Spitfire List Web site and blog of anti-fascist researcher and radio personality Dave Emory.

For The Record  

FTR #933 The Making of Donald Trump (Top Banana Republic), Part 2

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This broad­cast was record­ed in one, 60-minute seg­ment.

making-of-trumpIntro­duc­tion: In the after­math of the ascen­sion of Don­ald Trump to the Pres­i­den­cy, we are doing some­thing unprece­dent­ed in the long his­to­ry of For The Record. Ear­li­er in 2016, award-win­ning jour­nal­ist David Cay John­ston pub­lished a very well-writ­ten and researched, yet rel­a­tive­ly short and com­pact biog­ra­phy of Don­ald Trump–The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump (Melville House [HC]; copy­right 2016 by David Cay John­ston; ISBN 978–1‑61219–632‑9.)

For some weeks, we have been–and will be–reading most of the book into the record, to pro­vide peo­ple with a mea­sure against which to eval­u­ate not just “The Don­ald,” as his first wife Ivana called him, but our soci­ety, its insti­tu­tions and its cit­i­zens. We can’t rec­om­mend strong­ly enough that lis­ten­ers buy this book, read it and use what­ev­er means avail­able to spread the word about it. (We note that nei­ther Mr. Emory nor any of the sta­tions that air this pro­gram get mon­ey from this book, its pub­lish­er or author.)

This sec­ond install­ment of the series com­mences with a review the sub­stance of an arti­cle that embod­ies the enor­mous and fun­da­men­tal flaw in our polit­i­cal and civic process: a poll short­ly before the elec­tion found that most of the prospec­tive vot­ers polled felt that Trump was more hon­est and trust­wor­thy than Hillary Clin­ton. As our read­ing of John­ston’s excel­lent book unfolds, the grotesque, spec­tac­u­lar­ly fal­la­cious char­ac­ter of this per­cep­tion will become uncom­fort­ably clear. Don­ald Trump is cur­rent­ly track­ing as the more hon­est of the two pres­i­den­tial can­di­dates in a poll, although fact-check­ing of his state­ments dur­ing the cam­paign have shown he’s lied sev­er­al times. The lat­est ABC News/Washington Post track­ing poll reports that 46 per­cent of like­ly vot­ers believe he is the more hon­est and trust­wor­thy can­di­date, while 38 per­cent believed it was Hillary Clin­ton. This marks the biggest gap between the two can­di­dates in five ABC News/Washington Post polls that asked the ques­tion, begin­ning in May.”

thinkbignkickassIn the first excerpt read into the record in this broad­cast, we fin­ish  a chap­ter in which David Cay John­ston relates the gen­e­sis of Trump’s rela­tion­ship with Sen­a­tor Joe McCarthy’s right-hand man Roy Cohn. Hav­ing been sued by the Jus­tice Depart­ment because of his dis­crim­i­na­tion against peo­ple of col­or when rent­ing apart­ments in his prop­er­ties, Trump turned to Cohn. It was the begin­ning of a long rela­tion­ship between the long-time red-baiter and orga­nized crime apol­o­gist and “The Don­ald.” Trump and Cohn lost the case. Note Trump’s plac­ing of loy­al­ty above all else, a pri­or­i­ti­za­tion that John­ston cor­rect­ly char­ac­ter­izes in the ital­i­cize excerpt that fol­lows: ” . . . Elyse Gold­we­ber, the novice Jus­tice Depart­ment lawyer, told the court that one employ­ee who spoke to inves­ti­ga­tors was not being named because ‘he was afraid that the Trumps would have him ‘knocked off,’ or words to that effect’ for reveal­ing the tech­niques used to deny blacks and oth­er minori­ties. . . . In The Art of the Deal, Trump said he told Cohn, ‘I’d rather fight than fold, because a soon as you fold once you get the rep­u­ta­tion’ of some­one who set­tles case. But faced with a case in which nei­ther facts nor the law were on his side, Trump fold­ed and set­tled. . . .Trump han­dled the adverse set­tle­ment the way he had leaned from his father: by spin­ning the news and offer­ing a sim­ple and quotable nar­ra­tive . . . Trump’s take­away from this ear­ly loss was not that times had changed and civ­il rights laws would be enforced. . . . He also learned to place loy­al­ty above all else. . . . That is, of course, the kind of per­spec­tive we expect from mob­sters, dic­ta­tors, and oth­ers whose pri­ma­ry regard is for unflinch­ing sup­port, not for alle­giance to truth or facts. . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 37–39.)

As not­ed in the pro­gram, on the day this was record­ed, Trump Uni­ver­si­ty set­tled in a mas­sive law­suit by stu­dents who had been defraud­ed by the “school.” Trump played it in the fash­ion he learned from his father and that he applied in the hous­ing dis­crim­i­na­tion suit, high­light­ed above: “. . . In The Art of the Deal, Trump said he told Cohn, ‘I’d rather fight than fold, because a soon as you fold once you get the rep­u­ta­tion’ of some­one who set­tles case. But faced with a case in which nei­ther facts nor the law were on his side, Trump fold­ed and set­tled. . . .Trump han­dled the adverse set­tle­ment the way he had leaned from his father: by spin­ning the news and offer­ing a sim­ple and quotable nar­ra­tive . . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 38.)

John­ston notes at the end of chap­ter 5 that Trump learned that hav­ing Cohn as his attor­ney also had oth­er ben­e­fits: ” . . . . Hir­ing him [Cohn] could ensure that his Man­hat­tan con­struc­tion projects moved smooth­ly. Among Cohn’s oth­er clients were two of Amer­i­ca’s most pow­er­ful Mafia fig­ures who con­trolled key unions attached to demo­li­tion and con­struc­tion in New York City.. . . In The Art of the Deal, Trump boasts that when he applied for a casi­no own­er’s license in 1981, he per­suad­ed the New Jer­sey attor­ney gen­er­al to lim­it the inves­ti­ga­tion of his back­ground. It was per­haps the most lucra­tive nego­ti­a­tion of Trump’s life, one that would embar­rass state offi­cials a decade lat­er when Trump’s involve­ment with mob­sters, mob asso­ciates, and swindlers became clear. . . . ” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p9. 39–41.)

Against the back­ground of Cohn’s mob con­nec­tions, John­ston sets forth Trump’s uti­liza­tion of those assets to real­ize his New York City real estate under­tak­ings. Remark­ably, such asso­ci­a­tions did not inter­dict Trump’s Atlantic City [New Jer­sey] gam­ing projects, which nor­mal­ly would have been pre­clud­ed by such links. (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 42–49.)

Exem­pli­fy­ing Trump’s orga­nized crime asso­ciates and the ser­vices they provided–courtesy of Roy Cohn–were Antho­ny “Fat Tony” Saler­no and Paul Castel­lano. ” . . . Trump bought his Man­hat­tan ready-mix [con­crete] from a com­pa­ny called S & A Con­crete. Mafia chief­tains Antho­ny “Fat Tony” Saler­no and Paul Castel­lano secret­ly owned the firm. S & A charged the inflat­ed prices that the LeFrak and Resnik fam­i­lies com­plained about, LeFrak to both laws enforce­ment and The New York TimesAs [reporter Wayne] Bar­rett not­ed, by choos­ing to build with ready-mix con­crete rather than oth­er mate­ri­als, Trump put him­self ‘at the mer­cy of a legion of con­crete rack­e­teers.’ But hav­ing an ally in Roy Cohn mit­i­gat­ed Trump’s con­cerns. With Cohn as his fix­er, Trump had no wor­ries that the Mafia boss­es would have the unions stop work on Trump Tow­er; Saler­no and Castel­lano were Cohn’s clients. Indeed, when the cement work­ers struck in sum­mer 1982, the con­crete con­tin­ued to flow at Trump Tow­er. . . . Just as reveal­ing was Trump’s asso­ci­a­tion with John Cody, the cor­rupt head of Team­sters Local 282. Cody, under indict­ment when he ordered the city­wide strike in 1982, direct­ed that con­crete deliv­er­ies con­tin­ue to Trump Tow­er. Cody told Bar­rett, ‘Don­ald liked to deal with me through Roy Cohn. . . . ” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp.46–47.)

The excerpts read from John­ston’s remark­able tome con­clude with exam­i­na­tion of Trump’s rela­tion­ship with Joey Weich­sel­baum, a con­vict­ed drug traf­fick­er whose rela­tion­ship with Trump is high­ly unusu­al and opaque, even by “The Don­ald’s” stan­dards. “Among the assort­ed crim­i­nals with whom Trump did busi­ness over more than three decades, his most mys­te­ri­ous deal­ings involved a drug traf­fick­er named Joseph Weich­sel­baum. Trump did unusu­al favors for the three-time felon, repeat­ed­ly putting his lucra­tive casi­no license at risk to help a major cocaine and mar­i­jua­na traf­fick­er for rea­sons that remain unfath­omable. . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 59.)

Where­as Trump had many oth­er places to turn to for the var­i­ous aero­nau­ti­cal, auto­mo­tive and sup­ple­men­tal ser­vices Weichels­baum and his broth­er pro­vid­ed, Trump con­tin­ued to use them and pro­vid­ed them and their asso­ciates with remark­able “perks.” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 59–65.)

With Trump poised to name a num­ber of Supreme Court jus­tices, we note that the venue of one of Weichels­baum’s cas­es was changed in a high­ly sus­pi­cious, reveal­ing and inaus­pi­cious man­ner. ” . . . When Weichels­baum made a deal with pros­e­cu­tors to plead guilty to one of the eigh­teen counts in the Cincin­nati case, some­thing very sus­pi­cious hap­pened. His case was trans­ferred out of Ohio for the guilty plea and the sen­tenc­ing. Log­i­cal­ly, the case might have gone to South Flori­da, where Brad­ford Motors [one of the Weich­sel­baum drug-traf­fick­ing fronts] was locat­ed, or to New York, where Weich­sel­baum lived. Indeed, that is exact­ly what Weich­sel­baum’s Ohio lawyer, Arnold Morel­li, sought in a Jan­u­ary 30, 1986 motion request­ing his case be trans­ferred to either Man­hat­tan or Mia­mi for ‘the con­ve­nience of human beings such as the defen­dant and wit­ness­es.’ Instead the Weichels­baum case was moved to New Jer­sey. There it was assigned to Judge Maryanne Trump Barry–Donald Trump’s old­er sis­ter.

Judge Bar­ry recused her­self three weeks lat­er, as judi­cial ethics required, but the mere act of remov­ing her­self from the case came with a pow­er­ful mes­sage: a sit­ting fed­er­al judge, as well as her hus­band (lawyer John Bar­ry) and fam­i­ly, repeat­ed­ly flew in heli­copters con­nect­ed to a major drug traf­fick­er. . . .When Judge Harold A. Ack­er­man replaced Trump’s sis­ter, Trump wrote him a let­ter seek­ing lenien­cy for Weich­sel­baum on the drug traf­fick­ing charge. Trump char­ac­ter­ize the defen­dant as ‘a cred­it to the com­mu­ni­ty’ and described Weich­sel­baum as ‘con­sci­en­tious, forth­right and dili­gent’ in his deal­ings with the Trump Plaza and Trump’s Cas­tle casi­nos. When asked about the let­ter under oath in a pri­vate 1990 meet­ing with New Jer­sey Divi­sion of Gam­ing Enforce­ment lawyers, Trump tes­ti­fied that he could not recall whether ‘he had writ­ten any let­ters of ref­er­ence to the fed­er­al judge who sen­tenced Weich­sel­baum.’ Sub­se­quent­ly, the divi­sion obtained such a let­ter, and Trump acknowl­edged that it bore his sig­na­ture. . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 63–64.)

This pro­gram con­cludes with the read­ing of a poem by Robin­son Jef­fers, “Be Angry at the Sun,” which encom­pass­es Mr. Emory’s feel­ings about the recent elec­tion, as well as the peo­ple and insti­tu­tions that have pre­cip­i­tat­ed this event–one that fig­ures to be dev­as­tat­ing in its man­i­fes­ta­tions.

Pro­gram High­lights Include: 

  • Rudy Giu­liani ‘s pros­e­cu­tion of a case involv­ing some of the mob-run unions asso­ci­at­ed with Trump’s enter­pris­es. Giu­liani is a close advis­er to Trump and may be named to a cab­i­net post. (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 46.)
  • Anoth­er key Trump advis­er dur­ing the cam­paign was Michael Chertoff. He, too, was a pros­e­cu­tor who direct­ed a case against mob­sters involved with Trump’s oper­a­tions. (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 48.)

1. This sec­ond install­ment of the series com­mences with a review the sub­stance of an arti­cle that embod­ies the enor­mous and fun­da­men­tal flaw in our polit­i­cal and civic process: a poll short­ly before the elec­tion found that most of the prospec­tive vot­ers polled felt that Trump was more hon­est and trust­wor­thy than Hillary Clin­ton. As our read­ing of John­ston’s excel­lent book unfolds, the grotesque, spec­tac­u­lar­ly fal­la­cious char­ac­ter of this per­cep­tion will become uncom­fort­ably clear. Don­ald Trump is cur­rent­ly track­ing as the more hon­est of the two pres­i­den­tial can­di­dates in a poll, although fact-check­ing of his state­ments dur­ing the cam­paign have shown he’s lied sev­er­al times. The lat­est ABC News/Washington Post track­ing poll reports that 46 per­cent of like­ly vot­ers believe he is the more hon­est and trust­wor­thy can­di­date, while 38 per­cent believed it was Hillary Clin­ton. This marks the biggest gap between the two can­di­dates in five ABC News/Washington Post polls that asked the ques­tion, begin­ning in May.”

2. In the first excerpt read into the record in this broad­cast, we fin­ish  a chap­ter in which David Cay John­ston relates the gen­e­sis of Trump’s rela­tion­ship with Sen­a­tor Joe McCarthy’s right-hand man Roy Cohn. Hav­ing been sued by the Jus­tice Depart­ment because of his dis­crim­i­na­tion against peo­ple of col­or when rent­ing apart­ments in his prop­er­ties, Trump turned to Cohn. It was the begin­ning of a long rela­tion­ship between the long-time red-baiter and orga­nized crime apol­o­gist and “The Don­ald.” Trump and Cohn lost the case. ” . . . Elyse Gold­we­ber, the novice Jus­tice Depart­ment lawyer, told the court that one employ­ee who spoke to inves­ti­ga­tors was not being named because ‘he was afraid that the Trumps would have him ‘knocked off,’ or words to that effect’ for reveal­ing the tech­niques used to deny blacks and oth­er minori­ties. . . . In The Art of the Deal, Trump said he told Cohn, ‘I’d rather fight than fold, because a soon as you fold once you get the rep­u­ta­tion’ of some­one who set­tles case. But faced with a case in which nei­ther facts nor the law were on his side, Trump fold­ed and set­tled. . . .Trump han­dled the adverse set­tle­ment the way he had leaned from his father: by spin­ning the news and offer­ing a sim­ple and quotable nar­ra­tive . . . Trump’s take­away from this ear­ly loss was not that times had changed and civ­il rights laws would be enforced. . . . He also learned to place loy­al­ty above all else. . . . That is, of course, the kind of per­spec­tive we expect from mob­sters, dic­ta­tors, and oth­ers whose pri­ma­ry regard is for unflinch­ing sup­port, not for alle­giance to truth or facts. . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 37–39.)

3. As not­ed in the pro­gram, on the day this was record­ed, Trump Uni­ver­si­ty set­tled in a mas­sive law­suit by stu­dents who had been defraud­ed by the “school.” Trump played it in the fash­ion he learned from his father and that he applied in the hous­ing dis­crim­i­na­tion suit, high­light­ed above: “. . . In The Art of the Deal, Trump said he told Cohn, ‘I’d rather fight than fold, because a soon as you fold once you get the rep­u­ta­tion’ of some­one who set­tles case. But faced with a case in which nei­ther facts nor the law were on his side, Trump fold­ed and set­tled. . . .Trump han­dled the adverse set­tle­ment the way he had leaned from his father: by spin­ning the news and offer­ing a sim­ple and quotable nar­ra­tive . . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 38.)

4. John­ston notes at the end of chap­ter 5 that Trump learned that hav­ing Cohn as his attor­ney also had oth­er ben­e­fits: ” . . . . Hir­ing him [Cohn] could ensure that his Man­hat­tan con­struc­tion projects moved smooth­ly. Among Cohn’s oth­er clients were two of Amer­i­ca’s most pow­er­ful Mafia fig­ures who con­trolled key unions attached to demo­li­tion and con­struc­tion in New York City.” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 39.)

5. Against the back­ground of Cohn’s mob con­nec­tions, John­ston sets forth Trump’s uti­liza­tion of those assets to real­ize his New York City real estate under­tak­ings. Remark­ably, such asso­ci­a­tions did not inter­dict Trump’s Atlantic City [New Jer­sey] gam­ing projects, which nor­mal­ly would have been pre­clud­ed by such links. (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 41–49.)

6. About Trump, his busi­ness projects and the Mob:  ” . . . In The Art of the Deal, Trump boasts that when he applied for a casi­no own­er’s license in 1981, he per­suad­ed the New Jer­sey attor­ney gen­er­al to lim­it the inves­ti­ga­tion of his back­ground. It was per­haps the most lucra­tive nego­ti­a­tion of Trump’s life, one that would embar­rass state offi­cials a decade lat­er when Trump’s involve­ment with mob­sters, mob asso­ciates, and swindlers became clear. . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 41.)

7. Exem­pli­fy­ing Trump’s orga­nized crime asso­ciates and the ser­vices they provided–courtesy of Roy Cohn–were Antho­ny “Fat Tony” Saler­no and Paul Castel­lano. ” . . . Trump bought his Man­hat­tan ready-mix [con­crete] from a com­pa­ny called S & A Con­crete. Mafia chief­tains Antho­ny “Fat Tony” Saler­no and Paul Castel­lano secret­ly owned the firm. S & A charged the inflat­ed prices that the LeFrak and Resnik fam­i­lies com­plained about, LeFrak to both laws enforce­ment and The New York Times.

As [reporter Wayne] Bar­rett not­ed, by choos­ing to build with ready-mix con­crete rather than oth­er mate­ri­als, Trump put him­self ‘at the mer­cy of a legion of con­crete rack­e­teers.’ But hav­ing an ally in Roy Cohn mit­i­gat­ed Trump’s con­cerns. With Cohn as his fix­er, Trump had no wor­ries that the Mafia boss­es would have the unions stop work on Trump Tow­er; Saler­no and Castel­lano were Cohn’s clients. Indeed, when the cement work­ers struck in sum­mer 1982, the con­crete con­tin­ued to flow at Trump Tow­er. . . .

. . .  Just as reveal­ing was Trump’s asso­ci­a­tion with John Cody, the cor­rupt head of Team­sters Local 282. Cody, under indict­ment when he ordered the city­wide strike in 1982, direct­ed that con­crete deliv­er­ies con­tin­ue to Trump Tow­er. Cody told Bar­rett, ‘Don­ald liked to deal with me through Roy Cohn. . . . ” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp.46–47.)

8. The excerpts read from John­ston’s remark­able tome con­clude with exam­i­na­tion of Trump’s rela­tion­ship with Joey Weich­sel­baum, a con­vict­ed drug traf­fick­er whose rela­tion­ship with Trump is high­ly unusu­al and opaque, even by “The Don­ald’s” stan­dards. “Among the assort­ed crim­i­nals with whom Trump did busi­ness over more than three decades, his most mys­te­ri­ous deal­ings involved a drug traf­fick­er named Joseph Weich­sel­baum. Trump did unusu­al favors for the three-time felon, repeat­ed­ly putting his lucra­tive casi­no license at risk to help a major cocaine and mar­i­jua­na traf­fick­er for rea­sons that remain unfath­omable. . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; p. 59.)

9. Where­as Trump had many oth­er places to turn to for the var­i­ous aero­nau­ti­cal, auto­mo­tive and sup­ple­men­tal ser­vices Weichels­baum and his broth­er pro­vid­ed, Trump con­tin­ued to use them and pro­vid­ed them and their asso­ciates with remark­able “perks.” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 59–65.)

10. With Trump poised to name a num­ber of Supreme Court jus­tices, we note that the venue of one of Weichels­baum’s cas­es was changed in a high­ly sus­pi­cious, reveal­ing and inaus­pi­cious man­ner. ” . . . When Weichels­baum made a deal with pros­e­cu­tors to plead guilty to one of the eigh­teen counts in the Cincin­nati case, some­thing very sus­pi­cious hap­pened. His case was trans­ferred out of Ohio for the guilty plea and the sen­tenc­ing. Log­i­cal­ly, the case might have gone to South Flori­da, where Brad­ford Motors [one of the Weich­sel­baum drug-traf­fick­ing fronts] was locat­ed, or to New York, where Weich­sel­baum lived. Indeed, that is exact­ly what Weich­sel­baum’s Ohio lawyer, Arnold Morel­li, sought in a Jan­u­ary 30, 1986 motion request­ing his case be trans­ferred to either Man­hat­tan or Mia­mi for ‘the con­ve­nience of human beings such as the defen­dant and wit­ness­es.’ Instead the Weichels­baum case was moved to New Jer­sey. There it was assigned to Judge Maryanne Trump Barry–Donald Trump’s old­er sis­ter.

Judge Bar­ry recused her­self three weeks lat­er, as judi­cial ethics required, but the mere act of remov­ing her­self from the case came with a pow­er­ful mes­sage: a sit­ting fed­er­al judge, as well as her hus­band (lawyer John Bar­ry) and fam­i­ly, repeat­ed­ly flew in heli­copters con­nect­ed to a major drug traf­fick­er. . . .When Judge Harold A. Ack­er­man replaced Trump’s sis­ter, Trump wrote him a let­ter seek­ing lenien­cy for Weich­sel­baum on the drug traf­fick­ing charge. Trump char­ac­ter­ize the defen­dant as ‘a cred­it to the com­mu­ni­ty’ and described Weich­sel­baum as ‘con­sci­en­tious, forth­right and dili­gent’ in his deal­ings with the Trump Plaza and Trump’s Cas­tle casi­nos. When asked about the let­ter under oath in a pri­vate 1990 meet­ing with New Jer­sey Divi­sion of Gam­ing Enforce­ment lawyers, Trump tes­ti­fied that he could not recall whether ‘he had writ­ten any let­ters of ref­er­ence to the fed­er­al judge who sen­tenced Weich­sel­baum.’ Sub­se­quent­ly, the divi­sion obtained such a let­ter, and Trump acknowl­edged that it bore his sig­na­ture. . . .” (The Mak­ing of Don­ald Trump; pp. 63–64.)

11. This pro­gram con­cludes with the read­ing of a poem by Robin­son Jef­fers, “Be Angry at the Sun,” which encom­pass­es Mr. Emory’s feel­ings about the recent elec­tion, as well as the peo­ple and insti­tu­tions that have pre­cip­i­tat­ed this event–one that fig­ures to be dev­as­tat­ing in its man­i­fes­ta­tions.

“Be Angry at the Sun” by Robin­son Jef­fers

That pub­lic men pub­lish false­hoods
Is noth­ing new. That Amer­i­ca must accept
Like the his­tor­i­cal republics cor­rup­tion and empire
Has been known for years.

Be angry at the sun for set­ting
If these things anger you. Watch the wheel slope and turn,
They are all bound on the wheel, these peo­ple, those war­riors.
This repub­lic, Europe, Asia.

Observe them ges­tic­u­lat­ing,
Observe them going down. The gang serves lies, the pas­sion­ate
Man plays his part; the cold pas­sion for truth
Hunts in no pack.

You are not Cat­ul­lus, you know,
To lam­poon these crude sketch­es of Cae­sar. You are far
From Dan­te’s feet, but even far­ther from his dirty
Polit­i­cal hatreds.

Let boys want plea­sure, and men
Strug­gle for pow­er, and women per­haps for fame,
And the servile to serve a Leader and the dupes to be duped.
Yours is not theirs.

Discussion

3 comments for “FTR #933 The Making of Donald Trump (Top Banana Republic), Part 2”

  1. Dear Dave,

    This com­ment is not direct­ly relat­ed to FTR #933 but I real­ly need your help.

    I’ve known about your web site for a few years now and at times I have felt you were absolute­ly cor­rect and at oth­er times I have felt you were mis­tak­en but with Trump’s elec­tion my world has been thrown com­plete­ly upside down and I don’t know what to believe any­more! All the so called “alter­na­tive news sites” I used to read, which I thought were con­sti­tu­tion­al­ist lib­er­tar­i­ans, turned out to be out­right Nazis and RT, which I thought was an unbi­ased news source, turned out to be Russ­ian dis­in­for­ma­tion. They con­vinced me and mil­lions of peo­ple world­wide there would be WWIII if Hillary was elect­ed. Now I see this was just fear mon­ger­ing to influ­ence the US elec­tions but here comes my first ques­tion: Why? Why would Putin want a Nazi, or at least a fas­cist sym­pa­thiz­er like Trump, in the White House? Is it because Putin him­self is a Nazi as Gar­ry Kas­parov claims or was it sim­ply because Trump would not inter­vene with Rus­si­a’s geopo­lit­i­cal plans in the Mid­dle East. If so, here comes the first con­tra­dic­tion, who ever heard of a Nazi anti-war, non-inter­ven­tion­ist coun­try? If Trump is a Nazi then why does he want to with­draw from NATO and iso­late the US from the inter­na­tion­al com­mu­ni­ty? Isn’t that a con­tra­dic­tion in terms? Or is Trump mere­ly a pup­pet with­in the grand scheme of things. If this is the case then is Robert Mer­cer part of the Bor­mann Cap­i­tal Net­work?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/19/us/politics/robert-mercer-donald-trump-donor.html

    After all, Rebekah Mer­cer was the one who brought Stephen K. Ban­non (the man with the clear­est ties to Nazi groups in the US) into the pic­ture. Is Trump the step­ping stone to the hor­rif­ic real­i­ties described in this most dis­turb­ing arti­cle: “Zero to Eighty-Eight: Notes on Build­ing a Deep State.”

    http://fashthenation.com/2016/11/zero-to-eighty-eight-notes-on-building-a-deep-state/

    I have heard you say the end game is for Ger­many to recap­ture it’s lost pow­er and rein­state the Third Reich but hon­est­ly, Merkel seems to be the only ratio­nal voice left! I have per­son­al­ly seen her squelch any kind of nation­al­is­tic atti­tudes and she open­ly stat­ed the “Heil Trumps” in the recent Alt-right meet­ing video which cir­cu­lat­ed on youtube were “repug­nant”. So what’s the deal? Is the down­fall of Ger­many the future check-mate move? Because right now the coun­tries I see as total­i­tar­i­an Nazi-like states are the US and Rus­sia….. not Ger­many!

    When I con­tact­ed you some time ago you told me to read all the books on your web site but frankly I didn’t do it because the amount of infor­ma­tion was sim­ply over­whelm­ing. How­ev­er, giv­en the cur­rent state of affairs, I decid­ed to begin read­ing: “Mar­tin Bor­mann, Nazi in Exile” and right off the bat, in the very first sen­tence of the acknowl­edge­ments sec­tion Paul Man­ning is thank­ing Allen Dulles for his encour­age­ment……. Allen Dulles!?!?!? Wasn’t he the one who cov­ered up JFK’s assas­si­na­tion? The same Allen Dulles who sup­pos­ed­ly brought all those Nazis to the US in the infa­mous Oper­a­tion Paper­clip? Wikipedia says Allen Dulles was an anti-semi­te but in this obscure web site

    http://spartacus-educational.com/USAdullesA.htm

    It says: “In 1935 Dulles vis­it­ed Nazi Ger­many. He was appalled by the treat­ment of Ger­man Jews and advo­cat­ed his law firm to close their Berlin office.”

    So, will the real Allen Dulles please stand up? I spent 5 years of my life doing research on the JFK assas­si­na­tion but appar­ent­ly every­thing I thought I knew was mis­tak­en! I did see the sub­tle naz­i­fi­ca­tion of the US but I thought the line went through Dulles to the Bush­es and sub­se­quent admin­is­tra­tions, both Repub­li­can and Demo­c­rat, slow­ly erod­ing American’s free­dom and civ­il rights. And to be hon­est, would we now be in this pick­le if all the admin­is­tra­tions since Kennedy hadn’t put their lit­tle grain of sand to advance the nation­al secu­ri­ty state while giv­ing more pow­er to the exec­u­tive branch of gov­ern­ment?

    Please answer my ques­tions direct­ly. If I could deduce the answers to them by read­ing the infor­ma­tion on your web site I wouldn’t be ask­ing them. I don’t know which way is up or down and I am sure there are many peo­ple who are just as con­fused as I am with Trump’s elec­tion. It would be so help­ful if you, Pter­rafractyl or any­body else you trust with these issues, could post a syn­op­sis or schemat­ic dia­gram that would clear­ly explain exact­ly who advanced this Nazi agen­da in the US, where Trump fits into the pic­ture and what can we expect with­in the next 5 to 10 years. Sub­se­quent­ly we can do the leg­work our­selves but we need to know which path to fol­low if we are to take the first step.

    Wish­ing you a peace­ful Thanks­giv­ing….

    Posted by Silvia | November 25, 2016, 1:11 pm
  2. @Silvia–

    Yours is a very good ques­tion and is, no doubt, shared by many oth­er lis­ten­ers, read­ers and users of this web­site.

    Alas, a sim­ple, brief expla­na­tion is ever elu­sive.

    The strong part of my work is its aca­d­e­m­ic rig­or, sourc­ing, and cor­rect fore­shad­ow­ing of events to come.

    Sad­ly, its weak­ness is that is long, time-con­sum­ing to absorb and, as a result, beyond the reach of many who do not have the time or phys­i­cal resources to access the doc­u­men­ta­tion upon which my pre­sen­ta­tions are made.

    The answer is–as briefly as I can make it–that Trump is a vehi­cle for the Under­ground Reich.

    Putin, like Stal­in, is try­ing to avoid encir­clement by a hos­tile alliance and sees–mistakenly in my opinion–Trump as a means to that end.

    Stal­in signed the Hitler/Stalin pact not because he was a con­vert to Nazism, but because he sought a buffer zone between an ascen­dant Ger­many and the USSR and sought to buy time.

    As a result of that pact, the Sovi­et Union got the Baltic States, Mol­davia (then usu­al­ly referred to as Bessara­bia) and parts of Poland, after the war start­ed.

    Stal­in turned out to be deeply mis­tak­en, of course, and I sus­pect that Putin may be as well.

    They key dynam­ic, here is Ger­man “Ost­poli­tik.”

    Ger­many wants to sup­plant NATO (in the long run) with a Ger­man-dom­i­nat­ed all-EU mil­i­tary.

    Ger­many also wants to estab­lish an eco­nom­ic trade union stretch­ing from Lis­bon to Vladi­vos­tok. Pre­lim­i­nary dis­cus­sions are already under way, although the real­iza­tion of such a project is a long way off.

    The under­ly­ing con­cept, in my opin­ion, is to start a bid­ding war between East and West that will ulti­mate­ly ben­e­fit Ger­many.

    To under­stand this, one must under­stand Ger­man Ost­poli­tik.

    An essen­tial source on this is: http://spitfirelist.com/books/germany-plots-with-the-kremlin/

    For some back­ground on how Trump fits into this: http://spitfirelist.com/for-the-record/ftr-918-the-trumpenkampfverbande-part-1-german-ostpolitik-part‑1/

    Also this: http://spitfirelist.com/for-the-record/ftr-919-the-trumpenkampfverbande-part-2-german-ostpolitik-part‑2/

    FTR #930 will pro­vide some depth: http://spitfirelist.com/for-the-record/ftr-930-the-trumpenkampfverbande-part-9-alfa-males-part-3-german-ostpolitik-part‑3/

    I rec­om­mend doing a search in the “For The Record” cat­e­go­ry for key­words “Trump” and “Steuben.” Be sure to use the quotes.

    As to Allen Dulles, he head­ed the OSS Berne, Switzer­land office and was known to Paul Man­ning through their ser­vice in World War II (Man­ning was actu­al­ly in the mil­i­tary, as was required to fly com­bat mis­sions over Europe.)

    If one were to pur­sue the Bor­mann group from a jour­nal­is­tic stand­point, there would be few places to turn and Allen Dulles would have been one of them.

    Note that Man­ning was almost cer­tain­ly “dou­bled on” dur­ing his search. The book makes his dif­fi­cul­ties clear and my inter­view with Peter Man­ning (his son) goes into that at fur­ther depth.

    http://spitfirelist.com/for-the-record/ftr-125-interview-with-peter-manning/

    A cou­ple of ele­men­tal, fun­da­men­tal aspects of espi­onage work–spies don’t man­i­fest their true alle­giances on the sur­face. They are, after all, spies.

    The car­di­nal rule for a good dou­ble agent is to make one­self indis­pens­able to the effort.

    I’ve no doubt that Dulles, being a skilled oper­a­tive, would have done just that.

    He would have made him­self indis­pens­able to the effort, while at the same time betray­ing Man­ning to the Bor­mann group.

    I hope that this helps.

    Best,

    Dave

    Posted by Dave Emory | November 26, 2016, 3:39 pm
  3. Dear Dave,

    Thank you so much for you reply. It was indeed very help­ful and I am deeply impressed with your knowl­edge regard­ing this issue.

    I also appre­ci­ate the peace­ful and sub­dued tone in your expla­na­tion because this allowed me to step back and see things more clear­ly. When the elec­tion results first came through I was in a state of pan­ic. I thought nobody could be trust­ed because at that pre­cise moment I real­ized how Russ­ian pro­pa­gan­da had affect­ed the results but now I see the truth can be found any­where, if one knows where to look.

    What you said about Ger­many mobi­liz­ing to become the mil­i­tary leader of a coali­tion of EU coun­tries is men­tioned right here on RT

    https://www.rt.com/op-edge/361832-eu-army-nato-germany/

    No won­der Putin once said he thought he knew every­thing as a KGB agent until he became pres­i­dent and real­ized even the most sophis­ti­cat­ed KGB oper­a­tions were child’s play com­pared to inter­na­tion­al pol­i­tics!

    So, am I cor­rect to assume the west, i.e. Ger­many has been stok­ing people’s fear regard­ing Russ­ian expan­sion­ism? Because when Trump was elect­ed all the Baltic and for­mer Sovi­et states were ter­ri­fied to think the US might with­draw from the NATO. Some east­ern Euro­pean lead­ers are even “push­ing” Angela Merkel for a joint EU army

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/european-leaders-push-angela-merkel-for-joint-eu-army-a7211861.html

    while Putin is hap­py because he thinks a Trump pres­i­den­cy means a with­draw­al from NATO and the threat it rep­re­sents for Rus­sia. In the mean­time, nobody sees Ger­many as a major threat to any­one! Well, nobody except Britain who left the EU because (among many oth­er things) it did not want to form part of a EU army with Ger­many as it’s leader.

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/718527/EU-ARMY-BLACKMAIL-Germany-warns-post-Brexit-UK

    http://www.cnbc.com/2016/11/14/brexit-architect-nigel-farage-has-slammed-plans-for-an-eu-army-after-donald-trumps-election-win.html

    So, it seems Mr. Trump, Mr. Farage and Mr. Putin have all been played by Ger­many. Well, all I can say is…… Wow!

    Do you think Angela Merkel as Chan­cel­lor and Ursu­la von der Leyen as Min­is­ter of Defense have been cho­sen on pur­pose pre­cise­ly because they appear “non-threat­en­ing”? Maybe in this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fi0dffrSmPI

    Merkel wasn’t say­ing no, as I pre­vi­ous­ly thought. Maybe she was just say­ing: No, No, No..... not yet!
    Regards
    Sil­via

    Posted by Silvia | November 29, 2016, 3:26 pm

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