Stormfront.org. But the inves­ti­ga­tor was unable to locate the sol­dier in ques­tion. In a brief sum­ma­ry of the case, an inves­ti­ga­tor writes that due to “poor doc­u­men­ta­tion,” “attempts to locate with min­i­mal infor­ma­tion met with neg­a­tive results.” “I’m not doing my job here,” the inves­ti­ga­tor notes. “Needs to get fixed.”

In anoth­er case, inves­ti­ga­tors found that a Fort Hood sol­dier belonged to the neo-Nazi group Ham­mer­skins and was “close­ly asso­ci­at­ed with” the Celtic Knights of Austin, Texas, anoth­er extrem­ist orga­ni­za­tion, a sit­u­a­tion bad enough to mer­it a joint inves­ti­ga­tion by the FBI and the Army’s Crim­i­nal Inves­ti­ga­tion Com­mand. The Army sum­ma­ry states that there was “prob­a­ble cause” to believe the sol­dier had par­tic­i­pat­ed in at least one white extrem­ist meet­ing and had “pro­vid­ed a mil­i­tary tech­ni­cal man­u­al … to the leader of a white extrem­ist group in order to assist in the plan­ning and exe­cu­tion of future attacks on var­i­ous tar­gets.”

Our of four pre­lim­i­nary probes into white suprema­cists, the Crim­i­nal Inves­ti­ga­tion Com­mand car­ried through on only this one. The probe revealed that “a larg­er sin­gle attack was planned for the San Anto­nio, TX after a con­sid­er­able amount of media atten­tion was giv­en to ille­gal immi­grants. The attack was not com­plet­ed due to the inabil­i­ty of the orga­ni­za­tion to obtain explo­sives.” Despite these threats, the sub­ject was inter­viewed only once, in 2006, and the inves­ti­ga­tion was ter­mi­nat­ed the fol­low­ing year.

White suprema­cists may be doing more than avoid­ing expul­sion. They may be using their mil­i­tary sta­tus to help build the white right. The FBI found that two Army pri­vates in the 82nd Air­borne Divi­sion at Fort Bragg had attempt­ed in 2007 to sell stolen prop­er­ty from the mil­i­tary — includ­ing bal­lis­tic vests, a com­bat hel­met and pain med­ica­tions such as mor­phine — to an under­cov­er FBI agent they believed was involved with the white suprema­cist move­ment. (They were con­vict­ed and sen­tenced to six years.) It found mul­ti­ple exam­ples of white suprema­cist recruit­ment among active mil­i­tary, includ­ing a peri­od in 2003 when six active duty sol­diers at Fort Riley, mem­bers of the Aryan Nation, were recruit­ing their Army col­leagues and even serv­ing as the Aryan Nation’s point of con­tact for the state of Kansas.

One white suprema­cist sol­dier, James Dou­glas Ross, a mil­i­tary intel­li­gence offi­cer sta­tioned at Fort Bragg, was giv­en a bad con­duct dis­charge from the Army when he was caught try­ing to mail a sub­ma­chine gun from Iraq to his father’s home in Spokane, Wash. Mil­i­tary police found a cache of white suprema­cist para­pher­na­lia and sev­er­al weapons hid­den behind ceil­ing tiles in Ross’ mil­i­tary quar­ters. After his dis­charge, a Spokane Coun­ty deputy sher­iff saw Ross pass­ing out fliers for the neo-Nazi Nation­al Alliance.

Root­ing out extrem­ists is dif­fi­cult because racism per­vades the mil­i­tary, accord­ing to sol­diers. They say troops through­out the Mid­dle East use deroga­to­ry terms like “hajji” or “sand nig­ger” to define Arab insur­gents and often the Arab pop­u­la­tion itself.

“Racism was ram­pant,” recalls vet Michael Prys­ner, who served in Iraq in 2003 and 2004 as part of the 173rd Air­borne Brigade. “All of com­mand, every­where, it was com­plete­ly ingrained in the con­scious­ness of every sol­dier. I’ve heard top gen­er­als refer to the Iraq peo­ple as ‘hajjis.’ The anti-Arab racism came from the brass. It came from the top. And every­thing was jus­ti­fied because they weren’t con­sid­ered peo­ple.”

Anoth­er vet, Michael Tot­ten, who served in Iraq with the 101st Air­borne in 2003 and 2004, says, “It would­n’t stand out if you said ‘sand nig­gers,’ even if you aren’t a neo-Nazi.” Tot­ten says his per­spec­tive has changed in the inter­ven­ing years, but “at the time, I used the words ‘sand nig­ger.’ I did­n’t con­sid­er ‘hajji’ to be deroga­to­ry.”

Geof­frey Mil­lard, an orga­niz­er for Iraq Vet­er­ans Against the War, served in Iraq for 13 months, begin­ning in 2004, as part of the 42nd Infantry Divi­sion. He recalls Gen. George Casey, who served as the com­man­der in Iraq from 2004 to 2007, address­ing a brief­ing he attend­ed in the sum­mer of 2005 at For­ward Oper­at­ing Base, out­side Tikrit. “As he walked past, he was talk­ing about some inci­dent that had just hap­pened, and he was talk­ing about how ‘these stu­pid fuck­ing hajjis could­n’t fig­ure shit out.’ And I’m just like, Are you kid­ding me? This is Gen. Casey, the high­est-rank­ing guy in Iraq, refer­ring to the Iraqi peo­ple as ‘fuck­ing hajjis.’ ” (A spokesper­son for Casey, now the Army Chief of Staff, said the gen­er­al “did not make this state­ment.”)

“The mil­i­tary is attrac­tive to white suprema­cists,” Mil­lard says, “because the war itself is racist.”

The U.S. Sen­ate Com­mit­tee on the Armed Forces has long been con­sid­ered one of Con­gress’ most pow­er­ful groups. It gov­erns leg­is­la­tion affect­ing the Pen­ta­gon, defense bud­get, mil­i­tary strate­gies and oper­a­tions. Today it is led by the influ­en­tial Sens. Carl Levin and John McCain. An inves­ti­ga­tion by the com­mit­tee into how white suprema­cists per­me­ate the mil­i­tary in plain vio­la­tion of U.S. law could result in sub­stan­tive changes. I con­tact­ed the com­mit­tee but staffers would not agree to be inter­viewed. Instead, a spokesper­son respond­ed that white suprema­cy in the mil­i­tary has nev­er arisen as a con­cern. In an e‑mail, the spokesper­son said, “The Com­mit­tee does­n’t have any infor­ma­tion that would indi­cate this is a par­tic­u­lar prob­lem.”

“Neo-Nazis are in the Army Now” by Matt Kenard; Salon.com; 6/15/2009.

Discussion

31 comments for “FTR #681 Specialized Knowledge and Abilities, Part II”

  1. Any­one inter­est­ed in the Red-Brown alliance ought to inves­ti­gate the odyssey of Nick Camero­ta, for­mer­ly Pierce’s num­ber two man at the Nation­al Youth Alliance/National Alliance, now cur­rent­ly a mem­ber of Work­ers World Party/International Action Cen­ter. I’m sure he has a very inter­est­ing sto­ry to tell, if you can get him to talk.

    Posted by Markus | February 16, 2010, 1:44 pm
  2. Here’s an update on gang infil­tra­tion of the mil­i­tary: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2011–10-22/news/30309693_1_gang-members-law-enforcement-weapons

    The FBI Announces Gangs Have Infil­trat­ed Every Branch Of The Mil­i­tary
    Robert Johnson|October 22, 2011

    The FBI has released a new gang assess­ment announc­ing that there are 1.4 mil­lion gang mem­bers in the US, a 40 per­cent increase since 2009, and that many of these mem­bers are get­ting inside the mil­i­tary (via Stars and Stripes).

    The report says the mil­i­tary has seen mem­bers from 53 gangs and 100 regions in the U.S. enlist in every branch of the armed forces. Mem­bers of every major street gang, some prison gangs, and out­law motor­cy­cle gangs (OMGs) have been report­ed on both U.S. and inter­na­tion­al mil­i­tary instal­la­tions.

    From the report:

    Through trans­fers and deploy­ments, mil­i­tary-affil­i­at­ed gang mem­bers expand their cul­ture and oper­a­tions to new regions nation­wide and world­wide, under­min­ing secu­ri­ty and law enforce­ment efforts to com­bat crime. Gang mem­bers with mil­i­tary train­ing pose a unique threat to law enforce­ment per­son­nel because of their dis­tinc­tive weapons and com­bat train­ing skills and their abil­i­ty to trans­fer these skills to fel­low gang mem­bers.

    The report notes that while gang mem­bers have been report­ed in every branch of ser­vice, they are con­cen­trat­ed in the U.S. Army, Army Reserves, and the Army Nation­al Guard.

    Many street gang mem­bers join the mil­i­tary to escape the gang lifestyle or as an alter­na­tive to incar­cer­a­tion, but often revert back to their gang asso­ci­a­tions once they encounter oth­er gang mem­bers in the mil­i­tary. Oth­er gangs tar­get the U.S. mil­i­tary and defense sys­tems to expand their ter­ri­to­ry, facil­i­tate crim­i­nal activ­i­ty such as weapons and drug traf­fick­ing, or to receive weapons and com­bat train­ing that they may trans­fer back to their gang. Inci­dents of weapons theft and traf­fick­ing may have a neg­a­tive impact on pub­lic safe­ty or pose a threat to law enforce­ment offi­cials.

    The FBI points out that many gangs, espe­cial­ly the bik­ers, active­ly recruit mem­bers with mil­i­tary train­ing and advise young mem­bers with no crim­i­nal record to join the ser­vice for weapon access and com­bat expe­ri­ence.

    ....

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | October 26, 2011, 1:06 pm
  3. @Pterrafractyl: Scary shit if that report hap­pens to be even part­ly accurate...and frankly, I think it most like­ly is!

    Posted by Steven | October 27, 2011, 2:40 am
  4. on a tan­gen­tial­ly-relat­ed top­ic of spe­cial­ized knowl­edge and abilities...it looks like TEPCO has a pro­cliv­i­ty towards hir­ing yakuza to work the dirt­i­est jobs at their pow­er plants. That’s sounds like some use­ful spe­cial­ized skills: http://www.theatlanticwire.com/global/2011/06/tepco-will-someone-turn-lights/39364/

    TEPCO: Will Some­one Turn Off the Lights?
    The Atlantic
    Jake Adel­stein and Stephanie Naka­ji­ma
    Jun 28, 2011

    ...
    After an expose in the week­ly mag­a­zine Shukan Bun­shun, last week TEPCO admit­ted that 69 of its plant work­ers can’t be locat­ed for radi­a­tion checks—30 of them were found not even to have had their names record­ed. This rais­es ques­tions about how these work­ers were recruit­ed, paid, mon­i­tored for radi­a­tion expo­sure, or vet­ted before enter­ing the site of the nuclear dis­as­ter. For­mer and cur­rent work­ers with­in the plant tes­ti­fy that many of the hired hands are yakuza or ex-yakuza mem­bers. One com­pa­ny sup­ply­ing the firm with con­tract work­ers is a known Japan­ese mafia front com­pa­ny. TEPCO when ques­tioned would only say, “We don’t have knowl­edge of who is ulti­mate­ly sup­ply­ing the labor at the end of the out­sourc­ing. We do not have orga­nized crime exclu­sion­ary claus­es in our stan­dard con­tracts but are con­sid­er­ing it.” The Nuclear and Indus­tri­al Safe­ty Agency (NISA) has asked the com­pa­ny to “sub­mit a report” on the mat­ter.
    ....

    Sugao­ka also says he saw signs of yakuza ties among his col­leagues at the facil­i­ty. “When we’d enter the plant, we’d all change clothes first. The cleanup crews were staffed with guys cov­ered with typ­i­cal yakuza tat­toos, a rough bunch,” he says. Police sources con­firm that one of the com­pa­nies cur­rent­ly sup­ply­ing the plant with work­ers, M‑Kogyo, head­quar­tered in Fukuo­ka Pre­fec­ture is a front com­pa­ny for the Kudo-kai, a des­ig­nat­ed orga­nized crime group. A for­mer yakuza boss notes, “we’ve always been involved in recruit­ing labor­ers for TEPCO. It’s dirty, dan­ger­ous work and the only peo­ple who will do it are home­less, yakuza, ban­ished yakuza, or peo­ple so bad­ly in debt that they see no oth­er way to pay it off.” The reg­u­lar employ­ees were giv­en bet­ter radi­a­tion suits than the often une­d­u­cat­ed yakuza recruits, although it was the more legal­ly vul­ner­a­ble yakuza and day labor­ers who typ­i­cal­ly per­formed the most dan­ger­ous work.

    A TEPCO exec­u­tive, speak­ing on con­di­tions of anonymi­ty, described the TEPCO work­ing hierarchy:staff employ­ees work­ing at the nuclear reac­tors enjoy spe­cial ben­e­fits, safer con­di­tions, and more strin­gent radi­a­tion lev­el checks, while hired work­ers at the pow­er plants were con­sid­ered sub-human. “If you voice con­cerns about the wel­fare of tem­po­rary work­ers at the plants, you’re labeled a trou­ble­mak­er, or a poten­tial lia­bil­i­ty. It’s a taboo to even dis­cuss it.
    ....

    So if I’m inter­pret­ing this cor­rect­ly, the Fukushi­ma cleanup crew may con­sist of a large of num­ber of now-radi­ac­tive Yakuza mem­bers? I’m sure there’s noth­ing to wor­ry about...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | October 28, 2011, 6:13 pm
  5. Just FYI to all the White Suprema­cists: in case you were won­der­ing why every­one thinks you’re a bunch of vio­lent morons, here’s an exam­ple:

    Sikh tem­ple shoot­er iden­ti­fied as Wade Michael Page, white suprema­cist

    Page was a ‘frus­trat­ed neo-Nazi’ who led a racist white suprema­cist band, the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter said Mon­day.

    By Dinesh Ramde and Todd Rich­mond, Asso­ci­at­ed Press / August 6, 2012

    OAK CREEK, Wis.

    A 40-year-old Army vet­er­an, iden­ti­fied by a civ­il rights group as the one-time leader of a white suprema­cist band, was the gun­man who killed six peo­ple inside a Sikh tem­ple in Wis­con­sin, offi­cials said Mon­day.

    First Assis­tant U.S. Greg Haanstad in Mil­wau­kee iden­ti­fied the shoot­er as Wade Michael Page. Page joined the Army in 1992 and was dis­charged in 1998, accord­ing to a defense offi­cial who spoke to The Asso­ci­at­ed Press on con­di­tion of anonymi­ty because he was not autho­rized to release infor­ma­tion yet about the sus­pect.

    Offi­cials and wit­ness­es said the gun­man walked into the Sikh Tem­ple of Wis­con­sin in sub­ur­ban Mil­wau­kee and opened fire as sev­er­al dozen peo­ple pre­pared for Sun­day ser­vices. When the shoot­ing final­ly end­ed, sev­en peo­ple lay dead, includ­ing Page, who was shot to death by police. Three oth­ers were crit­i­cal­ly wound­ed in what police called an act of domes­tic ter­ror­ism.

    Page was a “frus­trat­ed neo-Nazi” who led a racist white suprema­cist band, the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter said Mon­day. Page told a white suprema­cist web­site in an inter­view in 2010 that he had been part of the white-pow­er music scene since 2000 when he left his native Col­orado and start­ed the band, End Apa­thy, in 2005, the non­prof­it civ­il rights orga­ni­za­tion said.

    He told the web­site his “inspi­ra­tion was based on frus­tra­tion that we have the poten­tial to accom­plish so much more as indi­vid­u­als and a soci­ety in whole,” accord­ing to the SPLC. He did not men­tion vio­lence in the web­site inter­view.

    Page joined the mil­i­tary in Mil­wau­kee in 1992 and was a repair­man for the Hawk mis­sile sys­tem before switch­ing jobs to become one of the Army’s psy­cho­log­i­cal oper­a­tions spe­cial­ists, accord­ing to the defense offi­cial.

    So-called “Psy-Ops” spe­cial­ists are respon­si­ble for the analy­sis, devel­op­ment and dis­tri­b­u­tion of intel­li­gence used for infor­ma­tion and psy­cho­log­i­cal effect; they research and ana­lyze meth­ods of influ­enc­ing for­eign pop­u­la­tions.

    Fort Bragg, N.C., was among the bases where Page served.

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | August 6, 2012, 7:42 am
  6. Wis­con­sin Sikh Tem­ple Shoot­er: Reput­ed Nazi back­ground + Report­ed to be “for­mer” psy­cho­log­i­cal oper­a­tions spe­cial­ist from Fort Bragg

    http://www.salon.com/2012/08/06/temple_shooters_hateful_past/

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/temple-shooting-suspect-was-former-army-psychological-operations-specialist/article4464677/

    Not much is being made (in the media) of the impli­ca­tions of his spe­cial­iza­tion and for­mer milieu (Fort Bragg).

    Posted by R. Wilson | August 6, 2012, 7:57 pm
  7. It’s also worth not­ing that page was an active White Suprema­cist dur­ing his time in the mil­i­tary:

    Wash­ing­ton Post
    Wade Michael Page: Exces­sive drink­ing cost Sikh tem­ple shoot­er his mil­i­tary career, civil­ian job

    By Michael Laris, Car­ol D. Leon­nig and Sand­hya Somashekhar, Updat­ed: Tues­day, August 7, 10:09 AM

    OAK CREEK, Wis. —Wade Michael Page, the gun­man in Sunday’s Sikh tem­ple shoot­ing, had a his­to­ry of prob­lems with alco­hol, which led to him los­ing his mil­i­tary career and, more recent­ly, a job as a truck­er.

    Page, 40, was shot to death by a Wis­con­sin police offi­cer after he killed six Sikh wor­shipers at a tem­ple here and shot anoth­er offi­cer. He was dis­charged from the Army in 1998 because he had been found drunk dur­ing mil­i­tary exer­cis­es, accord­ing to law enforce­ment author­i­ties. He was con­vict­ed of dri­ving under the influ­ence a year lat­er in Col­orado. And a truck­ing com­pa­ny con­firmed Tues­day morn­ing that it fired Page two years ago after he was pulled over in North Car­oli­na for dri­ving while impaired.

    Christo­pher Robil­lard, of Ore­gon, who described Page as “my clos­est friend” in the ser­vice more than a decade ago, said Page was pushed out of the mil­i­tary for show­ing up to for­ma­tion drunk.

    In an inter­view with CNN, he described Page as “a very kind, very smart indi­vid­ual — loved his friends. One of those guys with a soft spot.” But even then, Robil­lard said, Page “was involved with white suprema­cy.”

    “He would talk about the racial holy war, like he want­ed it to come,” Robil­lard said. “But to me, he didn’t seem like the type of per­son to go out and hurt peo­ple.”

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | August 7, 2012, 9:37 am
  8. @Pterrafractyl: I heard about the shoot­ing lat­er that afternoon.....that is just so trag­ic, man.....may the vic­tims rest in peace. =(

    I also won­der if there may be some­thing more to this, espe­cial­ly giv­en some of the infor­ma­tion that’s been post­ed from the C.S. Mon­i­tor, like the fact he served at Fort Bragg, and the fact that he became a psy-ops specialist.......definitely some­thing to think about there.

    Posted by Steven L. | August 7, 2012, 11:30 am
  9. http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/08/12/missouri-national-guardsman-gave-combat-training-to-white-supremacists/

    Mis­souri Nation­al Guards­man gave com­bat train­ing to white suprema­cists

    Sun­day, August 12, 2012

    A doc­u­ment released in a Flori­da court pro­ceed­ing against a white suprema­cist group reveals that its mem­bers received train­ing last year from a mem­ber of the Mis­souri Nation­al Guard who had for­mer­ly served with the U.S. Army in Iraq.

    The South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter and the Anti-Defama­tion League both iden­ti­fy the Amer­i­can Front as a hate group whose mem­bers believe they are prepar­ing for an inevitable race war. Accord­ing to the Asso­ci­at­ed Press, the 28-year-old guards­man trav­eled to Flori­da in July 2011 to train the group’s mem­bers in fight­ing tech­niques and the use of the use of the AK-47 assault rifle and was giv­en a patch as a sign that he had become a full-fledged mem­ber.

    Mem­bers of the group were charged this May with hate crimes, con­spir­a­cy, and para­mil­i­tary train­ing in fur­ther­ance of a civ­il dis­or­der. How­ev­er, the guards­man has not been charged in the case, and for that rea­son, the AP is not reveal­ing his name. Court doc­u­ments sug­gest that he has been coop­er­at­ing with author­i­ties, hand­ing over emails and a cell­phone with text mes­sages.

    Accord­ing to court doc­u­ments, the guards­man told inves­ti­ga­tors that he “became inter­est­ed in pro­tect­ing the White race” while serv­ing in Iraq in 2008. He began post­ing on skin­head blogs and exchanged mes­sages with Mar­cus Fael­la, the leader of Amer­i­can Front. He then remained in con­tact with Fael­la after return­ing to the Unit­ed States in 2010, which led to the invi­ta­tion to con­duct the train­ing.

    The guards­man now claims that he was already start­ing to have sec­ond thoughts about being asso­ci­at­ed with Amer­i­can Front, but he con­tin­ued send­ing Fael­la advice on firearms. He says that he is not cur­rent­ly affil­i­at­ed with any racist skin­head group but he con­sid­ers him­self a “lone wolf” and still believes in their ide­ol­o­gy.

    This lat­est rev­e­la­tion comes in the wake of the mass shoot­ing at a Sikh tem­ple by anoth­er Army vet­er­an turned racist skin­head, Wade Michael Page, who has also been described as hav­ing adopt­ed white suprema­cist views while in the mil­i­tary.

    The South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter has been fol­low­ing the Amer­i­can Front case close­ly. When sev­en mem­bers of the group — which was found­ed in Cal­i­for­nia but now appears to be cen­tered in Flori­da — were arrest­ed in May, a source indi­cat­ed that this was only the sec­ond round in a “major, ongo­ing inves­ti­ga­tion.” Court doc­u­ments charge that Fael­la was attempt­ing to turn his heav­i­ly for­ti­fied com­pound near St. Cloud, Flori­da into an “Aryan com­pound where all the AF mem­bers could live when the Unit­ed States Gov­ern­ment fails.”

    The Nation­al Guardman’s enlist­ment end­ed this May, and a Nation­al Guard spokesper­son told the AP that an inves­ti­ga­tion had been con­duct­ed but its results were not being made pub­lic.

    The AP notes, how­ev­er, that anoth­er Mis­souri Nation­al Guards­man was fired from a state mil­i­tary hon­or guard last March, after co-work­ers described him as a self-pro­claimed neo-Nazi who had tried to recruit them to the cause.

    Posted by R. Wilson | August 12, 2012, 6:28 pm
  10. I’ve always been curi­ous about just what phar­ma­ceu­ti­cals guys like this were tak­ing in the run up to these hor­rif­ic events. Clear­ly alco­hol has tak­en its toll on the shoot­er. I won­der what else?

    Posted by Vanfield | August 12, 2012, 7:58 pm
  11. Ugh:

    Wis­con­sin gun­man’s Army base had white suprema­cists
    August 08, 2012|By Tom Cohen, CNN

    When Wis­con­sin tem­ple gun­man Wade Michael Page arrived at Fort Bragg in 1995, the sprawl­ing Army base in North Car­oli­na already was home to a small num­ber of white suprema­cists includ­ing three sol­diers lat­er con­vict­ed in the mur­der of an African-Amer­i­can cou­ple.

    The killings launched a mil­i­tary inves­ti­ga­tion that tight­ened reg­u­la­tions against extrem­ist activ­i­ty, but some say such influ­ences per­sist in today’s armed forces.

    “Out­side every major mil­i­tary instal­la­tion, you will have at least two or three active neo-Nazi orga­ni­za­tions active­ly try­ing to recruit on-duty per­son­nel,” said T.J. Ley­den, a for­mer white pow­er skin­head in the U.S. Marines who now con­ducts anti-extrem­ism train­ing.

    ...

    With that in mind, note that the neo-Nazi white peo­ple’s rights leader fea­tured in this lat­est sto­ry also served at Fort Bragg. Plus, he was recent­ly elect­ed to a 4‑year term on the Repub­li­can par­ty com­mit­tee for Luzerne Coun­ty, PA. No rest for the wicked:

    citypaper.net
    Fri­day, August 10, 2012
    Dai­ly News and Scran­ton Times-Tri­bune refer to white suprema­cists as white peo­ple’s rights group

    A wire sto­ry in today’s Philadel­phia Dai­ly News refers to an orga­ni­za­tion led by Penn­syl­va­nia white suprema­cist Steve Smith as a “white peo­ple’s rights group” and does not dis­cuss Smith’s long his­to­ry with the neo-Nazi move­ment.

    The arti­cle, about a dis­pute over an event per­mit, was orig­i­nal­ly pub­lished in the Scran­ton Times-Tri­bune and picked up by the Asso­ci­at­ed Press.

    The orig­i­nal sin cer­tain­ly lies with the Times-Tri­bune, but why did the phrase “white peo­ple’s rights group” make it past edi­tors at the Dai­ly News?

    “I sug­gest you call AP and the Scran­ton Times-Tri­bune,” says Dai­ly News city edi­tor Gar Joseph.

    The Times-Tri­bune did not respond to a request for com­ment, but the AP claims that it scrubbed its ver­sion of the “white peo­ple’s rights” lan­guage and was just 93-words. But they refused to pro­vide City Paper with a copy of their sto­ry.

    “What pos­si­ble pur­pose would there be for me to send you this sto­ry when you’re try­ing to cause trou­ble for how it was writ­ten?” said an angry Karen Tes­ta, East Region Edi­tor at the AP. Before hang­ing up, she added: “That’s a good way to build a jour­nal­ism career.”

    What exact­ly did these edi­tors think a “white peo­ple’s rights group” is? And just a week after a skin­head white suprema­cist mas­sa­cred Sikhs at a Wis­con­sin tem­ple?

    Smith, recruit­ed into the neo-Nazi move­ment while sta­tioned at Fort Bragg, co-found­ed Key­stone Unit­ed (for­mer­ly Key­stone State Skin­heads) and is prob­a­bly Penn­syl­va­ni­a’s most promi­nent white suprema­cist. In 2003, he and two oth­er skin­heads were arrest­ed after attack­ing a black man in Scran­ton.

    It is trou­bling that main­stream news out­lets would describe Smith’s new out­fit, the Euro­pean Amer­i­can Action Coali­tion, as a “white peo­ple’s rights group,” pre­cise­ly the sort of lan­guage that white suprema­cists want to use in their attempt to broad­en their appeal beyond the fringe.

    And Smith, who has called Tea Par­ty events “fer­tile grounds for our activists,” is cer­tain­ly try­ing to make that appeal and lever­age Tea Par­ty fer­vor and anti-immi­grant hys­te­ria into polit­i­cal cred­i­bil­i­ty.

    In April, Smith used a sin­gle write in vote to elect him­self to the Luzerne Coun­ty Repub­li­can Com­mit­tee, prompt­ing par­ty offi­cials to seek his ouster.

    ...

    The neo-nazi won by a sin­gle vote. His own. And it was the only vote in the race. The state of our democ­ra­cy is just awe­some.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | August 13, 2012, 2:22 pm
  12. http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/21/us-usa-wisconsin-shooting-army-idUSBRE87K04Y20120821

    U.S. Army bat­tling racists with­in its own ranks

    By Daniel Trot­ta
    FAYETTEVILLE, North Car­oli­na | Tue Aug 21, 2012
    9:56am EDT

    (Reuters) — They call it “rahowa” — short for racial holy war — and they are prepar­ing for it by join­ing the ranks of the world’s fiercest fight­ing machine, the U.S. mil­i­tary.

    White suprema­cists, neo-Nazis and skin­head groups encour­age fol­low­ers to enlist in the Army and Marine Corps to acquire the skills to over­throw what some call the ZOG — the Zion­ist Occu­pa­tion Gov­ern­ment. Get in, get trained and get out to brace for the com­ing race war.

    If this sce­nario seems like fan­ta­sy or blus­ter, civ­il rights orga­ni­za­tions take it as dead­ly seri­ous, espe­cial­ly giv­en recent events. For­mer U.S. Army sol­dier Wade Page opened fire with a 9mm hand­gun at a Sikh tem­ple in Wis­con­sin on August 5, mur­der­ing six peo­ple and crit­i­cal­ly wound­ing three before killing him­self dur­ing a shootout with police.

    The U.S. Defense Depart­ment as well has stepped up efforts to purge vio­lent racists from its ranks, earn­ing praise from orga­ni­za­tions such as the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter, which has tracked and exposed hate groups since the 1970s.

    Page, who was 40, was well known in the white suprema­cist music scene. In the ear­ly 2000s he told aca­d­e­m­ic researcher Pete Simi that he became a neo-Nazi after join­ing the mil­i­tary in 1992. Fred Lucas, who served with him, said Page open­ly espoused his racist views until 1998, when he was demot­ed from sergeant to spe­cial­ist, dis­charged and barred from re-enlist­ment.

    While at Fort Bragg, in North Car­oli­na, Page told Simi, he made the acquain­tance of James Burmeis­ter, a skin­head para­troop­er who in 1995 killed a black Fayet­teville cou­ple in a racial­ly moti­vat­ed shoot­ing. Burmeis­ter was sen­tenced to life in prison and died in 2007.

    No one knows how many white suprema­cists have served since then. A 2008 report com­mis­sioned by the Jus­tice Depart­ment found half of all right-wing extrem­ists in the Unit­ed States had mil­i­tary expe­ri­ence.

    “We don’t real­ly think this is a huge prob­lem, at Bragg, and across the Army,” said Colonel Kevin Ara­ta, a spokesman for Fort Bragg.

    “In my 26 years in the Army, I’ve nev­er seen it,” the for­mer com­pa­ny com­man­der said.

    Experts have iden­ti­fied the pres­ence of street gang mem­bers as a more wide­spread prob­lem. Even so, the Pen­ta­gon has launched three major push­es in recent decades to crack down on racist extrem­ists. The first direc­tive was issued in 1986, when Defense Sec­re­tary Casper Wein­berg­er ordered mil­i­tary per­son­nel to reject suprema­cist orga­ni­za­tions.

    That failed to stop for­mer Marine T.J. Ley­den, with two-inch SS bolts tat­tooed above his col­lar, from serv­ing from 1988 to 1991 while open­ly sup­port­ing neo-Nazi caus­es. A mem­ber of the Ham­mer­skin Nation, a skin­head group, he said he hung a swasti­ka from his lock­er, tak­ing it down only when his com­man­der polite­ly asked him to ahead of inspec­tions by the com­mand­ing gen­er­al.

    “I went into the Marine Corps for one spe­cif­ic rea­son: I would learn how shoot,” Ley­den told Reuters. “I also learned how to use C‑4 (explo­sives), blow things up. I took all my mil­i­tary skills and said I could use these to train oth­er peo­ple,” said Ley­den, 46, who has since renounced the white pow­er move­ment and is a con­sul­tant for the anti-Nazi Simon Wiesen­thal Cen­ter.

    RATTLED BY OKLAHOMA BLAST

    In 1995, eight months before the Fort Bragg mur­ders, two for­mer Army sol­diers bombed the Okla­homa City fed­er­al build­ing, killing 168 peo­ple. With a grow­ing aware­ness of the spread­ing mili­tia move­ment, the Pen­ta­gon in 1996 banned mil­i­tary per­son­nel from par­tic­i­pat­ing in suprema­cist caus­es and autho­rized com­man­ders to cashier per­son­nel for ral­ly­ing, recruit­ing or train­ing racists.

    “What’s scary about Page is that he served in the 1990s when puta­tive­ly this was being treat­ed quite seri­ous­ly by the mil­i­tary. There’s plen­ty of oth­er Pages who served dur­ing the war on ter­ror, and we don’t know what they’re going to be doing over the next decade or so,” said Matt Ken­nard, author of the forth­com­ing book “Irreg­u­lar Army: How the U.S. Mil­i­tary Recruit­ed Neo-Nazis, Gang Mem­bers and Crim­i­nals to Fight the War on Ter­ror.”

    Ken­nard argues the U.S. mil­i­tary was so des­per­ate for troops while fight­ing simul­ta­ne­ous wars in Iraq and Afghanistan that it allowed extrem­ists, felons and gang mem­bers into the armed forces.

    The mil­i­tary can grant a “moral waiv­er” to allow a con­vict­ed crim­i­nal or oth­er­wise inel­i­gi­ble per­son into the armed forces, and the per­cent­age of recruits grant­ed such waivers grew from 16.7 per­cent in 2003 to 19.6 per­cent in 2006, accord­ing to Pen­ta­gon data obtained by the Palm Cen­ter in a 2007 Free­dom of Infor­ma­tion Act request. But the Pen­ta­gon says no waiv­er exists for par­tic­i­pa­tion in extrem­ist orga­ni­za­tions.

    “Our stan­dards have not changed; par­tic­i­pa­tion in extrem­ist activ­i­ties has nev­er been tol­er­at­ed and is pun­ish­able under the Uni­formed Code of Mil­i­tary Jus­tice,” said Eileen Lainez, a Defense Depart­ment spokes­woman.

    The Pen­tagon’s third direc­tive against white suprema­cists was issued in 2009 after a Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty report expressed con­cern that right-wing extrem­ists were recruit­ing vet­er­ans return­ing from wars over­seas.

    The Pen­tagon’s 2009 instruc­tion, updat­ed in Feb­ru­ary 2012, directs com­man­ders to remain alert for signs of racist activ­i­ty and to inter­vene when they see it. It bans sol­diers from blog­ging or chat­ting on racist web­sites while on duty.

    “This is the best we’ve ever seen,” said Hei­di Beirich, leader of the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter’s intel­li­gence project, refer­ring to the Pen­tagon’s atti­tude. “It was real­ly dis­heart­en­ing under the Bush admin­is­tra­tion how light­ly they took it, so this is a major advance.”

    Her group mon­i­tors online chat­ter among self-described active-duty war­riors serv­ing over­seas and reports it to mil­i­tary offi­cials. It also receives reg­u­lar calls from mil­i­tary inves­ti­ga­tors ask­ing about racists in the ser­vice.

    The South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter and the Anti-Defama­tion League (ADL), anoth­er civ­il rights mon­i­tor, have helped train offi­cers on how to spot extrem­ists, although Mark Pit­cav­age, direc­tor of inves­tiga­tive research at the ADL, says the mil­i­tary lacks com­pre­hen­sive train­ing for recruiters and com­man­ders. He called the mil­i­tary’s reac­tion when alert­ed to white suprema­cists “patchy.”

    “We’ve dis­cov­ered a great range of response, from get­ting a phone call the next day say­ing, ‘He’s already out,’ to not doing any­thing at all,” Pit­cav­age said.

    THE TATTOO MATRIX

    The Army showed Reuters a one-hour pre­sen­ta­tion it says was designed to edu­cate sol­diers and Army lead­ers about its extrem­ism pol­i­cy and how to respond, includ­ing to white suprema­cy groups. Penal­ties for extrem­ist ide­ol­o­gy may include being removed from the mil­i­tary, hav­ing secu­ri­ty clear­ances yanked or being demot­ed.

    “The stan­dard hate­ful mes­sage has not been replaced, just pack­aged dif­fer­ent­ly with issues like free­dom of speech, anti-gun con­trol themes, tax reform and oppres­sion,” the pre­sen­ta­tion says, not­ing that recruit­ment may be dif­fi­cult to detect, occur­ring qui­et­ly “in bars and break areas” on bases.
    The pre­sen­ta­tion instructs Army lead­ers to look out for tat­tooed sym­bols of light­ning bolts, skulls, swastikas, eagles and Nordic war­riors. Skin­heads may have tat­toos show­ing barbed wire, hob­nailed boots and ham­mers.

    In a detailed flow­chart called a “Tat­too Deci­sion Sup­port Matrix,” Army lead­ers are shown how to respond to var­i­ous tat­toos. At the time of pub­li­ca­tion, the Army was unable to iden­ti­fy the loca­tions where this course was being taught.

    SCREENING OUT ROGUES

    “We’re very strict on the tat­too pol­i­cy here with­in this recruit­ing sta­tion,” said Sergeant Aaron Isk­ender­ian, head of the Army recruit­ing office in Fayet­teville, the Army town next to Fort Bragg.

    With the Unit­ed States with­drawn from Iraq, wind­ing down from Afghanistan and unem­ploy­ment stuck above 8 per­cent, recruiters can be choosy again.
    Isk­ender­ian cit­ed the exam­ple of a young man who came in recent­ly with a tat­too of the Con­fed­er­ate flag.

    “We’re in the South here. It’s con­sid­ered South­ern her­itage. It’s on the Gen­er­al Lee,” Isk­ender­ian said, refer­ring to the car from the tele­vi­sion show “The Dukes of Haz­zard.”

    “Is it racist? I asked him, ‘What does it mean to you?’ and he said, ‘South­ern pride.’ ”

    The poten­tial recruit also told Isk­ender­ian he had a black girl­friend. Isk­ender­ian sent the issue up the chain of com­mand, and the young man was reject­ed.

    Aca­d­e­mics who study white suprema­cists say pro­po­nents of the “infil­tra­tion strat­e­gy” of join­ing the U.S. mil­i­tary have adapt­ed, telling skin­heads to deceive mil­i­tary recruiters by let­ting their hair grow, avoid­ing or cov­er­ing tat­toos, and sup­press­ing their racist views.

    “You have to dif­fer­en­ti­ate between some of the grandiose fan­tasies of some of the lead­ers of the move­ment and what actu­al­ly is going on,” cau­tioned the ADL’s Pit­cav­age.

    For neo-Nazis who get past the screen­ers, as with the gang mem­bers, the mil­i­tary needs a com­pre­hen­sive strat­e­gy, said Carter F. Smith, a for­mer mil­i­tary inves­ti­ga­tor who is now a pro­fes­sor of crim­i­nal jus­tice at Austin Peay State Uni­ver­si­ty in Ten­nessee.

    “They are some of the most dis­ci­plined sol­diers we have. They real­ly want to learn to shoot those weapons,” Smith said. “The prob­lem was­n’t just that we were open­ing the flood­gates to let them in. We let them out after pros­e­cu­tion or when their time was up and we did­n’t let the police know.”

    Posted by R. Wilson | August 21, 2012, 7:33 pm
  13. http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_SOLDIERS_CHARGED_PLOT

    Aug 27, 2012 5:59 PM EDT

    Pros­e­cu­tor: Ga. mur­der case uncov­ers plot to kill Oba­ma, “over­throw gov­ern­ment”

    By RUSS BYNUM
    Asso­ci­at­ed Press

    LUDOWICI, Ga. (AP) — Four Army sol­diers based in south­east Geor­gia killed a for­mer com­rade and his girl­friend to pro­tect an anar­chist mili­tia group they formed that stock­piled assault weapons and plot­ted a range of anti-gov­ern­ment attacks, pros­e­cu­tors told a judge Mon­day.

    Pros­e­cu­tors in rur­al Long Coun­ty, near the sprawl­ing Army post Fort Stew­art, said the mili­tia group of active and for­mer U.S. mil­i­tary mem­bers spent at least $87,000 buy­ing guns and bomb com­po­nents. They allege the group was seri­ous enough to kill two peo­ple — for­mer sol­dier Michael Roark and his 17-year-old girl­friend, Tiffany York — by shoot­ing them in the woods last Decem­ber in order to keep its plans secret.

    “This domes­tic ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion did not sim­ply plan and talk,” pros­e­cu­tor Isabel Pauley told a Supe­ri­or Court judge. “Pri­or to the mur­ders in this case, the group took action. Evi­dence shows the group pos­sessed the knowl­edge, means and motive to car­ry out their plans.”

    One of the Fort Stew­art sol­diers charged in the case, Pfc. Michael Bur­nett, also gave tes­ti­mo­ny that backed up many of the asser­tions made by pros­e­cu­tors. The 26-year-old sol­dier plead­ed guilty Mon­day to manslaugh­ter, ille­gal gang activ­i­ty and oth­er charges. He made a deal to coop­er­ate with pros­e­cu­tors against the three oth­er sol­diers.

    Pros­e­cu­tors said the group called itself F.E.A.R., short for For­ev­er Endur­ing Always Ready. Pauley said author­i­ties don’t know how many mem­bers it had.

    Bur­nett, 26, said he knew the group’s lead­ers from serv­ing with them at Fort Stew­art. He agreed to tes­ti­fy against fel­low sol­diers Pvt. Isaac Aguigui, iden­ti­fied by pros­e­cu­tors as the mili­ti­a’s founder and leader, and Sgt. Antho­ny Peden and Pvt. Christo­pher Salmon.

    All are charged by state author­i­ties with mal­ice mur­der, felony mur­der, crim­i­nal gang activ­i­ty, aggra­vat­ed assault and using a firearm while com­mit­ting a felony. A hear­ing for the three sol­diers was sched­uled Thurs­day.

    Pros­e­cu­tors say Roark, 19, served with the four defen­dants in the 4th Brigade Com­bat Team of the Army’s 3rd Infantry Divi­sion and became involved with the mili­tia. Pauley said the group believed it had been betrayed by Roark, who left the Army two days before he was killed, and decid­ed the ex-sol­dier and his girl­friend need­ed to be silenced.

    Bur­nett tes­ti­fied that on the night of Dec. 4, he and the three oth­er sol­diers lured Roark and York to some woods a short dis­tance from the Army post under the guise that they were going tar­get shoot­ing. He said Peden shot Roark’s girl­friend in the head while she was try­ing to get out of her car. Salmon, he said, made Roark get on his knees and shot him twice in the head. Bur­nett said Aguigui ordered the killings.

    “A ‘loose end’ is the way Isaac put it,” Bur­nett said.

    Aguigu­i’s attor­ney, Dav­eniya Fish­er, did not imme­di­ate­ly return a phone call from The Asso­ci­at­ed Press. Attor­neys for Peden and Salmon both declined to com­ment Mon­day.

    Also charged in the killings is Salmon’s wife, Heather Salmon. Her attor­ney, Charles Nester, did not imme­di­ate­ly return a call seek­ing com­ment.

    Pauley said Aguigui fund­ed the mili­tia using $500,000 in insur­ance and ben­e­fit pay­ments from the death of his preg­nant wife a year ago. Aguigui was not charged in his wife’s death, but Pauley told the judge her death was “high­ly sus­pi­cious.”

    She said Aguigui used the mon­ey to buy $87,000 worth of semi­au­to­mat­ic assault rifles, oth­er guns and bomb com­po­nents that were recov­ered from the accused sol­diers’ homes and from a stor­age lock­er. He also used the insur­ance pay­ments to buy land for his mili­tia group in Wash­ing­ton state, Pauley said.

    In a video­taped inter­view with mil­i­tary inves­ti­ga­tors, Pauley said, Aguigui called him­self “the nicest cold-blood­ed mur­der­er you will ever meet.” He used the Army to recruit mili­tia mem­bers, who wore dis­tinc­tive tat­toos that resem­ble an anar­chy sym­bol, she said. Pros­e­cu­tors say they have no idea how many mem­bers belong to the group.

    “All mem­bers of the group were on active-duty or were for­mer mem­bers of the mil­i­tary,” Pauley said. “He tar­get­ed sol­diers who were in trou­ble or dis­il­lu­sioned.”

    **The pros­e­cu­tor said the mili­tia group had big plans. It plot­ted to take over Fort Stew­art by seiz­ing its ammu­ni­tion con­trol point and talked of bomb­ing the Forsyth Park foun­tain in near­by Savan­nah, she said. In Wash­ing­ton state, she added, the group plot­ted to bomb a dam and poi­son the state’s apple crop. Ulti­mate­ly, pros­e­cu­tors said, the mili­ti­a’s goal was to over­throw the gov­ern­ment and assas­si­nate the pres­i­dent.**

    Fort Stew­art spokesman Kevin Lar­son said the Army has dropped its own charges against the four sol­diers in the slay­ings of Roark and York. The Mil­i­tary author­i­ties filed their charges in March but nev­er act­ed on them. Fort Stew­art offi­cials Mon­day refused to iden­ti­fy the units the accused sol­diers served in and their jobs with­in those units.

    “Fort Stew­art-Hunter Army Air­field does not have a gang or mili­tia prob­lem,” Lar­son said in a pre­pared state­ment, though he said Army inves­ti­ga­tors still have an open inves­ti­ga­tion in the case.

    “How­ev­er, we don’t believe there are any unknown sub­jects,” he said.

    Dis­trict Attor­ney Tom Dur­den said his office has been shar­ing infor­ma­tion with fed­er­al author­i­ties, but no charges have been filed in fed­er­al court. Jim Durham, an assis­tant U.S. attor­ney for the South­ern Dis­trict of Geor­gia, would not com­ment on whether a case is pend­ing.

    Posted by R. Wilson | August 27, 2012, 8:58 pm
  14. A white-suprema­cist US sol­dier just got bust­ed by the FBI try­ing to sell info to an agent pos­ing as a Russ­ian spy. This includ­ed info about the F22 and a US jam­ming sys­tem used to sweep for road­side bombs. That’s alarm­ing:

    Alas­ka-based sol­dier gets 16 years for sell­ing secrets to FBI agent pos­ing as Russ­ian spy

    By Asso­ci­at­ed Press, Pub­lished: April 15 | Updat­ed: Tues­day, April 16, 1:19 AM

    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alas­ka — An Alas­ka-based mil­i­tary police­man will serve 16 years in prison and will be dis­hon­or­ably dis­charged for sell­ing secrets to an FBI under­cov­er agent who he believed was a Russ­ian gov­ern­ment offi­cial, a pan­el of eight mil­i­tary mem­bers decid­ed Mon­day.

    Spec. William Colton Mil­lay, 24, plead­ed guilty last month to attempt­ed espi­onage and oth­er counts.

    Mil­i­tary pros­e­cu­tors paint­ed him as a white suprema­cist who was fed up with the Army and the Unit­ed States, and was will­ing to sell secrets to an ene­my agent, even if that would cost fel­low sol­diers their lives.

    Defense attor­neys said Mil­lay was emo­tion­al­ly stunt­ed, was only seek­ing atten­tion and was a can­di­date for reha­bil­i­ta­tion.

    Monday’s pro­ceed­ings were like a mini-tri­al con­duct­ed in front of the sen­tenc­ing pan­el, with both sides call­ing two wit­ness­es.

    FBI Spe­cial Agent Der­rick Chriswell said Mil­lay came to their atten­tion in the sum­mer of 2011 through an anony­mous tip after Mil­lay sent an email to a Russ­ian pub­li­ca­tion seek­ing infor­ma­tion about the mil­i­tary and made sev­er­al calls to the Russ­ian embassy.

    “That’s a con­cern for nation­al secu­ri­ty,” Chriswell said.

    The FBI, work­ing with mil­i­tary intel­li­gence agen­cies, con­duct­ed the inves­ti­ga­tion. On Sept. 13, 2011, an FBI under­cov­er agent called Mil­lay and set up a meet­ing the next day at an Anchor­age hotel-restau­rant.

    Chriswell tes­ti­fied that dur­ing the first meet­ing with the agent, Mil­lay “expressed his dis­gust with the U.S. mil­i­tary.” They then moved to the agent’s hotel room, where audio and video record­ing devices were in place.

    Mil­lay said he’d work for the Russ­ian gov­ern­ment, and if they made it worth his while, he’d re-enlist for a sec­ond five-year stint. He also said he had con­fi­den­tial infor­ma­tion on the War­lock Duke jam­ming sys­tem the U.S. mil­i­tary uses to sweep road­side bombs.

    Two days after that meet­ing, Mil­lay report­ed to his com­man­der that he had been con­tact­ed by a Russ­ian agent. He was lat­er inter­ro­gat­ed by mil­i­tary intel­li­gence offi­cers and the FBI, but pros­e­cu­tors say Mil­lay was mere­ly try­ing to throw off sus­pi­cion.

    Chriswell said Mil­lay, dur­ing the inter­ro­ga­tion, with­held infor­ma­tion that offi­cials already knew from the record­ings. That includ­ed a claim that he didn’t know why a Russ­ian agent would con­tact him, his claim to the agent that he had access to Social Secu­ri­ty num­bers of peo­ple on base because of his police job and that he had sent her an ear­li­er text claim­ing he had more infor­ma­tion on the jam­ming sys­tem.

    Lat­er, after he came off a month­long leave, he told the agent he was will­ing to sell infor­ma­tion using a con­fi­den­tial drop at a park.

    On Oct. 21, 2011, he dropped off a white enve­lope with infor­ma­tion about the F‑22s and the jam­ming sys­tem in a garbage can. That enve­lope was lat­er col­lect­ed by the FBI.

    Mil­lay was told to dri­ve to a hotel, where he col­lect­ed $3,000 and a dis­pos­able cell­phone from a pick­up.

    After­ward, the agent con­tact­ed Mil­lay to com­plain her supe­ri­ors want­ed infor­ma­tion that wasn’t on the Inter­net. Mil­lay assured her that the infor­ma­tion on the jam­ming sys­tem — about a paragraph’s worth — wasn’t avail­able. That was lat­er con­firmed by mil­i­tary per­son­nel.

    He was arrest­ed Oct. 28. A search of his bar­racks found two hand­guns, detailed instruc­tions on how to use a Russ­ian Inter­net phone ser­vice and lit­er­a­ture from the white suprema­cist orga­ni­za­tion, the Nation­al Social­ists Move­ment.

    Chriswell also tes­ti­fied that Mil­lay has two Nazi SS thun­der­bolt tat­toos under his biceps and spi­der web tat­toos, which he said was com­mon among racists in prison.

    ...

    Hyderkhan said jail­house record­ings show Mil­lay threat­ens to con­tin­ue to divulge secrets.

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | April 15, 2013, 11:04 pm
  15. Ah, won­der­ful, the Air Force just stripped 17 offi­cers of their nuclear mis­sile launch codes. There appears to be some sort of ther­monu­clear dis­ci­pli­nary rot:

    AP
    Air Force Stripped 17 Offi­cers Of Abil­i­ty To Launch Nuclear Mis­siles Due To Inter­nal ‘Rot’
    ROBERT BURNS May 8, 2013, 9:00 AM

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Air Force stripped an unprece­dent­ed 17 offi­cers of their author­i­ty to con­trol — and, if nec­es­sary, launch — nuclear mis­siles after a string of unpub­li­cized fail­ings, includ­ing a remark­ably dim review of their unit’s launch skills. The group’s deputy com­man­der said it is suf­fer­ing “rot” with­in its ranks.

    “We are, in fact, in a cri­sis right now,” the com­man­der, Lt. Col. Jay Folds, wrote in an inter­nal email obtained by The Asso­ci­at­ed Press and con­firmed by the Air Force.

    The tip-off to trou­ble was a March inspec­tion of the 91st Mis­sile Wing at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., which earned the equiv­a­lent of a “D” grade when test­ed on its mas­tery of Min­ute­man III mis­sile launch oper­a­tions. In oth­er areas, the offi­cers test­ed much bet­ter, but the group’s over­all fit­ness was deemed so ten­u­ous that senior offi­cers at Minot decid­ed, after prob­ing fur­ther, that an imme­di­ate crack­down was called for.

    The Air Force pub­licly called the inspec­tion a “suc­cess.”

    But in April it qui­et­ly removed 17 offi­cers at Minot from the high­ly sen­si­tive duty of stand­ing 24-hour watch over the Air Force’s most pow­er­ful nuclear mis­siles, the inter­con­ti­nen­tal bal­lis­tic mis­siles that can strike tar­gets across the globe. Inside each under­ground launch con­trol cap­sule, two offi­cers stand “alert” at all times, ready to launch an ICBM upon pres­i­den­tial order.

    “You will be a bench warmer for at least 60 days,” Folds wrote.

    The 17 cas­es mark the Air Force’s most exten­sive sidelin­ing ever of launch crew mem­bers, accord­ing to Lt. Col. Ang­ie Blair, a spokes­woman for Air Force Glob­al Strike Com­mand, which over­sees the mis­sile units as well as nuclear-capa­ble bombers. The wing has 150 offi­cers assigned to mis­sile launch con­trol duty.

    The trou­ble at Minot is the lat­est in a series of set­backs for the Air Force’s nuclear mis­sion, high­light­ed by a 2008 Pen­ta­gon advi­so­ry group report that found a “dra­mat­ic and unac­cept­able decline” in the Air Force’s com­mit­ment to the mis­sion, which has its ori­gins in a Cold War stand­off with the for­mer Sovi­et Union.

    In 2008, then-Defense Sec­re­tary Robert Gates sacked the top civil­ian and mil­i­tary lead­ers of the Air Force after a series of blun­ders, includ­ing a bomber’s mis­tak­en flight across the coun­try armed with nuclear-tipped mis­siles. Since then the Air Force has tak­en numer­ous steps designed to improve its nuclear per­for­mance.

    The email obtained by the AP describes a cul­ture of indif­fer­ence, with at least one inten­tion­al vio­la­tion of mis­sile safe­ty rules and an appar­ent unwill­ing­ness among some to chal­lenge or report those who vio­late rules.

    In response to AP inquiries, the Air Force said the laps­es nev­er put the secu­ri­ty of the nuclear force at risk. It said the offi­cers who lost their cer­ti­fi­ca­tion to oper­ate ICBMs are now get­ting more train­ing with the expec­ta­tion that they will return to nor­mal duty with­in about two months. The mis­siles remain on their nor­mal war foot­ing, offi­cials said.

    Although sidelin­ing 17 launch offi­cers at once is unprece­dent­ed, the Air Force said strip­ping offi­cers of their author­i­ty to con­trol nuclear mis­siles hap­pens to “a small num­ber” of offi­cers every year for a vari­ety of rea­sons.

    In addi­tion to the 17, pos­si­ble dis­ci­pli­nary action is pend­ing against one oth­er offi­cer at Minot who inves­ti­ga­tors found had pur­pose­ful­ly bro­ken a mis­sile safe­ty rule in an unspec­i­fied act that could have com­pro­mised the secret codes that enable the launch­ing of mis­siles, which stand on high alert in under­ground silos in the nation’s mid­sec­tion. Offi­cials said there was no com­pro­mise of mis­sile safe­ty or secu­ri­ty.

    Folds is deputy com­man­der of the 91st Oper­a­tions Group, whose three squadrons are respon­si­ble for man­ning the wing’s 15 Min­ute­man III launch con­trol cen­ters.

    Advis­ing his troops on April 12 that they had “fall­en,” Folds wrote that dras­tic cor­rec­tive action was required because “we didn’t wake up” after an under­whelm­ing inspec­tion in March that he said amount­ed to a fail­ure, even though the unit’s over­all per­for­mance tech­ni­cal­ly was rat­ed “sat­is­fac­to­ry.” That is two notch­es below the high­est rat­ing.

    ...

    Expo­sure of short­com­ings with­in Vercher’s unit recalls an ear­li­er series of stun­ning mis­takes by oth­er ele­ments of the nuclear force, includ­ing the August 2007 inci­dent in which an Air Force B‑52 bomber flew from Minot to Barks­dale Air Force Base, La., with­out the crew real­iz­ing it was armed with six nuclear-tipped cruise mis­siles. One out­come of the inci­dent was the cre­ation of Glob­al Strike Com­mand in Jan­u­ary 2009 as a way of improv­ing man­age­ment of the nuclear enter­prise.

    ...

    If sto­ries about major dis­ci­pli­nary prob­lems amongst the indi­vid­u­als with nuclear mis­sile launch codes puts the fear of God in you don’t feel alone. God also fears sit­u­a­tions that might dis­rupt the US’s abil­i­ty to launch its mis­siles. Jesus loves nukes:

    The Tele­graph
    ‘Jesus loves nukes’: US Air Force taught the Chris­t­ian Just War The­o­ry
    To the men and women bur­dened with the ulti­mate respon­si­bil­i­ty of launch­ing America’s nuclear mis­siles it was known as the “Jesus loves nukes” les­son.

    By Nick Allen, Los Ange­les

    7:20PM BST 05 Aug 2011

    For 20 years the course on “Chris­t­ian Just War The­o­ry” was taught by chap­lains at Van­den­berg Air Force Base in Cal­i­for­nia to those who would turn the key should World War III break out.

    The train­ing, which used pas­sages from the Bible and reli­gious imagery to demon­strate the moral jus­ti­fi­ca­tion for atom­ic war­fare, has now been sus­pend­ed.

    The Air Force act­ed after receiv­ing an inquiry from Truthout, a news web­site which first broke the sto­ry.

    A Pow­er­Point pre­sen­ta­tion which was part of the course had con­sist­ed of 43 slides which includ­ed ref­er­ences to Bib­li­cal fig­ures like Abra­ham and John the Bap­tist, and paint­ings of the Visig­oths attack­ing Rome in AD410.

    Instruc­tors quot­ed St Augustine’s just cause for war, telling them it was right “to avenge or to avert evil, to pro­tect the inno­cent and restore moral and social order.”

    They also recount­ed how, in the Book of Gen­e­sis, Abra­ham had organ­ised an army to res­cue Lot, and how there were “Old Tes­ta­ment believ­ers who engaged in war in a right­eous way.” Offi­cers were also told that in Judges, God is “moti­vat­ing judges to fight and deliv­er Israel from for­eign oppres­sors,” and that there was “no paci­fistic sen­ti­ment in main­stream Jew­ish his­to­ry.”

    In the New Tes­ta­ment, they were told, Jesus used the Roman cen­tu­ri­on as a “pos­i­tive illus­tra­tion of faith.” One slide read: “Rev­e­la­tion 19:11 Jesus Christ is the mighty war­rior.”

    The course lit­er­a­ture also quot­ed Wern­er von Braun, the lead­ing Ger­man rock­et sci­en­tist who went on to work for the Unit­ed States after the Sec­ond World War, say­ing that it was a “moral deci­sion” to sur­ren­der his tech­nol­o­gy to the US.

    Von Braun said: “We felt that only by sur­ren­der­ing such a weapon to peo­ple who are guid­ed by the Bible could such an assur­ance to the world be best secured.”

    Before the the course was stopped 31 nuclear mis­sile launch offi­cers, includ­ing Protes­tants and Roman Catholics, had com­plained to the Mil­i­tary Reli­gious Free­dom Foun­da­tion, a group that cam­paigns for the sep­a­ra­tion of church and state.

    Its founder Mikey Wein­stein said the offi­cers were being told that “under fun­da­men­tal­ist Chris­t­ian doc­trine, war is a good thing”.

    He said the offi­cers found that “dis­gust­ing.” Mr Wein­stein said: “The Unit­ed States Air Force was pro­mot­ing a par­tic­u­lar brand of right wing fun­da­men­tal­ist Chris­tian­i­ty.

    “The main essence was that war is a nat­ur­al part of the human expe­ri­ence and it’s some­thing that is favoured by this par­tic­u­lar per­spec­tive of the New Tes­ta­ment.”

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | May 8, 2013, 10:49 am
  16. Umm­mm...WTF?

    Ter­ror­ism radi­a­tion plot uncov­ered in Albany
    Feds: Sus­pect promised to build “Hiroshi­ma on a light switch”

    By Bren­dan J. Lyons, with staff reports
    Updat­ed 1:32 pm, Wednes­day, June 19, 2013

    ALBANY, N.Y. — An indus­tri­al mechan­ic with Gen­er­al Elec­tric Co., who is also alleged­ly a mem­ber of the Ku Klux Klan, designed a dead­ly, mobile radi­a­tion device that he tried to sell to Jew­ish groups and then to a south­ern branch of the Ku Klux Klan, accord­ing to a fed­er­al com­plaint unsealed Wednes­day in Albany.

    The device was intend­ed to be a truck-mount­ed radi­a­tion par­ti­cle weapon that could be remote­ly con­trolled and capa­ble of silent­ly aim­ing a lethal beam of radioac­tiv­i­ty at its human tar­gets. The con­cept was that vic­tims would even­tu­al­ly die from radi­a­tion sick­ness.

    Glen­don Scott Craw­ford, 49, of Gal­way, is accused in a fed­er­al com­plaint of devel­op­ing “a radi­a­tion emit­ting device that could be placed in the back of a van to covert­ly emit ion­iz­ing radi­a­tion strong enough to bring about radi­a­tion sick­ness or death against Craw­ford’s ene­mies,” states the com­plaint attrib­uted to an FBI agent.

    Eric J. Feight, 54, of Hud­son, also is iden­ti­fied as a co-con­spir­a­tor and list­ed in the com­plaint as Craw­ford’s acquain­tance. Feight works for an elec­tron­ics com­pa­ny in Colum­bia Coun­ty. He is accused in a fed­er­al com­plaint of agree­ing to help Craw­ford con­struct the elec­tron­ic con­trols for the device.

    Craw­ford nev­er actu­al­ly obtained a radi­a­tion source. Dur­ing the past year, the com­plaint indi­cates he was deal­ing with an under­cov­er FBI agent pre­tend­ing to be a sup­pli­er of radi­a­tion equip­ment, such as x‑ray tubes used in con­struc­tion projects or med­ical devices. At one point, the under­cov­er agent sent an email to Craw­ford show­ing dif­fer­ent x‑ray sys­tems that could be sup­plied.

    The inves­ti­ga­tion broke open in April 2012 when Craw­ford alleged­ly went into an Albany syn­a­gogue and “asked to speak with a per­son who might be will­ing to help him with a type of tech­nol­o­gy that could be used by Israel to defeat its ene­mies, specif­i­cal­ly, by killing Israel’s ene­mies while they slept,” the com­plaint says. He referred to Mus­lims and ene­mies of the Unit­ed States as “med­ical waste,” accord­ing to court records.

    Lat­er that day, Craw­ford tele­phoned a sec­ond area syn­a­gogue, using his cell phone, and made a sim­i­lar offer, the com­plaint states. An FBI agen­t’s affi­davit indi­cates that some­one at the uniden­ti­fied syn­a­gogue con­tact­ed Albany police, who relayed the infor­ma­tion to the FBI. At that point a Joint Ter­ror­ism Task Force began an inves­ti­ga­tion.

    The FBI com­plaint states that on June 5, 2012, Craw­ford met with a con­fi­den­tial source for the FBI at a Sco­tia restau­rant and alleged­ly talked about his ene­mies and of being “tired of get­ting ‘raped,’ that there are peo­ple out there who have decid­ed that they don’t get their fair share in life, and that (Craw­ford) want­ed to stop these peo­ple.”

    In tele­phone calls record­ed by the FBI, Craw­ford iden­ti­fied him­self as “a mem­ber of the Ku Klux Klan, specif­i­cal­ly, the Unit­ed North­ern & South­ern Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.”

    Dur­ing the meet­ing at the restau­rant a year ago, Craw­ford described his plan to pur­chase or con­struct a pow­er­ful indus­tri­al x‑ray machine that would be pow­ered by bat­ter­ies. The plan includ­ed an attempt by Craw­ford to find part-time work in a met­al shop where he would have access to x‑ray tubes, the com­plaint states.

    “Craw­ford also told the (source) that the tar­get of his radi­a­tion emit­ting device would be the Mus­lim com­mu­ni­ty,” the com­plaint states. “Craw­ford described the device’s capa­bil­i­ties as ‘Hiroshi­ma on a light switch’ and that ‘every­thing with res­pi­ra­tion would be dead by the morn­ing.’ ”

    Craw­ford end­ed the meet­ing by stat­ing “how much sweet­er could there be than a big stack of smelly bod­ies?”

    The FBI com­plaint charges Craw­ford and Feight with con­spir­a­cy to pro­vide mate­r­i­al sup­port to ter­ror­ists, includ­ing use of a weapon of mass destruc­tion.

    Accord­ing to fed­er­al author­i­ties, Craw­ford recruit­ed Feight, who worked for a man­u­fac­tur­er of elec­tron­ic con­trol devices in Hud­son, to assist him with the design and con­struc­tion of the device. Feight, as an out­side con­trac­tor, met Craw­ford last year through their asso­ci­a­tion at Gen­er­al Elec­tric Co., accord­ing to the com­plaint.

    FBI agents were able to get a “con­fi­den­tial human source” and an under­cov­er agent close to Craw­ford in May 2012, record­ing their con­ver­sa­tions and meet­ings. In Decem­ber, the FBI obtained a search war­rant that enabled them to mon­i­tor Craw­ford’s and Feight’s cell phone calls, emails and text mes­sages.

    Under the plot described by the FBI, Craw­ford con­cen­trat­ed on build­ing the radi­a­tion device while Feight was build­ing the elec­tron­ic con­trols. The two men met May 20 in Albany and Feight gave a remote-trans­mis­sion device to Craw­ford. They had planned a test to take place at an undis­closed hotel in the Albany area.

    The sus­pects had suc­cess­ful­ly test­ed the remote trig­ger­ing sys­tem that could work from a lit­tle less than a half mile away from the weapon, the com­plaint states. On June 12, they planned to have a din­ner where Craw­ford would be pro­vid­ed with the radi­a­tion sys­tem, which was not fin­ished. When the men were meet­ing, the FBI was mon­i­tor­ing their activ­i­ties, includ­ing using under­cov­er infor­mants who posed as mem­bers of a South Car­oli­na Ku Klux Klan group inter­est­ed in pur­chas­ing the device and financ­ing the project.

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | June 19, 2013, 10:04 am
  17. Pret­ty creepy, whether or not they were “Watch­men of Amer­i­ca” mem­bers or just fans:

    Moth­er Jones
    Min­ing Com­pa­ny Deploys More Masked Mili­ti­a­men Against “Eco-Ter­ror­ists”
    Wel­come to the scary new world of min­ing in Scott Walk­er’s Wis­con­sin.

    —By Kate Shep­pard
    | Tue Jul. 16, 2013 3:00 AM PDT

    Debate over a pro­posed open-pit iron ore mine in north­ern Wis­con­sin went from heat­ed to out­right bizarre last week when masked guards bran­dish­ing assault rifles showed up at the site in the remote and scenic wilder­ness of Peno­kee Hills.

    Local activist Rob Gan­son, 56, first came upon three heav­i­ly armed guards while lead­ing a small group on a hike to view the min­ing site. (The drilling site is on pri­vate land, but the own­er has been giv­en a tax break in exchange for keep­ing it open to pub­lic use.) The guards, said Gan­son, car­ried semi-auto­mat­ic guns, were dressed in cam­ou­flage, and wore masks cov­er­ing their faces. “As you can imag­ine, it was quite a shock for five mid­dle-aged peo­ple out for a walk,” he said. Gan­son tried to engage the guards, but was “met with stony-faced silence.” He was alarmed but man­aged to grab a few pho­tos of the men. “I was think­ing if the worst sce­nario hap­pened, at least there would be pho­tos on my cam­era.”

    After they deter­mined that the guards worked for Ari­zona-based Bul­let­proof Secu­ri­ty, Gan­son and the oth­er activists post­ed their pho­tos of the guards online, draw­ing local and nation­al news cov­er­age of the mine, a pro­posed four-mile-long, 1,000-feet-deep open pit oper­a­tion in Ash­land and Iron coun­ties. In June, the com­pa­ny began explorato­ry drilling in the region for taconite, a type of iron ore used in steel.

    Last Wednes­day, the min­ing com­pa­ny, Goge­bic Taconite—G‑Tac for short—a sub­sidiary of the West Vir­ginia-based Cline Group, pulled the armed guards after find­ing that the secu­ri­ty firm lacked per­mits to work in the state. A spokesman for the com­pa­ny has said that the Bul­let­proof guards will be back once they’re prop­er­ly licensed.

    One of the activists in the area, how­ev­er, told Moth­er Jones on Mon­day that a new group of armed guards—includ­ing one whose shirt bore the insignia for Watch­men of Amer­i­ca, a mili­tia group active in at least 21 states—was on patrol last Thurs­day, the day after Goge­bic Taconite pulled the Bul­let­proof guards.* A spokesman for G‑Tac said that the guards are nec­es­sary to pro­tect its work­ers from “eco-ter­ror­ists.” The com­pa­ny point­ed to an inci­dent in June when pro­test­ers had a con­fronta­tion with work­ers; one of the pro­test­ers alleged­ly took a work­er’s cam­era. But most of the pro­test­ers’ actions around the mine have been peace­ful; local tribes have plant­ed a small gar­den near­by, and oth­ers are lead­ing edu­ca­tion­al tours on the ecol­o­gy of the region.

    Gov. Scott Walk­er signed sweep­ing changes to the state’s min­ing reg­u­la­tions into law in March, thus allow­ing the mine to move for­ward. The new law, which cre­ates a sep­a­rate set of laws for taconite min­ing, abbre­vi­ates the per­mit­ting process, reduces the num­ber of oppor­tu­ni­ties for pub­lic com­ment, and weak­ens rules on dump­ing mine waste into wet­lands and water­ways. It also real­lo­cates min­ing rev­enues that pre­vi­ous­ly went to local com­mu­ni­ties into the state’s Eco­nom­ic Devel­op­ment Cor­po­ra­tion, a prob­lem-plagued pro­gram Walk­er cre­at­ed in 2011 to spur job growth in the state. G‑Tac worked close­ly with law­mak­ers to draft the leg­is­la­tion. Pro­po­nents of the law argue that it will gen­er­ate new jobs in the state.

    But envi­ron­men­tal groups argue that the law sets a bad prece­dent for envi­ron­men­tal reg­u­la­tions more broad­ly. “Basi­cal­ly almost every envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion and pub­lic health pro­tec­tion you could think of is elim­i­nat­ed under this bill,” Ker­ry Schu­mann, exec­u­tive direc­tor of the Wis­con­sin League of Con­ser­va­tion Vot­ers.

    ...

    UPDATE: On Tues­day, Mike Free­byrd, CEO of Watch­men of Amer­i­ca, told Moth­er Jones that the new guards are not work­ing for his orga­ni­za­tion. “The Watch­men of Amer­i­ca is not a secu­ri­ty com­pa­ny that pro­vides com­mer­cial secu­ri­ty ser­vices and we are not involved in any way in the secu­ri­ty oper­a­tions with respect to GTAC min­ing oper­a­tion in Wis­con­sin, nor do we sanc­tion or approve of any of our mem­bers doing so while wear­ing our patch­es or logos,” said Free­byrd via email. “We sell many pro­mo­tion­al mate­ri­als includ­ing T‑shirts, stick­ers, patch­es, pens, etc. to our pub­lic sup­port­ers, there­fore we have no con­trol if a per­son wears our logos while con­duct­ing activ­i­ties which are not con­ducive to our true rep­re­sen­ta­tion.”

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | July 21, 2013, 9:24 pm
  18. You have to won­der why some­one that is con­vinced that soci­ety will inevitably col­lapse into race war would also want to work for DHS. Pre­sum­ably they aren’t expect­ed that gov­ern­ment pen­sion decades from now so what oth­er kinds of ben­e­fits would they be get­ting from that kind of posi­tion? With the Snow­den affair high­light­ing how much clas­si­fied infor­ma­tion low-lev­el ana­lysts have access to, it rais­es the ques­tion of just what kinds of spe­cial perks a black or white suprema­cist might find with this guy’s job:

    SPLC
    DHS Employ­ee Pro­motes Race War in Spare Time, Advo­cates Mass Mur­der of Whites
    Don Ter­ry on August 21, 2013, Post­ed in Anti-White

    By day, Ayo Kimathi works for the Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty (DHS) as a small busi­ness spe­cial­ist in a unit that buys such items as hand­cuffs, ammu­ni­tion and guns.

    Off-duty, he calls him­self “the Irri­tat­ed Genie.” He’s a gay-bash­ing, revenge-seek­ing black nation­al­ist who advo­cates on his web­site – War on the Hori­zon – the mass mur­der of whites and the “eth­nic cleans­ing” of “black-skinned Uncle Tom race trai­tors.”

    “War­fare is emi­nent,” the web­site declares, “and in order for Black peo­ple to sur­vive the 21st cen­tu­ry, we are going to have to kill a lot of whites – more than our Chris­t­ian hearts can pos­si­bly count.”

    A for­mer super­vi­sor of Kimathi’s at the DHS told Hate­watch, “Every­body in the office is afraid of him.”

    “This guy is filled with hate,” the super­vi­sor con­tin­ued. “Peo­ple are afraid he will come in with a gun some­day and go postal. I am astound­ed, he’s employed by the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment, let alone Home­land Secu­ri­ty.”

    When reached by tele­phone today and asked by Hate­watch if he is the Irri­tat­ed Genie, Kimathi hung up. The night before, a woman answered the phone at his web­site, known as WOH, and refused to say whether the Irri­tat­ed Genie is Ayo Kimathi.

    “He just goes by the Irri­tat­ed Genie,” she said, promis­ing to pass along an inter­view request.

    The web­site has des­ig­nat­ed August as “Nat Turn­er Month” in hon­or of the slave who led a bloody rebel­lion in Vir­ginia in 1831. One of the ways in which WOH rec­om­mends Nat Turn­er be cel­e­brat­ed is for black peo­ple to “Plan every act of vengeance, retal­i­a­tion, protest, aggres­sion, etc. … for the month of August know­ing that the ances­tors, and espe­cial­ly Prophet Nat, Bouk­man Dut­ty, and Jean-Jacques Dessalines, will be with you as you do your hunt­ing.”

    Kimathi’s for­mer super­vi­sor dis­cov­ered Kimathi’s hate­ful Inter­net pres­ence in mid-June. “When I saw the web­site, I was stunned,” she said. “To see the hate, to know that he is a fed­er­al employ­ee, it both­ered me”.

    Kimathi works for U.S. Immi­gra­tion and Cus­toms Enforce­ment (ICE), a divi­sion of Home­land Secu­ri­ty. Because it is a law enforce­ment agency, the super­vi­sor said, employ­ees are required to obtain offi­cial per­mis­sion in writ­ing for any out­side activ­i­ties, such as work­ing a sec­ond job at McDon­alds, run­ning the bin­go game at church, or vol­un­teer­ing at the Red Cross.

    Kimathi obtained offi­cial per­mis­sion but only by mis­rep­re­sent­ing the true nature of his endeav­or. He told man­age­ment that it was an enter­tain­ment web­site sell­ing videos of con­certs and lec­tures. He called it sim­ply WOH, nev­er say­ing that WOH stood for War on the Hori­zon.

    “If he had ade­quate­ly and truth­ful­ly described his group,” the super­vi­sor said, “I can’t imag­ine for a minute he would have been grant­ed per­mis­sion.”

    Kimathi also spreads his mes­sage of pend­ing race war and geno­cide and his dis­gust with “the small­hates (white so-called ‘jews’) and the white homos like Gay Edgar Hoover” in a series of videos and speech­es he gives around the coun­try.

    The ene­mies’ list on WOH rivals that of Pres­i­dent Richard Nixon’s in terms of length. It includes, among oth­ers, Rev. Al Sharp­ton, Lil Wayne, Oprah Win­frey, Whoopi Gold­berg, Con­doleez­za Rice, Col­in Pow­ell, who he calls “Colon,” and even Pres­i­dent Oba­ma, “a trea­so­nous mulat­to scum dweller … who will fight against repa­ra­tions for Black peo­ple in amerikkka, but in favor of fag rights for freaks in amerikkka and Afri­ka.”

    Kimathi’s for­mer super­vi­sor said among his duties at DHS and ICE is speak­ing at var­i­ous ven­dor events. He’s one of the agency’s pub­lic faces. It is his job to advo­cate for small busi­ness own­ers “white, black, his­tor­i­cal­ly dis­ad­van­taged, dis­abled vet­er­an-owned, every­body,” the super­vi­sor said.

    “He fights for the lit­tle guy,” the super­vi­sor said. “And he’s very good at it. He has a com­mand­ing pres­ence. He’s very suave. It’s almost as if he has a split per­son­al­i­ty.”

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | August 24, 2013, 6:15 pm
  19. If a band of mer­ce­nary elite snipers sounds kind if scary, imag­ine mer­ce­nary elite snipers that seem to engage in con­tract killing for the love of the work. And cocaine. Lots of cocaine:

    Team of con­tract killers led by ex-sol­dier ‘Ram­bo’ bust­ed, pros­e­cu­tors say

    By Tra­cy Con­nor, Staff Writer, NBC News

    A sharp-shoot­ing for­mer Army sergeant nick­named Ram­bo has been charged with recruit­ing ex-sol­diers as globe-trot­ting hit­men for drug traf­fick­ers in a scheme that pros­e­cu­tors said could have been “ripped from the pages of a Tom Clan­cy nov­el.”

    Three mem­bers of the gang were ready to assas­si­nate a fed­er­al agent for an $800,000 pay­off, and one of them boast­ed that mur­der-for-hire was “fun,” accord­ing to court papers out­lin­ing an elab­o­rate four-con­ti­nent sting oper­a­tion.

    “The charges tell a tale of an inter­na­tion­al band of mer­ce­nary marks­men who enlist­ed their elite mil­i­tary train­ing to serve as hired guns for evil ends,” said Man­hat­tan U.S. Attor­ney Preet Bharara.

    “Three of the defen­dants were ready, will­ing and eager to take cold hard cash to com­mit the cold-blood­ed mur­ders of a DEA agent and an infor­mant.”

    The accused ring­leader was Joseph “Ram­bo” Hunter, 48, whose fam­i­ly told NBC News he was mys­te­ri­ous about his inter­na­tion­al activ­i­ties and they had no idea he had been arrest­ed.

    Hunter was in the U.S. Army from 1983 to 2004, serv­ing as a sniper instruc­tor and senior drill sergeant, accord­ing to the indict­ment unsealed Fri­day.

    After leav­ing the mil­i­tary, he launched a new career as a con­tract killer who “has arranged for the mur­ders of mul­ti­ple peo­ple,” the court papers charge.

    “These were con­sum­mat­ed, com­plet­ed con­tract killings,” Bharara said at a Fri­day press con­fer­ence, with­out pro­vid­ing details of the killings, which occurred over­seas.

    “And because it was clear that Hunter was a threat to the pub­lic and to pub­lic safe­ty around the world, our part­ners at the [DEA] Spe­cial Oper­a­tions Divi­sion set out to stop him.”

    As the feds hatched an oper­a­tion to take down Hunter, he embarked on a twist­ed form of head-hunt­ing: col­lect­ing resumes over the Inter­net for a secu­ri­ty team that would do “the dirty work” of nar­cotics king­pins, Bharara said.

    Hunter alleged­ly recruit­ed four oth­er ex-sol­diers — one Amer­i­can, two from Ger­many and one from Poland — to sup­port what he thought was a mas­sive Colom­bian-based cocaine-smug­gling oper­a­tion.

    Inves­ti­ga­tors say Hunter’s Colom­bian con­tacts were actu­al­ly con­fi­den­tial fed­er­al sources, who record­ed the gang of five’s chill­ing chit-chat as they trav­eled the world for the crim­i­nal enter­prise.

    The cabal went to Thai­land in March, the African nation of Mau­ri­tius in April, and the Bahamas in June to per­form sur­veil­lance and soon signed on for a more nefar­i­ous under­tak­ing: the mur­der of a law-enforce­ment offi­cer, offi­cials said.

    Hunter enlist­ed two of the men, Ger­man sniper Den­nis “Nico” Gogel and U.S. Army vet­er­an Tim­o­thy “Tay” Vam­vakias for what he called a “bonus job” — a plot to mur­der a Drug Enforce­ment Admin­is­tra­tion agent and an infor­mant in Liberia for $800,000.

    Visas and plane tick­ets were obtained, a sub­ma­chine gun and .22-cal­iber pis­tols were ordered, and sophis­ti­cat­ed Hol­ly­wood-style latex face masks, which could make some­one appear to be of anoth­er race, were shipped to Africa.

    With Hunter “quar­ter­back­ing” the oper­a­tion from Thai­land, Gogel, 27, and Vamakias, 42, flew to Liberia ear­li­er this week with plans to car­ry out the twin assas­si­na­tions, Bharara said. By then, the DEA “had seen enough” and took them down, the pros­e­cu­tor said.

    The indict­ment por­trays the men as blood-thirsty, quot­ing from an email in which Hunter said of his team, “They also, real­ly want a bonus job after this next mis­sion, if avail­able.”

    Dur­ing a con­ver­sa­tion with one of the under­cov­er sources in June, two of the men swapped ideas about how best to kill the DEA agent and the infor­mant, includ­ing machine guns, cyanide or a grenade, author­i­ties said.

    Dur­ing one meet­ing, Gogel cheer­ful­ly offered him­self up for more “bonus jobs” in the future, the indict­ment says.

    “That’s fun, actu­al­ly for me, that’s fun,” he was quot­ed as say­ing in court papers. “I love this work.”

    Vam­vakias and Gogel were arrest­ed in Liberia and qui­et­ly brought to Man­hat­tan and pre­sent­ed in fed­er­al court on Thurs­day. Ger­man-trained sniper Michael “Paul” Fil­ter, 29, and Sla­womir “Ger­ald” Sobors­ki, 40, a Pol­ish coun­tert­er­ror­ism expert, were arrest­ed in Esto­nia this week and will be extra­dit­ed.

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | September 27, 2013, 7:47 pm
  20. Any­one that hap­pened to serve with the 82nd Air­borne Divi­sion at Fort Bragg from 2009–2012 might want to check in with an iden­ti­ty pro­tec­tion ser­vice:

    Minn. Nat. Guard Mem­ber Charged with Steal­ing IDs for Mili­tia
    Amy For­lit­ti – Decem­ber 11, 2013, 11:58 PM EST

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A mem­ber of the Min­neso­ta Nation­al Guard and self-described com­man­der of a mili­tia group was charged Wednes­day with steal­ing names, Social Secu­ri­ty num­bers and secu­ri­ty clear­ance lev­els of rough­ly 400 mem­bers of his for­mer Army unit in Fort Bragg, N.C., so he could make fake IDs for his mili­tia mem­bers.

    Accord­ing to a fed­er­al com­plaint and affi­davit obtained Wednes­day by The Asso­ci­at­ed Press, Kei­th Michael Novak, 25, of Maple­wood, threat­ened to use vio­lence if author­i­ties came to arrest him.

    “I’ve my AK in my bed. If I hear that door kick, it’s going boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. I’m just going to start putting them through the (exple­tive) wall,” he told an under­cov­er FBI employ­ee in July, accord­ing to the affi­davit unsealed Wednes­day.

    Novak was charged with com­mit­ting fraud in con­nec­tion with iden­ti­fi­ca­tion doc­u­ments. He was in fed­er­al cus­tody Wednes­day and unavail­able for com­ment. His father has an unlist­ed num­ber, and attempts to reach him were unsuc­cess­ful. The fed­er­al defend­er’s office has the case, but an attor­ney had not been select­ed to rep­re­sent him by Wednes­day evening.

    Accord­ing to an FBI affi­davit, Novak was an active duty sol­dier and intel­li­gence ana­lyst with the 82nd Air­borne Divi­sion at Fort Bragg from Feb. 26, 2009, to Sept. 3, 2012. He also served in active duty in Iraq in 2010. Novak is cur­rent­ly a human intel­li­gence ana­lyst with the Min­neso­ta Nation­al Guard.

    In late Jan­u­ary, he went to a train­ing camp in Utah and there met two under­cov­er FBI employ­ees who posed as mem­bers of a Utah-based mili­tia, accord­ing to the affi­davit. It also said Novak told the under­cov­er employ­ees that he took clas­si­fied mate­ri­als from Fort Bragg and that he would share the mate­ri­als with them.

    The under­cov­er employ­ees met Novak in Min­neso­ta in July, and he gave them an elec­tron­ic copy of clas­si­fied doc­u­ments and taught them how to encrypt files, the affi­davit said. He also said that he had a per­son­nel ros­ter — includ­ing names, birth­dates and Social Secu­ri­ty num­bers — of a “Bat­tal­ion’s-worth of peo­ple” from his for­mer unit.

    The under­cov­er employ­ees said they want­ed that infor­ma­tion and knew some­one who could make fake IDs, which Novak said he need­ed for his mili­tia. On Nov. 4, Novak sent the infor­ma­tion for 44 indi­vid­u­als to an under­cov­er FBI employ­ee. On Nov. 25, he accept­ed $2,000 and said he had addi­tion­al pages to sell, the affi­davit said.

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | December 13, 2013, 1:07 pm
  21. Here’s a strange twist; won­der what hap­pens if these guys return to the U.S.—

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2014/03/03/two-l-a-gang-members-are-apparently-fighting-for-syrias-assad/

    Two L.A. gang mem­bers are appar­ent­ly fight­ing for Syria’s Assad
    By Liz Sly March 3 at 5:30 am

    Two Los Ange­les gang mem­bers appear to have joined the flow of for­eign­ers flock­ing to fight in Syr­ia – in this instance, on the side of Pres­i­dent Bashar al-Assad. In a video post­ed online, the two men boast that they are on the front lines and fire their guns in the direc­tion of what they call “the ene­mi­gos.”

    One of the men iden­ti­fies him­self as Creep­er from the Sur-13 or Surenos, a loose affil­i­a­tion of south­ern Cal­i­for­nia gangs linked to the Mex­i­can mafia. He rolls up his sleeves to show his gang tat­toos and greets fel­low gang mem­bers Capone‑E and Crazy Loco.

    The oth­er says he is called Wino, and belongs to a gang called West­side Armen­ian Pow­er. Mem­bers of the Armen­ian Chris­t­ian minor­i­ty in Syr­ia are known to be staunch sup­port­ers of Assad.

    The two men don’t reveal much about what they are doing or why they are fight­ing for Assad.

    “It’s Syr­ia, homie, we’re in Syr­ia, homie. ... Front­line, homie, front­line, homie,” says Wino.

    “In Mid­dle East, homie, in Syr­ia, still gang­bang­ing,” says Creep­er, in com­ments typ­i­cal of the 2 1/2‑minute video.

    Warn­ing: the video, post­ed here, con­tains strong lan­guage. This ver­sion is pro­vid­ed by the Mid­dle East Media Research Insti­tute, and con­tains sub­ti­tles.

    It was impos­si­ble to inde­pen­dent­ly ver­i­fy the authen­tic­i­ty of the video or deter­mine where or when it was filmed. But the des­o­late scene in which the two men are fir­ing from a bombed build­ing looks like Syr­ia.

    The Mid­dle East Media Research Insti­tute, a pro-Israel group that mon­i­tors media in the region, said it had iden­ti­fied Wino as Ners­es Kila­jyan, whose Face­book page fea­tures mul­ti­ple pho­tographs of the man who calls him­self Wino, appar­ent­ly in the north­ern Syr­i­an city of Alep­po. In some, Wino is seen pos­ing with fight­ers from the Shi­ite Hezbol­lah mili­tia. In oth­ers, he is pic­tured with the man who calls him­self Creep­er. The dates on the pho­tographs sug­gest the pair have been in Syr­ia for about a year.

    It was also unclear whether they are U.S. cit­i­zens. So far, there have been no report­ed instances in which Amer­i­cans have vol­un­teered to fight in Syr­ia on behalf of Assad, though at least 50 U.S. cit­i­zens are believed to have trav­eled there to join the rebels, accord­ing to con­gres­sion­al tes­ti­mo­ny by Direc­tor of Nation­al Intel­li­gence James Clap­per last month. Thou­sands of Arabs, Euro­peans and Sun­ni Mus­lims of oth­er nation­al­i­ties who have flood­ed into Syr­ia, most of them join­ing rad­i­cal Islamist groups.

    Thou­sands of Iraqi and Lebanese Shi­ite Mus­lims are mean­while report­ed to be fight­ing on the side of Assad’s gov­ern­ment, as well as Ira­ni­ans, some Rus­sians and small­er num­bers of Afghans, Pak­ista­nis and oth­er Arabs, mak­ing this a tru­ly inter­na­tion­al war.

    Posted by Swamp | March 5, 2014, 9:35 am
  22. Return­ing troops help KKK build para­mil­i­tary force to ‘retake’ US in com­ing race war
    By Travis Get­tys

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/06/10/returning-troops-help-kkk-build-paramilitary-force-to-retake-us-in-coming-race-war/

    The Ku Klux Klan plans to begin mil­i­tary-style com­bat train­ing under the direc­tion of mil­i­tary troops return­ing home from over­seas deploy­ments, accord­ing to a Bar­croft Media report.

    The noto­ri­ous hate group has been attempt­ing to recruit new mem­bers – chil­dren, in par­tic­u­lar – in recent months, and the Loy­al White Knights fac­tion has begun prepa­ra­tions for a long-await­ed race war.

    “We’re going to do some­thing a lit­tle dif­fer­ent for prob­a­bly the next cou­ple of years to try to get our men and women ready for the upcom­ing bat­tle that we’re about to take upon us, and this is some­thing that no Klan has ever done and we’re going to start it,” said one Klan leader dur­ing a ral­ly in Park­ers­burg, West Vir­ginia. “All our boys are final­ly com­ing back home from the mil­i­tary, which is good, and we’re get­ting a lot more mil­i­tary mem­bers to join.”

    Klan mem­bers have dropped leaflets and can­dy in neigh­bor­hoods across the Unit­ed States, and the group has also used social media in hopes of attract­ing teenage recruits.

    Oth­er young peo­ple are recruit­ed by their own par­ents to join the group.

    “I enjoy days like today, because I like being around peo­ple, not dis­gust­ing peo­ple, not drug addicts,” said one hood­ed boy whose par­ents brought him and his broth­er to the Park­ers­burg ral­ly – which drew about 40 peo­ple.

    The boy’s moth­er said she believes black and His­pan­ic stu­dents take drugs from their par­ents and sell them at her son’s school.

    “Their par­ents are so wor­ried about doing drugs than pro­vid­ing for their own chil­dren, that’s what I think,” said the woman, who was wear­ing full Klan regalia like her hus­band and two sons.

    Bar­croft report­ed that Klan lead­ers claim exist­ing mem­bers serv­ing in the mil­i­tary will begin train­ing oth­er mem­bers in armed com­bat, hand-to-hand com­bat, and sur­vival skills.

    The group, which has an esti­mat­ed 6,500 mem­bers, has nev­er before trained its mem­bers in com­bat tac­tics.

    “We got police offi­cers in the Klan, we got lawyers, we got doc­tors – your next-door neigh­bor could be in the Klan, and you’d nev­er know it,” said James Moore, grand drag­on for Vir­ginia.

    Klan expert Bri­an Levin said the biggest threat comes from indi­vid­ual mem­bers try­ing to make a name for them­selves, rather than an army affil­i­at­ed with the hate group.

    “This is some­thing we’ve seen through­out recent decades, where the Klan has gone through cycles, where they’ve armed them­selves, got­ten in trou­ble, then mel­lowed out and then armed them­selves again,” Levin said.

    He said Klan mem­bers hope to sig­nal their social rel­e­vance by arm­ing them­selves and warn­ing of racial unrest.

    “The ulti­mate goal for myself is to have our mem­ber­ship get to the point where we can affect change through the polit­i­cal sys­tem,” said one Klan offi­cial. “Right now, our num­bers aren’t quite good enough.”

    But mem­bers are con­fi­dent their mes­sage will attract new fol­low­ers.

    “Black peo­ple, white peo­ple, we’re all get­ting tired of the gov­ern­ment, and pret­ty soon you can see the gov­ern­ment col­lapse,” Moore said. “And when the gov­ern­ment keeps on send­ing their mon­ey over to Israel, and it final­ly col­laps­es, you can see the Klan take it back and make this nation the way it needs to be.”

    Posted by Swamp | June 10, 2014, 9:31 am
  23. https://www.splcenter.org/news/2016/08/03/intelligence-report-constitutional-sheriffs-movement-spreads-promotes-defiance-federal-laws

    Intel­li­gence Report: ‘Con­sti­tu­tion­al sher­iffs’ move­ment spreads, pro­motes defi­ance of fed­er­al laws

    The cov­er sto­ry, “Line in the Sand,” details the growth of this rad­i­cal ide­ol­o­gy since 2009. The move­ment, formed around an orga­ni­za­tion called the Con­sti­tu­tion­al Sher­iffs and Peace Offi­cers Asso­ci­a­tion (CSPOA), is a phe­nom­e­non rarely, if ever, seen in the Unit­ed States – a con­cert­ed, long-term effort to recruit law enforce­ment offi­cers into the antigov­ern­ment “Patri­ot” move­ment.

    “The phe­nom­e­non of the ‘con­sti­tu­tion­al sher­iffs’ move­ment is deeply trou­bling and prob­lem­at­ic,” said Mark Potok, senior fel­low at the SPLC and edi­tor of the Intel­li­gence Report. “These men and women are being told by extrem­ist lead­ers that they have the right to decide what laws they want to enforce and can keep fed­er­al law enforce­ment agents out of their coun­ties. That is utter­ly untrue, the very oppo­site of con­sti­tu­tion­al, and it in fact encour­ages sher­iffs and their deputies to defy the law of the land.”

    The Intel­li­gence Report inter­viewed dozens of sher­iffs who appeared on a list, com­piled by the CSPOA, of almost 500 sher­iffs who pur­port­ed­ly had “vowed to uphold and defend the Con­sti­tu­tion against Obama’s uncon­sti­tu­tion­al gun mea­sures.” Over­all, it appears the move­ment is suc­cess­ful­ly exploit­ing con­cerns about gun, envi­ron­men­tal and land-use reg­u­la­tions to bring law enforce­ment offi­cers into the fold.

    The report notes that the orga­niz­ing of these sher­iffs is occur­ring against the back­drop of the larg­er mili­tia move­ment and the occu­pa­tion at the Mal­heur Nation­al Wildlife Refuge in Ore­gon ear­ly this year by antigov­ern­ment extrem­ists.

    The threat of the antigov­ern­ment “Patri­ot” move­ment is also exam­ined in a train­ing DVD includ­ed in the law enforce­ment edi­tion of this issue of the Intel­li­gence Report. The video, a short film designed to be shown at roll call, focus­es on the ris­ing threat of antigov­ern­ment extrem­ists, espe­cial­ly in the wake of the occu­pa­tion in Ore­gon and a relat­ed 2014 armed stand­off with law enforce­ment offi­cials in Neva­da.

    Also in this issue of the Intel­li­gence Report:

    “White Lives Mat­ter” is a look at a counter-move­ment to Black Lives Mat­ter that has been built by rad­i­cal-right activists. The project, which has become increas­ing­ly pop­u­lar among neo-Nazis and oth­er white suprema­cists, appears to be large­ly the work of a 40-year-old woman in Ten­nessee.

    “Hate in the Race” is a month-by-month exam­i­na­tion of the polit­i­cal vit­ri­ol and extrem­ism that has char­ac­ter­ized the pres­i­den­tial race since last sum­mer – a del­uge of extrem­ist rhetoric com­ing pri­mar­i­ly from Don­ald Trump.
    “670 Days” reflects on the near­ly two years between Neva­da ranch­er Cliv­en Bundy’s first armed stand­off with the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment and his arrest in Feb­ru­ary – a peri­od that saw the antigov­ern­ment move­ment grow by leaps and bounds, in part because of Bundy’s appar­ent imper­vi­ous­ness to arrest.

    Posted by Roger Wilson | August 7, 2016, 1:57 pm
  24. Here’s a rather alarm­ing sto­ry about neo-Nazis in a group that was offi­cial­ly declared ille­gal in the UK last Decem­ber infil­trat­ing the UK mil­i­tary. It’s alarm­ing for the obvi­ous rea­sons (neo-Nazis infil­trat­ing mil­i­taries are inher­ent­ly alarm­ing) but it’s an extra alarm­ing due large­ly to how clear­ly unalarmed the UK is in gen­er­al about the threat posed by vio­lent far-right groups. Because it turns out when this neo-Nazi group, Nation­al Action, was added to the UK’s list of banned ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tions back in Decem­ber it was the first far-right group in the UK added to the list (a list that had 70 oth­er orga­ni­za­tions already on it):

    BBC

    Neo-Nazi arrests: Nation­al Action sus­pects are in the Army

    5 Sep­tem­ber 2017

    Four serv­ing mem­bers of the Army have been arrest­ed under anti-ter­ror laws on sus­pi­cion of being mem­bers of banned neo-Nazi group Nation­al Action.

    The men are a 22-year-old from Birm­ing­ham, a 32-year-old from Powys, a 24-year-old from Ipswich and a 24-year-old from Northamp­ton.

    All four are being held at a West Mid­lands police sta­tion.

    The Army con­firmed the arrests, and said it had sup­port­ed the police-led oper­a­tion.

    An Army spokesper­son added: “This is now the sub­ject of a civil­ian police inves­ti­ga­tion and it would be inap­pro­pri­ate to com­ment fur­ther.”

    The BBC under­stands three of the sol­diers arrest­ed are from the Roy­al Anglian Reg­i­ment.

    Two of them were arrest­ed in Cyprus, and the oth­er two were detained in Ipswich and Bre­con.

    Police said the arrests were pre-planned and intel­li­gence-led, and there had been no threat to the pub­lic’s safe­ty.

    They said they were con­tin­u­ing to search sev­er­al prop­er­ties.

    The men are being held on sus­pi­cion of being con­cerned in the com­mis­sion, prepa­ra­tion and insti­ga­tion of acts of ter­ror­ism under Sec­tion 41 of the Ter­ror­ism Act 2000; name­ly on sus­pi­cion of being mem­bers of a pro­scribed organ­i­sa­tion.

    Who are Nation­al Action?

    By Dominic Cas­ciani, BBC home affairs cor­re­spon­dent

    Nation­al Action became the first British neo-Nazi group to be banned last Decem­ber after Home Sec­re­tary Amber Rudd said it was pro­mot­ing vio­lence and acts of ter­ror­ism.

    Mem­bers and sup­port­ers applaud­ed the mur­der of Jo Cox MP by a white suprema­cist — and the group had car­ried out a series of small, but con­fronta­tion­al, demon­stra­tions in towns and cities through­out Eng­land.

    One of its most noto­ri­ous events saw masked mem­bers — many of them very young men — gath­er­ing out­side York Min­ster to make Hitler salutes.

    Since it was banned, detec­tives have been car­ry­ing out more and more inves­ti­ga­tions into the group which, to all intents and pur­pos­es, has organ­ised itself in a sim­i­lar way to the banned al Muha­jiroun net­work — the extrem­ist Islamist youth move­ment.

    Both have used social media to tar­get young peo­ple, attract­ing them with a sim­plis­tic us-and-them mes­sage designed to make them angry.

    Being a mem­ber of — or invit­ing sup­port for — a pro­scribed organ­i­sa­tion is a crim­i­nal offence car­ry­ing a sen­tence of up to 10 years in prison.

    There are 71 such groups list­ed by the Home Office on its reg­is­ter.

    They include a range of inter­na­tion­al and nation­al groups, of which Nation­al Action was the first far-right group to be banned.

    It describes itself as a “Nation­al Social­ist youth organ­i­sa­tion” and says its move­ment is aimed at the “bro­ken right-wing”.

    The offi­cial reg­is­ter says it was estab­lished in 2013 and has branch­es across the UK which “con­duct provoca­tive street demon­stra­tions and stunts aimed at intim­i­dat­ing local com­mu­ni­ties”.

    Its online mate­r­i­al con­tains extreme­ly vio­lent imagery and lan­guage and it con­dones and glo­ri­fies those who have used extreme vio­lence for polit­i­cal or ide­o­log­i­cal ends, the Home Office says.

    That includ­ed tweets in 2016 about the mur­der of Labour MP Jo Cox, who was stabbed and shot by Thomas Mair. One such tweet said there were “only 649 MPs to go”.

    ...

    ———-

    “Neo-Nazi arrests: Nation­al Action sus­pects are in the Army”; BBC; 09/05/2017

    “Its online mate­r­i­al con­tains extreme­ly vio­lent imagery and lan­guage and it con­dones and glo­ri­fies those who have used extreme vio­lence for polit­i­cal or ide­o­log­i­cal ends, the Home Office says.”

    Yeah, if you’re going to ban groups based on their sup­port for vio­lence it sure sounds like Nation­al Action deserves to be on the list. And yet, amaz­ing­ly, it’s the only far-right group on the list that includes 71 such banned groups:

    ...
    There are 71 such groups list­ed by the Home Office on its reg­is­ter.

    They include a range of inter­na­tion­al and nation­al groups, of which Nation­al Action was the first far-right group to be banned.
    ...

    So yeah, the rel­a­tive lack of alarm is pret­ty alarm­ing. And note that when Nation­al Action was added to the list of banned orga­ni­za­tions last Decem­ber it’s not like there were hard­ly any oth­er vio­lent extrem­ists of a far-right nature that the counter-extrem­ism offi­cials were deal­ing with. It was clos­er to a quar­ter of counter-extrem­ist cas­es involv­ing the far-right:

    The Guardian

    Neo-Nazi group Nation­al Action banned by UK home sec­re­tary

    Sup­port for anti­se­mit­ic white supre­ma­tist group out­lawed under Amber Rudd move to pro­scribe it as a ter­ror­ist organ­i­sa­tion
    Nation­al Action demon­stra­tion

    Jes­si­ca Elgot
    Mon­day 12 Decem­ber 2016 06.49 ES

    A neo-Nazi group that cel­e­brat­ed the mur­der of the Labour MP Jo Cox is to become the first far-right group to be pro­scribed as a ter­ror­ist organ­i­sa­tion by the home sec­re­tary.

    Sup­port or mem­ber­ship of Nation­al Action, an anti­se­mit­ic white suprema­cist group, will become a crim­i­nal offence under the Ter­ror­ism Act 2000, pend­ing approval from par­lia­ment.

    Nation­al Action has held demon­stra­tions in UK cities with ban­ners that say “Hitler was right”, and speak­ers have been filmed telling a small group of sup­port­ers about “the dis­ease of inter­na­tion­al Jew­ry” and that “when the time comes they’ll be in the cham­bers”.

    The group has also been filmed train­ing sup­port­ers in hand-to-hand com­bat, and putting up posters across Liv­er­pool and New­bury declar­ing them “white zones”. The slo­gan on its web­site is “Death to trai­tors, free­dom for Britain,” which was the only state­ment giv­en in court by Cox’s mur­der­er, Thomas Mair.

    After the order comes into force, arrang­ing meet­ings or wear­ing brand­ed cloth­ing from the group will also be ille­gal, with breach­es of the order car­ry­ing a pos­si­ble max­i­mum sen­tence of 10 years in prison or an unlim­it­ed fine.

    The home sec­re­tary, Amber Rudd, said the group had no place in British soci­ety. “I am clear that the safe­ty and secu­ri­ty of our fam­i­lies, com­mu­ni­ties and coun­try comes first,” she said. “So today I am tak­ing action to pro­scribe the neo-Nazi group Nation­al Action. This will mean that being a mem­ber of, or invit­ing sup­port for, this organ­i­sa­tion will be a crim­i­nal offence.

    “Nation­al Action is a racist, anti­se­mit­ic and homo­pho­bic organ­i­sa­tion which stirs up hatred, glo­ri­fies vio­lence and pro­motes a vile ide­ol­o­gy, and I will not stand for it. It has absolute­ly no place in a Britain that works for every­one.”

    ...

    The Home Office said the deci­sion had been tak­en by Rudd pri­or to the tri­al of Mair, a far-right extrem­ist who was con­vict­ed and sen­tenced for the mur­der of Cox out­side her con­stituen­cy surgery short­ly before the EU ref­er­en­dum.

    How­ev­er, the debate could not be put before the House of Com­mons until after the tri­al had con­clud­ed in order not to affect the out­come.

    A spokesman for the Com­mu­ni­ty Secu­ri­ty Trust, an anti­semitism mon­i­tor­ing char­i­ty, said: “Nation­al Action is a vicious­ly anti­se­mit­ic neo-Nazi group that repeat­ed­ly incites hatred and vio­lence and whose sup­port­ers have been involved in hate crimes. We have raised our con­cerns about them with the gov­ern­ment and the police on many occa­sions over the past two years and we wel­come the news that they are to be pro­scribed.”

    Gideon Fal­ter, the chair­man of Cam­paign Against Anti­semitism, said: “In com­mon with oth­er ter­ror­ist groups, Nation­al Action rad­i­calis­es and indoc­tri­nates the young, teach­es them vio­lence, attacks the police and the pub­lic and demands the anni­hi­la­tion of Jews.

    “This deci­sion by the home sec­re­tary is some­thing we have long called for and sends a strong mes­sage that the far right is in the government’s sights and will not be per­mit­ted to con­tin­ue its incite­ment and vio­lence.”

    Rudd said last month that far-right groups were becom­ing increas­ing­ly sophis­ti­cat­ed, and about a quar­ter of the cas­es being han­dled by the government’s counter-extrem­ism pro­gramme, Chan­nel, con­cerned rightwing rad­i­cal­i­sa­tion.

    ———-

    “Neo-Nazi group Nation­al Action banned by UK home sec­re­tary” by Jes­si­ca Elgot; The Guardian; 12/12/0216

    “Rudd said last month that far-right groups were becom­ing increas­ing­ly sophis­ti­cat­ed, and about a quar­ter of the cas­es being han­dled by the government’s counter-extrem­ism pro­gramme, Chan­nel, con­cerned rightwing rad­i­cal­i­sa­tion

    About a quar­ter of the cas­es being han­dled by the government’s counter-extrem­ism pro­gram involve rightwing rad­i­cal­iza­tion. And yet Nation­al Action was the only one added, just added late last year, and is report­ed­ly still oper­at­ing under dif­fer­ent names. Sounds like that list could use a few new entries.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | September 5, 2017, 1:27 pm
  25. Giv­en the ongo­ing ten­sions between police depart­ments and minor­i­ty com­mu­ni­ties over police shoot­ings in the US and the fail­ure to reach some sort of com­mon ground between the dif­fer­ent par­ties, here’s a very dis­turb­ing report that iron­i­cal­ly might present an oppor­tu­ni­ty to find that com­mon ground between com­mu­ni­ties and law enforce­ment: Accord­ing to a recent­ly leaked trove of inter­nal com­mu­ni­ca­tions on white suprema­cist chat boards recent­ly obtained and pub­lished by Uni­corn Riot, the over­whelm­ing major­i­ty of the white suprema­cists on that board appear to believe that US law enforce­ment and the mil­i­tary are large­ly on the side of the white suprema­cists. Beyond that, these leaked com­mu­ni­ca­tions indi­cate that the white suprema­cists are still quite enthu­si­as­tic about their long-stand­ing dri­ve to drop the ‘skin­head’ look and instead infil­trate pub­lic insti­tu­tions under cov­er. The fact that Nazis are try­ing to infil­trat­ed law enforce­ment and the mil­i­tary isn’t a new find­ing. Calls for infil­tra­tion have been going on for years. But these leaked chats are a time­ly reminder that this infil­tra­tion effort con­tin­ues to this day. And that seems like the kind of find­ing that presents a very con­ve­nient oppor­tu­ni­ty for cre­at­ing com­mon ground between minor­i­ty com­mu­ni­ties and law enforce­ment: unit­ing around open­ly reject­ing the white suprema­cists and what they stand for and mak­ing it very clear that white suprema­cists aren’t wel­come in law enforce­ment. Espe­cial­ly mak­ing it very clear to the neo-Nazis:

    Rewire.news

    A Leaked Mes­sage Board Shows What White Suprema­cists Think of the Police

    A recent­ly leaked trove of inter­nal com­mu­ni­ca­tions among white suprema­cists show that many believed mem­bers of the police and mil­i­tary are on their side.

    by Jack­son Lan­ders
    Mar 9, 2018, 10:20am

    The South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter in 2008 began issu­ing reports about mem­bers of white suprema­cist groups join­ing the mil­i­tary in large num­bers. The FBI in 2006 issued a heav­i­ly redact­ed report warn­ing of sys­tem­at­ic infil­tra­tion of law enforce­ment orga­ni­za­tions by white suprema­cists.

    More than a decade on, what results have those infil­tra­tion efforts gleaned and how do neo-Nazi groups talk about their rela­tions with the mil­i­tary and police offi­cers?

    A recent­ly leaked trove of inter­nal com­mu­ni­ca­tions pro­vides a win­dow into the think­ing of mem­bers of the mod­ern “alt-right” white suprema­cist move­ment. The edu­ca­tion­al non­prof­it media orga­ni­za­tion Uni­corn Riot obtained access to tens of thou­sands of mes­sages passed among hun­dreds of white suprema­cists on chat servers used to plan the August 12 Unite the Right ral­ly in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia, where a white suprema­cist alleged­ly killed a counter pro­test­er, Heather Hey­er.

    Chat serv­er user Erwin Frey claimed to have spent years prepar­ing to enlist in the Navy before being turned away due to a nut aller­gy, but said in a post that he is now seek­ing a job as a police offi­cer.

    “Be me in my Crim­i­nal inves­ti­ga­tion class. We’re doing intro­duc­tions and it gets to me. They ask me what kind of police offi­cer I want­ed to be and I respond­ed with ‘Riot Police Offi­cer,’” Frey wrote on the chat board. “They asked why and I instant­ly respond­ed with ‘I like curb stomp­ing pro­tes­tors who cause a riot.’ I think the pro­fes­sor likes me.”

    Dur­ing one online con­ver­sa­tion about what encoun­ters with police in Char­lottesville might be like, some white suprema­cist plan­ners expressed dis­sent­ing views, but the con­sen­sus seemed to be that they could expect some lev­el of sup­port from law enforce­ments. One user called Stan­nis­the­man­nis said the Vir­ginia State Police “will be focused on antifa [anti-fas­cists] not us … espe­cial­ly if we kiss some ass with a few blue lives mat­ter chants …. Be nice to cops and they will be nice to you.”

    “Ran­dom Reminder: Cops of all races are our nat­ur­al allies; we should keep it that way,” wrote anoth­er user known as Uil­liam Cionnaoith – MD.

    “I have sev­er­al cops in my fam­i­ly,” Stan­nis­the­man­nis wrote, “most white cops are sym­pa­thet­ic to us.” The online chat board user added “I’m not too wor­ried about the cops as long as we act like whites …. Get to know more cops [in real life] No one hates nig­gers more than white cops.”

    Archive search­es for ref­er­ences to “police,” “cops,” “law enforce­ment” and sim­i­lar ref­er­ences to uni­formed author­i­ty fig­ures revealed the gist of that con­ver­sa­tion. While a few users dis­liked or mis­trust­ed police offi­cers, most expressed belief that many mem­bers of the police and mil­i­tary are on the side of white suprema­cy.

    “Also of note is that most police and mil­i­tary picked that career because they want­ed to aid their com­mu­ni­ties or coun­try,” wrote a user named rflagg SC. “That’s the foun­da­tion of a col­lec­tivist fas­cist mind­set.”

    “I know so many mil­i­tary fas­cists,” Nathan TX wrote. “And many that are join­ing.”

    In the ear­ly 2000s, some white suprema­cist lead­ers exhort­ed their fol­low­ers to aban­don the clich­es of the skin­head lifestyle in order to infil­trate the worlds of busi­ness, gov­ern­ment, and the mil­i­tary. Chris­t­ian Pic­ci­oli­ni, a for­mer neo-Nazi skin­head leader from Chica­go who has since renounced white suprema­cism, said the strat­e­gy of infil­tra­tion has worked.

    “I do know very many peo­ple from the orga­ni­za­tion that I used to lead 30 years ago, the neo-Nazi group, that actu­al­ly did go on to become police offi­cers in Chica­go,” Pic­ci­oloni said in a radio inter­view with Democ­ra­cy Now. “Pro­ba­tion offi­cers, prison guards, and, you know, infil­trate that way, and espe­cial­ly the mil­i­tary. Many went into the mil­i­tary.”

    Dil­lon Ulysses Hop­per, the leader of white suprema­cist group Van­guard Amer­i­ca, is a for­mer Marine Corp recruiter. Mem­bers of Van­guard Amer­i­ca played a promi­nent role in the August 12 white suprema­cist ral­ly in Char­lottesville. James Alex Fields Jr., who is await­ing tri­al on a charge of first-degree mur­der after alleged­ly dri­ving a car into a crowd of counter-pro­test­ers, killing Hey­er, was dressed as a Van­guard Amer­i­ca mem­ber and car­ried a shield with their logo while in line with oth­er mem­bers.

    ...

    Pic­ci­oli­ni said that the doors between uni­formed ser­vices and white suprema­cists go both ways. Non-rad­i­cal police offi­cers and mil­i­tary per­son­nel are com­mon tar­gets for white suprema­cist recruiters.

    “Police offi­cers and law enforce­ment offi­cers and mil­i­tary peo­ple are con­stant­ly, every day, in dif­fi­cult sit­u­a­tions,” Pic­ci­oli­ni says. “And over time, peo­ple become jad­ed, espe­cial­ly after you’ve … worked in crime-rid­den neigh­bor­hoods for 20 years, and you’ve had to deal with some­times the worst of the worst peo­ple. Well, recruiters know this. Recruiters know that they become jad­ed, and they become prej­u­diced towards these peo­ple.

    The Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty in 2009 issued a report on the threat of right-wing extrem­ists infil­trat­ing the mil­i­tary. “Right wing extrem­ists have cap­i­tal­ized on the elec­tion of the first African-Amer­i­can pres­i­dent, and are focus­ing their efforts to recruit new mem­bers, mobi­lize exist­ing sup­port­ers, and broad­en their scope and appeal through pro­pa­gan­da,” the report said, “but they have not yet turned to attack plan­ning.”

    A month after the report was released, a flur­ry of angry respons­es from con­ser­v­a­tive politi­cians and pun­dits result­ed in then-Sec­re­tary of Home­land Secu­ri­ty Janet Napoli­tano pulling the report from the DHS web­site.

    The U.S. mil­i­tary is aware of the efforts that white suprema­cists have made to infil­trate and recruit from their ranks. They have tak­en some steps to com­bat the prob­lem. Recruits with racist tat­toos or obvi­ous con­nec­tions to white suprema­cist groups are reject­ed. But mil­i­tary offi­cers and recruiters can­not read minds. The clean-cut, kha­ki-wear­ing racists of today are hard­er to iden­ti­fy than the skin­heads of the 1980s.

    That change in image and cul­ture from swasti­ka tat­toos to polo shirts was in part due to the suc­cess of online rad­i­cal­iza­tion of young men through the inter­net rather than among skin­head street gangs. Hordes of young racists came to white suprema­cy via memes and 4chan posts rather than through white pow­er hard­core con­certs. There was also a delib­er­ate deci­sion by white suprema­cist lead­ers to shed their old images to dis­guise them­selves.

    “We decid­ed at that point, 30 years ago, that we were not going to shave our heads,” Pic­ci­oli­ni said. “We were going to trade in our boots for suits. We were going to go enroll in col­lege and recruit on cam­pus­es. We would get jobs in law enforce­ment, go into the mil­i­tary to get train­ing and to be able to recruit there, and then even run for office. And here we are 30 years lat­er with that dream—or that nightmare—realized.”

    ———-

    “A Leaked Mes­sage Board Shows What White Suprema­cists Think of the Police” by Jack­son Lan­ders; Rewire.news; 03/09/2018

    “The South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter in 2008 began issu­ing reports about mem­bers of white suprema­cist groups join­ing the mil­i­tary in large num­bers. The FBI in 2006 issued a heav­i­ly redact­ed report warn­ing of sys­tem­at­ic infil­tra­tion of law enforce­ment orga­ni­za­tions by white suprema­cists.”

    Yep, this infil­tra­tion effort has been going on for years. And the longer it goes on, the hard­er it’s going to be to deal with.

    And as one of the mem­bers of the neo-Nazi chat board made clear was he described his expe­ri­ences dur­ing a crim­i­nal inves­ti­ga­tion class, these neo-Nazis are join­ing the police for the explic­it pur­pose of engag­ing in exact­ly the kind of abus­es of pow­er minor­i­ty com­mu­ni­ties are com­plain­ing about:

    ...
    More than a decade on, what results have those infil­tra­tion efforts gleaned and how do neo-Nazi groups talk about their rela­tions with the mil­i­tary and police offi­cers?

    A recent­ly leaked trove of inter­nal com­mu­ni­ca­tions pro­vides a win­dow into the think­ing of mem­bers of the mod­ern “alt-right” white suprema­cist move­ment. The edu­ca­tion­al non­prof­it media orga­ni­za­tion Uni­corn Riot obtained access to tens of thou­sands of mes­sages passed among hun­dreds of white suprema­cists on chat servers used to plan the August 12 Unite the Right ral­ly in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia, where a white suprema­cist alleged­ly killed a counter pro­test­er, Heather Hey­er.

    Chat serv­er user Erwin Frey claimed to have spent years prepar­ing to enlist in the Navy before being turned away due to a nut aller­gy, but said in a post that he is now seek­ing a job as a police offi­cer.

    “Be me in my Crim­i­nal inves­ti­ga­tion class. We’re doing intro­duc­tions and it gets to me. They ask me what kind of police offi­cer I want­ed to be and I respond­ed with ‘Riot Police Offi­cer,’” Frey wrote on the chat board. “They asked why and I instant­ly respond­ed with ‘I like curb stomp­ing pro­tes­tors who cause a riot.’ I think the pro­fes­sor likes me.”

    Dur­ing one online con­ver­sa­tion about what encoun­ters with police in Char­lottesville might be like, some white suprema­cist plan­ners expressed dis­sent­ing views, but the con­sen­sus seemed to be that they could expect some lev­el of sup­port from law enforce­ments. One user called Stan­nis­the­man­nis said the Vir­ginia State Police “will be focused on antifa [anti-fas­cists] not us … espe­cial­ly if we kiss some ass with a few blue lives mat­ter chants …. Be nice to cops and they will be nice to you.”

    “Ran­dom Reminder: Cops of all races are our nat­ur­al allies; we should keep it that way,” wrote anoth­er user known as Uil­liam Cionnaoith – MD.
    ...

    And as long as these white suprema­cists believe they will be wel­comed in the police force, or in the mil­i­tary, they’re going to be far more like­ly to join. Which, again, is rea­son why open­ly mak­ing it clear that white suprema­cists (or suprema­cists of any type) won’t be wel­come in the police force, and then enforc­ing that, could be a great way to not only avoid future offi­cers that ruin the rep­u­ta­tion of the entire force but also build greater trust with com­mu­ni­ties:

    ...
    Archive search­es for ref­er­ences to “police,” “cops,” “law enforce­ment” and sim­i­lar ref­er­ences to uni­formed author­i­ty fig­ures revealed the gist of that con­ver­sa­tion. While a few users dis­liked or mis­trust­ed police offi­cers, most expressed belief that many mem­bers of the police and mil­i­tary are on the side of white suprema­cy.

    “Also of note is that most police and mil­i­tary picked that career because they want­ed to aid their com­mu­ni­ties or coun­try,” wrote a user named rflagg SC. “That’s the foun­da­tion of a col­lec­tivist fas­cist mind­set.”

    “I know so many mil­i­tary fas­cists,” Nathan TX wrote. “And many that are join­ing.”

    In the ear­ly 2000s, some white suprema­cist lead­ers exhort­ed their fol­low­ers to aban­don the clich­es of the skin­head lifestyle in order to infil­trate the worlds of busi­ness, gov­ern­ment, and the mil­i­tary. Chris­t­ian Pic­ci­oli­ni, a for­mer neo-Nazi skin­head leader from Chica­go who has since renounced white suprema­cism, said the strat­e­gy of infil­tra­tion has worked.

    “I do know very many peo­ple from the orga­ni­za­tion that I used to lead 30 years ago, the neo-Nazi group, that actu­al­ly did go on to become police offi­cers in Chica­go,” Pic­ci­oloni said in a radio inter­view with Democ­ra­cy Now. “Pro­ba­tion offi­cers, prison guards, and, you know, infil­trate that way, and espe­cial­ly the mil­i­tary. Many went into the mil­i­tary.”
    ...

    “I do know very many peo­ple from the orga­ni­za­tion that I used to lead 30 years ago, the neo-Nazi group, that actu­al­ly did go on to become police offi­cers in Chica­go.”

    Those were the chill­ing words of for­mer neo-Nazi Chris­t­ian Pic­ci­oli­ni: he actu­al­ly knew about of neo-Nazis who did actu­al­ly become police offi­cers. It’s not just Nazi aspi­ra­tions. This is a real issue even if the scale of the issue remains an open ques­tion.

    And beyond the dan­ger infil­trat­ed Nazis rep­re­sent to the com­mu­ni­ties they police and the rep­u­ta­tion of their police forces, these Nazis are also going to pro­ceed to try and recruit from with­in the police force, exac­er­bat­ing the prob­lem:

    ...
    Pic­ci­oli­ni said that the doors between uni­formed ser­vices and white suprema­cists go both ways. Non-rad­i­cal police offi­cers and mil­i­tary per­son­nel are com­mon tar­gets for white suprema­cist recruiters.

    “Police offi­cers and law enforce­ment offi­cers and mil­i­tary peo­ple are con­stant­ly, every day, in dif­fi­cult sit­u­a­tions,” Pic­ci­oli­ni says. “And over time, peo­ple become jad­ed, espe­cial­ly after you’ve … worked in crime-rid­den neigh­bor­hoods for 20 years, and you’ve had to deal with some­times the worst of the worst peo­ple. Well, recruiters know this. Recruiters know that they become jad­ed, and they become prej­u­diced towards these peo­ple.
    ...

    Now, the last thing we want to do is cre­ate some sort of cryp­to-Nazi witch hunt with­in law enforce­ment since that would be guar­an­teed to back­fire and prob­lem enhance the stand­ing of the cryp­to-Nazis that are there. And you don’t want to cre­ate an envi­ron­ment where every offi­cer involved in a con­tro­ver­sial shoot­ing is assumed to be a neo-Nazi.

    But the more we learn neo-Nazis are active­ly encour­ag­ing each oth­er to join law enforce­ment agen­cies — or any pub­lic insti­tu­tions, for that mat­ter — the greater the risk that there real­ly is going to be a major prob­lem with this at some point, which just adds to the rea­sons why both police and com­mu­ni­ties should proac­tive­ly treat this like a “known unknown” sit­u­a­tion: we know neo-Nazis are doing this and we know they suc­ceed­ed in some cas­es. But we also know that it would be absurd to casu­al­ly assume every white police offi­cer is a white suprema­cist. So per­haps mak­ing it clear to the pub­lic, and espe­cial­ly mak­ing it clear to neo-Nazis, that law enforce­ment takes this seri­ous­ly and will make seri­ous attempts to iden­ti­fy and expel white suprema­cists (or any kind of rad­i­cal big­ots) could be a pro­duc­tive par­al­lel com­mu­ni­ty-rela­tions effort in the cur­rent envi­ron­ment where ten­sions between minor­i­ty com­mu­ni­ties and the police often run high. After all, police depart­ments across the coun­try are already engag­ing in a num­ber of active efforts to improve rela­tions with minor­i­ty com­mu­ni­ties. It seems like a pub­lic anti-cryp­to-Nazi effort could be a high­ly pro­duc­tive pro­gram to add to that list.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | March 30, 2018, 1:35 pm
  26. This next arti­cle shows that Ger­many is fac­ing mount­ing polit­i­cal pres­sure on its “prep­pers” which are their ver­sion of far-right wing sur­vival­ists who may be hav­ing some lev­el of infil­tra­tion into Ger­man intel­li­gence agen­cies.

    In the wake of the assas­si­na­tion of the pro-refugee politi­cian Wal­ter Lübcke and a white supremacist’s planned ter­ror attack on a syn­a­gogue in Halle, secu­ri­ty cir­cles have raised alarm about rightwing extrem­ist attempts to infil­trate the mil­i­tary and police. More mem­bers of the Chris­t­ian Demo­c­ra­t­ic Union were revealed to be mem­bers of a shad­owy mil­i­tary net­work with links to “prep­per” or sur­vival­ist cir­cles. Robert Möritz, con­firmed that he was a mem­ber of Uniter, a pri­vate sup­port net­work for active and for­mer sol­diers and secu­ri­ty per­son­nel.

    While Uniter remains a legal­ly reg­is­tered asso­ci­a­tion and is cur­rent­ly not on any of the intel­li­gence agen­cies’ offi­cial watch­lists, its founder André Schmitt is on tri­al for offences against Germany’s weapons and explo­sives act. Uniter’s founder also set up and admin­is­tered a com­plex com­mand chain of Telegram chat net­works, in whose sub­groups so-called prep­pers dis­cussed plans to build up par­al­lel infra­struc­tures in prepa­ra­tion for the antic­i­pat­ed col­lapse of the pre­vail­ing social order.
    One found­ing mem­ber of Uniter in its 2016 incar­na­tion, Ringo M, used to work for the domes­tic intel­li­gence agency in Baden-Würt­tem­berg, while one of Uniter’s four dis­trict lead­ers has been train­ing police at a police acad­e­my in Bran­den­burg.

    Armin Schus­ter, a CDU chair­man of the Bundestag’s com­mit­tee on inter­nal affairs, stat­ed “What we are see­ing is a num­ber of iso­lat­ed sus­pi­cious cas­es, and every sin­gle one of them is one too many for me,” Schus­ter told the Guardian. CDU par­ty leader Annegret Kramp-Kar­ren­bauer also assert­ed that “Every­one should be aware that any­one who is a mem­ber of Uniter and wears Uniter sym­bols will be sus­pect­ed of prox­im­i­ty of rightwing extrem­ist net­works and chats”.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/18/members-of-angela-merkels-party-found-to-have-far-right-links?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

    More mem­bers of Angela Merkel’s par­ty found to have ‘prep­per’ links

    CDU crit­i­cised for alleged­ly fail­ing to guard against neo-Nazis and ‘prep­per’ infil­tra­tion

    Philip Olter­mann and Jan­i­na Find­eisen
    @philipoltermann
    Wed 18 Dec 2019 13.00 EST Last mod­i­fied on Thu 19 Dec 2019 03.35 EST

    • Hun­dreds of neo-Nazis demon­strate in Halle, Ger­many, in May 2011. Pho­to­graph: Dpa Pic­ture Alliance Archive/Alamy

    Pres­sure is mount­ing on the lead­er­ship of Angela Merkel’s con­ser­v­a­tive par­ty to for­ti­fy its “fire­wall against the far right”, as more mem­bers of the Chris­t­ian Demo­c­ra­t­ic Union were revealed to be mem­bers of a shad­owy mil­i­tary net­work with links to “prep­per” or sur­vival­ist cir­cles.

    Last week a mem­ber of the CDU’s exec­u­tive com­mit­tee in the dis­trict of Anhalt-Bit­ter­feld, Robert Möritz, con­firmed that he was a mem­ber of Uniter, a pri­vate sup­port net­work for active and for­mer sol­diers and secu­ri­ty per­son­nel.

    In the wake of the assas­si­na­tion of the pro-refugee politi­cian Wal­ter Lübcke and a white supremacist’s planned ter­ror attack on a syn­a­gogue in Halle, secu­ri­ty cir­cles have raised alarm about rightwing extrem­ist attempts to infil­trate the mil­i­tary and police.

    While Uniter remains a legal­ly reg­is­tered asso­ci­a­tion and is cur­rent­ly not on any of the intel­li­gence agen­cies’ offi­cial watch­lists, its founder André Schmitt is on tri­al for offences against Germany’s weapons and explo­sives act.
    Uniter’s founder also set up and admin­is­tered a com­plex com­mand chain of Telegram chat net­works, in whose sub­groups so-called prep­pers dis­cussed plans to build up par­al­lel infra­struc­tures in prepa­ra­tion for the antic­i­pat­ed col­lapse of the pre­vail­ing social order.

    Some of the chats, which were divid­ed into region­al dis­tricts, cov­ered the threat of Islamist ter­ror­ist attacks and how to respond to them by hoard­ing weapons, muni­tions and food sup­plies. Oth­er prep­per groups have been accused of com­pil­ing “death lists” of left­wing and pro-refugee tar­gets, as well as order­ing body bags and quick­lime to dis­pose of their vic­tims after a “Day X” dooms­day sce­nario.

    • Ger­man far-right group ‘used police data to com­pile death list’

    So far the CDU’s branch in Sax­ony-Anhalt has declined to expel the ex-Uniter mem­ber Möritz, in spite of him admit­ting to tak­ing part in a neo-Nazi ral­ly in 2011 and car­ry­ing a “black sun” tat­too on his right arm, a sym­bol which has been adopt­ed by neo-Nazis and occultists. The CDU’s dis­trict leader in Anhalt-Bit­ter­feld insist­ed the 29-year-old had “cred­i­bly” dis­tanced him­self from his rightwing extrem­ist past.
    Uniter’s enmesh­ment with the east­ern offices of Germany’s dom­i­nant polit­i­cal par­ty of the post­war era is more intri­cate than pre­vi­ous­ly known, how­ev­er. Kai Mehliss, a mem­ber of the CDU’s hard­line “con­ser­v­a­tive cir­cle” who also sits on the dis­trict branch in Anhalt-Bit­ter­feld, is list­ed on Uniter’s web­site as a mem­ber and organ­ised a round­table event for the net­work as recent­ly as last week. Like Möritz, he has since can­celled his mem­ber­ship.

    Anoth­er CDU mem­ber, a town coun­cil­lor in the munic­i­pal­i­ty of Sander­s­dorf-Brehna, was a found­ing mem­ber of Uniter in its orig­i­nal incar­na­tion in 2012, before the asso­ci­a­tion was found­ed anew in Stuttgart.

    The local politi­cian said on Wednes­day that he co-found­ed Uniter to help elite Ger­man sol­diers find employ­ment after they had been deployed abroad, and claimed not to know the oth­er two Uniter mem­bers in his par­ty per­son­al­ly. Since Sat­ur­day, his pro­file appears to have been removed from the CDU’s web­site.

    The rev­e­la­tions came on the eve of what is like­ly to be Angela Merkel’s last full year as Ger­man chan­cel­lor, and as the coun­try ner­vous­ly eyes her party’s polit­i­cal direc­tion in the post-Merkel era.

    While Merkel’s suc­ces­sor at the head of the CDU, Annegret Kramp-Kar­ren­bauer, is a politi­cian in the chancellor’s lib­er­al mould, con­ser­v­a­tive politi­cians in the east­ern states have agi­tat­ed for the par­ty to drop its cor­don san­i­taire against coali­tions with the rightwing pop­ulist Alter­na­tive für Deutsch­land.

    The gen­er­al sec­re­tary of Merkel’s junior coali­tion part­ner, the Social Demo­c­ra­t­ic par­ty, on Wednes­day accused Kramp-Kar­ren­bauer of fail­ing to crack down on far-right ten­den­cies in her par­ty.

    “What we are see­ing in the CDU’s Sax­ony-Anhalt branch is a burst­ing of the dam against the far right,” Lars Kling­beil told Tagesspiegel news­pa­per. Social Demo­c­rat politi­cian Ralf Steg­n­er, mean­while, said events in Sax­ony-Anhalt showed “the fire­wall against the far right is crum­bling”.

    The vet­er­an con­ser­v­a­tive and for­mer finance min­is­ter Wolf­gang Schäu­ble said that “demo­c­ra­t­ic par­ties, and espe­cial­ly the par­ty of which I am a mem­ber, must not have any­thing to do with neo-Nazis”. But many senior fig­ures in the par­ty have stopped short of explic­it­ly call­ing for the expul­sion of mem­bers with a neo-Nazi past.

    The inte­ri­or min­is­ter, Horst See­hofer, of the CDU’s Bavar­i­an sis­ter par­ty, at the start of this week announced 600 new intel­li­gence posi­tions for weed­ing out poten­tial­ly vio­lent rightwing extrem­ists and their net­works. But oppo­si­tion politi­cians say the search will have to start at the door of Seehofer’s own agen­cies.

    One found­ing mem­ber of Uniter in its 2016 incar­na­tion, Ringo M, used to work for the domes­tic intel­li­gence agency in Baden-Würt­tem­berg, while one of Uniter’s four dis­trict lead­ers has been train­ing police at a police acad­e­my in Bran­den­burg.
    Armin Schus­ter, a CDU chair­man of the Bundestag’s com­mit­tee on inter­nal affairs, reject­ed claims that Ger­man secu­ri­ty had a “large-scale prob­lem” with the far right, but con­ced­ed some of the recent rev­e­la­tions had been trou­bling. “What we are see­ing is a num­ber of iso­lat­ed sus­pi­cious cas­es, and every sin­gle one of them is one too many for me,” Schus­ter told the Guardian.

    CDU par­ty leader Annegret Kramp-Kar­ren­bauer on Wednes­day night vowed to take “deci­sive and uncom­pro­mis­ing” action in tack­ling the issue in her par­ty. “Every­one should be aware that any­one who is a mem­ber of Uniter and wears Uniter sym­bols will be sus­pect­ed of prox­im­i­ty of rightwing extrem­ist net­works and chats”.

    Posted by Mary Benton | December 19, 2019, 2:57 pm
  27. This next arti­cles shows how at an Army-Navy Foot­ball games which was attend­ed by Pres­i­dent Trump. Some of the Cadets were flash­ing White Pow­er hand Sym­bols with the “OK” sign. The sym­bol­’s co-option by racists began as a joke on far-right mes­sag­ing site 4Chan — where users took an inno­cent ges­ture and pre­tend­ed there was a hid­den mean­ing behind it, hop­ing to trick left-lean­ing peo­ple into out­rage.  The joke esca­lat­ed and soon the sym­bol was being wide­ly used among far-right extrem­ists, lead­ing some peo­ple to con­clude it has changed its mean­ing. Con­ser­v­a­tive Vin­er Piz­za Par­ty Ben and the alt-right’s for­mer pin-up boy Milo Yiannopou­los began mak­ing the ges­ture at var­i­ous cam­paign events for Don­ald Trump in the lead up to the 2016 elec­tion.

    White suprema­cist Richard Spencer also flashed the sign on elec­tion night in 2016 in front of a Trump Hotel with the cap­tion ‘Tonight’s the night.’ The sym­bol has con­tin­ued to be used, includ­ing alleged­ly by White House intern Jack Breuer in 2017, pho­tographed mak­ing the OK sign in his class pho­to, who claimed he was copy­ing the pres­i­den­t’s ges­ture of touch­ing his index fin­ger and thumb while speak­ing. 

    The pop­u­lar emo­ji has been reg­is­tered as a hate sym­bol by the US-based Anti-Defama­tion League, but the group warned it is still ‘over­whelm­ing­ly’ used to show approval or that some­one is OK. 

    https://mol.im/a/7793965

    US mil­i­tary opens inves­ti­ga­tion after West Point cadets and Annapo­lis mid­ship­men appeared to flash white pow­er hand signs dur­ing the live broad­cast of the Army-Navy game
    • West Point and Annapo­lis are inves­ti­gat­ing the hand signs at Sat­ur­day’s game
    • Sev­er­al cadets and mid­ship­men were seen mak­ing the ‘OK’ hand sym­bol
    • Once innocu­ous, the hand sign has been appro­pri­at­ed by racist provo­ca­teurs 

    By KEITH GRIFFITH FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
    PUBLISHED: 01:32 EST, 15 Decem­ber 2019 | UPDATED: 02:43 EST, 16 Decem­ber 2019 

    Offi­cials at West Point and the U.S. Naval Acad­e­my in Annapo­lis are inves­ti­gat­ing after sev­er­al cadets and mid­ship­men were seen flash­ing a hand sign some­times asso­ci­at­ed with ‘white pow­er’ at Sat­ur­day’s Army-Navy foot­ball game.

    Stu­dents at both ser­vice acad­e­mies were seen appear­ing to flash the con­tro­ver­sial hand sym­bol dur­ing a pregame side­line report from jour­nal­ist Rece Davis on an ESPN broad­cast.

    The hand sym­bol, once innocu­ous and typ­i­cal­ly mean­ing ‘OK’, was ini­tial­ly asso­ci­at­ed with ‘white pow­er’ as an online joke, but has since been adopt­ed by fringe racist fig­ures.

    Now, mil­i­tary offi­cials are inves­ti­gat­ing to see what the inten­tion of the cadets and mid­ship­men may have been in dis­play­ing the hand sym­bol.

    PHOTO: A cadet appears to flash a ‘white pow­er’ hand sign live on ESPN at the Army-Navy game dur­ing a pregame side­line report from jour­nal­ist Rece Davis

    PHOTO A mid­ship­man on the right side of the shot is shown extend­ing his arm and mak­ing the sym­bol

    TWEET

    Looky Yon­der
    @YonderLooky
     · Dec 14, 2019

    Reply­ing to @KwikWarren @WestPoint_USMA
    I have it on my DVR. His face is clear­ly vis­i­ble just a moment before. And one of his ass­hole class­mates one row up does the same hand sign. Not pho­to­shopped.

    Looky Yon­der
    @YonderLooky

    ‘We’re look­ing into it,’ Lt. Col. Chris Ophardt, a West Point spokesman, told the Wall Street Jour­nal. ‘I don’t know what their inten­tion is.’ 

    ‘We are aware and will be look­ing into it,’ said Annapo­lis spokes­woman Cmdr. Alana Garas.

    At least two cadets and one mid­ship­man were seen mak­ing the hand sym­bol. 
    The hand sign is formed by join­ing the the index fin­ger and thumb in a cir­cle while extend­ing the oth­er three fin­gers, as in the tra­di­tion­al ‘OK’ sym­bol.

    A sim­i­lar ges­ture is used in the so-called ‘cir­cle game,’ in which the per­son mak­ing the ges­ture tries to trick some­one into look­ing at it, and if suc­cess­ful gets to punch the onlook­er in the arm. 

    How­ev­er, the ambigu­ous nature of the ges­ture is part of the appeal to extrem­ists, accord­ing to the Anti-Defama­tion League. 

    PHOTO: Cadets were seen goof­ing off in the back­ground dur­ing the live TV shot, and some of them flashed the con­tro­ver­sial hand sym­bol

    U.S. Coast Guard lead­ers last year rep­ri­mand­ed an offi­cer who used a sim­i­lar hand sign dur­ing a tele­vi­sion broad­cast. 

    After the Army-Navy broad­cast, many spoke up say­ing that they were cer­tain the ges­ture was intend­ed as a brazen dis­play of racist white suprema­cy.

    ‘They did this because they ful­ly under­stand that most peo­ple in the dom­i­nant soci­ety share their views, and there will be no seri­ous pun­ish­ment against them,’ tweet­ed Tariq Nasheed, direc­tor of the film Hid­den Col­ors 4: The Reli­gion Of White Suprema­cy, and author of dat­ing advice book The Art Of Mackin’.
    ‘Any­one try­ing to deny that this is a white pow­er hand sig­nal, are most like­ly to be white suprema­cist them­selves,’ Nasheed added. 

    Sat­ur­day’s game was the 120th such match-up between the two ser­vice acad­e­mies, and part of a beloved tra­di­tion in both branch­es of the mil­i­tary as well as the world of col­lege sports. 

    PHOTO: Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump takes part in the cer­e­mo­ni­al coin toss before the start of the Army-Navy col­lege foot­ball game in Philadel­phia on Sat­ur­day

    The Philadel­phia game drew 68,075 fans and ESP­N’s ‘Col­lege Game­Day’ was on hand. 

    The cadets and mid­ship­men stood, salut­ed, bounced and cheered for the entire­ty of what’s billed as ‘Amer­i­ca’s Game.’ 

    Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump attend­ed the game for the sec­ond straight year. Trump also was at the 2016 game as pres­i­dent-elect.

    Trump wore a red ‘Keep Amer­i­ca Great’ hat for the tra­di­tion­al coin flip in misty con­di­tions, and was greet­ed by a roar­ing ova­tion. 

    Army called heads, the coin land­ed tails and the Mid­ship­men deferred pos­ses­sion. 

    The ref­er­ee said before the toss it was with ‘great pride, great hon­or, to wel­come our Com­man­der in Chief, our Pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States, Don­ald J. Trump. Mr. Pres­i­dent, thank you for all that you do.’
    Trump sat on the Army side of the field in the first half and crossed the field to the Navy side for the sec­ond half.

    In 2016, Army snapped Navy´s 14-game win­ning streak and has won three years in a row. But the Mid­ship­men rout­ed Army’s Black Knights 31–7 on Sat­ur­day. They had entered the game as a sig­nif­i­cant favorite. 

    How the ‘OK’ sign came to be asso­ci­at­ed with white suprema­cy:

    The his­toric hand sign for OK — touch­ing the fore­fin­ger to thumb with oth­er three fin­gers raised — is a for­mer­ly inno­cent sym­bol that has recent­ly been co-opt­ed by the far right. 

    The sym­bol­’s co-option by racists began as a joke on far-right mes­sag­ing site 4Chan — where users took an inno­cent ges­ture and pre­tend­ed there was a hid­den mean­ing behind it, hop­ing to trick left-lean­ing peo­ple into out­rage. 

    But the joke esca­lat­ed and soon the sym­bol was being wide­ly used among far-right extrem­ists, lead­ing some peo­ple to con­clude it has changed its mean­ing. 

    PHOTOS: The ‘OK’ hand ges­ture (left) is now some­times asso­ci­at­ed with white suprema­cy despite its usu­al­ly inno­cent mean­ing. Bren­ton Tar­rant, the Aus­tralian man arrest­ed for killing 51 peo­ple at mosques in New Zealand ear­li­er this year, is seen right mak­ing the ges­ture in court in March

    Con­ser­v­a­tive Vin­er Piz­za Par­ty Ben and the alt-right’s for­mer pin-up boy Milo Yiannopou­los began mak­ing the ges­ture at var­i­ous cam­paign events for Don­ald Trump in the lead up to the 2016 elec­tion.

    White suprema­cist Richard Spencer also flashed the sign on elec­tion night in 2016 in front of a Trump Hotel with the cap­tion ‘Tonight’s the night.’

    The sym­bol has con­tin­ued to be used, includ­ing alleged­ly by White House intern Jack Breuer in 2017, pho­tographed mak­ing the OK sign in his class pho­to, who claimed he was copy­ing the pres­i­den­t’s ges­ture of touch­ing his index fin­ger and thumb while speak­ing. 

    The pop­u­lar emo­ji has been reg­is­tered as a hate sym­bol by the US-based Anti-Defama­tion League, but the group warned it is still ‘over­whelm­ing­ly’ used to show approval or that some­one is OK. 

    Oth­ers use it as part of a ‘cir­cle game’ cre­at­ed on US TV show Mal­colm in the Mid­dle, which involves some­one mak­ing the ges­ture and hold­ing it below their waist. If some­one else looks at it, they get a punch in the arm.   

    ——————————————-
    This issue was also cov­ered in the Guardian which stat­ed: “The US army and navy acad­e­mies are inves­ti­gat­ing hand signs flashed by stu­dents that can be asso­ci­at­ed with “white pow­er” and were tele­vised dur­ing the Army-Navy foot­ball game on Sat­ur­day, school offi­cials said.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/dec/15/army-navy-white-power-hand-signals?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

    Posted by Mary Benton | December 19, 2019, 3:23 pm
  28. Here’s a set of arti­cles that under­score just how close we are to a sit­u­a­tion in the US where Pres­i­dent Trump real­ly does issue a gen­er­al call for open war­fare against ‘the left’ on the streets of Amer­i­ca. Like actu­al shoot­ing war­fare, although it would­n’t real­ly be ‘war’ so much as a gov­ern­ment-sanc­tioned one-sided slaugh­ter of left-lean­ing indi­vid­u­als jus­ti­fied by bad faith dirty trick­sters and car­ried out by Trump-loy­al­ist mili­tias (in oth­er words, the white nation­al­ist dream sce­nario):

    First, here’s an arti­cle about a leaked tele­con­fer­ence call between Trump and US gov­er­nors regard­ing the response to the nation­wide police bru­tal­i­ty protests that have erupt­ed in the wake of the killing of George Floyd. A call where Trump berates gov­er­nors for being ‘weak’ and calls for mass arrests and long jail sen­tences for pro­tes­tors:

    Asso­ci­at­ed Press

    Trump slams gov­er­nors as ‘weak,’ urges crack­down on protests

    By JONATHAN LEMIRE, ZEKE MILLER and ALAN SUDERMAN
    06/01/2020 16:00:38 GMT ‑500 (Cen­tral Day­light Time)

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump on Mon­day derid­ed many gov­er­nors as “weak” and demand­ed tougher crack­downs on burn­ing and steal­ing among some demon­stra­tions in the after­math of vio­lent protests in dozens of Amer­i­can cities.

    Trump spoke to gov­er­nors on a video tele­con­fer­ence that also includ­ed law enforce­ment and nation­al secu­ri­ty offi­cials, telling the state lead­ers they “have to get much tougher.”

    “Most of you are weak,” Trump said. “You have to arrest peo­ple.”

    The days of protests were trig­gered by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died when a white Min­neapo­lis police offi­cer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for sev­er­al min­utes even after he stopped mov­ing and plead­ing for air. The demon­stra­tions turned vio­lent in sev­er­al cities, with peo­ple trash­ing stores, smash­ing and burn­ing police cars and ignit­ing fires in his­toric Lafayette Park across from the White House.

    The pres­i­dent urged the gov­er­nors to deploy the Nation­al Guard, which he cred­it­ed for help­ing calm the sit­u­a­tion Sun­day night in Min­neapo­lis. He demand­ed that sim­i­lar­ly tough mea­sures be tak­en in cities that also expe­ri­enced vio­lence, includ­ing New York, Philadel­phia and Los Ange­les.

    “You’ve got to arrest peo­ple, you have to track peo­ple, you have to put them in jail for 10 years and you’ll nev­er see this stuff again,” said Trump. “We’re doing it in Wash­ing­ton, D.C. We’re going to do some­thing that peo­ple haven’t seen before.”

    The pres­i­dent told the gov­er­nors they were mak­ing them­selves “look like fools” for not call­ing up more of the Nation­al Guard as a show for force on city streets.

    Attor­ney Gen­er­al Bill Barr, who was also on the call, told gov­er­nors that a joint ter­ror­ist task force would be used to track agi­ta­tors and urged local offi­cials to “dom­i­nate” the streets and con­trol, not react to crowds. He urged the gov­er­nors to “go after trou­ble­mak­ers.”

    Trump’s angry exhor­ta­tions at the nation’s gov­er­nors came after a Sun­day night of esca­lat­ing vio­lence, images of fires and loot­ing and clash­es with police fill­ing the nation’s air­waves and over­shad­ow­ing the large­ly peace­ful protests. The protests had grown so heat­ed Fri­day night that the Secret Ser­vice rushed the pres­i­dent to an under­ground bunker pre­vi­ous­ly used dur­ing ter­ror­ist attacks.

    On Mon­day, Trump also spoke of try­ing to crim­i­nal­ize flag-burn­ing. The Supreme Court has con­ser­v­a­tive new mem­bers since it last ruled on that issue, and Trump said that “I think it’s time to review that again.”

    He con­tin­ued his effort to project strength, using inflam­ma­to­ry tweets and deliv­er­ing par­ti­san attacks.

    As cities have burned night after night and images of vio­lence have dom­i­nat­ed tele­vi­sion cov­er­age, Trump’s advis­ers have dis­cussed the prospect of an Oval Office address in an attempt to ease ten­sions. The notion was quick­ly scrapped for lack of pol­i­cy pro­pos­als and the president’s own seem­ing dis­in­ter­est in deliv­er­ing a mes­sage of uni­ty.

    ...

    The demon­stra­tions in Wash­ing­ton appeared to catch offi­cers by sur­prise. They sparked one of the high­est alerts at the White House com­plex since the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001.

    Trump has told advis­ers he wor­ries about his safe­ty, while both pri­vate­ly and pub­licly prais­ing the work of the Secret Ser­vice.

    Demon­stra­tors returned Sun­day after­noon, fac­ing off against police at Lafayette Park into the evening. Trump retweet­ed a mes­sage from a con­ser­v­a­tive com­men­ta­tor encour­ag­ing author­i­ties to respond with greater force.

    “This isn’t going to stop until the good guys are will­ing to use over­whelm­ing force against the bad guys,” Buck Sex­ton wrote in a mes­sage ampli­fied by the pres­i­dent.

    In recent days secu­ri­ty at the White House has been rein­forced by the Nation­al Guard and addi­tion­al per­son­nel from the Secret Ser­vice and the U.S. Park Police.

    The Jus­tice Depart­ment deployed mem­bers of the U.S. Mar­shals Ser­vice and agents from the Drug Enforce­ment Admin­is­tra­tion to sup­ple­ment Nation­al Guard troops out­side the White House, accord­ing to a senior Jus­tice Depart­ment offi­cial. The offi­cial could not dis­cuss the mat­ter pub­licly and spoke on the con­di­tion of anonymi­ty.

    ———–

    “Trump slams gov­er­nors as ‘weak,’ urges crack­down on protests” by JONATHAN LEMIRE, ZEKE MILLER and ALAN SUDERMAN; Asso­ci­at­ed Press; 06/01/2020

    ““You’ve got to arrest peo­ple, you have to track peo­ple, you have to put them in jail for 10 years and you’ll nev­er see this stuff again,” said Trump. “We’re doing it in Wash­ing­ton, D.C. We’re going to do some­thing that peo­ple haven’t seen before.””

    “We’re doing it in Wash­ing­ton, D.C. We’re going to do some­thing that peo­ple haven’t seen before.” A pledge of some sort of crack­down that “peo­ple haven’t seen before” in DC and exhor­ta­tions that gov­er­nors fol­low suit. That’s the lead­er­ship com­ing out of the White House house dur­ing the call to gov­er­nors. But that mes­sage was­n’t lim­it­ed to a behind-the-scenes call. Trump was open­ly retweet­ing calls for the use of “over­whelm­ing force against the bad guys.” That sure sounds like a vari­ant of ‘when the loot­ing starts, the shoot­ing starts’. So we can clear­ly see that Trump real­ly would like to declared the left as ‘the bad guys’ and ene­mies of Amer­i­ca. He’s open­ly tweet­ing this:

    ...
    Demon­stra­tors returned Sun­day after­noon, fac­ing off against police at Lafayette Park into the evening. Trump retweet­ed a mes­sage from a con­ser­v­a­tive com­men­ta­tor encour­ag­ing author­i­ties to respond with greater force.

    “This isn’t going to stop until the good guys are will­ing to use over­whelm­ing force against the bad guys,” Buck Sex­ton wrote in a mes­sage ampli­fied by the pres­i­dent.
    ...

    But it was­n’t just Trump call­ing on gov­er­nors to be much more aggres­sive with pro­tes­tors. Attor­ney Gen­er­al Bill Barr was also call­ing on gov­er­nors to “dom­i­nate” the streets:

    ...
    The pres­i­dent told the gov­er­nors they were mak­ing them­selves “look like fools” for not call­ing up more of the Nation­al Guard as a show for force on city streets.

    Attor­ney Gen­er­al Bill Barr, who was also on the call, told gov­er­nors that a joint ter­ror­ist task force would be used to track agi­ta­tors and urged local offi­cials to “dom­i­nate” the streets and con­trol, not react to crowds. He urged the gov­er­nors to “go after trou­ble­mak­ers.”
    ...

    As as the fol­low­ing TPM piece omi­nous­ly describes, Bill Bar­r’s calls for the “dom­i­na­tion” of the streets was echoed by none oth­er than Sec­re­tary of Defense Mark Esper. As the arti­cle also notes, this chill­ing phone call took place a day after Trump threat­ened to issue an exec­u­tive order declar­ing Antifa a domes­tic ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion. And while legal experts appear to dis­miss that threat as some­thing Trump does­n’t have the author­i­ty to car­ry out, it’s a sign of how keen the Trump admin­is­tra­tion is on using the loot­ing and chaos emerg­ing from uniden­ti­fied actors in the George Floyd protests to cre­ate a nation­al atmos­phere of ‘war on Antifa/the Left.’ Civ­il war/race war/Helter Skel­ter real­ly is his reelec­tion strat­e­gy and the Defense Sec­re­tary is enthu­si­as­ti­cal­ly on board:

    Talk­ing Points Memo
    News

    Defense Sec­re­tary Calls Tur­moil On America’s Streets A ‘Bat­tle­space’ To ‘Dom­i­nate’

    By Zoë Richards
    June 1, 2020 4:36 p.m.

    Defense Sec­re­tary Mark Esper described Amer­i­can streets, which have become the site of protests and riots over the death of unarmed black man George Floyd, as a “bat­tle­space” to “dom­i­nate” in a call on Mon­day.

    “I think the soon­er that you mass and dom­i­nate the bat­tle­space, the quick­er this dis­si­pates and we can get back to the right nor­mal,” Esper said in a White House call with gov­er­nors, accord­ing to audio obtained by the Wash­ing­ton Post.

    Here’s the audio of the US sec­re­tary of defense refer­ring to Amer­i­can streets as the “bat­tle space” pic.twitter.com/SmqynReHTC— John Hud­son (@John_Hudson) June 1, 2020

    Esper and oth­er allies of Pres­i­dent Trump are eager to reel in protests that have swept across the coun­try. Many of the protests have remained peace­ful, with calls for racial equal­i­ty and an end to police bru­tal­i­ty. But sev­er­al flash points have erupt­ed, with loot­ing, torch­ing of prop­er­ty and vio­lent exchanges with police.

    ...

    The president’s call to des­ig­nate “antifa” as a domes­tic ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion in a tweet Sun­day seems to have incit­ed some mem­bers of Con­gress to advo­cate the use of vio­lence and force against their fel­low Amer­i­cans. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R‑FL) tweet­ed his desire to “hunt them down” in the tra­di­tion of Amer­i­cans hunt­ing ter­ror­ists “in the Mid­dle East.”

    Now that we clear­ly see Antifa as ter­ror­ists, can we hunt them down like we do those in the Mid­dle East?— Matt Gaetz (@mattgaetz) June 1, 2020

    After a com­menter respond­ed with­in min­utes to Gaetz’s tweet sug­gest­ing that the tweet pro­mot­ed vio­lence, Gaetz shot back in a tone that echoed Trump’s rebuke of gov­er­nors that “weak­ness” incites vio­lence.

    ————

    “Defense Sec­re­tary Calls Tur­moil On America’s Streets A ‘Bat­tle­space’ To ‘Dom­i­nate’” by Zoë Richards; Talk­ing Points Memo; 06/01/2020

    ““I think the soon­er that you mass and dom­i­nate the bat­tle­space, the quick­er this dis­si­pates and we can get back to the right nor­mal,” Esper said in a White House call with gov­er­nors, accord­ing to audio obtained by the Wash­ing­ton Post.”

    Dom­i­nat­ing the bat­tle­space. That’s how the White House is encour­ag­ing gov­er­nors to think about this sit­u­a­tion. Dom­i­nat­ing a bat­tle­space where any­one who can be asso­ci­at­ed with Antifa is con­sid­ered a dan­ger­ous ter­ror­ist who should be hunt­ed down. That’s lit­er­al­ly what Trump-toady con­gress­man Matt Gaetz glee­ful­ly called for in response to the threat to des­ig­nate Antifa a domes­tic ter­ror­ist group: a wish to “hunt them down”:

    ...
    The president’s call to des­ig­nate “antifa” as a domes­tic ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion in a tweet Sun­day seems to have incit­ed some mem­bers of Con­gress to advo­cate the use of vio­lence and force against their fel­low Amer­i­cans. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R‑FL) tweet­ed his desire to “hunt them down” in the tra­di­tion of Amer­i­cans hunt­ing ter­ror­ists “in the Mid­dle East.”

    Now that we clear­ly see Antifa as ter­ror­ists, can we hunt them down like we do those in the Mid­dle East?— Matt Gaetz (@mattgaetz) June 1, 2020

    After a com­menter respond­ed with­in min­utes to Gaetz’s tweet sug­gest­ing that the tweet pro­mot­ed vio­lence, Gaetz shot back in a tone that echoed Trump’s rebuke of gov­er­nors that “weak­ness” incites vio­lence.
    ...

    And Rep. Gaetz was­n’t the only Repub­li­can elect­ed offi­cial enthu­si­as­ti­cal­ly back­ing Trump’s threat of using mil­i­tary force on pro­test­ers. Sen­a­tor Tom Cot­ton, a noto­ri­ous hawk when it comes to the us of US mil­i­tary force over­sees, demon­strat­ed his enthu­si­asm for using that force domes­ti­cal­ly when he tweet­ed out a call to do “what­ev­er it takes to restore order. No quar­ter for insur­rec­tion­ists, anar­chists, riot­ers, and loot­ers.” That’s where we are: calls for “no quar­ter” against the pro­test­ers. And yes, these calls are osten­si­bly only against large­ly fic­tion­al mil­i­tant antifa “bad guys”, but this is the kind of sit­u­a­tion where “bad guys” is a high­ly vague def­i­n­i­tion and could eas­i­ly encom­pass vir­tu­al­ly all of the pro­test­ers. After all, the pres­i­dent is threat­en­ing to make self-described antifas­cists domes­tic ter­ror­ists. It’s unclear who won’t be con­sid­ered a ‘bad guy’ under those def­i­n­i­tions:

    Talk­ing Points Memo

    Cot­ton Urges Trump To Deploy Mil­i­tary Forces Against ‘Anar­chist’ Pro­test­ers

    By Sum­mer Con­cep­cion
    June 1, 2020 12:14 p.m.

    Sen. Tom Cot­ton (R‑AR) echoed Pres­i­dent Trump’s threat to deploy the “unlim­it­ed pow­er” of the mil­i­tary amid mount­ing protests over the death of George Floyd, dur­ing an inter­view on “Fox and Friends” on Mon­day.

    After com­mend­ing the Pres­i­dent for say­ing that he will declare “ANTIFA” as a ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion, Cot­ton said that he finds the video of Floyd’s death “deeply dis­turb­ing.” The Arkansas sen­a­tor then called on the Jus­tice Depart­ment to inves­ti­gate Floyd’s death, insist­ing that “the anar­chy, riot­ing and loot­ing” needs to end tonight.

    Cot­ton went on to add that “the riots and the anar­chy” from recent protests “have noth­ing to do with” Floyd’s death. He urged the Pres­i­dent to deploy mil­i­tary police to quell the vio­lence that has emerged from the protests.

    “What the Pres­i­dent can do is say that jus­tice will be done in accor­dance with law for George Floyd and we will always respect the right of peace­ful protest as many of these cities saw in the day­time, but the riot­ing, the anar­chy and the loot­ing ends tonight,” Cot­ton said. “If local law enforce­ment is over­whelmed, if local politi­cians will not do their most basic job to pro­tect our cit­i­zens, let’s see how these anar­chists respond when the 101st air­borne is on the oth­er side of the street.”

    Cot­ton, who’s known to be a Trump ally, reit­er­at­ed his call to the Pres­i­dent in a Mon­day tweet say­ing that he should do “what­ev­er it takes to restore order.”

    And, if nec­es­sary, the 10th Moun­tain, 82nd Air­borne, 1st Cav, 3rd Infantry—whatever it takes to restore order. No quar­ter for insur­rec­tion­ists, anar­chists, riot­ers, and loot­ers. https://t.co/OnNJmnDrYM— Tom Cot­ton (@TomCottonAR) June 1, 2020

    ....

    ————

    “Cot­ton Urges Trump To Deploy Mil­i­tary Forces Against ‘Anar­chist’ Pro­test­ers” by Sum­mer Con­cep­cion; Talk­ing Points Memo; 06/01/2020

    ““What the Pres­i­dent can do is say that jus­tice will be done in accor­dance with law for George Floyd and we will always respect the right of peace­ful protest as many of these cities saw in the day­time, but the riot­ing, the anar­chy and the loot­ing ends tonight,” Cot­ton said. “If local law enforce­ment is over­whelmed, if local politi­cians will not do their most basic job to pro­tect our cit­i­zens, let’s see how these anar­chists respond when the 101st air­borne is on the oth­er side of the street.””

    That’s a pret­ty clear call for mar­tial law by Sen­a­tor Cot­ton. You have to won­der what Alex Jones has to say about this. Will he be only mild­ly sup­port­ive or super sup­port­ive? We’ll see, but relat­ed to that ques­tion of how the ‘patri­ot­ic’ wing of the far right will response to Trump’s threats of mar­tial law, here’s an arti­cle from Right Wing Watch about far right per­son­al­i­ty Bren­den putting out a video that basi­cal­ly pleads with Trump to call for the mili­tias to come out to the streets and start shoot­ing pro­test­ers. And Dil­ley puts it, there’s a legion of Trump sup­port­ers just wait­ing for Trump to give them “the green light” to go into the streets and start killing pro­test­ers:

    Right Wing Watch

    Bren­den Dil­ley Is Just Wait­ing Until Trump ‘Gives Us the Green Light’ to Start Gun­ning Down Pro­test­ers

    By Kyle Manty­la | June 1, 2020 3:21 pm

    MAGA “life coach” and proud­ly amoral right-wing broad­cast­er Bren­den Dil­ley said dur­ing his livestream pro­gram today that he and mil­lions of oth­er gun-lov­ing Amer­i­cans are just wait­ing until Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump “gives us the green light” to take to the streets and start gun­ning down activists who have been protest­ing all over the coun­try fol­low­ing the police killing of George Floyd.

    “Some­one should polite­ly explain to antifa [that] the most vio­lent Amer­i­cans, the most vio­lent and will­ing Amer­i­cans, haven’t even left the couch yet,” Dil­ley said. “The most vio­lent and ready to go, the most tac­ti­cal­ly trained, haven’t even got off the couch yet. So you bet­ter pray to God, and I mean this literally—or who­ev­er the fu ck it is you pray to—that Don­ald J. Trump, Pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States, and Attor­ney Gen­er­al Barr clean this up law­ful­ly.”

    “If for any rea­son the pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States feels that it’s not get­ting done the way it should and decides to put out the tweet that says, ‘My fel­low Amer­i­cans, my fel­low 2A-lov­ing Amer­i­cans, it’s time to take up arms against these ass­holes,’ you are all fu cked in under an hour,” he con­tin­ued. “[We’re] wait­ing for that one tweet, that one emer­gency text mes­sage from the fu cking pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States that gives us the green light to fin­ish this entire thing in under an hour.”

    “It will not be law enforce­ment. It will not be one of these slow, bureau­crat­ic, jus­tice sys­tem wheels of jus­tice turn­ing,” Dil­ley con­clud­ed. “It’ll be a group of peo­ple you didn’t even know fu cking exist­ed because we were at our hous­es, we got off work, we were with our fam­i­lies, but we were ready for that call. And if that call ever does come, you will be fu cked sev­en ways from Sun­day. So I sug­gest you back down.”

    ———-

    “Bren­den Dil­ley Is Just Wait­ing Until Trump ‘Gives Us the Green Light’ to Start Gun­ning Down Pro­test­ers” by Kyle Manty­la; Right Wing Watch; 06/01/2020

    ““If for any rea­son the pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States feels that it’s not get­ting done the way it should and decides to put out the tweet that says, ‘My fel­low Amer­i­cans, my fel­low 2A-lov­ing Amer­i­cans, it’s time to take up arms against these ass­holes,’ you are all fu cked in under an hour,” he con­tin­ued. “[We’re] wait­ing for that one tweet, that one emer­gency text mes­sage from the fu cking pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States that gives us the green light to fin­ish this entire thing in under an hour.”

    “[We’re] wait­ing for that one tweet, that one emer­gency text mes­sage from the fu cking pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States that gives us the green light to fin­ish this entire thing in under an hour.” That’s how volatile the sit­u­a­tion is: the mili­tias are wait­ing for Trump to tweet out per­mis­sion to go out and slaugh­ter the Left. This is a pres­i­dent that rou­tine­ly sends out vague­ly inter­pretable tweets on a near dai­ly basis. How long before he ‘acci­den­tal­ly’ tweets out some­thing that gets wide­ly inter­pret­ed as that ‘green light’?

    And note that, while many have crit­i­cized Trump’s threat to declare Antifa a domes­tic ter­ror group as non­sense in part because there isn’t actu­al­ly a for­mal Antifa group, that vague­ness just means it will be up to the peo­ple ‘hunt­ing down’ Antifa mem­bers to decide who is a mem­ber of Antifa. Are you a Trump loy­al­ist who sup­ports the mass round­ing up of Antifa mem­bers? No? Well then you are clear­ly an Antifa mem­ber. That’s the kind of dynam­ic we’re see­ing devel­op.

    Don’t for­get that the grand prize of the far right has long been com­ing up with a grand excuse for the future his­to­ry books for why they just had to vio­lent­ly sup­press the polit­i­cal left and lead a insur­rec­tion that bru­tal­ly sub­ju­gates any polit­i­cal oppo­si­tion. Phys­i­cal­ly and per­ma­nent­ly elim­i­nat­ing the left in a man­ner that does­n’t so moral­ly repulse the sur­vivors that it desta­bi­lizes the new far right regime: that’s the big chal­lenge that fig­ures like Steve Ban­non and right-wing media forces have been work­ing on for years which is why com­ing up with an excuse for why that kind of mass vio­lence has to hap­pen has been a top pri­or­i­ty in terms of right-wing rhetoric. It’s why right-wing rhetoric rou­tine­ly dehu­man­izes the left and por­trays it has an inhu­man plot against decent Amer­i­cans. It’s what the whole QAnon phe­nom­e­na is about: Con­vinc­ing a large num­ber of con­ser­v­a­tive Amer­i­cans that they have no choice but to vio­lent­ly sup­press the glob­al­ist Satan­ic pedophile left. And, lo and behold, we find that Trump retweet­ed a QAnon account on Sat­ur­day. Because of course he did. QAnon is ded­i­cat­ed to con­vinc­ing con­ser­v­a­tives that they real­ly are under some sort of exis­ten­tial threat from the left and the only solu­tion is civ­il war. Retweet­ing QAnon memes is com­plete­ly con­sis­tent with this broad­er strat­e­gy. A broad­er strat­e­gy that’s been an iron­ic source of sta­bil­i­ty amidst all of the chaos of the Trump admin­is­tra­tion: no mat­ter how chaot­ic he’s been, Trump has been con­sis­tent in his por­tray­al of the Amer­i­can left as a fun­da­men­tal­ly ille­git­i­mate force in Amer­i­ca that pos­es a threat to ‘real Amer­i­cans’ and will have to be ‘dealt with’ at some point in the future. It’s nev­er clear when that point will arrive where con­ser­v­a­tive Amer­i­ca has ‘had enough’ and ris­es up to ‘do some­thing’. We haven’t reached that point of open slaugh­ter of the left but we’re almost there. It’s always get­ting clos­er and clos­er. That’s been the con­sis­tent mes­sage com­ing from the Trump admin­is­tra­tion and with the attor­ney gen­er­al and sec­re­tary of defense now open­ly back­ing Trump’s calls for a mil­i­tary crack­down it’s look­ing like that point of open slaugh­ter of the left is about one inflam­ma­to­ry vague­ly inter­pretable pres­i­den­tial tweet away.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | June 1, 2020, 6:05 pm
  29. Are we see­ing the con­tours of a far right false flag mur­der plot to kill inflame ten­sions between pro­test­ers over the death of George Floyd and law enforce­ment? It’s start­ing to look like that with the FBI hav­ing announced that it’s inves­ti­gat­ing whether or not an Air Force sergeant who was just arrest­ed on Sat­ur­day over an ambush attack on Cal­i­for­nia sher­iffs is con­nect­ed to the May 29 ran­dom dri­ve-by mur­der of a fed­er­al secu­ri­ty guard near­by some of the protests.

    Here’s what we know so far: Steven Car­ril­lo — a 32 year old US Air Force sergeant assigned to the 60th Secu­ri­ty Forces Squadron based at Travis Air Force Base in Fair­field, Cal­i­for­nia — was involved in a shootout with three deputies in the San­ta Cruz Moun­tains on Sat­ur­day. The shootout appears to have been trig­gered by a 911 call about a sus­pi­cious ban in with guns and bomb-mak­ing mate­r­i­al inside that was parked off the road. The van pulled away right when deputies arrived. They fol­lowed it to Car­ril­lo’s house in Ben Lomond and when they approached the vehi­cle they were met with gun­fire and mul­ti­ple impro­vised explo­sives thrown at them. One deputy, Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller, was killed and oth­ers were injured. Car­ril­lo was tak­en into cus­tody alive after being shot and wound­ed.

    Here’s the tie-in to a pre­vi­ous mur­der that sus­pi­cious took place near­by some of the George Floyd protests: on May 29th, Fed­er­al Pro­tec­tive Ser­vices Offi­cer Dave Patrick Under­wood was killed with stand­ing out­side guard­ing the Ronald V. Del­lums Fed­er­al Build­ing dur­ing protests. A white van with no license plates was seen speed­ing away from the crime scene. As we’ll see in the third arti­cle excerpt below, they have it nar­rowed down to a white 1997–2002 Ford E‑250 or E‑350, so it’s a more spe­cif­ic descrip­tion than just “a white van” and Car­ril­lo’s van pre­sum­ably match­es that descrip­tion. The descrip­tion of a mys­tery van that appeared to sense­less­ly mur­der a fed­er­al secu­ri­ty guard right near­by the George Floyd protests which is pre­cise­ly what we would expect from the ‘Booga­loo Bois’ and oth­er far right groups who have been open­ly talk­ing with each oth­er about stag­ing vio­lent attacks against law enforce­ment in the mid­dle of the protests in order to cre­ate chaos.

    So is there any­thing in Car­ril­lo’s back­ground or state­ments that would sug­gest a motive? Well, as we’ll see, Car­ril­lo, who is His­pan­ic, report­ed­ly expressed dis­gusts over police bru­tal­i­ty both on Face­book and after get­ting arrest­ed, telling offi­cers, “This is what I came here to fight. I’m sick of these god­damn police.” And yet as we’ll see, his Face­book page also indi­cates a Lib­er­tar­i­an ide­ol­o­gy and it turns out Car­ril­lo is essen­tial­ly an elite Air Force mil­i­tary police offi­cer. He’s a team leader in the elite Phoenix Raven unit, a group describes as pro­vid­ing “secu­ri­ty for Air Mobil­i­ty Com­mand air­craft tran­sit­ing high ter­ror­ist and crim­i­nal threat areas.” So a Lib­er­tar­i­an elite mil­i­tary police offi­cer ran­dom­ly mur­ders a secu­ri­ty guard for no appar­ent rea­son near­by the George Floyd protests and was dri­ving around with bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als. And when he’s caught and arrest­ed after a dead­ly shootout he tells offi­cers he did it all over being upset over the police. Hmm­mm....:

    ABC News

    FBI probes pos­si­ble link between Air Force sergeant sus­pect­ed in ambush killing of CA deputy and offi­cer’s mur­der
    A fed­er­al offi­cer was shot to death dur­ing protests in Oak­land on May 29.

    By Bill Hutchin­son, Alex Stone, Josh Mar­golin and Eliz­a­beth McLaugh­lin
    June 7, 2020, 3:31 PM

    An active-duty U.S. Air Force sergeant sus­pect­ed of wield­ing a rifle and impro­vised explo­sives in the ambush killing of a 38-year-old North­ern Cal­i­for­nia sher­if­f’s deputy is also being inves­ti­gat­ed for a pos­si­ble con­nec­tion to the fatal shoot­ing last month of a fed­er­al offi­cer dur­ing a protest in Oak­land, mul­ti­ple sources told ABC News on Sun­day.

    The sus­pect, Steven Car­ril­lo, 32, was tak­en into cus­tody on Sat­ur­day after he was wound­ed in a shootout with law enforce­ment offi­cers in the San­ta Cruz Moun­tains, about 35 miles west of San Jose, offi­cials said.

    Car­ril­lo is alleged to have fatal­ly shot Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller and injured anoth­er deputy when he attacked them with a rifle and mul­ti­ple impro­vised explo­sives in Ben Lomond, Cal­i­for­nia, author­i­ties said. A Cal­i­for­nia High­way Patrol offi­cer was also wound­ed dur­ing a shootout that erupt­ed as offi­cers moved to take Car­ril­lo into cus­tody, offi­cials said.

    “In my 32-year career, this is my worst day I’ve ever expe­ri­enced,” San­ta Cruz Coun­ty Sher­iff Jim Hart said at a news con­fer­ence on Sat­ur­day evening. “Today we lost one of our own and he was a true hero.”

    Car­ril­lo is an active-duty sergeant assigned to the 60th Secu­ri­ty Forces Squadron based at Travis Air Force Base in Fair­field, Cal­i­for­nia, about 100 miles north­east of Ben Lomond, 2nd Lt. Mike Lon­go­ria, a spokesman for the base, told ABC News on Sun­day. Lon­go­ria referred all oth­er ques­tions about Car­ril­lo to the San­ta Cruz Coun­ty Sher­if­f’s Office.

    Mul­ti­ple law enforce­ment sources told ABC News that the FBI is inves­ti­gat­ing a pos­si­ble link between the dead­ly ambush in San­ta Cruz Coun­ty and the May 29 killing of Fed­er­al Pro­tec­tive Ser­vices Offi­cer Dave Patrick Under­wood in Oak­land.

    Under­wood, 53, was guard­ing the Ronald V. Del­lums Fed­er­al Build­ing dur­ing protests that broke out in the Bay Area city over the police-involved killing of George Floyd in Min­neapo­lis, Min­neso­ta, when he was shot to death while stand­ing out­side the build­ing, offi­cials said.

    A white car­go van that appeared to not have license plates was spot­ted rac­ing from the scene of Under­wood’s slay­ing, accord­ing to the FBI, who released secu­ri­ty pho­tos of the vehi­cle last week. The FBI warned that the “occu­pants of the van should be con­sid­ered armed and dan­ger­ous.”

    The dead­ly attack on Sat­ur­day unfold­ed after a caller con­tact­ed a 911 dis­patch­er at 1:30 p.m. to report see­ing guns and bomb-mak­ing mate­r­i­al inside a sus­pi­cious van parked off the road in the San­ta Cruz Moun­tains, Hart said.

    Gutzwiller and oth­er sher­if­f’s deputies arrived at the scene just as the van was pulling away. They fol­lowed the van to a house in Ben Lomond and as they approached the vehi­cle gun­fire rang out.

    “As deputies began inves­ti­gat­ing, they were ambushed with gun­fire and mul­ti­ple impro­vised explo­sives,” Hart said.

    Anoth­er deputy was either shot or struck by bomb shrap­nel and was hit by a vehi­cle as the sus­pect drove out of the dri­ve­way of the home, he said.

    With­in min­utes after the attack, 911 dis­patch­ers received mul­ti­ple calls from peo­ple report­ing a car­jack­ing near­by and offi­cers from police agen­cies through­out San­ta Cruz Coun­ty raced to the scene, accord­ing to Hart.

    He said Car­ril­lo was arrest­ed after being shot and wound­ed. He said a Cal­i­for­nia High­way Patrol offi­cer was also shot in the hand dur­ing the ordeal.

    Car­ril­lo was tak­en to a local hos­pi­tal where he was treat­ed and released to the cus­tody of sher­if­f’s deputies.

    The FBI and the San­ta Cruz Dis­trict Attor­ney’s Office are inves­ti­gat­ing the inci­dent.

    Hart said Car­il­lo was arrest­ed on charges of mur­der, assault with a dead­ly weapon, car­jack­ing “and a myr­i­ad of oth­er charges.”

    “There’s a lot that we don’t know at this point. It’s still a very flu­id sit­u­a­tion,” Hart said. “I ask that the com­mu­ni­ty be patient as we go through this inves­ti­ga­tion and the griev­ing process.”

    ...

    An Air Force spokesper­son said Car­ril­lo arrived at Travis Air Force Base in June 2018 and was a team leader on the Phoenix Raven unit. That group is com­prised of “spe­cial­ly trained secu­ri­ty forces per­son­nel ded­i­cat­ed to pro­vid­ing secu­ri­ty for Air Mobil­i­ty Com­mand air­craft tran­sit­ing high ter­ror­ist and crim­i­nal threat areas,” accord­ing to an Air Force web­site.

    ————

    “FBI probes pos­si­ble link between Air Force sergeant sus­pect­ed in ambush killing of CA deputy and offi­cer’s mur­der” by Bill Hutchin­son, Alex Stone, Josh Mar­golin and Eliz­a­beth McLaugh­lin; ABC News; 06/07/2020

    An Air Force spokesper­son said Car­ril­lo arrived at Travis Air Force Base in June 2018 and was a team leader on the Phoenix Raven unit. That group is com­prised of “spe­cial­ly trained secu­ri­ty forces per­son­nel ded­i­cat­ed to pro­vid­ing secu­ri­ty for Air Mobil­i­ty Com­mand air­craft tran­sit­ing high ter­ror­ist and crim­i­nal threat areas,” accord­ing to an Air Force web­site.”

    Yep, this guy was a team leader on the Phoenix Raven unit. That’s lit­er­al­ly elite Air Force mil­i­tary police. And yet, as the fol­low­ing arti­cle describes, Car­ril­lo was quite open after get­ting arrest­ed with his motive: “This is what I came here to fight. I’m sick of these god­damn police.”

    And yet, as reporters dis­cov­ered, his friends from the Air Force were absolute­ly stunned that he would have done some­thing like this. While his Face­book page is already down jour­nal­ists cap­tures a pro­file pic­ture that lists him as a Lib­er­tar­i­an. But it also turns out he was post­ing on Face­book var­i­ous mes­sages sym­pa­thet­ic to the pro­test­ers. For exam­ple, on June 5th, he wrote, “Who need antifa to start riots when you have the police to do it for you...” And on May 31st he repost­ed a meme that said, “I’ll nev­er let racist white peo­ple make me for­get about the dope white peo­ple I know exist. I love y’all.” The post includes fist emo­jis of dif­fer­ent skin tones, and both of the “whites” in the meme were crossed out. Car­ril­lo wrote, “The only race that mat­ters, the human race.” That’s the ear­li­est exam­ple list­ed in the arti­cle of Car­ril­lo post­ing memes relat­ed to race rela­tions and police bru­tal­i­ty on his Face­book page. And what’s inter­est­ing about that is, of course, that all of these posts came after the shoot­ing of Dave Patrick Under­wood on May 29. So it would be inter­est­ing to know if these types of posts lit­er­al­ly only start­ed show­ing up on his Face­book page after May 29 or if there’s a longer-track record of this. Either way, the fact of the mat­ter is this was a Lib­er­tar­i­an mil­i­tary police offi­cer who appears to be behind this law enforce­ment killing spree alleged­ly moti­vat­ed by out­rage over police bru­tal­i­ty:

    ABC News7

    I‑TEAM: Air Force sergeant arrest­ed on sus­pi­cion for killing of deputy in San­ta Cruz Coun­ty

    By Dan Noyes
    Mon­day, June 8, 2020 1:21AM

    BEN LOMOND, Calif. (KGO) — The ABC7 I‑Team has new infor­ma­tion about the sus­pect in the death of 38-year-old San­ta Cruz Coun­ty Sher­if­f’s Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller.

    ...

    The FBI is inves­ti­gat­ing whether Car­ril­lo is also respon­si­ble for the shoot­ing at the Oak­land Fed­er­al Build­ing that killed secu­ri­ty offi­cer Pat Under­wood and injured his part­ner on May 29th. Secu­ri­ty cam­eras caught this white van as the side door opened and gun­fire erupt­ed.

    Sat­ur­day’s inci­dent began when some­one spot­ted Car­ril­lo in a white van with weapons and bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als. Sher­if­f’s deputies fol­lowed the van back to his Ben Lomond house, where author­i­ties say he ambushed offi­cers, fir­ing on them and throw­ing explo­sives, killing Sgt. Gutzwiller. He bolt­ed in a white sedan, hit­ting anoth­er offi­cer. A female deputy was on the radio when that hap­pened; you can hear her scream.

    Short­ly after his arrest, Car­ril­lo may have revealed a motive for the attack.

    Dur­ing his arrest, Steven Car­ril­lo shout­ed at offi­cers, “This is what I came here to fight. I’m sick of these god­damn police.”

    He gets gar­bled, but then men­tions police “use of force”.

    Car­ril­lo yelled, “Lis­ten!”

    The I‑Team has con­firmed Car­ril­lo is an active duty mil­i­tary police offi­cer, a staff sergeant at Travis Air Force Base in Fair­field. His for­mer col­leagues are baf­fled that, in effect, a cop would tar­get cops.

    His friend, Justin Ehrhardt, is a retired Air Force mil­i­tary police offi­cer. “It just breaks my heart, the offi­cers who were impact­ed and their fam­i­lies, we’re sup­posed to be on the same side.”

    Ehrhardt told us he spoke with Car­ril­lo just a month ago, about his plans to retire from the ser­vice. “He was look­ing for­ward to get­ting out of Cal­i­for­nia, but there was noth­ing even brought up in a neg­a­tive light bout any­thing with police at all.”

    Car­ril­lo’s Face­book page has been tak­en down, but I cap­tured his pro­file pic­ture that lists him as Lib­er­tar­i­an, and his friends have been send­ing me screen­shots from the past month. It’s clear Car­ril­lo was grow­ing increas­ing­ly upset about police exces­sive force. June 5th, he wrote, “Who need antifa to start riots when you have the police to do it for you...”

    Just min­utes before yes­ter­day’s killing, he post­ed this from the Holo­caust Muse­um — “the ear­ly warn­ing signs of Fas­cism”.

    On his Face­book page on May 31, Car­ril­lo repost­ed a meme that said, “I’ll nev­er let racist white peo­ple make me for­get about the dope white peo­ple I know exist. I love y’all.” The post includes fist emo­jis of dif­fer­ent skin tones, and both of the “whites” in the meme were crossed out. Car­ril­lo wrote, “The only race that mat­ters, the human race.

    Justin Ehrhardt tells us, Car­ril­lo was also hav­ing a hard time with his wife’s sui­cide in 2018. She was an Air Force Air­man 1st Class, found dead in an off-base hotel in South Car­oli­na.

    “A lot of regret, I think was there and it was just chal­leng­ing for him. But even with all that none of us the peo­ple I talked to who were sta­tioned with him even once thought this would hap­pen at all.”

    ———–

    “I‑TEAM: Air Force sergeant arrest­ed on sus­pi­cion for killing of deputy in San­ta Cruz Coun­ty” by Dan Noyes; ABC News7; 06/08/2020

    “The I‑Team has con­firmed Car­ril­lo is an active duty mil­i­tary police offi­cer, a staff sergeant at Travis Air Force Base in Fair­field. His for­mer col­leagues are baf­fled that, in effect, a cop would tar­get cops.”

    A cop tar­get­ing cops. That’s the sit­u­a­tion here. And Car­ril­lo did­n’t hide this alleged motive. He yelled it at the police dur­ing his arrest:

    ...
    Short­ly after his arrest, Car­ril­lo may have revealed a motive for the attack.

    Dur­ing his arrest, Steven Car­ril­lo shout­ed at offi­cers, “This is what I came here to fight. I’m sick of these god­damn police.”

    He gets gar­bled, but then men­tions police “use of force”.

    Car­ril­lo yelled, “Lis­ten!”
    ...

    And yet his friends, like retired Air Force mil­i­tary police offi­cer Justin Ehrhardt, expressed shock that he would ever do this. Accord­ing to Ehrhardt, Car­ril­lo talked about retir­ing last month with him and yet “there was noth­ing even brought up in a neg­a­tive light bout any­thing with police at all.” Now, grant­ed, per­haps Car­ril­lo would­n’t be inclined to com­plain about the police to a retired mil­i­tary police offi­cer friend, but it’s inter­est­ing that all of the exam­ples giv­en of Car­ril­lo’s Face­book posts about the police came after the May 29th mur­der of Under­wood:

    ...
    His friend, Justin Ehrhardt, is a retired Air Force mil­i­tary police offi­cer. “It just breaks my heart, the offi­cers who were impact­ed and their fam­i­lies, we’re sup­posed to be on the same side.”

    Ehrhardt told us he spoke with Car­ril­lo just a month ago, about his plans to retire from the ser­vice. “He was look­ing for­ward to get­ting out of Cal­i­for­nia, but there was noth­ing even brought up in a neg­a­tive light bout any­thing with police at all.”

    Car­ril­lo’s Face­book page has been tak­en down, but I cap­tured his pro­file pic­ture that lists him as Lib­er­tar­i­an, and his friends have been send­ing me screen­shots from the past month. It’s clear Car­ril­lo was grow­ing increas­ing­ly upset about police exces­sive force. June 5th, he wrote, “Who need antifa to start riots when you have the police to do it for you...”

    Just min­utes before yes­ter­day’s killing, he post­ed this from the Holo­caust Muse­um — “the ear­ly warn­ing signs of Fas­cism”.

    On his Face­book page on May 31, Car­ril­lo repost­ed a meme that said, “I’ll nev­er let racist white peo­ple make me for­get about the dope white peo­ple I know exist. I love y’all.” The post includes fist emo­jis of dif­fer­ent skin tones, and both of the “whites” in the meme were crossed out. Car­ril­lo wrote, “The only race that mat­ters, the human race.
    ...

    So did Steven Car­ril­lo only recent­ly start express­ing con­cern about police bru­tal­i­ty fol­low­ing the out­break of the George Floyd protests or is this a long-stand­ing thing with him. In fair­ness, maybe he would­n’t have want­ed to express those kinds of sen­ti­ments while work­ing as the team leader of an elite mil­i­tary police offi­cer. But if we’re to believe he real­ly did go on this killing spree to express his out­rage over the death of George Floyd we would have to assume he’s held extreme­ly intense feel­ings about these mat­ters for a while.

    It’s also worth recall­ing that one of the fac­tors that was con­tribut­ing to the strange out­reach efforts between the far right ‘Booga­loo Bois’ move­ment and the pro­test­ers is the loathing of law enforce­ment felt by some, but not all, mem­bers of far right (espe­cial­ly the ‘accel­er­a­tionist’ neo-Nazis). So giv­en Car­ril­lo’s appar­ent lib­er­tar­i­an lean­ings it’s pos­si­ble he fell into one of those ‘lib­er­tar­i­an who hates the police’ groups. And yet this was an elite Air Force mil­i­tary police offi­cer. It’s all quite odd.

    Final­ly, here’s a short arti­cle from June 5th, the day before the shootout, about the FBI ask­ing for help to iden­ti­fy the white van involved with the May 29th shoot­ing. As the arti­cle points out, they have this van nar­rowed down to a 1997–2002 Ford E‑250 or E‑350:

    ABC7

    FBI seek­ing help iden­ti­fy­ing sus­pec­t’s van in Oak­land Fed­er­al Build­ing shoot­ing

    By Alix Mar­ti­choux
    Fri­day, June 5, 2020 4:30PM

    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) — The FBI is ask­ing for the pub­lic’s help iden­ti­fy­ing the white van dri­ven by the sus­pect or sus­pects who opened fired on the Fed­er­al Build­ing in down­town Oak­land Fri­day night.

    The shoot­er or shoot­ers hit and killed a secu­ri­ty offi­cer, Pat Under­wood. Anoth­er offi­cer was also injured.

    The FBI is look­ing for a white van that’s either a 1997–2002 Ford E‑250 or E‑350. They say the van did­n’t appear to have license plates attached at the time of the shoot­ing.

    The agency is ask­ing busi­ness own­ers and res­i­dents in the down­town area to check sur­veil­lance footage from the night of Fri­day, May 29 between 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. for any sign of the van. The area they’re inter­est­ed is between Grand Avenue and 7th Street to the north and south, and Mar­ket and Web­ster streets to the west and east.

    They are also ask­ing any­one who may have infor­ma­tion on the firearms used in the attack to come for­ward.

    ...

    ———–

    “FBI seek­ing help iden­ti­fy­ing sus­pec­t’s van in Oak­land Fed­er­al Build­ing shoot­ing” by Alix Mar­ti­choux; ABC7; 06/05/2020

    “The FBI is look­ing for a white van that’s either a 1997–2002 Ford E‑250 or E‑350. They say the van did­n’t appear to have license plates attached at the time of the shoot­ing.”

    Is Steven Car­ril­lo a gen­uine­ly aggriev­ed lib­er­tar­i­an who anony­mous­ly attacked a fed­er­al build­ing right next to the protests, an act that almost seems designed to spark a broad­er con­flict between the pro­test­ers and law enforce­ment? Or was this elite mil­i­tary police offi­cer act­ing as a far right provo­ca­teur? He’s clear­ly anx­ious to play the role of the aggriev­ed pro­test­er as his admis­sions to the arrest­ing offi­cers made clear. So we’re going to see how this inves­ti­ga­tion plays out but it seems pret­ty clear that he had much more vio­lence in mind. Those IEDs in his van weren’t just for fun. He was a His­pan­ic man plan­ning on bomb­ing some­thing in the name of the pro­test­ers, which hap­pens to be the ‘Booga­loo Bois’ dream sce­nario and a pro­test­er night­mare sce­nario. A Booga­loo dream sce­nario that would have been the per­fect pre­text for send­ing mil­i­tary troops into the streets and por­trayed the pro­test­ers as a dan­ger­ous insur­gent army. Is it just a coin­ci­dence that the guy car­ry­ing out this Booga­loo dream sce­nario that would have jus­ti­fied the mil­i­tary tak­ing on domes­tic polic­ing pow­ers hap­pens to be a Lib­er­tar­i­an elite mil­i­tary pol­i­cy offi­cer? That’s what Steven Car­ril­lo would have us believe. It’s a reminder if that if there’s one major fac­tor in these protests that should uni­fy pro­test­ers with the police it’s the far right extrem­ists who are more than hap­py to get both of them killed.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | June 8, 2020, 1:59 pm
  30. Oh look at that: it turns out Steven Car­ril­lo — the Air Force elite mil­i­tary police team leader who killed a police offi­cer in Ben Lomond, Cal­i­for­nia, dur­ing a shootout that was trig­gered by reports of guns and bomb-mak­ing equip­ment in his van and who is sus­pect­ed of killing a fed­er­al secu­ri­ty guard near­by a police bru­tal­i­ty protest in Oak­land — hap­pened to write in blood var­i­ous ‘Booga­loo’ and Lib­er­tar­i­an slo­gans right being arrest­ed. So the guy who’s open­ing act of vio­lence was killing a fed­er­al secu­ri­ty guard David Patrick Under­wood — who hap­pened to be African Amer­i­can — appears to be a far right provo­ca­teur. Sur­prise!

    And as we’ll see in the arti­cle excerpts below, he was also using these far right slo­gans when talk­ing to var­i­ous bystanders before being appre­hend­ed. One of the phras­es he wrote in blood was sim­ply ‘boog’, a clear ‘boola­gloo’ ref­er­ence. Anoth­er was, “I become unrea­son­able”, which is a ref­er­ence to the Mar­vin Heemey­er. Heemey­er became a far right folk hero in 2004 after he lev­eled his town using a weaponized bull­doz­er — the “Kill­doz­er” — in revenge for being upset with the local zon­ing reg­u­la­tions and ref­er­ences to Heeymey and the “Kill­doz­er” are appar­ent­ly quite com­mon on ‘booga­loo’ cha­t­rooms and social media groups.

    Car­ril­lo also wrote “Stop the duop­oly”, a fre­quent slo­gan used by Lib­er­tar­i­an can­di­dates. For­mer Lib­er­tar­i­an pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Gary John­son launched a “Stop the Duop­oly” cam­paign to pro­mote third-par­ty can­di­dates in 2018. As we’ve seen, Car­ril­lo was an avowed Lib­er­tar­i­an based on his social media posts. As we’re going to see below, one of the peo­ple Car­ril­lo spoke to while flee­ing from the police before get­ting appre­hend­ed report­ed that Car­ril­lo told him, “I’m not a bad guy. I’m just sick of all the dual­i­ty bullsh*t.” He also had a his­to­ry of call­ing for the abo­li­tion of the Bureau of Alco­hol, Tobac­co, and Firearms (ATF).

    So the guy appears to have pret­ty clear anar­cho-far right lean­ings. And yet, as we’ve also seen, he start­ed post­ing anti-police bru­tal­i­ty con­tent on Face­book in the last few weeks. And now we learn that one of his last Face­book posts was a link to a group “A Gun Page for Poors Who Know They Are Poors,” a the now noto­ri­ous video of police in Buf­fa­lo shov­ing a 75 year old man to the group. And just min­utes before he waged his attack on the offi­cers in Ben Lomond he post­ed some sort of anti-fas­cist image on his Face­book page. So the pic­ture emerg­ing is one of Car­ril­lo one of being a long-time Lib­er­tar­i­an ide­o­logue who only recent­ly has been try­ing to asso­ciate him­self with the protest move­ment right before and dur­ing this anti-police killing spree. Which leaves the big ques­tion of whether or not this elite mil­i­tary police offi­cer’s attacks on the police for dri­ven from gen­uine anti-police beliefs or pure cyn­i­cism intend­ed to bring about the ‘booga­loo’ civ­il war:

    NBC News

    Man charged in deputy ambush scrawled extrem­ist ‘Booga­loo’ phras­es in blood
    Steven Car­ril­lo, accused of killing a sher­if­f’s deputy in San­ta Cruz Coun­ty, Cal­i­for­nia, wrote the words on the hood of a car, pros­e­cu­tors said

    By Brandy Zadrozny, Ben Collins and Andrew Blankstein
    June 11, 2020, 8:04 PM CDT

    Steven Car­ril­lo, a Cal­i­for­nia man who was charged with mur­der after he ambushed two San­ta Cruz Coun­ty deputies, scrawled phras­es tied to an online far-right extrem­ist move­ment in blood on a car short­ly before he was detained.

    Car­ril­lo killed Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller, crit­i­cal­ly injured anoth­er deputy and threw pipe bombs at police on June 6th, San­ta Cruz Dis­trict Attor­ney Jef­frey S. Rosell alleged on Thurs­day.

    Before he was appre­hend­ed, Car­ril­lo scrawled the word “boog” and “I became unrea­son­able” in blood on the hood of a car. “Boog” is short for booga­loo, a far-right anti-gov­ern­ment move­ment that began on the extrem­ist site 4chan and aims to start a sec­ond Amer­i­can civ­il war.

    The phrase “I became unrea­son­able” has become a meme in pub­lic Booga­loo com­mu­ni­ties on Face­book, which dis­cuss weapons and fan­ta­size about a sec­ond civ­il war. One recent meme on Face­book shows a man hold­ing a Booga­loo flag at a protest, along with the phrase “Become unrea­son­able.”

    “I became unrea­son­able” is a ref­er­ence to a quote writ­ten by Mar­vin Heemey­er, an anti-gov­ern­ment extrem­ist who bull­dozed 13 build­ings in Gran­by, Col­orado, in ret­ri­bu­tion for a zon­ing dis­pute. Heemey­er killed him­self after the ram­page, which occurred on June 4, 2004, almost 16 years to the day of Carrillo’s attack.

    Heemey­er is known by the nick­name Kill­doz­er in extrem­ist groups online and is fre­quent­ly quot­ed in Booga­loo Dis­cord chats and Face­book groups.

    “Heemey­er is revered in Booga­loo groups,” said Megan Squire, a com­put­er sci­ence pro­fes­sor at Elon Uni­ver­si­ty who tracks online extrem­ism and is mon­i­tor­ing sev­er­al pri­vate Booga­loo groups online.

    Ref­er­enc­ing a nick­name for Heemey­er, Squire said, “Kill­doz­er rep­re­sents the inter­sec­tion between the lib­er­tar­i­an ide­al of small gov­ern­ment and the mil­i­tant fan­ta­sy of the Booga­loo. Heemey­er, as Kill­doz­er, metic­u­lous­ly planned a revenge fan­ta­sy on some local gov­ern­ment enti­ties that he blamed for exces­sive reg­u­la­tion of his busi­ness.”

    Car­ril­lo also wrote the phrase “Stop the duop­oly” in blood on the car hood. “Stop the duop­oly” is an oth­er­wise non­vi­o­lent polit­i­cal slo­gan fre­quent­ly pushed by third par­ty and lib­er­tar­i­an can­di­dates.

    Carrillo’s pres­ence on Face­book most­ly fea­tured sup­port for a lib­er­tar­i­an pres­i­den­tial can­di­date, anti-police sen­ti­ment and pro-gun caus­es. His pro­file pic­ture showed George Wash­ing­ton and oth­er Amer­i­can pres­i­dents hold­ing mod­ern weapons and tac­ti­cal gear.

    In one of his last posts on Face­book, Car­ril­lo post­ed a now infa­mous video of two Buf­fa­lo police offi­cers shov­ing a 75-year-old man to the ground in a group called “A Gun Page for Poors Who Know They Are Poors.”

    ...

    Online Booga­loo mes­sag­ing has grown “increas­ing­ly extreme” amid pan­dem­ic lock­downs and nation­wide protests over the killing of George Floyd, accord­ing to a recent report by the Net­work Con­ta­gion Research Insti­tute, an inde­pen­dent non­prof­it orga­ni­za­tion of sci­en­tists and engi­neers that tracks mis­in­for­ma­tion and hate speech across social media.

    “Ele­ments of The Booga­loo have evolved from a gath­er­ing of mili­tia enthu­si­asts and Sec­ond Amend­ment advo­cates into a full-fledged vio­lent extrem­ist group, which inspires lone wolf actors and cell-like actors alike,” said Joel Finkel­stein, direc­tor of the insti­tute.

    “Giv­en recent events and the inabil­i­ty of law enforce­ment to grasp and inter­cept this new mode of dis­trib­uted ter­ror, we think an increase in these kinds of vio­lent attacks against police are almost inevitable,” Finkel­stein said.

    Booga­loo groups are pub­lic and read­i­ly acces­si­ble on Face­book, but a com­pa­ny spokesper­son told NBC News last week that the social net­work is now “pre­vent­ing these Pages and groups from being rec­om­mend­ed on Face­book.”

    Face­book accounts tied to three men who were arrest­ed and charged with mul­ti­ple state and fed­er­al vio­la­tions of con­spir­a­cy to cause destruc­tion at protests in Las Vegas were pulled from the plat­form last week. At least one of the men, Stephen T. Par­shall, repeat­ed­ly post­ed to Booga­loo groups on Face­book, includ­ing the phrase “Start. Foment­ing. Insur­rec­tion.”

    ————-

    “Man charged in deputy ambush scrawled extrem­ist ‘Booga­loo’ phras­es in blood” by Brandy Zadrozny, Ben Collins and Andrew Blankstein; NBC News; 06/11/2020

    “Carrillo’s pres­ence on Face­book most­ly fea­tured sup­port for a lib­er­tar­i­an pres­i­den­tial can­di­date, anti-police sen­ti­ment and pro-gun caus­es. His pro­file pic­ture showed George Wash­ing­ton and oth­er Amer­i­can pres­i­dents hold­ing mod­ern weapons and tac­ti­cal gear.

    A pro­file pic with George Wash­ing­ton and oth­er Amer­i­can pres­i­dents hold­ing mod­ern weapons and tac­ti­cal gear. That sure does­n’t sound like some­one with left-wing sen­si­bil­i­ties. And yet one of his very last Face­book posts appeared to be an attempt to asso­ciate him­self with the protests, albeit in a gun-nut kind of way:

    ...
    In one of his last posts on Face­book, Car­ril­lo post­ed a now infa­mous video of two Buf­fa­lo police offi­cers shov­ing a 75-year-old man to the ground in a group called “A Gun Page for Poors Who Know They Are Poors.”
    0...

    But when he was about to final­ly get appre­hend­ed he appears to drop the act and starts writ­ing ‘booga­loo’ slo­gans in blood on the hood of a car:

    ...
    Before he was appre­hend­ed, Car­ril­lo scrawled the word “boog” and “I became unrea­son­able” in blood on the hood of a car. “Boog” is short for booga­loo, a far-right anti-gov­ern­ment move­ment that began on the extrem­ist site 4chan and aims to start a sec­ond Amer­i­can civ­il war.

    The phrase “I became unrea­son­able” has become a meme in pub­lic Booga­loo com­mu­ni­ties on Face­book, which dis­cuss weapons and fan­ta­size about a sec­ond civ­il war. One recent meme on Face­book shows a man hold­ing a Booga­loo flag at a protest, along with the phrase “Become unrea­son­able.”

    “I became unrea­son­able” is a ref­er­ence to a quote writ­ten by Mar­vin Heemey­er, an anti-gov­ern­ment extrem­ist who bull­dozed 13 build­ings in Gran­by, Col­orado, in ret­ri­bu­tion for a zon­ing dis­pute. Heemey­er killed him­self after the ram­page, which occurred on June 4, 2004, almost 16 years to the day of Carrillo’s attack.

    Heemey­er is known by the nick­name Kill­doz­er in extrem­ist groups online and is fre­quent­ly quot­ed in Booga­loo Dis­cord chats and Face­book groups.

    “Heemey­er is revered in Booga­loo groups,” said Megan Squire, a com­put­er sci­ence pro­fes­sor at Elon Uni­ver­si­ty who tracks online extrem­ism and is mon­i­tor­ing sev­er­al pri­vate Booga­loo groups online.

    Ref­er­enc­ing a nick­name for Heemey­er, Squire said, “Kill­doz­er rep­re­sents the inter­sec­tion between the lib­er­tar­i­an ide­al of small gov­ern­ment and the mil­i­tant fan­ta­sy of the Booga­loo. Heemey­er, as Kill­doz­er, metic­u­lous­ly planned a revenge fan­ta­sy on some local gov­ern­ment enti­ties that he blamed for exces­sive reg­u­la­tion of his busi­ness.”
    ...

    And then there’s the “Stop the duop­oly” phrase he also wrote on the hood of the car in blood:

    ...
    Car­ril­lo also wrote the phrase “Stop the duop­oly” in blood on the car hood. “Stop the duop­oly” is an oth­er­wise non­vi­o­lent polit­i­cal slo­gan fre­quent­ly pushed by third par­ty and lib­er­tar­i­an can­di­dates.
    ...

    So when he was about to be appre­hend­ed sud­den­ly the guy lets his inner ‘booga­loo’ Lib­er­tar­i­an out. But as the fol­low­ing arti­cle describes, he was­n’t just try­ing to con­vey these motives by writ­ing slo­gans in blood. He was telling them to var­i­ous bystanders, includ­ing the peo­ple he was try­ing to car­jack. Notably, he did­n’t shoot the peo­ple when they resist­ed. In fact, he apol­o­gized and left the car, telling a bystander “I’m not a bad guy. I’m just sick of all the dual­i­ty bullsh*t.” But accord­ing to his deceased wife’s par­ents, Car­ril­lo was a dom­i­neer­ing nar­cis­sist with “dead eyes” who direct­ly caused their daugh­ters’ sui­cide in 2018:

    Bay Area News Group

    San­ta Cruz deputy killing: Hero­ic cit­i­zen brought accused killer’s ram­page to an end

    Steve Car­ril­lo led elite anti-ter­ror­ist unit at Travis Air Force Base

    By JULIA PRODIS SULEK | jsulek@bayareanewsgroup.com, NATE GARTRELL | ngartrell@bayareanewsgroup.com and JOHN WOOLFOLK | jwoolfolk@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group
    PUBLISHED: June 8, 2020 at 12:34 p.m. | UPDATED: June 9, 2020 at 5:32 a.m.

    BEN LOMOND — Call­ing it “remark­able” and “hero­ic,” San­ta Cruz Sher­iff Jim Hart on Mon­day laud­ed a hum­ble unarmed res­i­dent for out­smart­ing and tak­ing down the Air Force sergeant accused of ambush­ing two deputy sher­iffs in the San­ta Cruz moun­tains this week­end with bombs and an assault rifle, killing one offi­cer and hos­pi­tal­iz­ing the oth­er.

    The dra­mat­ic scene was cap­tured on a neighbor’s cell phone video Sat­ur­day, as a res­i­dent in a red T‑shirt and kha­ki shorts calm­ly pinned the sus­pect — 32-year-old Steven Car­ril­lo — on his grav­el dri­ve­way while anoth­er man and his dog loomed over them. “Hey, we are hold­ing him on the ground right here,” neigh­bors shout­ed as they fran­ti­cal­ly waved down offi­cers up the road. “There’s a gun … please!”

    Inves­ti­ga­tors say Car­ril­lo ambushed the deputies with gun­fire and pipe bombs after they respond­ed to a call about a white van with guns and explo­sives inside. Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller was killed, leav­ing behind his preg­nant wife and their young child. The sec­ond offi­cer was struck by shrap­nel and by a vehi­cle as the gun­man fled.

    The ambush and fran­tic search trau­ma­tized this small moun­tain town, where wit­ness­es on Mon­day described how the Car­ril­lo alleged­ly leapt into at least two vehi­cles try­ing to steal them. At one point, when con­front­ed by a shop­keep­er while stand­ing behind a parked car, he said, “I’m not a bad guy. I’m just sick of all the dual­i­ty bullsh*t.”

    The tragedy also brought up painful mem­o­ries for the fam­i­ly of Carrillo’s late wife, Moni­ka, who killed her­self two years ago, leav­ing their two small chil­dren to be raised by her par­ents. The fam­i­ly has long blamed Car­ril­lo for dri­ving her to sui­cide, call­ing him nar­cis­sis­tic and dom­i­neer­ing.

    “He did a lot of dam­age to our fam­i­ly just by destroy­ing my niece,” Char­lotte Tol­liv­er-Lopes told the Bay Area News Group in a phone inter­view from her home in Ari­zona. “It dev­as­tat­ed my fam­i­ly.”

    The actions of the hero in the red T‑shirt brought spe­cial praise from Sher­iff Hart.

    “It was a remark­able, remark­able, hero­ic thing that that res­i­dent did,” Hart said. “He does not want to be named. He doesn’t want any recog­ni­tion. But at a lat­er date, if I have to per­son­al­ly dri­ve up there and see him, we will pro­vide him with a com­men­da­tion and a citizen’s medal because this guy could have done a lot more dam­age in our com­mu­ni­ty had that res­i­dent not tak­en the action that he did.”

    Car­ril­lo hid for per­haps 15 or 20 min­utes after the attempt­ed car­jack­ings before emerg­ing near­by in the grav­el yard of the man in the red T‑shirt, wit­ness­es said Mon­day.

    Armed with what Hart said was an AR-15 type rifle, Car­ril­lo demand­ed the resident’s car. The man went inside to grab a key, but when he hand­ed it to Car­ril­lo, he tack­led him and knocked away his rifle, Hart said.

    The sus­pect wasn’t done though. In a tense scuf­fle, Car­ril­lo pulled a pipe bomb from his pock­et and tried to ignite it before the res­i­dent knocked it away, Hart said. He then pulled a pis­tol from his waist­band, which the res­i­dent also swat­ted away as oth­ers rushed in to help him keep the sus­pect — who locals say was once a wrestler at San Loren­zo Val­ley High — pinned until deputy sher­iffs arrived.

    As four offi­cers sur­round­ed Car­ril­lo with their weapons drawn, he appeared to say some­thing in the video like: “Hey lis­ten every­body. This is what I’m sick of.”

    “He was dan­ger­ous, he was an angry man,” Hart said. “Just his actions alone up there said a lot about him. He used some very heavy weapon­ry to shoot at our deputies and then threw incen­di­ary devices at them.”

    Car­ril­lo was an active duty U.S. Air Force sergeant who served in a secu­ri­ty detail at Travis Air Force Base in Fair­field. He joined the U.S. Air Force in 2009, and was trans­ferred to Travis in 2018. He was a mem­ber of the 60th Secu­ri­ty Force Squadron and team leader of the Phoenix Ravens, a spe­cial­ly-trained secu­ri­ty force that pro­tects air­craft from ter­ror­ist and “crim­i­nal threats.”

    Fed­er­al inves­ti­ga­tors are try­ing to deter­mine whether the Sat­ur­day attack is con­nect­ed with the killing of a fed­er­al secu­ri­ty offi­cer in Oak­land late last month. Both inci­dents involved a white van.

    But John Ben­nett, spe­cial agent in charge of the FBI San Fran­cis­co bureau, said Mon­day any con­nec­tion remains under inves­ti­ga­tion and would not com­ment fur­ther.

    When Car­ril­lo was still on the loose Sat­ur­day after­noon, police blocked off High­way 9, the main artery through Ben Lomond, caus­ing a traf­fic back­up. A few of the vehi­cles pulled into the park­ing lot of Red­wood Coast Dis­pen­sary to wait for the road to be reopened, includ­ing soft­ware engi­neer Troy Hunter in his green Porsche With the win­dows rolled down, he heard a man across the high­way call­ing out to him, “You’re going to tell my sto­ry.”

    Hunter dis­missed him as “an inter­est­ing moun­tain per­son,” until Car­ril­lo walked up to the pas­sen­ger win­dow and demand­ed he unlock the door. When Car­ril­lo reached inside, the spe­cial spin­ning lock pre­vent­ed him from open­ing the door. So Car­ril­lo, with his gun, man­aged to climb in through the win­dow.

    “He kept telling me he didn’t want to hurt me,” Hunter said. “I told him he could take my car. I turned it off and exit­ed the vehi­cle and took the keys as I left.” The igni­tion is on the left side of the steer­ing wheel.

    Moments lat­er, Mark Kowal­s­ki who works at the dis­pen­sary, came out­side and came eye to eye with Car­ril­lo, who was hid­ing behind a parked car.

    “He looked at me and I looked at him,” Kowal­s­ki said. When Car­ril­lo said he was “sick of the dual­i­ty,” Kowal­s­ki took it to mean the split between “the haves and the havenots.”

    Car­ril­lo, who was injured dur­ing the ram­page, remained hos­pi­tal­ized Mon­day and in cus­tody.

    Dur­ing a news con­fer­ence Mon­day, the sher­iff was pained to even say his name. He said the com­mu­ni­ty was show­ing an out­pour­ing of sup­port for his offi­cers and griev­ing for the fam­i­ly of Sgt. Gutzwiller, a 14-year vet­er­an. “He was a good man, a good police offi­cer and a friend,” Hart said. “Damon was a hero, some­body we’ll nev­er for­get.”

    Hart said the sec­ond deputy, who was iden­ti­fied as Alexan­der Spencer in a gofundme page Mon­day, was shot in the chest and saved by his bul­let-proof vest, but the pow­er­ful round still caused “sig­nif­i­cant inter­nal trau­ma.” He also suf­fered wounds from bomb frag­ments and being struck by the flee­ing suspect’s car.

    “He’s in good spir­its, he’s in sta­ble con­di­tion,” Hart said.

    Tol­liv­er-Lopes, the great aunt of Carrillo’s late wife, said that when she heard that Car­ril­lo was accused of ambush­ing the deputies, she said that “fits his per­son­al­i­ty.”

    “Sneak up behind you — that’s the way he would behave,” she said. “I don’t think he has the guts to face you. He’s the type who would do it around the cor­ner. He wouldn’t con­front any­one dead on — a woman, yeah, he feels supe­ri­or to them, but a man, no.”

    The cou­ple, who grew up in the neigh­bor­ing moun­tain towns of Ben Lomond and Boul­der Creek, were both in the Air Force and had two young chil­dren. The boy and girl have been liv­ing with Moni­ka Carrillo’s par­ents in Boul­der Creek since some­time after her death.

    Her great niece com­mit­ted sui­cide while in an Air Force train­ing pro­gram in late May 2018 in North or South Car­oli­na, she said. Car­ril­lo was in Cal­i­for­nia at the time, but Tol­liv­er-Lopes says her fam­i­ly has long blamed him for her death and com­plained to the Air Force about his behav­ior.

    While his wife was away, Tol­liv­er-Lopes said, Car­ril­lo appar­ent­ly was “kicked out” of their apart­ment and he and their two chil­dren lived briefly in a van.

    “Some­thing hap­pened on the tele­phone with him and it was right after that that she died,” Tol­liv­er-Lopes said. “She was nev­er good enough. She was stu­pid, she was fat, she was this, she was that. Noth­ing she did was ever good enough. So we lost a beau­ti­ful life in our fam­i­ly.”

    Tol­liv­er-Lopes said she always had a bad feel­ing about Car­ril­lo.

    “He had dead eyes,” she said. “He didn’t strike me as the type of man who had any empa­thy. He looked at you, but he didn’t see you for you. He just saw some­body beneath him.”

    ...

    ————-

    “San­ta Cruz deputy killing: Hero­ic cit­i­zen brought accused killer’s ram­page to an end” by JULIA PRODIS SULEK, NATE GARTRELL, and JOHN WOOLFOLK; Bay Area News Group; 06/08/2020

    “The ambush and fran­tic search trau­ma­tized this small moun­tain town, where wit­ness­es on Mon­day described how the Car­ril­lo alleged­ly leapt into at least two vehi­cles try­ing to steal them. At one point, when con­front­ed by a shop­keep­er while stand­ing behind a parked car, he said, “I’m not a bad guy. I’m just sick of all the dual­i­ty bullsh*t.”

    “I’m not a bad guy. I’m just sick of all the dual­i­ty bullsh*t.” That’s what Car­ril­lo was telling the ran­dom peo­ple he was encoun­ter­ing as he was flee­ing from the police. So he does­n’t appear to have been in the kind of mind­set where he was just ran­dom­ly killing peo­ple like a typ­i­cal spree shoot­er. But he was :

    ...
    When Car­ril­lo was still on the loose Sat­ur­day after­noon, police blocked off High­way 9, the main artery through Ben Lomond, caus­ing a traf­fic back­up. A few of the vehi­cles pulled into the park­ing lot of Red­wood Coast Dis­pen­sary to wait for the road to be reopened, includ­ing soft­ware engi­neer Troy Hunter in his green Porsche With the win­dows rolled down, he heard a man across the high­way call­ing out to him, “You’re going to tell my sto­ry.”

    Hunter dis­missed him as “an inter­est­ing moun­tain per­son,” until Car­ril­lo walked up to the pas­sen­ger win­dow and demand­ed he unlock the door. When Car­ril­lo reached inside, the spe­cial spin­ning lock pre­vent­ed him from open­ing the door. So Car­ril­lo, with his gun, man­aged to climb in through the win­dow.

    “He kept telling me he didn’t want to hurt me,” Hunter said. “I told him he could take my car. I turned it off and exit­ed the vehi­cle and took the keys as I left.” The igni­tion is on the left side of the steer­ing wheel.

    Moments lat­er, Mark Kowal­s­ki who works at the dis­pen­sary, came out­side and came eye to eye with Car­ril­lo, who was hid­ing behind a parked car.

    “He looked at me and I looked at him,” Kowal­s­ki said. When Car­ril­lo said he was “sick of the dual­i­ty,” Kowal­s­ki took it to mean the split between “the haves and the havenots.”
    ...

    At the same time, he also appeared to be will­ing to blow him­self up with one of his pipebombs, along with the man who ulti­mate­ly tack­led and appre­hend­ed him. And when the offi­cers arrive, he’s caught on video say­ing, “Hey lis­ten every­body. This is what I’m sick of.” So when he was arrest­ed he was try­ing to ensure every­one assumed his motive was pri­mar­i­ly a grudge against the police:

    ...
    Car­ril­lo hid for per­haps 15 or 20 min­utes after the attempt­ed car­jack­ings before emerg­ing near­by in the grav­el yard of the man in the red T‑shirt, wit­ness­es said Mon­day.

    Armed with what Hart said was an AR-15 type rifle, Car­ril­lo demand­ed the resident’s car. The man went inside to grab a key, but when he hand­ed it to Car­ril­lo, he tack­led him and knocked away his rifle, Hart said.

    The sus­pect wasn’t done though. In a tense scuf­fle, Car­ril­lo pulled a pipe bomb from his pock­et and tried to ignite it before the res­i­dent knocked it away, Hart said. He then pulled a pis­tol from his waist­band, which the res­i­dent also swat­ted away as oth­ers rushed in to help him keep the sus­pect — who locals say was once a wrestler at San Loren­zo Val­ley High — pinned until deputy sher­iffs arrived.

    As four offi­cers sur­round­ed Car­ril­lo with their weapons drawn, he appeared to say some­thing in the video like: “Hey lis­ten every­body. This is what I’m sick of.”
    ...

    It’s worth not­ing that being sub­dued by the man in the red shirt is prob­a­bly the act that saved Car­ril­lo’s life. After killing an offi­cer he was almost cer­tain­ly going to be shot and killed by police when they found him if he was­n’t already pinned to the ground by that man.

    Final­ly, note how the fam­i­ly of his wife, who com­mit­ted sui­cide in 2018, blames Car­ril­lo for her death and view him as a dan­ger­ous dom­i­neer­ing nar­cis­sist:

    ...
    The tragedy also brought up painful mem­o­ries for the fam­i­ly of Carrillo’s late wife, Moni­ka, who killed her­self two years ago, leav­ing their two small chil­dren to be raised by her par­ents. The fam­i­ly has long blamed Car­ril­lo for dri­ving her to sui­cide, call­ing him nar­cis­sis­tic and dom­i­neer­ing.

    “He did a lot of dam­age to our fam­i­ly just by destroy­ing my niece,” Char­lotte Tol­liv­er-Lopes told the Bay Area News Group in a phone inter­view from her home in Ari­zona. “It dev­as­tat­ed my fam­i­ly.”

    ...

    “Some­thing hap­pened on the tele­phone with him and it was right after that that she died,” Tol­liv­er-Lopes said. “She was nev­er good enough. She was stu­pid, she was fat, she was this, she was that. Noth­ing she did was ever good enough. So we lost a beau­ti­ful life in our fam­i­ly.”

    Tol­liv­er-Lopes said she always had a bad feel­ing about Car­ril­lo.

    “He had dead eyes,” she said. “He didn’t strike me as the type of man who had any empa­thy. He looked at you, but he didn’t see you for you. He just saw some­body beneath him.”
    ...

    So we have this odd mix of some­one who has been described by fam­i­ly mem­bers as being a dom­i­neer­ing nar­cis­sist who lacks empa­thy and drove his wife to sui­cide, a charge that’s not hard to believe giv­en his actions. And yet when he was try­ing to car­jack peo­ple after flee­ing the police he was clear­ly try­ing to con­vey to the ter­ri­fied strangers that he did­n’t want to hurt them and he’s not a “bad guy” but was just “sick of all the dual­i­ty bullsh*t.” It’s a weird mix.

    Next, here’s anoth­er arti­cle that gives a few more details on Car­ril­lo’s behav­ior dur­ing his car­jack­ing attempts. It sounds like after Car­ril­lo tried to car­jack the first car in the park­ing lot of the mar­i­jua­na dis­pen­sary he jumped into a sec­ond parked car but then left the car after the occu­pant screamed. So oth­er than his attempts to blow him­self up when he was wrestling with the man who ulti­mate­ly appre­hend­ed him it appears that Car­ril­lo was exclu­sive­ly focus­ing his vio­lence on police offi­cers.

    The arti­cle also includes more inter­views with his friend from the mil­i­tary, Justin Erhardt, who report­ed­ly has­n’t seen Car­ril­lo since 2014 but has been main­tain­ing con­tact with him over Face­book. Accord­ing to Ehrhardt, Car­ril­lo’s recent posts about police bru­tal­i­ty was out of char­ac­ter, some­thing not hard to believe giv­en his Face­book pro­file of heav­i­ly armed for­mer pres­i­dents and gen­er­al focus on Lib­er­tar­i­an­ism and gun rights:

    The San Fran­cis­co Chron­i­cle

    San­ta Cruz Coun­ty deputy’s sus­pect­ed killer post­ed crit­i­cism of police in hours before shoot­ing

    Matthias Gafni and Ale­jan­dro Ser­ra­no
    June 8, 2020 Updat­ed: June 9, 2020 9:51 a.m.

    In the 48 hours before Steven Car­ril­lo alleged­ly shot a San­ta Cruz Coun­ty sheriff’s deputy to death in an ambush, the Air Force staff sergeant who led an elite pro­tec­tion unit post­ed a flur­ry of Face­book posts that were crit­i­cal of police bru­tal­i­ty and law enforcement’s respons­es to the Black Lives Mat­ter protests.

    “Who needs antifa to start riots when you have the police to do it for you,” Car­ril­lo wrote Fri­day, shar­ing a post about tear gas fired at pro­test­ers in Rich­mond, Va.

    Car­ril­lo post­ed anoth­er meme before Saturday’s shootout with deputies in Ben Lomond, mock­ing the idea that tear gas kills the coro­n­avirus and com­ment­ing: “Unfor­tu­nate­ly it just kills peo­ple with asth­ma, RIP Sarah Gross­man.” Car­ril­lo was refer­ring to the Ohio woman who died after get­ting tear gassed by police at a protest in Colum­bus.

    San­ta Cruz Coun­ty Sher­iff Jim Hart said Mon­day it was too soon to say if Car­ril­lo had an ani­mus toward police, but he called him “dan­ger­ous” and offered addi­tion­al details about an attack that appeared to be pre­med­i­tat­ed and includ­ed mul­ti­ple impro­vised explo­sives.

    ...

    Law enforce­ment offi­cials said it was too soon to announce a motive for Carrillo’s alleged attack on Gutzwiller and anoth­er unnamed deputy who was wound­ed and in sta­ble con­di­tion Mon­day, but a fel­low air­man of Carrillo’s who served with him at Hill Air Force Base out­side of Salt Lake City called the suspect’s recent social media posts out of char­ac­ter.

    “Just crazy to think that a few min­utes before he does this he’s post­ing things on Face­book,” said Justin Ehrhardt, who met Car­ril­lo a decade ago.

    The two last saw each oth­er in per­son in 2014 but remained in com­mu­ni­ca­tion, exchang­ing com­ments and mes­sages on Face­book and talk­ing on the phone just few weeks ago.

    More recent­ly, Ehrhardt said, posts on Carrillo’s Face­book page, which appears to have been tak­en down, turned polit­i­cal as he start­ed post­ing about police bru­tal­i­ty. When anoth­er col­league sent a Face­book mes­sage to Ehrhardt about the shoot­ing, he thought, “There is no way this could be Car­ril­lo.”

    Posts about reform­ing police and hold­ing law enforce­ment offi­cials account­able were typ­i­cal for Car­ril­lo, but he nev­er con­doned vio­lence — on social media or in per­son, Ehrhardt said. He also shared an anti-fas­cism screed and gun rights arti­cle.

    “There was noth­ing ever to the extent of, ‘They should die,’ or doing any­thing like that,” Ehrhardt said. “It threw a lot of us off.”

    Ehrhardt took screen­shots of about a dozen recent posts, which he shared with The Chron­i­cle.

    It appears Car­ril­lo last post­ed at 1:22 p.m. Sat­ur­day, min­utes before his alleged attack on the deputies. That post shared an anti-fas­cism image.

    Ehrhardt said Car­il­lo has “lost every bit of respect” from his friends.

    “None of us are ever going to con­done what he did,” Ehrhardt said. “It’s not a reflec­tion of how we are in the mil­i­tary at all.”

    Car­ril­lo, 32, was active duty at Travis Air Force Base in Fair­field, serv­ing as the team leader for a spe­cial­ly trained secu­ri­ty group called the Phoenix Ravens, said Tech­ni­cal Sgt. Traci Keller.

    He arrived at the North­ern Cal­i­for­nia base in 2018, and led the team that is tasked with pro­vid­ing secu­ri­ty for air­craft tran­si­tion­ing air fields where secu­ri­ty is unknown or addi­tion­al secu­ri­ty is deemed nec­es­sary.

    Car­ril­lo also per­formed recruit­ing duties in Brent­wood and served at Hill Air Force Base and Lack­land Air Force Base in Texas.

    ...

    Fed­er­al author­i­ties found pipe bombs, bomb-mak­ing equip­ment, a large amount of ammu­ni­tion and mul­ti­ple firearms at the scene, Hart said.

    Video of Carrillo’s arrest doesn’t appear to indi­cate an injury, but Hart said the alleged gun­man was shot at some point.

    Offi­cials said Car­ril­lo fled the shootout with deputies but made it only a short dis­tance to a small retail area along the two-lane High­way 9, where he alleged­ly attempt­ed to car­jack mul­ti­ple peo­ple.

    Two employ­ees of a mar­i­jua­na dis­pen­sary said they spoke to the armed Car­ril­lo in a park­ing lot and he asked them for their keys. After turn­ing him down, the pair said, Car­ril­lo entered the driver’s side of a parked car, only to imme­di­ate­ly exit after the pas­sen­ger screamed and he apol­o­gized.

    Car­ril­lo then walked about 50 feet to the unnamed resident’s house, where he final­ly would be sub­dued.

    ...

    ———-

    “San­ta Cruz Coun­ty deputy’s sus­pect­ed killer post­ed crit­i­cism of police in hours before shoot­ing” by Matthias Gafni and Ale­jan­dro Ser­ra­no; The San Fran­cis­co Chron­i­cle; 06/08/2020

    “Law enforce­ment offi­cials said it was too soon to announce a motive for Carrillo’s alleged attack on Gutzwiller and anoth­er unnamed deputy who was wound­ed and in sta­ble con­di­tion Mon­day, but a fel­low air­man of Carrillo’s who served with him at Hill Air Force Base out­side of Salt Lake City called the suspect’s recent social media posts out of char­ac­ter.”

    That’s how Justin Ehrhardt describes Car­ril­lo’s recent social media posts express­ing con­cerns about police bru­tal­i­ty: out of char­ac­ter. And this is com­ing from some­one who has pri­mar­i­ly been in con­tact with Car­ril­lo over Face­book since 2014 so he pre­sum­ably has a good sense of what Car­ril­lo posts about. And yet min­utes before police arrive at his res­i­dence and the shootout ensues, Car­ril­lo was shar­ing an anti-fas­cism image on social media:

    ...
    Car­ril­lo post­ed anoth­er meme before Saturday’s shootout with deputies in Ben Lomond, mock­ing the idea that tear gas kills the coro­n­avirus and com­ment­ing: “Unfor­tu­nate­ly it just kills peo­ple with asth­ma, RIP Sarah Gross­man.” Car­ril­lo was refer­ring to the Ohio woman who died after get­ting tear gassed by police at a protest in Colum­bus.

    ...

    “Just crazy to think that a few min­utes before he does this he’s post­ing things on Face­book,” said Justin Ehrhardt, who met Car­ril­lo a decade ago.

    The two last saw each oth­er in per­son in 2014 but remained in com­mu­ni­ca­tion, exchang­ing com­ments and mes­sages on Face­book and talk­ing on the phone just few weeks ago.

    More recent­ly, Ehrhardt said, posts on Carrillo’s Face­book page, which appears to have been tak­en down, turned polit­i­cal as he start­ed post­ing about police bru­tal­i­ty. When anoth­er col­league sent a Face­book mes­sage to Ehrhardt about the shoot­ing, he thought, “There is no way this could be Car­ril­lo.”

    Posts about reform­ing police and hold­ing law enforce­ment offi­cials account­able were typ­i­cal for Car­ril­lo, but he nev­er con­doned vio­lence — on social media or in per­son, Ehrhardt said. He also shared an anti-fas­cism screed and gun rights arti­cle.

    “There was noth­ing ever to the extent of, ‘They should die,’ or doing any­thing like that,” Ehrhardt said. “It threw a lot of us off.”

    Ehrhardt took screen­shots of about a dozen recent posts, which he shared with The Chron­i­cle.

    It appears Car­ril­lo last post­ed at 1:22 p.m. Sat­ur­day, min­utes before his alleged attack on the deputies. That post shared an anti-fas­cism image.
    ...

    And, again, note how he could have just shot peo­ple and tak­en their cars but he did­n’t. When he attempt­ed to car­jack as sec­ond per­son he fled and apol­o­gized after the occu­pant screamed:

    ...
    Offi­cials said Car­ril­lo fled the shootout with deputies but made it only a short dis­tance to a small retail area along the two-lane High­way 9, where he alleged­ly attempt­ed to car­jack mul­ti­ple peo­ple.

    Two employ­ees of a mar­i­jua­na dis­pen­sary said they spoke to the armed Car­ril­lo in a park­ing lot and he asked them for their keys. After turn­ing him down, the pair said, Car­ril­lo entered the driver’s side of a parked car, only to imme­di­ate­ly exit after the pas­sen­ger screamed and he apol­o­gized.

    Car­ril­lo then walked about 50 feet to the unnamed resident’s house, where he final­ly would be sub­dued.
    ...

    Part of what makes his unwill­ing­ness to just vio­lence take one of these cars by force is what it hints about his mind­set: unlike spree killers who shoot peo­ple seem­ing­ly at ran­dom because they are mad at ‘soci­ety’ and ready to die going down in a blaze of vio­lent ‘glo­ry’, Car­ril­lo seemed to gen­uine­ly want to escape. Oth­er than his attempts to light a pipebomb after get­ting sub­dued by the man in the red shirt he seemed to want to escape and live. It’s the kind of mind­set that again rais­es the ques­tion: did Car­ril­lo real­ly ‘snap’ because he just could­n’t stand police bru­tal­i­ty and the ‘dual­i­ty bullsh*t’ any­more? Because he does­n’t appear to have snapped to point where he was ready to die, some­thing that fur­ther sug­gests his orig­i­nal intent was stok­ing the ‘booga­loo’ dream sce­nario by killing fed­er­al offi­cers and hop­ing it would be blamed on the pro­test­ers.

    Final­ly, here’s anoth­er arti­cle with Justin Ehrhardt about his inter­ac­tions with Car­ril­lo. Ehrhardt, who now run a finan­cial plan­ning com­pa­ny, says he recent­ly spoke with Car­ril­lo about finan­cial plan­ning and noth­ing seemed off about it. Ehrhardt also appears to be speak­ing on behalf of the Raven Phoenix Unit to put dis­tance between Car­ril­lo and the elite Air Force unit. But when recount­ing his and oth­ers’ expe­ri­ences with Car­ril­lo, Ehrhardt described it as a shock to every­one. “Every sin­gle per­son is shocked by it. A lot of peo­ple are say­ing they are shocked, because he was one of the nicest guys they dealt with when they were sta­tioned with him.”:

    Good Times

    Offi­cer Who Served with Ben Lomond Gun­man Speaks Out

    Steven Car­ril­lo was U.S. Air Force’s ver­sion of a mil­i­tary police offi­cer

    By Todd Guild
    Post­ed on June 9, 2020

    As a mem­ber of the elite Air Mobil­i­ty Command’s 60th Secu­ri­ty Forces Squadron—a unit also known as the Phoenix Raven Team—Steven Car­ril­lo was the U.S. Air Force’s ver­sion of a mil­i­tary police offi­cer.

    For a time, one of Carrillo’s jobs was to issue weapons at the begin­ning of shifts to gate guards and patrol offi­cers, and to col­lect them at the end of shifts. That is accord­ing to Justin Erhardt, who served with Car­ril­lo in the secu­ri­ty forces.

    Car­ril­lo is sus­pect­ed of killing a San­ta Cruz Coun­ty Sheriff’s Deputy on Sat­ur­day, June 6, and injur­ing anoth­er deputy and police offi­cer dur­ing a short but vio­lent crime spree.

    As a mem­ber of the secu­ri­ty forces, Car­ril­lo received train­ing in hand-to-hand com­bat, anti-ter­ror­ism tech­niques and “ver­bal judo,” which is the art of using words to de-esca­late dan­ger­ous sit­u­a­tions.

    Secu­ri­ty forces mem­bers also receive “exten­sive train­ing” in rec­og­niz­ing and han­dling impro­vised explo­sive devices, Erhardt said.

    ...

    Erhardt, who left the Air Force in 2014, said he was will­ing to speak to reporters as a way to dis­tance the pres­ti­gious unit from Carrillo’s actions.

    “He doesn’t reflect our secu­ri­ty forces com­mu­ni­ty,” Erhardt said. “Even though we’ve had great expe­ri­ences with him, as soon as he start­ed plan­ning these ambush­es and attacks he lost all bit of respect from us, obvi­ous­ly.”

    Erhardt, who runs his own finan­cial plan­ning com­pa­ny, said he kept in touch with Car­ril­lo via Face­book, and spoke with him recent­ly about his finan­cial future. He said that news of the attack came as a bomb­shell.

    While Car­ril­lo made his dis­dain for police bru­tal­i­ty known through Face­book posts over the past few weekshe is a self-pro­claimed Lib­er­tar­i­an who is against gov­ern­ment involve­ment and wants to abol­ish the Bureau of Alco­hol, Tobac­co and Firearms—there was no indi­ca­tion he was con­sid­er­ing a vio­lent attack, Erhardt said.

    “It just threw me off like it threw a lot of us off,” he said. “Every sin­gle per­son is shocked by it. A lot of peo­ple are say­ing they are shocked, because he was one of the nicest guys they dealt with when they were sta­tioned with him.”

    But in the end, that is irrel­e­vant, Erhardt said.

    “He doesn’t rep­re­sent our career field at all with his actions,” he said. “I just want to make sure the com­mu­ni­ty knows that, the type of per­son he is now, it doesn’t mat­ter how nice of a per­son he was in the past.”

    ————

    “Offi­cer Who Served with Ben Lomond Gun­man Speaks Out” by Todd Guild; Good Times; 06/10/2020

    “While Car­ril­lo made his dis­dain for police bru­tal­i­ty known through Face­book posts over the past few weekshe is a self-pro­claimed Lib­er­tar­i­an who is against gov­ern­ment involve­ment and wants to abol­ish the Bureau of Alco­hol, Tobac­co and Firearms—there was no indi­ca­tion he was con­sid­er­ing a vio­lent attack, Erhardt said.”

    A self-pro­claimed Lib­er­tar­i­an who is against gov­ern­ment involve­ment and wants to abol­ish the Bureau of Alco­hol, Tobac­co and Firearms. That’s how Erhardt described Car­ril­lo. But he also seemed to be vouch­ing for the oth­er peo­ple who inter­act­ed with Car­ril­lo in the mil­i­tary by empha­siz­ing that every sin­gle per­son who knew him from the mil­i­tary is shocked by these events because Car­ril­lo is one of the nicest peo­ple they’ve ever worked with:

    ...
    “He doesn’t reflect our secu­ri­ty forces com­mu­ni­ty,” Erhardt said. “Even though we’ve had great expe­ri­ences with him, as soon as he start­ed plan­ning these ambush­es and attacks he lost all bit of respect from us, obvi­ous­ly.”

    Erhardt, who runs his own finan­cial plan­ning com­pa­ny, said he kept in touch with Car­ril­lo via Face­book, and spoke with him recent­ly about his finan­cial future. He said that news of the attack came as a bomb­shell.

    ...

    “It just threw me off like it threw a lot of us off,” he said. “Every sin­gle per­son is shocked by it. A lot of peo­ple are say­ing they are shocked, because he was one of the nicest guys they dealt with when they were sta­tioned with him.”

    But in the end, that is irrel­e­vant, Erhardt said.

    “He doesn’t rep­re­sent our career field at all with his actions,” he said. “I just want to make sure the com­mu­ni­ty knows that, the type of per­son he is now, it doesn’t mat­ter how nice of a per­son he was in the past.”
    ...

    All in all, we have quite a jum­ble of con­tra­dic­tions here: a self-pro­claimed Lib­er­tar­i­an elite mil­i­tary police offi­cer who is described as scary and lack­ing empa­thy by his wife’s fam­i­ly but described as the nicest per­son any­one has met by his for­mer mil­i­tary col­leagues sud­den­ly starts post­ing con­cerns about police bru­tal­i­ty right before he like­ly car­ried out an assas­si­na­tion of an African Amer­i­can fed­er­al secu­ri­ty guard near­by the police bru­tal­i­ty protests in Oak­land. Then, days lat­er, his van gets report­ed by some­one who saw what appeared to be bomb-mak­ing mate­ri­als in it. The police track the van down to his house where he ambush­es them, killing one offi­cer. Short­ly before that ambush he’s post­ing more anti-fas­cism memes on Face­book. And after flee­ing the police he pro­ceeds to attempt to car­jack two vehi­cles but is apolo­getic about it and refus­es to use force to actu­al­ly take the cars while explain­ing his actions with vague Lib­er­tar­i­an slo­gans. He’s then appre­hend­ed at a near­by house where the man in the red shirt knocks the AR-15 out of his hands and wres­tles him to the ground, at which point Car­ril­lo fails at attempt­ing to light a pipe bomb. And at some point dur­ing this time he man­ages to write “boog” and “I become unrea­son­able”, two far right slo­gans, in blood on the hood of a car. So the pic­ture that emerges is that Car­ril­lo start­ed off with the intent of depict­ing him­self as sym­pa­thet­ic to the pro­test­ers but as it became clear that he was like­ly about to die he start­ing telling peo­ple and leav­ing Lib­er­tar­i­an and ‘booga­loo’ slo­gans. It’s as if Car­ril­lo was try­ing to ensure he would become a ‘booga­loo’ folk hero after he was killed by the police. And that rais­es an inter­est­ing ques­tion: So is Car­ril­lo a ‘booga­loo’ hero yet?

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | June 12, 2020, 1:57 pm
  31. And there we have it: the FBI just for­mal­ly charged Steven Car­ril­lo in the dead­ly May 29 shoot­ing of fed­er­al secu­ri­ty guard David Patrick Under­wood out­side of the George Floyd protests in Oak­land, Cal­i­for­nia. That was to be large­ly expect­ed.

    Here’s the unex­pect­ed twist: an accom­plice was just arrest­ed. Robert Alvin Jus­tus Jr., a white man of Mill­brae, Cal­i­for­nia, just turned him­self in to the FBI, although it sounds like he was already under sur­veil­lance in con­nec­tion to this case. Accord­ing to the FBI, both Jus­tus and Car­ril­lo trav­eled to Oak­land for the pur­pose of using the chaos of the protests to car­ry­ing out the assas­si­na­tion of law enforce­ment, with Jus­tus dri­ving the vehi­cle and Car­ril­lo fir­ing the gun. Elec­tron­ic mes­sages exchanged between the two indi­cate that the assas­si­na­tions were the intent of their trip. It sounds like Car­ril­lo used a pri­vate­ly-made machine gun with a silencer to car­ry out the attack.

    So while we don’t yet know the full pic­ture, at a min­i­mum we can say this was­n’t Steven Car­ril­lo sud­den­ly going off the deep end in response to police bru­tal­i­ty. Leav­ing the big ques­tion of whether or not this con­spir­a­cy was lim­it­ed to Car­ril­lo and Jus­tus or part of a larg­er ‘boogaloo’-backed oper­a­tion:

    ABC News7

    Fed­er­al offi­cer shoot­ing sus­pects Steven Car­ril­lo, Robert Jus­tus ‘came to Oak­land to kill cops,’ FBI says
    One of the sus­pects, Steven Car­ril­lo, has also been charged with killing San­ta Cruz Co. Sher­iff Deputy Damon Gutzwiller on June 6 in Ben Lomond.

    By Dan Noyes and Joce­lyn Fiset
    06/16/2020 Updat­ed

    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) — The FBI announced Tues­day that Air Force Staff Sgt. Steven Car­ril­lo has been fed­er­al­ly charged with mur­der and attempt­ed mur­der in the case of a fed­er­al secu­ri­ty offi­cer who was killed in a dri­ve-by shoot­ing on May 29 out­side the Fed­er­al Build­ing in Oak­land.

    Car­ril­lo is the sus­pect charged with killing San­ta Cruz Co. Sher­iff Deputy Damon Gutzwiller and wound­ing of four oth­er offi­cers in an ambush-style attack on June 6 in Ben Lomond.

    In addi­tion, the FBI has arrest­ed a sus­pect­ed accom­plice, Mill­brae res­i­dent Robert Alvin Jus­tus Jr. He is fed­er­al­ly charged with aid­ing and abet­ting in the mur­der of 53-year-old fed­er­al offi­cer Dave Patrick Under­wood and attempt­ed mur­der of a sec­ond secu­ri­ty offi­cer, who was crit­i­cal­ly injured in the Oak­land shoot­ing.

    The two con­tract secu­ri­ty offi­cers worked for Home­land Secu­ri­ty’s Fed­er­al Pro­tec­tive Ser­vice and had been mon­i­tor­ing a near­by protest over the death of George Floyd.

    The U.S. Attor­ney just said the van used in Oak­land Fed­er­al Build­ing shoot­ing was also used in the San­ta Cruz Co. attack. Author­i­ties say that Jus­tus is believed to have been the dri­ver of the van dur­ing the Oak­land attack while Car­ril­lo was the shoot­er.

    Author­i­ties say Car­ril­lo used a pri­vate­ly made machine gun with a silencer in the shoot­ing.

    John Ben­net, Spe­cial Agent in Charge of the FBI in San Fran­cis­co, said Car­ril­lo and Jus­tus used the protests on May 29 as a cov­er. “They came to Oak­land to kill cops.”

    “We believe Car­ril­lo and Jus­tice had cho­sen this date because the planned protest in Oak­land pro­vid­ed an oppor­tu­ni­ty for them to tar­get mul­ti­ple law enforce­ment per­son­nel and avoid appre­hen­sion to the large crowds attend­ing the demon­stra­tions, as described in detail in the com­plaint,” Ben­nett said.

    Cor­rect­ing for spelling. FBI was sur­veilling Robert Jus­tus of Mill­brae when he rode with par­ents to turn him­self in at FBI. Com­plaint says this pho­to shows him check­ing out Oak­land Fed Bldg before Car­ril­lo shot Pat Under­wood. https://t.co/f7ZY9VYNtw pic.twitter.com/Thx41uQEPh— Dan Noyes (@dannoyes) June 16, 2020

    Mes­sages exchanged that day indi­cat­ed a plan to trav­el and attack fed­er­al law enforce­ment offi­cers.

    Car­ril­lo, accord­ing to author­i­ties, used “his own blood” to write phras­es in a car he alleged­ly car­jacked. The phras­es, the U.S. Attor­ney explained, are asso­ci­at­ed with the Booga­loo move­ment.

    “The booga­loo term is used by extrem­ists to ref­er­ence a vio­lent upris­ing or impend­ing war in the Unit­ed States,” Ander­son said.

    Jus­tus was arrest­ed by the FBI and tak­en into fed­er­al cus­tody on June 11.

    ...

    Read the full com­plaint against Car­ril­lo here and the com­plaint against Jus­tus here here.

    ————

    “Fed­er­al offi­cer shoot­ing sus­pects Steven Car­ril­lo, Robert Jus­tus ‘came to Oak­land to kill cops,’ FBI says” by Dan Noyes and Joce­lyn Fiset; ABC News7; 06/16/2020

    ““We believe Car­ril­lo and Jus­tice had cho­sen this date because the planned protest in Oak­land pro­vid­ed an oppor­tu­ni­ty for them to tar­get mul­ti­ple law enforce­ment per­son­nel and avoid appre­hen­sion to the large crowds attend­ing the demon­stra­tions, as described in detail in the com­plaint,” Ben­nett said.”

    Based on the infor­ma­tion they have, inves­ti­ga­tors believe Car­ril­lo and Jus­tus were plan­ning on using the crowds of the protests to hide them­selves while they killed law enforce­ment. In oth­er words, this is pre­cise­ly the plan ‘booga­loo’ mem­bers were caught talk­ing about on leaked encrypt­ed chat boards: infil­trat­ing the protests and killing law enforce­ment in the hopes of spark­ing a broad­er con­flict between the pro­test­ers and police. The exact plan. A plan that involved a silenced pri­vate­ly made machine gun with a silencer:

    ...
    Author­i­ties say Car­ril­lo used a pri­vate­ly made machine gun with a silencer in the shoot­ing.

    John Ben­net, Spe­cial Agent in Charge of the FBI in San Fran­cis­co, said Car­ril­lo and Jus­tus used the protests on May 29 as a cov­er. “They came to Oak­land to kill cops.”

    ...

    Mes­sages exchanged that day indi­cat­ed a plan to trav­el and attack fed­er­al law enforce­ment offi­cers.
    ...

    And while we haven’t yet heard about Jus­tus’s ide­o­log­i­cal affil­i­a­tions, Car­ril­lo’s deci­sion to write ‘booga­loo’ slo­gans in blood fol­low­ing his shootout with deputies in Ben Lomond give us a pret­ty good idea of what those moti­va­tions are going to be:

    ...
    Car­ril­lo, accord­ing to author­i­ties, used “his own blood” to write phras­es in a car he alleged­ly car­jacked. The phras­es, the U.S. Attor­ney explained, are asso­ci­at­ed with the Booga­loo move­ment.

    “The booga­loo term is used by extrem­ists to ref­er­ence a vio­lent upris­ing or impend­ing war in the Unit­ed States,” Ander­son said.

    Jus­tus was arrest­ed by the FBI and tak­en into fed­er­al cus­tody on June 11.
    ...

    So a big ques­tion remain­ing in this case is the ques­tion of whether or not this was a con­spir­a­cy of two or part of a broad­er ‘booga­loo’ oper­a­tion. But that leads to the much larg­er ques­tion relat­ed all of the arson, loot­ing, and any oth­er attacks on law enforce­ment that have tak­en place in the con­text of these weeks of nation­al police bru­tal­i­ty protests in cities around the US: how much of all of that destruc­tion and vio­lence was in real­i­ty a far right false flag oper­a­tion? It’s a ques­tion we had to ask all along. But now we have a pair of ‘boogaloo’-connected indi­vid­u­als — one of whom hap­pens to be a high­ly trained enlist­ed mil­i­tary offi­cer — who were caught trav­el­ing to a protest with a silenced machine gun for the pur­pose of mur­der­ing law enforce­ment and blam­ing it on the pro­test­ers. And they did it. They real­ly did mur­der a fed­er­al secu­ri­ty guard right next to a protest. This isn’t just talk on an encrypt­ed ‘booga­loo’ chat room. So how much oth­er ‘booga­loo’ talk is get­ting trans­lat­ed into action that we haven’t learned about yet? We have no idea, but we can be pret­ty con­fi­dent this was­n’t the last of it. And that’s part of what makes this sto­ry poten­tial­ly so big: It’s the kind of crime sto­ry where the biggest part of the sto­ry is all the oth­er sim­i­lar crimes we nev­er hear about.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | June 16, 2020, 2:19 pm

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