Spitfire List Web site and blog of anti-fascist researcher and radio personality Dave Emory.

For The Record  

FTR #909 A Different Kind of Tea Party: More about Fascism and the New Age

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This program was recorded in one, 60-minute segment.

urantiaMeinKampfIntroduction: NB: One should not necessarily conclude that all or most of the folks at Celestial Seasonings are eugenicists, although that may be the case. The discussion here is undertaken to illustrate the extent to which fascist and Nazi ideology has infiltrated the so-called New Age. In our opinion, the New Age, for the most part, is a synthesis of Nazi occultism and the intelligence community’s mind control programs.

Continuing discussion about the profound fascist influences in the so-called New Age, this program highlights strong links between people involved in launching Celestial Seasonings herbal teas and the Urantia Book. The latter is a voluminous New Age tract that maintains that human beings descended from fair-skinned, blue-eyed space aliens.

” . . . . But there might be another rea­son they named it ‘celes­tial.’ Mo Siegel and John Hay, two of the founders, were avid believ­ers in a new-age bible called The Uran­tia Book, which fol­low­ers call ‘an epochal rev­e­la­tion authored solely by celes­tial beings.’ The book touches upon every­thing from mind con­trol to a eugen­ics plot to elim­i­nate the ‘infe­rior races’ of our great nation. . . . The Uran­tia Book, a 4.3-pound, 2,097-page tome, pub­lished first in 1955, is a mod­i­fied Seventh-Day Adven­tist text sup­pos­edly com­mu­ni­cated to an anony­mous man in a trance by aliens. . . . “

The genesis of the book appears to lie with people associated with influential American elite players who subscribe to the eugenics philosophy. ” . . . . In real­ity, it was likely authored in the early 1900s by a psy­chi­a­trist named William Sadler who used it as a ves­sel for his racist ideas. . . .”

Asserting that humans evolved from the blue-eyed, fair-skinned, extraterrestrial Adam and Eve, the book manifests an outlook that is not only racist, but could clearly lead to genocidal policies.

” . . . . On every planet through­out every uni­verse, fair-skinned, blue-eyed aliens named Adam and Eve appear to ‘upstep’ the natives. When their prog­eny mate with the accept­able inhab­i­tants of the planet, the ‘infe­rior stocks will be elim­i­nated and there will be one puri­fied race, one lan­guage, and one reli­gion,’ as Gard­ner explains it in Uran­tia: The Great Cult Mystery.

But before that can hap­pen, Paper 51 of The Uran­tia Book says, ‘the infe­rior and unfit are largely elim­i­nated… it seems that you ought to be able to agree upon the bio­logic dis­fel­low­ship­ing of your more markedly unfit, defec­tive, degen­er­ate, and anti­so­cial stocks.’

This process hap­pens on every planet when Adam and Eve appear. But on Uran­tia (i.e., earth), it didn’t go accord­ing to plan. Adam and Eve messed up. So, ‘hav­ing failed to achieve race har­mo­niza­tion by the Adamic tech­nique,’ Part II: The Local Uni­verse sec­tion of book tells us, ‘you must now work out your plan­e­tary prob­lem of race improve­ment by other and largely human meth­ods of adap­ta­tion and control.’

‘Bio­logic ren­o­va­tion of the racial stocks — the selec­tive elim­i­na­tion of infe­rior human strains,’ Paper 70 of The Uran­tia Book says, will ‘tend to erad­i­cate many mor­tal inequalities.’ . . . . “

William Sadler, the patron of the Urantia text, was a well-known, avowed eugenicist, who moved in elite circles: ” . . . . While Hitler didn’t have any­thing to do with writ­ing The Uran­tia Book, William Sadler did. One of the most well-known psy­chi­a­trists of his era, Sadler got his start work­ing for Dr. John H. Kel­logg at the famous Bat­tle Creek San­i­tar­ium, which treated celebri­ties like the Rock­e­fellers, Mont­gomery Ward and even Thomas Edi­son. Kel­logg was a noto­ri­ous eugeni­cist and founded the Race Bet­ter­ment Foun­da­tion, whose goals were ‘to call atten­tion to the dan­gers which threaten the race.’

Influ­enced by Kellogg’s ideas, Sadler pub­lished three eugeni­cist books: Long Heads and Round Heads; or, What’s the Mat­ter With Ger­many (1918), Racial Deca­dence: An Exam­i­na­tion of the Causes of Racial Degen­er­a­tion in the United States (1922) and The Truth About Hered­ity (1927). The Uran­tia Book echoes the ideas pre­sented in these books, and in some cases, it repro­duces the text word for word.

In Racial Deca­dence, Sadler expresses, among other notions, that the ‘unfit’ should be ster­il­ized, that ‘moral­ity is hered­ity’ and that ‘some races are more moral than oth­ers.’ And in The Truth About Hered­ity, Sadler writes that mar­riage between races ‘is to be deplored when one of the races would be infe­rior as com­pared with the other, which hap­pens to be the bio­logic fact as con­cerns the White and Negro races in this country.’ . . . .”

Compare the advocacy contained within Urantia Book and the views of Hitler: “ . . . .’Bio­logic ren­o­va­tion of the racial stocks — the selec­tive elim­i­na­tion of infe­rior human strains,’ Paper 70 of the Uran­tia Book says, will ‘tend to erad­i­cate many mor­tal inequalities.’

Com­pare that to Hitler’s words in Mein Kampf: ‘The demand that defec­tive peo­ple be pre­vented from prop­a­gat­ing equally defec­tive off­spring rep­re­sents the most human act of mankind.’ . . . .”

There are indications that the Urantia crowd have taken the eugenicist teachings of the text to heart. Note that Kermit Anderson, director of the genetic screening program at Kaiser Permanente is associated with the group” . . . . The [Urantia] Fel­low­ship is putting its money where its mouth is, too. In a 2010 email sent to “read­ers with advanced infor­ma­tion and for­ward look­ing per­spec­tives that are not suited for being posted on the web­site,” a fol­lower named Mar­tin Green­hut writes that the trustees have con­vened a panel on eugen­ics. He names all of the panel mem­bers, the most strik­ing of which is Ker­mit Ander­son, who at that time was the genetic screen­ing pro­gram direc­tor at Kaiser Per­ma­nente in Cal­i­for­nia and the author of much genet­ics research.

In FTR #908, we reviewed the evolutionary progression of the overlapping mental hygiene movements and eugenics movements. Graduating from theory to practice and involving sterilization, legal prohibition against “intermarriage,” and euthanasia, that evolution led to the Nazi extermination programs derived from the T-4 program.

With technology forecast as on track to replace large numbers of working people in years soon to come, the issue of what happens to “excess” population is one to be addressed.

The infiltration of outright Nazi ideas into the intellectual realm of the New Age philosophy embraced by otherwise gentle and altogether unsuspecting individuals is to be viewed with alarm.

There is abundant evidence that so-called “UFO’s” are real and come from right here on earth, NOT from outer space. People who have been manipulated into believing in the superior wisdom of “space aliens” who advise us to embrace “kinder, gentler genocide” may well be paving the way for a cataclysm.

Program Highlights Include:

  • Review of “The Nine”–a New Age manifestation that also posits that life on earth descended from blue-eyed, fair-skinned space aliens and which incorporates a racist, eugenics-oriented philosophy.
  • Prognostication about the possible impact of political, economic and environmental catastrophe on the inclination of human beings to resign themselves to being dictated to by “our brothers from space.”
  • Review of the Nazi/Operation Paperclip genesis of the U.S. space program.
  • Review of SS officer Werner Von Braun’s role in launching the Institute for Noetic Sciences, a major epicenter of New Age thinking.

1. The broadcast highlights strong links between people involved in launching Celestial Seasonings herbal teas and the Urantia Book. The latter is a voluminous New Age tract that maintains that human beings descended from fair-skinned, blue-eyed space aliens.

The genesis of the book appears to lie with people associated with influential American elite players who subscribe to the eugenics philosophy.

“Cults, Con­spir­a­cies and the Twisted His­tory of Sleep­y­time Tea” by Megan Giller; Van Winkle’s; 2/1/2016.

Its calm­ing com­bi­na­tion of chamomile, spearmint and other herbs might seem benign, almost bor­ing — the ideal for­mula for lulling you to sleep. But there’s a pecu­liar story lurk­ing in your cup of Sleep­y­time tea, one that con­cerns invol­un­tary trances, com­mu­ni­ca­tion with aliens and a eugen­ics plot to elim­i­nate the “infe­rior races” of our great nation.

Before Sleep­y­time became the crown jewel of Celes­tial Sea­son­ings, with 1.6 bil­lion cups sold per year, before the com­pany became the largest tea man­u­fac­turer in North Amer­ica, the tea was noth­ing more than a dream in the heads of a few flow­er­chil­dren hik­ing up the Rocky Moun­tains in search of herbs.

One of the friends, Mo Siegel, was serv­ing an Asian herbal tea to cus­tomers in a local shop to much suc­cess in 1969. The con­cept that “tea” could be herbal was inno­v­a­tive in itself, since up until then, all tea in Amer­ica and Great Britain was made of the plant Camel­lia sinen­sis. The group wanted to get into the business.

On those first hikes, the team har­vested enough herbs for 500 pounds of a blend they called Mo’s 36 Herb Tea, and the sleep-conjuring tea made of chamomille, spearmint and other herbs soon fol­lowed. In no time the friends were saun­ter­ing into the local bank to get a loan for their new busi­ness, “wear­ing jeans, smelling of herbs, and armed with Tup­per­ware con­tain­ers of Mo’s 36 and Sleep­y­time blends.” They called their com­pany Celes­tial Sea­son­ings, after co-founder Lucinda Ziesing’s flowername.

But there might be another rea­son they named it “celes­tial.” Mo Siegel and John Hay, two of the founders, were avid believ­ers in a new-age bible called The Uran­tia Book, which fol­low­ers call “an epochal rev­e­la­tion authored solely by celes­tial beings.” The book touches upon every­thing from mind con­trol to a eugen­ics plot to elim­i­nate the “infe­rior races” of our great nation.

In fact, the reli­gious text is respon­si­ble for much more than the name of the com­pany. In You’ve GOT to Read This Book! 55 Peo­ple Tell the Story of the Book That Changed Their Life, Siegel dis­closes that the ideals he gath­ered from The Uran­tia Book guided how he ran Celes­tial Sea­son­ings from the begin­ning and pro­vided a moral com­pass for him­self and his employ­ees. “I had wanted bold; I found bold,” he wrote. “I wanted spir­i­tual adven­ture, and I was on the ride of my life. I was search­ing for truth and the book was loaded with it.”

The Uran­tia Book, a 4.3-pound, 2,097-page tome, pub­lished first in 1955, is a mod­i­fied Seventh-Day Adven­tist text sup­pos­edly com­mu­ni­cated to an anony­mous man in a trance by aliens. In real­ity, it was likely authored in the early 1900s by a psy­chi­a­trist named William Sadler who used it as a ves­sel for his racist ideas. (You can down­load the entire thing for free: Because the Uran­tia Foun­da­tion asserts that its author­ship is super­hu­man, an Ari­zona court ruled in 1995 that it’s not pro­tected by copy­right and is, thus, in the pub­lic domain.)

There are so many wild ideas in The Uran­tia Book that it’s hard to know where to start. “Lucifer, Satan, Melchizedek, Adam and Eve, and Jesus are all extra-terrestrial beings who have vis­ited earth,” Mo Siegel, who is still inti­mately involved with The Uran­tia Book and the Uran­tia Book Fel­low­ship, tells us in “The Twenty Most-Asked Ques­tions”. In fact, Adam and Eve were brought to earth to “upstep the human race” (more on that later).

The first three parts of The Uran­tia Book describe a com­pli­cated uni­verse with invis­i­ble seraphim and spirit and semi-spirit beings of all sorts; the last part tells the story of Jesus’ entire life in detail, all 36 years. Though it has just a few thou­sand fol­low­ers, the book has been trans­lated into 20 lan­guages, includ­ing Ara­bic, Chi­nese, Croa­t­ian and Por­tuguese. There’s even a famous oper­atic cycle based on it, as well as at least four fan­tasy novels.

The Uran­tia Book itself does not rep­re­sent a destruc­tive cult,” said Rick Ross, a cult expert who helped in Waco with the Branch David­i­ans. “But some of its self-proclaimed prophets lead groups that can be seen as destruc­tive cults.”

The book also pur­ports that there have been many, many sons of God like Jesus on many dif­fer­ent plan­ets, because there are a bil­lion worlds. When evo­lu­tion is com­plete, each of these worlds will have 100,000 local uni­verses with 10 mil­lion inhab­ited plan­ets. Our earth is called Uran­tia, and it’s num­ber 606 in a plan­e­tary group named Sata­nia, the head­quar­ters of which is called Jerusem. When we die, we’re rein­car­nated from planet-to-planet, then finally to Par­adise, where the Deity lives. There is a lit­tle piece of the Deity in each of us, called a Thought Adjuster.

The Fel­low­ship will tell you that it’s not a cult, but in The Uran­tia Book, the rev­e­la­tor named the Bril­liant Evening Star of Nebadon calls for Uran­tians to replace Chris­tian­ity with a “new cult” that will be the “true reli­gion” of the future.

“The Uran­tia Book itself does not rep­re­sent a destruc­tive cult. But some of its self-proclaimed prophets lead groups that can be seen as destruc­tive cults.”

So how did this insight­ful book come to be? Well, there are many ori­gin sto­ries, but every­one seems to agree that it’s a “direct-voice” book, mean­ing that it wasn’t writ­ten by a human. Instead, aliens com­mu­ni­cated the text directly to a per­son, or in the words of the Uran­tia Book Fel­low­ship, “numer­ous super­mor­tal personalities…made con­tact through the Thought Adjuster (indwelling spirit of God) of a par­tic­u­lar human being on our world.”

Accord­ing to William Sadler, the leader of the move­ment, a “Divine Coun­selor” pre­sented the ideas in a lan­guage called Uversa, which had to be trans­lated into Salv­ing­ton and then into Sata­nia before it could be trans­lated into Eng­lish and com­mu­ni­cated to a human being.

The Uran­tia Book, a 4.3-pound, 2,097-page tome, pub­lished first in 1955, is a mod­i­fied Seventh-Day Adven­tist text sup­pos­edly com­mu­ni­cated to an anony­mous man in a trance by aliens.

The most accepted story, found in How to Know What to Believe by Harold Sher­man, quoted and sum­ma­rized in Mar­tin Gardner’s Uran­tia: The Great Cult Mys­tery, is that around 1911, a man in Sadler’s apart­ment build­ing began hav­ing fits and spells at night. Even­tu­ally he started speak­ing in other voices and revealed that he was “a stu­dent vis­i­tor on an obser­va­tion trip here from a far dis­tant planet.” William Sadler and his wife, Dr. Lena Sadler, had con­ver­sa­tions with these voices for almost 10 years while their adopted daugh­ter, Christy, took notes.

In the 1920s a group of friends (even­tu­ally called the Forum) put together a list of 4,000 ques­tions for these beings, and lo and behold, a few weeks later the sleep­ing man furi­ously wrote a man­u­script that answered all of them.

Along with later com­mu­ni­ca­tions from the “rev­e­la­tors,” that man­u­script became The Uran­tia Book. These “direct-trance” medi­ums were hugely pop­u­lar in the sec­ond half of the 1800s, and appar­ently even the famed psy­chol­o­gist philoso­pher William James was lured by one. (In the 1990s many fol­low­ers of The Uran­tia Book started to hear celes­tial voices of their own, though the Foun­da­tion hasn’t acknowl­edged that any are legit­i­mate but, instead has done quite a bit to dis­credit them.)

“Psy­cho­analy­sis, hyp­no­tism, inten­sive com­par­i­son, fail to show that the writ­ten or spo­ken mes­sages of this indi­vid­ual have ori­gin in his own mind,” Sadler wrote in his 1929 book The Mind at Mis­chief: Tricks and Decep­tions of the Sub­con­scious and How to Cope With Them.

The orig­i­nal human transmitter’s name is never revealed, but in Uran­tia: The Great Cult Mys­tery, from which much of the above is found, author Mar­tin Gard­ner (who for many years wrote for Sci­en­tific Amer­i­can and other legit­i­mate pub­li­ca­tions) makes the case that it was Sadler’s brother-in-law, Wil­fred Custer Kel­logg. Sadler had been duped by other chan­nel­ers in the past, most notably Ellen White, the founder of Seventh-Day Adven­tism, but he believed his brother-in-law was the real thing.

The Spell on Mo Siegel

“I thought that was just the goofi­est thing I’d ever heard,” Mo Siegel wrote of The Uran­tia Book in You’ve GOT to Read This Book: 55 Peo­ple Tell the Story of the Book That Changed Their Life. “After I read it, I was not con­cerned about who had writ­ten it or how it had been writ­ten because it was so powerful.”

Siegel, who is now the cur­rent pres­i­dent of the Uran­tia Foun­da­tion and hosts a weekly study group at his house, dis­cov­ered The Uran­tia Book in 1969, the same year he started hik­ing up the Rock­ies for herbs. In fact, the text was a major rea­son he decided to found Celes­tial Seasonings.

“The ideas [in The Uran­tia Book] were the inspi­ra­tion for the uplift­ing quotes we print on the side of our tea boxes and on our teabag tags!”

“After study­ing the teach­ings in The Uran­tia Book, I knew that it would feel self­ish and waste­ful to sim­ply focus on mate­r­ial suc­cess,” he said. “So, as a young man, when I began think­ing of what I could do to make a liv­ing, I imme­di­ately turned to the health food industry…The ideas [in The Uran­tia Book] were the inspi­ra­tion for the uplift­ing quotes we print on the side of our tea boxes and on our teabag tags!”

“Mo and John used it as a guid­ing prin­ci­pal and con­tin­u­ally quoted from The Uran­tia Book,” Car­o­line Mac­Dougall, the company’s fifth employee and the cur­rent founder and CEO of Tee­cino told Van Winkle’s. At staff meet­ings they would even use quotes to bol­ster their argu­ments. “It was a guide for mak­ing sure of the moral val­ues that under­lay the com­pany at that time,” she added.

But which morals? The Hate Within

In The Twenty Most-Asked Ques­tions about The Uran­tia Book, Siegel is care­ful to say that “all per­sons are equal in the sight of God” and that “race should become irrel­e­vant.” But the text itself is weighed down with some of the most racist ideas I’ve read in a long time.

For exam­ple, start­ing around 500,000 years ago, six col­ored races appeared on Uran­tia (i.e., earth): red, orange, yel­low, green, blue, and indigo

“The ear­lier races are some­what supe­rior to the later; the red man stands far above the indigo — black — race,” says Paper 51 of The Uran­tia Book, and “each suc­ceed­ing evo­lu­tion­ary man­i­fes­ta­tion of a dis­tinct group of mor­tals rep­re­sents vari­a­tion at the expense of the orig­i­nal endow­ment.” Fur­ther­more, “The yel­low race usu­ally enslaves the green, while the blue man [which cor­re­sponds to Cau­casians] sub­dues the indigo [black].”

“[The Uran­tia Book] was a guide for mak­ing sure of the moral val­ues that under­lay the com­pany at that time.”

On every planet through­out every uni­verse, fair-skinned, blue-eyed aliens named Adam and Eve appear to “upstep” the natives. When their prog­eny mate with the accept­able inhab­i­tants of the planet, the “infe­rior stocks will be elim­i­nated and there will be one puri­fied race, one lan­guage, and one reli­gion,” as Gard­ner explains it in Uran­tia: The Great Cult Mystery.

But before that can hap­pen, Paper 51 of The Uran­tia Book says, “the infe­rior and unfit are largely elim­i­nated… it seems that you ought to be able to agree upon the bio­logic dis­fel­low­ship­ing of your more markedly unfit, defec­tive, degen­er­ate, and anti­so­cial stocks.”

This process hap­pens on every planet when Adam and Eve appear. But on Uran­tia (i.e., earth), it didn’t go accord­ing to plan. Adam and Eve messed up. So, “hav­ing failed to achieve race har­mo­niza­tion by the Adamic tech­nique,” Part II: The Local Uni­verse sec­tion of book tells us, “you must now work out your plan­e­tary prob­lem of race improve­ment by other and largely human meth­ods of adap­ta­tion and control.”

“Bio­logic ren­o­va­tion of the racial stocks — the selec­tive elim­i­na­tion of infe­rior human strains,” Paper 70 of The Uran­tia Book says, will “tend to erad­i­cate many mor­tal inequalities.”

In fact, per the text, evil, in the form of ill­ness and dis­ease, exists because “unfit” peo­ples like “Aus­tralian natives and the Bush­men and Pyg­mies of Africa…these mis­er­able rem­nants of the nonso­cial peo­ples of ancient times” haven’t been elim­i­nated. Eugen­ics is the way to cor­rect this error.

“Bio­logic ren­o­va­tion of the racial stocks — the selec­tive elim­i­na­tion of infe­rior human strains,” Paper 70 of the Uran­tia Book says, will “tend to erad­i­cate many mor­tal inequalities.”

Com­pare that to Hitler’s words in Mein Kampf: “The demand that defec­tive peo­ple be pre­vented from prop­a­gat­ing equally defec­tive off­spring rep­re­sents the most human act of mankind.”

The Urant­ian Philosophy

While Hitler didn’t have any­thing to do with writ­ing The Uran­tia Book, William Sadler did. One of the most well-known psy­chi­a­trists of his era, Sadler got his start work­ing for Dr. John H. Kel­logg at the famous Bat­tle Creek San­i­tar­ium, which treated celebri­ties like the Rock­e­fellers, Mont­gomery Ward and even Thomas Edi­son. Kel­logg was a noto­ri­ous eugeni­cist and founded the Race Bet­ter­ment Foun­da­tion, whose goals were “to call atten­tion to the dan­gers which threaten the race.”

Influ­enced by Kellogg’s ideas, Sadler pub­lished three eugeni­cist books: Long Heads and Round Heads; or, What’s the Mat­ter With Ger­many (1918), Racial Deca­dence: An Exam­i­na­tion of the Causes of Racial Degen­er­a­tion in the United States (1922) and The Truth About Hered­ity (1927). The Uran­tia Book echoes the ideas pre­sented in these books, and in some cases, it repro­duces the text word for word.

William Sadler, via WikiCommons

In Racial Deca­dence, Sadler expresses, among other notions, that the “unfit” should be ster­il­ized, that “moral­ity is hered­ity” and that “some races are more moral than oth­ers.” And in The Truth About Hered­ity, Sadler writes that mar­riage between races “is to be deplored when one of the races would be infe­rior as com­pared with the other, which hap­pens to be the bio­logic fact as con­cerns the White and Negro races in this country.”

His wife, Lena Sadler, who was John Kellogg’s niece, had equally damn­ing words. In a paper called “Is the Abnor­mal to Become Nor­mal” deliv­ered to the Illi­nois Fed­er­a­tion of Women’s Clubs in 1932 and pub­lished in a col­lec­tion called A Decade of Progress in Eugen­ics, she calls for a manda­tory ster­il­iza­tion law and says that if we do not prac­tice good eugen­ics, “ulti­mately this mon­ster will grow to such hideous pro­por­tions that it will strike us down.”

If we prac­tice eugen­ics cor­rectly, she con­tin­ues, we’ll elim­i­nate “at least 90 per­cent of crime, insan­ity, fee­ble­mind­ed­ness, moron­ism, and abnor­mal sex­u­al­ity, not to men­tion many other forms of defec­tive­ness and degen­er­acy. Thus, within a cen­tury, our asy­lums, pris­ons, and state hos­pi­tals would be largely emp­tied of their present vic­tims of human woe and misery.”

Lena Sadler’s speech was writ­ten nearly 100 years ago. Maybe things have changed for such modern-day fol­low­ers of The Uran­tia Book as Mo Siegel?

Unfor­tu­nately not.

“Ill­ness and dis­ease result from evil and cause suf­fer­ing,” Siegel writes in “The Twenty Most-Asked Ques­tions” on The Uran­tia Book Fel­low­ship web­site. “Unfor­tu­nately, sev­eral fac­tors hin­der progress toward the devel­op­ment of a disease-free world. The laws of genet­ics are immutable, and form the phys­i­cal cor­ner­stone of evo­lu­tion. At the present time mankind loses about as much progress as it makes by ignor­ing eugenics.”

Lit­tle infor­ma­tion on the panel’s cur­rent activ­i­ties could be found, and repeated attempts to reach Mo Siegel and the Uran­tia Foun­da­tion were met with resound­ing silence.

The Fel­low­ship is putting its money where its mouth is, too. In a 2010 email sent to “read­ers with advanced infor­ma­tion and for­ward look­ing per­spec­tives that are not suited for being posted on the web­site,” a fol­lower named Mar­tin Green­hut writes that the trustees have con­vened a panel on eugen­ics. He names all of the panel mem­bers, the most strik­ing of which is Ker­mit Ander­son, who at that time was the genetic screen­ing pro­gram direc­tor at Kaiser Per­ma­nente in Cal­i­for­nia and the author of much genet­ics research.

Lit­tle infor­ma­tion on the panel’s cur­rent activ­i­ties could be found, and repeated attempts to reach both Mo Siegel and the Uran­tia Foun­da­tion were met with resound­ing silence.

Celes­tial Sea­son­ings Today

So where does this leave Celes­tial Sea­son­ings? The com­pany also declined to com­ment for this piece, which means we don’t know if The Uran­tia Book still guides their busi­ness deci­sions. Most likely not: Siegel retired in 2002, and John Hay, the other Uran­tia Book believer and co-founder, left even ear­lier, in 1985, pushed out by Siegel’s desire to become a big com­pany “like Coca-Cola,” Car­o­line Mac­Dougall recalled. (Hay went on to be the CEO of Rudi’s Organic Bak­ery, White­Dove Herbals, and more than a few tech­nol­ogy companies.)

Siegel got his wish: Since 2000, the com­pany has been part of Hain Celes­tial Group, a mas­sive multibillion-dollar cor­po­ra­tion that also includes Arrow­head Mills, MaraNatha, Spec­trum Nation­als and Jason. Celes­tial pretty much invented an entire cat­e­gory that we now take for granted: nat­ural health foods. And they do it well. How­Good, which rates pack­aged food prod­ucts, told me that Celestial’s prod­ucts receive a “great” rat­ing, which means that in terms of social and envi­ron­men­tal impact, accord­ing to How­Good, they’re 85 per­cent bet­ter than all of the food pro­duced in the United States.

Like any big com­pany, though, over the years they’ve faced a few class-action law­suits. The largest one is still ongo­ing: It accuses Celes­tial of falsely label­ing prod­ucts includ­ing Sleep­y­time Tea as “all nat­ural” even though they allegedly con­tain pes­ti­cides. Propachlor, which is said to be in Sleep­y­time Kids Good­night Grape Tea, is “a Bad Actor Chem­i­cal (mean­ing it is toxic, car­cino­genic, or a known repro­duc­tive or devel­op­men­tal tox­i­cant), a car­cino­gen and a devel­op­men­tal or repro­duc­tive toxin.” Hain has coun­tered that it had teas tested by the National Food Lab, but there’s been some con­tro­versy about whether or not it is impar­tial, as the National Food Lab lists Celes­tial as one of its clients on its web­site, say­ing, “some­where along the line, we have had a hand in their success.”

That may be. And the same could be said for The Uran­tia Book and its racist celes­tial and not-so-celestial creators.

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