Spitfire List Web site and blog of anti-fascist researcher and radio personality Dave Emory.

For The Record  

FTR #834 Compendium of Fascist Connections to the Zionist Movement

Dave Emory’s entire life­time of work is avail­able on a flash drive that can be obtained here. The new drive is a 32-gigabyte drive that is current as of the programs and articles posted by 12/19/2014. The new drive (available for a tax-deductible contribution of $65.00 or more) contains FTR #827.  (The previous flash drive was current through the end of May of 2012 and contained FTR #748.)

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This program was recorded in one, 60-minute segment

Introduction: Controversy in both Israel and the United States has surrounded the impending appearance by Benjamin Netanyahu before the U.S. Congress. The appearance stems from an invitation by House Speaker John Boehner, who was obviously moving to undercut and embarass Barack Obama.

Like the GOP, which has incorprated fascists and Nazis into its ranks, the Likud Party of Benjamin Netanyahu is no stranger to fascism.

This broadcast reviews and updates past and present links between the Israeli right-wing and fascist elements of various stripes.

Benjamin Netanyahu’s political views have evolved from those of his father, who was personal secretary to Vladimir Jabotinsky, head of the Betar, a fascist element within the Zionist movement.

Excerpting Miscellaneous Archive Show M30, the program sets forth the fascist ideology of “Ze’ev” (nee “Vladimir” Jabotinsky). (The program was recorded in the fall of 1983.) The text is excerpted from Alexander Cockburn’s article “History as the Propaganda of the Victors” in The Village Voice of 10/12/1982.

The program notes that Jabotinsky’s Betar: took military training under the auspices of Mussolini; had its cadre reviewed by Il Duce; saw their alliance with Mussolini as one of ideology not mere convenience; supported Mussolini’s invasion of Ethiopia; felt that Zionism should manifest itself as a form of fascism (underscoring the superiority of European peoples over the darker-skinned races).

Links between the Likud and Italian fascism have continued to this day. Next, we review the dis­cus­sion of a 1998 con­gress of the AN, the Ital­ian Fas­cist Party that is the direct lin­eal descen­dant of and heir to Mussolini’s black­shirts. Present at that meeting were GOP Representative Bob Young, representing the Republican Party, and Udi Cohen, representing the Likud Party of Benjamin Netanyahu. (This excerpt is taken from FTR #94, recorded on 5/5/1998.)

The recent meet­ing of an Israeli cab­i­net min­is­ter with a promi­nent Swedish fas­cist is the lat­est exam­ple of a long-standing fea­ture of the behav­ior of that country’s polit­i­cal right wing. Israelis and Zion­ists from the right side of the polit­i­cal spec­trum have main­tained con­tact and inter­ac­tion with ele­ments of the fas­cist international. In par­tic­u­lar, mem­bers of the Likud and other Israeli far-right par­ties have con­ducted polit­i­cal inter­face with Euro­pean Nazis and fascists.

Another right-wing Israeli polit­i­cal con­tin­gent has reached out to Euro­pean fas­cists. Com­muning with Russ­ian fas­cists, the “National Unity” bloc has impressed the leader of the National Demo­c­ra­tic Alliance, who feels the two groups have much in common.

Fol­low­ing on the heels of an Iraeli deputy minister’s schmooz­ing with a promi­nent Swedish neo-fascist financier, Aryeh Eldad’s hob­nob­bing with Ilya Lazarenko per­pet­u­ates the dis­turb­ing pat­tern of Zionist/fascist inter­face dat­ing back to the pre-World War II period.

Recapping more material from Miscellaneous Archive Show M30, the program details the abortive relationship between the Haganah and the SS. Prior to the Wannsee Conference and the commencement of the “Final Solution,” the SS and the Haganah actually formed an alliance to cooperate in promoting Jewish emigration to Palestine. This aborted cooperation was adopted to make Germany “Judenrein” (“Jew-Free”) and to drive a wedge into the British holdings in the Middle East.

We conclude by looking at the influence of the remarkable and deadly Bormann capital network in Israel. Contributing both directly from Latin America and through donations made through Jewish businessmen incorporated into the Bormann machine, the network is among the clandestine players in Israeli politics.

Program Highlights Include: Pre-war networking between Adolph Eichmann and elements of the Haganah; review of the GOP’s Nazi element; review of the role of Otto von Bolschwing in forming the GOP’s Nazi element; a synoptic overview on the absurdity of calling Israel and/or the Zionist movement as a whole “fascist.”

1a. Benjamin Netanyahu’s political views have evolved from those of his father, who was personal secretary to Vladimi Jabotinsky, head of the Betar, a fascist element within the Zionist movement.

“Ben-Zion Netanyahu Dies at 102: Father of Israeli Prime Minister” by Batsheva Sobelman; Los Angeles Times; 5/01/2012.

Historian Ben-Zion Netanyahu, the father of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the man said to have had the most profound influence on the conservative Israeli leader, died early Monday in his Jerusalem home. He was 102.

The elder Netanyahu served as the personal secretary of Zionism’s prominent Revisionist leader, Zeev Jabotinsky, in the United States during World War II, lobbying for the creation of a Jewish state. He also pursued his academic work, specializing in medieval Spanish Jewry and the roots of the Spanish Inquisition.

Many attribute the prime minister’s deep convictions and interest in history to his father’s unwavering hawkish beliefs; the Revisionist movement differed sharply from the socialist Zionists of the early 20th century and did not believe in partitioning what was Palestine during the British mandate into separate Jewish and Arab states. . . .

1b. More about the influence of the elder Netanyahu on his son:

“Received Wisdom? How the Ideology of Netanyahu’s Late Father Influenced the Son” by Karl Vick; Time; 5/02/2012.

. . . .But in recent decades Israeli politics came to be dominated by the Likud, the party founded on the philosophy of Ze’ev Jabotinksy, the man Benzion Netanyahu went to America to serve as secretary, and whose vision he carried on after Jabotinsky’s death. The ideology called for a “Greater Israel” that stretched across not only the West Bank but even across what is today Jordan,  land regarded as promised to the Jews in the view of Revisionist Zionism, as the movement was known. It was a robust, even militaristic movement that called for an “iron wall” between the newly founded state and the Arabs surrounding it. . . .

1c. Excerpting Miscellaneous Archive Show M30, the program sets forth the fascist ideology of “Ze’ev” (nee “Vladimir” Jabotinsky). (The program was recorded in the fall of 1983.) The text is excerpted from Alexander Cockburn’s article “History as the Propaganda of the Victors” in The Village Voice of 10/12/1982.

The program notes that Jabotinsky’s Betar: took military training under the auspices of Mussolini; had its cadre reviewed by Il Duce; saw their alliance with Mussolini as one of ideology not mere convenience; supported Mussolini’s invasion of Ethiopia; felt that Zionism should manifest itself as a form of fascism (underscoring the superiority of European peoples over the darker-skinned races).

2. Next, we review the dis­cus­sion of a 1998 con­gress of the AN, the Ital­ian Fas­cist Party that is the direct lin­eal descen­dant of and heir to Mussolini’s black­shirts. Present at that meeting were GOP Representative Bob Young, representing the Republican Party, and Udi Cohen, representing the Likud Party of Benjamin Netanyahu. (This excerpt is taken from FTR #94, recorded on 5/5/1998.)

3. The recent meet­ing of an Israeli cab­i­net min­is­ter with a promi­nent Swedish fas­cist is the lat­est exam­ple of a long-standing fea­ture of the behav­ior of that country’s polit­i­cal right wing. Israelis and Zion­ists from the right side of the polit­i­cal spec­trum continue to maintain con­tact and inter­ac­tion with ele­ments of the fas­cist international. In par­tic­u­lar, mem­bers of the Likud and other Israeli far-right par­ties have con­ducted polit­i­cal inter­face with Euro­pean Nazis and fascists. Note that Ayoob Kara also met with the head of the Aus­trian Free­dom Party, the neo-fascist party for­merly headed up by Jurg Haider.

“Deputy Min­is­ter Meets neo-Nazi Mil­lion­aire” by Eldad Beck; ynet­news.com; 7/4/2011.

 Deputy Min­is­ter Ayoob Kara met with Swedish-German mil­lion­aire Patrik Brinkmann who has ties with Ger­man neo-Nazi groups in Berlin over the week­end, Yedioth Ahronoth reported.

Brinkmann, who is try­ing to estab­lish a far-right anti-Islamic party in Ger­many claims he is not an anti-Semite, how­ever his pre­vi­ous close con­tacts with the Ger­man neo-Nazi party (NPD) and his past mem­ber­ship in another neo-Nazi party raise ques­tions regard­ing his ideology.

Brinkmann, 44, made his for­tune in the Swedish real estate busi­ness in the 1980s before becom­ing mixed in tax prob­lems in his home coun­try. As legal bat­tles were going on he used the major­ity of his finances for the estab­lish­ment of two research foun­da­tions which became closely affil­i­ated with far-right and neo-Nazi ele­ments in Germany. . . .

. . . Sev­eral months ago, Kara met with Aus­trian Free­dom Party leader Heinz-Christian Stra­che who was once active in neo-Nazi groups.  . . .

4. Another right-wing Israeli polit­i­cal con­tin­gent has reached out to Euro­pean fas­cists. Com­muning with Russ­ian fas­cists, the “National Unity” bloc has impressed the leader of the National Demo­c­ra­tic Alliance, who feels the two groups have much in common.

Fol­low­ing on the heels of an Iraeli deputy minister’s schmooz­ing with a promi­nent Swedish neo-fascist financier, Aryeh Eldad’s hob­nob­bing with Ilya Lazarenko per­pet­u­ates the dis­turb­ing pat­tern of Zionist/fascist inter­face dat­ing back to the pre-World War II period.

“The Unholy Alliance: How Israeli Wingnuts Befriended Russ­ian Hitlerophiles” by Sergey Romanov; Lit­tle Green Foot­balls; 7/14/2011.

Russ­ian nation­al­ists met in Israel with right-wing Zionists.

One of the lead­ers of Russia’s National Demo­c­ra­tic Alliance, who vis­ited Israel together with his col­leagues at the invi­ta­tion of religious-right-wing Zion­ists, came to the con­clu­sion that the two polit­i­cal forces have a lot in common …

Since last week, in Israel there is a group of mod­er­ate [eth­nic] Russ­ian nation­al­ists from Rus­sia, arrived here at the invi­ta­tion of the religious-right bloc “Ihud ha-Leumi” (“National Unity”). The lead­ers of an inter­re­gional pub­lic asso­ci­a­tion of the National Demo­c­ra­tic Alliance (estab­lished in March 2010) made sev­eral trips to the Holy Land, vis­ited the Knes­set, and the memo­r­ial com­plex “Yad Vashem”. Fol­low­ing the visit, co-chairman of the move­ment Ilya Lazarenko came to the con­clu­sion that the Russ­ian nation­al­ists and right-wing Zion­ists have much in com­mon. “We are very much in com­mon, and first of all — rejec­tion of vio­lent Islamism, which is a threat to civ­i­liza­tion — he said to the por­tal IzRus. — We also have some ide­o­log­i­cal over­lap asso­ci­ated with the objec­tives of nation-building and its operation.” . . . .

5. Recapping more material from Miscellaneous Archive Show M30, the program details the abortive relationship between the Haganah and the SS. Prior to the Wannsee Conference and the commencement of the “Final Solution,” the SS and the Haganah actually formed an alliance to cooperate in promoting Jewish emigration to Palestine. This aborted cooperation was adopted to make Germany “Judenrein” (“Jew-Free”) and to drive a wedge into the British holdings in the Middle East.

Two of the key SS officers involved in coordinating this alliance were Adolph Eichmann and Otto von Bolschwing.

6a. Bormann’s business operations have included Jewish participants as a matter of strategic intent. In turn, this has given the Bormann organization considerable influence in Israel. The excerpts are read from FTR #305.

Mar­tin Bor­mann: Nazi in Exile; Paul Man­ning; Copy­right 1981 [HC]; Lyle Stu­art Inc.; ISBN 0–8184-0309–8; pp. 226–227.

. . . .Since the founding of Israel, the Federal Republic of Germany had paid out 85.3 billion marks, by the end of 1977, to survivors of the Holocaust. East Germany ignores any such liability. From South America, where payment must be made with subtlety, the Bormann organization has made a substantial contribution. It has drawn many of the brightest Jewish businessmen into a participatory role in the development of many of its corporations, and many of these Jews share their prosperity most generously with Israel. If their proposals are sound, they are even provided with a specially dispensed venture capital fund. I spoke with one Jewish businessman in Hartford, Connecticut. He had arrived there quite unknown several years before our conversation, but with Bormann money as his leverage. Today he is more than a millionaire, a quiet leader in the community with a certain share of his profits earmarked, as always, for his venture capital benefactors. This has taken place in many other instances across America and demonstrates how Bormann’s people operate in the contemporary commercial world, in contrast to the fanciful nonsense with which Nazis are described in so much ‘literature.’ So much emphasis is placed on select Jewish participation in Bormann companies that when Adolf Eichmann was seized and taken to Tel Aviv to stand trial, it produced a shock wave in the Jewish and German communities of Buenos Aires. Jewish leaders informed the Israeli authorities in no uncertain terms that this must never happen again because a repetition would permanently rupture relations with the Germans of Latin America, as well as with the Bormann organization, and cut off the flow of Jewish money to Israel. It never happened again, and the pursuit of Bormann quieted down at the request of these Jewish leaders. He is residing in an Argentine safe haven, protected by the most efficient German infrastructure in history as well as by all those whose prosperity depends on his well-being. Personal invitation is the only way to reach him. . . .

6b. The program relates an incident in which organized crime kingpin Meyer Lansky tried to blackmail the Bormann group, which resulted in his removal from Israel.

Ibid.; pp.227-228.

. . . . .A revealing insight into this international financial and industrial network was given me by a member of the Bormann organization residing in West Germany. Meyer Lansky, he said, the financial advisor to the Las Vegas—Miami underworld sent a message to Bormann through my West German SS contact. Lansky promised that if he received a piece of Bormann’s action he would keep the Israeli agents off Bormann’s back. ‘I have a very good relation with the Israeli secret police’ was his claim, although he was to be kicked out of Israel when his presence became too noted—and also at the urging of Bormann’s security chief in South America. At the time Lansky was in the penthouse suite of Jerusalem’s King David Hotel, in which he owned stock. He had fled to Israel to evade a U.S. federal warrant for his arrest. He sent his message to Bormann through his bag man in Switzerland, John Pullman, also wanted in the United States on a federal warrant. Lansky told Pullman to make this offer ‘which he can’t refuse.’ The offer was forwarded to Buenos Aires, where it was greeted with laughter. When the laughter died down, it was replaced with action. Meyer was evicted from Israel and was told by Swiss authorities to stay out of their country, so he flew to South America. There he offered any president who would give him asylum a cool $1 million in cash. He was turned down everywhere and had to continue his flight to Miami, where U.S. marshals, alerted, were waiting to take him into custody. . . .

 

Discussion

6 comments for “FTR #834 Compendium of Fascist Connections to the Zionist Movement”

  1. Great collage of older broadcasts weaving them together though time.

    As Dave’s said, quoting William Faulkner: ‘the past is not dead it is not even past.’

    Posted by Dusty | February 10, 2015, 10:42 am
  2. The Zionist Movement originated as one of two ways to deal with the antisemitism that flourished in Europe as a response to the framing of Dreyfus. The Zionists, in effect, sided with the antisemites in agreeing with them that Jews don’t belong in European countries, but instead should have their own separate country. The Jewish socialists, on the other hand, went on to form the Jewish Bund or joined multi-ethnic socialist organizations. Of course, there were also non-Zionist, non-socialist Haskalah (renaissance) Jews, and devoutly religious Jews who were neither. The main avowed enemy of Hitler’s Nazis wasn’t the Jews, as much as the Nazis embraced and augmented the already rampant antisemitism among Catholics and Lutherans, but Marxism. This can be seen from the huge banner draping Hitler’s first public speech as Chancellor of Germany, which reads, “Make Germany Marxism-free!”, NOT “Make Germany Jew-free!”, here (at the 5:00 minute mark): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnpTWKKWQ1o&t=05m00s

    Posted by Atlanta Bill | January 10, 2016, 6:16 am
  3. Posted by Dave Emory | January 10, 2016, 12:40 pm
  4. @ Dave Emory –
    Thanks. I’ve heard both interviews, in fact all 10 of them. I have the links in a text file handy for copying and pasting into comments. They’re terrific, and I think you should be commended for deferring so much to Peter since you’ve been researching the topic for so much longer than he has, and for holding back and letting him do the talking. The interesting thing about Peter is that it was serendipitous personal encounters that got him interested in the Underground Reich; gives him credibility, even more than the tone of sincerity that he projects. It was watching videos of Peter’s earlier interviews and presentations that had me searching for more on the topic in the way he laid it out, which in a very short time led me to you and Spitfire List.
    [You needn’t post this]

    Posted by Atlanta Bill | November 20, 2016, 5:13 am
  5. Here’s a pair of stories that highlights one of the more unexpected forces that has helped fuel the growth of government-backed Holocaust revisionism and denial across Eastern Europe: the de facto endorsement of this trend by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

    First, here’s an article about the criticisms Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is receiving for his warm welcome to Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis of Lithuania, one of the European countries that’s most aggressively embraced Holocaust revisionism in recent years. Part of the reason for this criticism is that it comes a week after Netanyahu gave a similar warm welcome to Petro Poroshenko, the President of Ukraine where Holocaust revisionism has been rampant and backed by the state. And then there’s Netanyahu’s backing of Viktor Orban in Hungary and the leaders of Poland. So, basically, there’s nothing these European countries can do in terms of official Holocaust revisionism that would cause Netanhayu to refuse rolling out the red carpet for the leaders who are presiding over these policies. But as the article notes, there are some groups Netanyahu will criticize for anti-Semitism: Muslims and left-wingers:

    Associated Press

    Israel leader scorned for wooing Holocaust-distorting allies

    By ARON HELLER
    January 30, 2019

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s warm welcome to Lithuania’s prime minister marks his latest embrace of an eastern European leader who has offered strong political support while promoting a distorted image of the Holocaust.

    Lithuania is among a slew of former communist nations swept up in a wave of World War II-era revisionism that seeks to diminish their culpability in the Holocaust while making heroes out of anti-Soviet nationalists involved in the mass killing of Jews. In Israel, established in the wake of the Nazi genocide of 6 million Jews, many say Netanyahu is cynically betraying the victims’ memory.

    Lithuania, for instance, has been a leading force behind creating a joint memorial day for all victims of totalitarianism, blurring the distinction between the crimes of the Nazis and the communists who fought them.

    It also has pushed for legislation to prohibit the sale of books that “distort Lithuanian history” by citing the rampant, documented collaboration of the local population with Nazis. Most recently it has resisted calls to remove the various plaques commemorating anti-Soviet fighter Jonas Noreika, despite recent revelations by his own granddaughter, Silvia Foti, that he was a fierce anti-Semite who had a role in the murder of thousands of Jews.

    Nearly all of Lithuania’s 200,000 Jews were killed in the Holocaust.

    When Netanyahu, who has Lithuanian roots, visited Vilnius last year, he praised Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis for taking “great steps to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust” and for fighting modern-day anti-Semitism.

    “It’s unforgivable. Netanyahu is giving them a green light,” said Efraim Zuroff, the chief Nazi-hunter of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. “It’s like praising the Ku Klux Klan for improving racial relations in the South.”

    “We have to say the truth. We owe it to the victims,” he added.

    In a meeting with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin on Tuesday, Skvernelis said “Lithuania has been learning the lessons of the past” and was “improving the life of the Jewish community and restoring historical sites.”

    At Tuesday’s meeting, Netanyahu treaded cautiously. He referred to the “tragedies of the past” but steered clear of any criticism of modern Lithuania, praising the “spirit of friendship” and “a bridge from the past to a future.”

    Skvernelis’ visit comes a week after Netanyahu similarly rolled out the red carpet for President Petro Poroshenko of Ukraine, whose parliament just designated the birthday of Ukrainian wartime collaborator Stepan Bandera a national holiday. A regional legislature declared 2019 “the year of Stepan Bandera.”

    Bandera’s forces fought alongside the Nazis and were implicated in the murder of thousands of Jews. As Poroshenko was visiting Israel, another memorial was being erected in Kiev for Symon Petliura, whose troops are linked to pogroms that killed as many as 50,000 Jews after World War I.

    Netanyahu’s outreach in eastern Europe is part of his larger strategy of forging alliances to counter the criticism Israel faces in the United Nations and other international forums over its treatment of the Palestinians.

    Critics consider it a deal with the devil. They say Netanyahu — who often invokes the Holocaust when inveighing against archrival Iran — turns a blind eye when it comes to like-minded allies.

    “It’s a specific maneuver that legitimizes anti-Semitism and borders on Holocaust denial,” said Tamar Zandberg, leader of the dovish Meretz party.

    Under communist rule, the Holocaust was not seriously dealt with and, upon independence, the newfound eastern and central European nations sought to canonize nationalist icons who resisted the Soviets, while largely ignoring their crimes alongside the Nazis. Domestic academics who have challenged the false narrative have been shamed, and external criticism has often been met with new anti-Semitic outbursts.

    For countries like Lithuania and Ukraine, the warm embrace of the Israeli leader provides a strong defense against accusation of anti-Semitism while also strengthening ties with a close U.S. ally.

    Netanyahu has also formed a close alliance with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has lavished praise on Miklos Horthy, Hungary’s World War II-era ruler, who introduced anti-Semitic laws and collaborated with the Nazis. Orban has also employed anti-Semitic tropes against the Jewish Hungarian-American billionaire philanthropist George Soros and backed a state-funded museum that experts say plays down the role of Hungarian collaborators.

    Netanyahu also struck a deal with Polish leaders over their country’s controversial Holocaust speech law, which would have criminalized blaming the Polish nation for crimes committed against Jews during World War II.

    Israeli Holocaust historians slammed the agreement, which seemed to accept a Polish narrative that they were only victims of the Nazis. Scholars say anti-Semitism was deeply rooted in pre-war Poland and Poles might have either killed or helped Germans kill up to 200,000 Jews.

    Still, Netanyahu has invited Orban and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki — who last year equated Polish perpetrators in the Holocaust to supposed “Jewish perpetrators” — to Israel in February for a summit with the leaders of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

    Yair Lapid, leader of the centrist Yesh Atid party and the son of a Holocaust survivor, called on Netanyahu to cancel the meeting, saying one prime minister has “published anti-Semitic content” and another “passed a law desecrating the memory of Holocaust victims.”

    In an annual report Sunday, Israel’s Ministry of Diaspora Affairs said 2018 saw a record number of worldwide anti-Semitic attacks, with most carried out by neo-Nazis in Europe and white supremacists.

    But at his Cabinet meeting later in the day, Netanyahu singled out “Islamic anti-Semitism and the anti-Semitism of the extreme left, which includes anti-Zionism.”

    Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, which hosts all visiting foreign dignitaries, has been thrust into the controversy.

    While it says it will never disqualify anyone wishing to visit, Yad Vashem insists it will “forcefully” address any denial or distortion. Yad Vashem said the Lithuanian leader received a comprehensive explanation of the Holocaust, including details about “the murder of Jews of Lithuania by the Nazis and their Lithuanian collaborators.”

    ———-

    “Israel leader scorned for wooing Holocaust-distorting allies” by ARON HELLER; Associated Press; 01/30/2019

    ““It’s unforgivable. Netanyahu is giving them a green light,” said Efraim Zuroff, the chief Nazi-hunter of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. “It’s like praising the Ku Klux Klan for improving racial relations in the South.””

    It’s like praising the Ku Klux Klan for improving racial relations in the South. That’s a pretty good way to describe Netanyahu’s warm embrace of one EU leader after another who is currently leading the way on the official Holocaust revisionism sweeping Europe. But it’s particularly egregious in the case of Lithuania, where laws now exist to ban any mention of the role local populations played in the murder of nearly all of the country’s Jews:


    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s warm welcome to Lithuania’s prime minister marks his latest embrace of an eastern European leader who has offered strong political support while promoting a distorted image of the Holocaust.

    Lithuania is among a slew of former communist nations swept up in a wave of World War II-era revisionism that seeks to diminish their culpability in the Holocaust while making heroes out of anti-Soviet nationalists involved in the mass killing of Jews. In Israel, established in the wake of the Nazi genocide of 6 million Jews, many say Netanyahu is cynically betraying the victims’ memory.

    Lithuania, for instance, has been a leading force behind creating a joint memorial day for all victims of totalitarianism, blurring the distinction between the crimes of the Nazis and the communists who fought them.

    It also has pushed for legislation to prohibit the sale of books that “distort Lithuanian history” by citing the rampant, documented collaboration of the local population with Nazis. Most recently it has resisted calls to remove the various plaques commemorating anti-Soviet fighter Jonas Noreika, despite recent revelations by his own granddaughter, Silvia Foti, that he was a fierce anti-Semite who had a role in the murder of thousands of Jews.

    Nearly all of Lithuania’s 200,000 Jews were killed in the Holocaust.

    When Netanyahu visited Lithuania last year, he praised Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis for taking “great steps to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust” and for fighting modern-day anti-Semitism. And Skvernelis returned the perverse favor when visiting Israel list week and declaring that “Lithuania has been learning the lessons of the past” and was “improving the life of the Jewish community and restoring historical sites”:


    When Netanyahu, who has Lithuanian roots, visited Vilnius last year, he praised Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis for taking “great steps to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust” and for fighting modern-day anti-Semitism.

    In a meeting with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin on Tuesday, Skvernelis said “Lithuania has been learning the lessons of the past” and was “improving the life of the Jewish community and restoring historical sites.”

    At Tuesday’s meeting, Netanyahu treaded cautiously. He referred to the “tragedies of the past” but steered clear of any criticism of modern Lithuania, praising the “spirit of friendship” and “a bridge from the past to a future.”

    And then there’s the warm welcome given to Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko last week at the same time Ukraine was erecting a memorial to Symon Petliura in Kiev. As the article notes, for countries’s engaged in the kind of crass overt Holocaust denial like Lithuania and Ukraine, a warm embrace by Netanyahu is exactly what they needed to defend against accusation of anti-Semitism:


    Skvernelis’ visit comes a week after Netanyahu similarly rolled out the red carpet for President Petro Poroshenko of Ukraine, whose parliament just designated the birthday of Ukrainian wartime collaborator Stepan Bandera a national holiday. A regional legislature declared 2019 “the year of Stepan Bandera.”

    Bandera’s forces fought alongside the Nazis and were implicated in the murder of thousands of Jews. As Poroshenko was visiting Israel, another memorial was being erected in Kiev for Symon Petliura, whose troops are linked to pogroms that killed as many as 50,000 Jews after World War I.

    Netanyahu’s outreach in eastern Europe is part of his larger strategy of forging alliances to counter the criticism Israel faces in the United Nations and other international forums over its treatment of the Palestinians.

    Critics consider it a deal with the devil. They say Netanyahu — who often invokes the Holocaust when inveighing against archrival Iran — turns a blind eye when it comes to like-minded allies.

    “It’s a specific maneuver that legitimizes anti-Semitism and borders on Holocaust denial,” said Tamar Zandberg, leader of the dovish Meretz party.

    Under communist rule, the Holocaust was not seriously dealt with and, upon independence, the newfound eastern and central European nations sought to canonize nationalist icons who resisted the Soviets, while largely ignoring their crimes alongside the Nazis. Domestic academics who have challenged the false narrative have been shamed, and external criticism has often been met with new anti-Semitic outbursts.

    For countries like Lithuania and Ukraine, the warm embrace of the Israeli leader provides a strong defense against accusation of anti-Semitism while also strengthening ties with a close U.S. ally.

    And we can’t forget Netanyahu’s close ties to Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban and the leaders of Poland. It’s like a giant act of malicious trolling and Netanyahu is leading it:


    Netanyahu has also formed a close alliance with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has lavished praise on Miklos Horthy, Hungary’s World War II-era ruler, who introduced anti-Semitic laws and collaborated with the Nazis. Orban has also employed anti-Semitic tropes against the Jewish Hungarian-American billionaire philanthropist George Soros and backed a state-funded museum that experts say plays down the role of Hungarian collaborators.

    Netanyahu also struck a deal with Polish leaders over their country’s controversial Holocaust speech law, which would have criminalized blaming the Polish nation for crimes committed against Jews during World War II.

    Israeli Holocaust historians slammed the agreement, which seemed to accept a Polish narrative that they were only victims of the Nazis. Scholars say anti-Semitism was deeply rooted in pre-war Poland and Poles might have either killed or helped Germans kill up to 200,000 Jews.

    Still, Netanyahu has invited Orban and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki — who last year equated Polish perpetrators in the Holocaust to supposed “Jewish perpetrators” — to Israel in February for a summit with the leaders of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

    But Netanyahu does at least condemn some instances of anti-Semitism…as long as it comes from Muslims or left-wingers:


    Yair Lapid, leader of the centrist Yesh Atid party and the son of a Holocaust survivor, called on Netanyahu to cancel the meeting, saying one prime minister has “published anti-Semitic content” and another “passed a law desecrating the memory of Holocaust victims.”

    In an annual report Sunday, Israel’s Ministry of Diaspora Affairs said 2018 saw a record number of worldwide anti-Semitic attacks, with most carried out by neo-Nazis in Europe and white supremacists.

    But at his Cabinet meeting later in the day, Netanyahu singled out “Islamic anti-Semitism and the anti-Semitism of the extreme left, which includes anti-Zionism.”

    So as we can see, Benjamin Netanyahu has more or less given his blessing to the increasingly aggressive Holocaust denial and revisionism sweeping Eastern Europe.

    And in related news, Benjamin Netanyanhu claims to be very concerned about polls showing both rising anti-Semitism in Europe and that a third of respondents barely knew anything about the Holocaust at all

    CNN

    Netanyahu joins world leaders in lamenting results of CNN poll on anti-Semitism

    By James Masters,

    Updated 1306 GMT (2106 HKT) November 28, 2018

    (CNN)Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has joined lawmakers and leading figures involved in the fight against anti-Semitism by saying he is “concerned” about the results of CNN’s investigation into European attitudes toward Jews.

    “I’m concerned, because I think anti-Semitism is an ancient disease and when it rears its ugly head, it first attacks the Jews, but it never stops with that, and then it sweeps entire societies, as happened obviously in mid-century Europe,” he told CNN’s Oren Liebermann. “First in Germany and then throughout all of Europe and the consequences were horrible.”

    According to the poll, more than a quarter of Europeans surveyed believe Jews have too much influence in business and finance. Nearly one in four said Jews have too much influence in conflict and wars across the world.

    Meanwhile, a third of Europeans polled said they knew just a little or nothing at all about the Holocaust, the mass murder of some six million Jews in lands controlled by Adolf Hitler’s Nazi regime in the 1930s and 1940s.

    Netanyahu said while he is concerned about CNN’s results, he was not surprised. He said that society needs to continue the fight against the rise in anti-Semitism — especially with education.

    “In your survey, a good chunk — a third of people — hardly knew anything about the Holocaust,” he said.

    “I think education is important and I think a strong, forceful position is important.”

    Meanwhile, the Israeli Prime Minister commended European leaders for fighting anti-Semitism.

    “I spoke to Merkel, Macron, May and others — they’re putting up a fight,” Netanyahu said referring to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Theresa May.

    He also praised leaders who have faced criticism on this issue.

    “I’m seeing this in Eastern Europe. I saw Viktor Orban in Hungary — he’s opened up a center against anti-Semitism. I saw Sebastian Kurz in Austria — he just held a conference against anti-Semitism, and that’s encouraging.”

    Hungary has previously faced accusations of anti-Semitism in the lead-up to this year’s election, with critics of President Orban claiming he has used anti-Semitic tropes during his campaign.

    Meanwhile in Austria, the far-right Freedom Party was welcomed into the governing coalition with Chancellor Kurz’s People’s Party, much to the consternation of the country’s Jewish community.

    Felix Klein, who was appointed as Germany’s federal government commissioner for Jewish life in April, said that while he was upset by the poll’s findings, they did not surprise him. “The results of the CNN survey are appalling.”

    In a statement sent to CNN, Klein said: “For combating anti-Semitism, it is fundamental to keep the memory of the Shoah (Holocaust) alive and nurture a vivid culture of remembrance.

    “On a European level, I am going to encourage other states to create national functions similar to mine. We have already started to fight anti-Semitism on the level of the EU, for example by calling for the member states to adopt the definition for anti-Semitism that the (International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance) has formulated.

    “The German Bundestag and the German government have adopted this definition in 2017. Our biggest challenge, however, will be to change the views people hold about Jews. This is a task for all of us, and for the sake of society as a whole — because anti-Semitism is a threat for any democratic, open society.”

    ‘Not surprising’

    The CNN/ComRes poll poll interviewed more than 7,000 people across Europe, with more than 1,000 respondents each in Austria, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Poland and Sweden.

    American historian Deborah Lipstadt,, author of the forthcoming book “Antisemitism: Here and Now,” said the poll showed in “frightening detail, how traditional anti-Semitic motifs persist in Europe.”

    “While, given recent developments, this is not entirely surprising, it is disheartening,” she said of the results.

    “Stepping back from the specific findings of the study, it is imperative to note that anti-Semitism constitutes a conspiracy theory, i.e. an irrational evidence-free perspective that attributes to all Jews — irrespective of their location, status, age, nationality, world view — the same qualities and stereotypes. Anti-Semitism makes as much sense as attributing to all left-handed people or all blonds similar attributes and behaviors.”

    Lipstadt, one of the world’s pre-eminent Holocaust historians, says she was also disturbed by the ignorance that surrounds the systematic murder of Europe’s Jewish population during World War II.

    “This is not something that should so easily be forgotten. It should be something about which Europeans should still be grappling. Not because of guilt — today’s Europeans are clearly not guilty of anything — but in terms of the society within which they live.”

    Karen Pollock, chief executive of the UK Holocaust Educational Trust, said the poll confirmed “a worrying increase in the number of people who believe traditional anti-Semitic tropes or hold anti-Semitic views, as well as a disappointing lack of knowledge about the Holocaust.”

    Survivors like Susan Pollack do an incredible job of sharing their testimonies, but they cannot do this forever. So, we will redouble our efforts to make sure that her story, along with all other survivors and the victims of the Holocaust, lives on and continue to educate where hate can ultimately lead.”

    The poll also highlighted a sharpening of attitudes when it comes to the relationship between the Holocaust, Israel, Jews and anti-Semitism.

    A third of survey respondents believe that criticism of Israel tends to be motivated by anti-Semitism, while only one in five said it does not.

    However, a third of people CNN surveyed said that Israel uses the Holocaust to justify its actions, with half the respondents in Poland agreeing. Only one in five disagreed.

    A third of Europeans said supporters of Israel use accusations of anti-Semitism to shut down criticism of Israel, while only one in 10 said that was not true.

    “We have always known that for many, being anti-Israel is a natural extension of their anti-Semitic beliefs. This has an impact both on their attitudes to history and to the present,” Israel’s Minister of Education and Minister of Diaspora Affairs, Naftali Bennett, told CNN.

    “What is clear is that it is not only important that people know about the Holocaust, but that they understand the lessons of the Holocaust. The same deeply antisemitic stereotypes and accusations we hear today were the same fuel which powered the death camps.”

    Danny Danon, Israel’s Ambassador to the United Nations, told CNN that the poll findings showed how easy it was for people to forget history.

    “We are barely a few generations removed from the Holocaust, and yet these numbers are alarming. Anti-Semitism can take many forms, including denying the Holocaust and questioning Israel’s right to exist,” Danon told CNN in an email.

    “There is a direct connection between not knowing your history, and the rise in anti-Semitism and animosity towards Israel. We need to be more vigilant to ensure we do not forget our past, and protect against this most ancient form of bigotry.”

    ‘Entrenched’

    According to the poll, 34% of Europeans surveyed know just a little or have never heard of the Holocaust, while 20% of French people between the ages of 18 and 34 said they had never heard of the Holocaust.

    And 31% of Europeans polled believe commemorating the Holocaust distracts from other atrocities and injustices today.

    “The survey highlights the troubling fact that many entrenched hateful anti-Semitic tropes persist in European civilization, 75 years after the end of the Holocaust,” said Avner Shalev, chairman of Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem.

    “The result of this survey proves the necessity to intensify broad-based efforts in the area of Holocaust education and awareness, which is essential to any effort to contend with anti-Semitism.”

    Piotr M. A. Cywinski, director of the Auschwitz Memorial, said the poll results underlined the importance of education in tackling hate.

    “The anti-Semitic or xenophobic ideologies that in the past led to the human catastrophe of Auschwitz, seem not to have been erased from our lives today. They still poison people’s minds and influence our contemporary attitudes in social, political, ethical, and other aspects.”

    ———–

    “Netanyahu joins world leaders in lamenting results of CNN poll on anti-Semitism” by James Masters; CNN; 11/28/2018

    “Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has joined lawmakers and leading figures involved in the fight against anti-Semitism by saying he is “concerned” about the results of CNN’s investigation into European attitudes toward Jews.”

    It’s quite a mystery. Despite giving aid and comfort to the EU leaders leading the way on distorting the history of the Holocaust, Netanyahu claims to be very concerned and points to the importance of education.

    But putting Netanyahu’s hypocrisy aside, this was a pretty shocking poll, with a third claiming to know little or nothing at all about the Holocaust and 31% believing that commemorating the Holocaust distracts from other atrocities and injustices today:


    “I’m concerned, because I think anti-Semitism is an ancient disease and when it rears its ugly head, it first attacks the Jews, but it never stops with that, and then it sweeps entire societies, as happened obviously in mid-century Europe,” he told CNN’s Oren Liebermann. “First in Germany and then throughout all of Europe and the consequences were horrible.”

    According to the poll, more than a quarter of Europeans surveyed believe Jews have too much influence in business and finance. Nearly one in four said Jews have too much influence in conflict and wars across the world.

    Meanwhile, a third of Europeans polled said they knew just a little or nothing at all about the Holocaust, the mass murder of some six million Jews in lands controlled by Adolf Hitler’s Nazi regime in the 1930s and 1940s.

    Netanyahu said while he is concerned about CNN’s results, he was not surprised. He said that society needs to continue the fight against the rise in anti-Semitism — especially with education.

    “In your survey, a good chunk — a third of people — hardly knew anything about the Holocaust,” he said.

    “I think education is important and I think a strong, forceful position is important.”

    According to the poll, 34% of Europeans surveyed know just a little or have never heard of the Holocaust, while 20% of French people between the ages of 18 and 34 said they had never heard of the Holocaust.

    And 31% of Europeans polled believe commemorating the Holocaust distracts from other atrocities and injustices today.

    So we’ll see how this current wave of government-backed Holocaust revisionism plays out, but we can be confident that the European politicians leading this effort will have at least one friend in Israel no matter how bad this gets.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | February 5, 2019, 1:00 pm
  6. @Pterrafractyl–

    This is Netanyahu being Netanyahu.

    Loyal to his roots: http://spitfirelist.com/news/team-netanyahu-and-thyssenkrupp-bormann-jews-in-action/

    Bibi’s father, Benzion Netanyahu was the personal secretary to Vladimir Jabotinsky, the founder of the Betar–the primary fascist element in the Zionist movement.

    Jabotinsky was an ally of the pogromist butcher Semion Petlyura, whose statue is being erected in Kiev.

    http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/opinion/jabotinsky-s-embarrassing-offer-1.280234

    Not surprising to see Netanyahu acting like this.

    Best,

    Dave

    Posted by Dave Emory | February 5, 2019, 1:42 pm

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