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FTR #944 Fireside Rant: WTF Is Going On? The Caligulization of America and the End of the American Century

Dave Emory’s entire life­time of work is avail­able on a flash drive that can be obtained HERE [1]. The new drive is a 32-gigabyte drive that is current as of the programs and articles posted by early winter of 2016. The new drive (available for a tax-deductible contribution of $65.00 or more.) (The previous flash drive was current through the end of May of 2012.)

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This broadcast was recorded in one, 60-minute segment [5].

NB: This program contains information that was not contained in the original program.

Trump kept a copy of this by his bedside. [6]

Trump kept a copy of this by his bedside.

Introduction: This broadcast is a (probably partly unsuccessful) summary attempt at explaining what will be the results of the ascendance of the Trumpenkampfverbande in the U.S.

It is to be hoped that this description will go further toward explaining what is going on than the original program.

In addition to the excerpts of articles presented in the program, we will summarize some of the central arguments in the broadcast, with links to other programs and lectures, where possible.

In AFA #37 [7], we discussed the Gehlen “Org” and related elements as a Trojan Horse, using anti-communism to infiltrate the United States and, ultimately, destroy it from within. In this program we develop that analysis further, adding the role of the House of Habsburg and associates to the Trojan Horse metaphor.

When the U.S. frustrated the de-Nazification of Germany [8], opted to ally with the remarkable and deadly Bormann capital network [9] and the associated Habsburg royal family, and returned the Japanese [10] and Italian fascists to power (with a civilian facade), this country signed its own death warrant.

America’s entry into two World Wars, after the combat had proceeded for years, decided both conflicts against Germany. The American revolution was the first successful revolt of a European colonial power against its colonial master.

Both Germany and the House of Habsburg vowed never again! Never! 

In this context, we observe that the Habsburgs (royal house of the Austro-Hungarian Empire) ruled for six hundred years. Six hundred years ago–1417–was three quarters of a century before Columbus sailed.

To the Habsburgs, America is a blip. Democracy is a blip. They see things in an entirely different way. Because the U.S. was an unassailable military power and the most powerful economy on earth, the country could only be brought down by subversion from within.

We gave the Underground Reich and the Habsburgs the keys to the kingdom, not unlike the Praetorian Guard–Germanic mercenary troops appointed to guard the Roman Emperor. Eventually they controlled the throne and preserved the Roman Empire for as long as it could make lucrative payments to the Germanic tribes who eventually defeated and sacked Rome.

The thrust of the broadcast is that the ascension of Trump–an American Caligula–is indeed the end of what Henry Luce called “The American Century.”

The author of our first article [11] is a former editor for Time magazine and a former State Department officer, so his literal take on Luce’s pronouncement is not surprising.

What Stengel is talking about is the end of “Brand America,” to coin a phrase–the successful PR marketing of this country as the Land of the Free, Home of the Brave, etc.

That political mythology, which compelled much of Mr. Emory’s initial involvement in this research when he began in the early ’70s, will evaporate. That dissipation, however, will be eclipsed by the devastating economic, environmental, social and political devastation that will surely follow Trump’s policies.

As Mr. Emory forecast in FTR #’s 918 [12] and 919 [13], among other programs in the “Trumpenkampfverbande” series, Trump’s anti-NATO rhetoric and general disparaging of the Atlanticist alliances that have held sway during the better part of “The American Century” are focused on precipitating the Underground Reich goals of: an all-EU army replacing NATO, a German-dominate Europe  assuming center stage in world affairs, and the forging of an economic alliance with Russia (following Russian concessions on Ukraine) that will give “Corporate Germany” economic domination over the Earth Island.

Our next article [14] heralds Mr. Emory’s prognostications. We do not feel Trump is necessarily conscious of his role. In the age of mind control, what goes on between a given individual’s ears is impossible to gauge, past a point.

Among the various and sundry disastrous outcomes of Trump’s policies may well be a cyber-terrorist incident [15] from a nation-state actor or a lone malefactor, this the result of a federal hiring freeze.

” . . . On his first official day in office after inauguration, President Donald Trump has made good on his plan to institute a federal hiring freeze—part of his effort to slash the federal workforce. Details are sparse: Trump has said there would be exceptions for the military, and a White House memo [16] notes the freeze would be waived “when necessary to meet national or public safety responsibilities.” Some experts fear a temporary hiring freeze could exacerbate a chronic problem in the federal government: a widespread shortage of cybersecurity talent. A hiring freeze could signal to essential cybersecurity talent—especially those who might consider joining the public sector from higher-paying industry jobs—that there’s no need or desire for them in the federal government, Alan Chvotkin, executive vice president of the Professional Services Council, told Nextgov. . . .”

Exemplifying a disconnect that is sure to help bring our economy down, Labor Secretary Puzder lauds the value [17] of machines over humans. While he is correct that machines do not do many things that he sees as counter-productive, he ignores the fact that machines don’t by food at Carl’s Junior or Hardees, the food chains for which he is chief executive. No machine has ever bought anything.

” . . . Fast food executive Andrew Puzder, who President-elect Donald Trump is expected to tap as labor secretary [18], has advocated replacing some human workers with machines as a way for businesses to reduce costs associated with rising wages and health-care expenses. While machines require regular maintenance and can sometimes malfunction, Puzder said, they are also easier to manage than humans and don’t pose the same legal risks. “They’re always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there’s never a slip-and-fall, or an age, sex, or race discrimination case,” Puzder told Business Insider in March [19]. Puzder serves as the chief executive of CKE Restaurants, the corporate parent behind fast food chains Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. . . .”

When automation, inflation of the price of consumer goods that are imported and have had tariffs slapped on them by “The Donald,” lack of health care forcing working people to devote increasingly scarce resources toward maintaining their and/or their families’ health, the subversion of minimum wage, overtime and unionization laws and statutes and increasing concentration of economic ownership have brought American consumers to their knees, our consumer-based economy will collapse.

Lastly, we note something that heralds poorly [20] for the response of the American people to the chaos that is sure to envelope this country after the environmental, economic and social chaos that will inevitably result from Trump’s rollback of decades of necessary regulation, enormous budget deficits from the GOP’s tax cuts, neutralization of decades of progress on health care and rollback of the New Deal.

With Betsy De Vos appointed as Secretary of Education, the already dismal, frightening civic awareness of our public school students figures to get worse. In and of itself, that is cause for extreme pessimism.

As our society disintegrates from the interplay of various economic, political and military factors, the calls for “someone to do something” to repair our dysfunctional society are likely to increase exponentially.

“. . . . When, 2011, the World Values Survey asked US citizens in their late teens and early 20s whether democracy was a good way to run a country, about a quarter said it was ‘bad’ or ‘very bad,’ an increase of one-third since the late 1990s. Among citizens of all ages, 1 in 6 now say in would be fine for the ‘army to rule,’ up from 1 in 16 in 1995. In a different national survey, about two-thirds of Americans could not name all three branches of the federal government or which party controlled the House of Representatives. In a third study, almost half of the respondents said the government should be permitted to prohibit a peaceful march. . . .”

Program Highlights Include:

1. The thrust of the broadcast is that the ascension of Trump–an American Caligula–is indeed the end of what Henry Luce called “The American Century.” The author is a former editor for Time magazine and a former State Department officer, so his literal take on Luce’s pronouncement is not surprising.

What Stengel is talking about is the end of “Brand America,” to coin a phrase–the successful PR marketing of this country as the Land of the Free, Home of the Brave, etc.

That political mythology, which compelled much of Mr. Emory’s initial involvement in this research when he began in the early ’70s, will evaporate. That dissipation, however, will be eclipsed by the devastating economic, environmental, social and political devastation that will surely follow Trump’s policies.

“The End of the American Century” by Richard Stengel; The Atlantic; 1/26/2017. [11]

The inaugural address of Donald Trump did not contain the word justice or cooperation or ideals or morals or truth or charity. It has only one reference to freedom. It did mention carnage and crime and tombstones and a variety of words never uttered before in a presidential inaugural. Since then, the president has doubled-down on his desire to build a wall on America’s Southern border and has said his administration will re-evaluate accepting refugees from designated Muslim countries and cut back by half the relatively small number of refugees accepted by the Obama administration. I spent seven years as editor of Time before I worked in the State Department as under secretary for public diplomacy and public affairs. While I was editor of Time, I never wanted to be the first of Luce’s successors to pronounce the end of the American Century. In part, this was because of a misunderstanding of the term. Most people thought it meant American power or hegemony and there was not much diminution in America’s global power. What it really means is America as a global model and guarantor of freedom and rule of law and fairness.

Trump ’s administration is the death knell of the American Century. . . .

2. As Mr. Emory forecast in FTR #’s 918 [12] and 919 [13], among other programs in the “Trumpenkampfverbande” series, Trump’s anti-NATO rhetoric and general disparaging of the Atlanticist alliances that have held sway during the better part of “The American Century” are focused on precipitating the Underground Reich goals of: an all-EU army replacing NATO, a German-dominate Europe  assuming center stage in world affairs, and the forging of an economic alliance with Russia (following Russian concessions on Ukraine) that will give “Corporate Germany” economic domination over the Earth Island.

This article heralds Mr. Emory’s prognostications. We do not feel Trump is necessarily conscious of his role. In the age of mind control, what goes on between a given individual’s ears is impossible to gauge, past a point.

“The Moment of the Europeans;” german-foreign-policy.com; 1/18/2017. [14]

Germany’s top politicians are calling on the EU to close ranks behind Europe’s “central power,” Germany, following President-Elect Donald Trump’s recent declarations in an interview. Trump suggested the possibility of “deals” with Russia, predicted the further disintegration of the EU and pointed to Germany’s dominant role within the EU. A new Russian-American world order is looming, according to Elmar Brok (CDU), Chairman of the European Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs, it is therefore imperative that the EU “close ranks.” Germany’s Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier expressed a similar opinion. Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the Munich Security Conference, called for Russian and US disarmament and for enhancing the EU’s militarization. He recommended that “German nuclear armament” not be discussed – at least “at the moment.”

“Vehicle for Germany”

Donald Trump’s declarations in a recent interview have provoked Berlin’s call for the EU to close ranks. In his interview with the German “Bild” and the British “Times,” Trump called NATO “obsolete,” because only five member countries are investing the generally agreed two percent of their respective GDPs in their armed forces. He also suggested the possibility of “some good deals” with Russia, hailed the Brexit and predicted that other members would leave the EU. He also pointed to Berlin’s dominant role in the EU – a fact that is no longer denied in Europe’s foreign policy establishment. (german-foreign-policy.com reported.[1]) “You look at the European Union, and it is Germany; basically, a vehicle for Germany,” Trump was quoted.[2]

Close Ranks on Military Policy

The prospect that Washington under Trump could reach agreements with Moscow on international policy issues without the EU – which, for years, has been crippled with crisis and actually is facing disintegration – has provoked indignant reactions from German foreign policy makers and appeals to close ranks. “If we fail now to close ranks in the field of security and foreign policy, we will be faced with a new world order under Russia’s President Putin and the new US President Trump,” Elmar Brok, Chairman of the European Parliament Committee on Foreign Affairs contended on Monday.[3] Already at the beginning of the year, Wolfgang Ischinger, Chair of the Munich Security Conference had called for the EU to “speak more in unison in the future” and certainly not in the “cacophony of 27 or 28 European heads of states and governments.”[4] Germany’s Foreign Minister – who will soon become Germany’s President – Frank-Walter Steinmeier declared, following a meeting with his EU counterparts last Monday that it has “perhaps become again clearer to one or the other, just how important it is that Europe stands together and assumes common positions.”[5] Brok packaged his plea for a pan-EU closing of ranks into an appeal: “This is now the moment of the Europeans.”[6]

Disarm the Rivals

In Berlin, the contention is making the rounds that an eventual rapprochement between Washington and Moscow could be politically advantageous – not least of all to put the power struggle over Ukraine on ice. This would permit a roll back of sanctions on Russia and create new room for German companies to make lucrative business deals with the East – without relinquishing one’s own positions.[7] Thus, Ischinger alleges to have heard “courageous voices” in Kiev, who are prepared to forego membership in NATO. “A new US President Trump could talk to President Poroshenko in Kiev and Putin in Moscow and offer Ukraine security guarantees in exchange for renunciation of NATO membership,” explained the prominent diplomat.[8] It is also important that US-Russian negotiations reach an agreement on a new round in arms control. Disarmament must be sought. “More trust must be established again between the militaries, between NATO and Russia.” “I would make a plea for a round-the-clock jointly run crisis control center on neutral territory.” Ischinger did not mention whether he would consider Germany a suitable site.

Never Again “No War!”

While calling for US and Russian disarmament, Ischinger speaks out also for the further militarization of German and EU policy. “Putin” – meaning the conflicts concerning Ukraine and Syria – has clearly “demonstrated, how absolutely wrong it is to contend that there can be no military solutions,” he explained. Because the EU did not openly intervene militarily, “we, Europeans, … have once again been banned to the sidelines – a spectator position – which is not the appropriate role for the EU, the world’s largest trading and economic power, with a population of 500 million.”[9] He “would like to see” that “no responsible German politician” will repeat the sentence, “there can be no military solutions.” In fact, the EU is preparing – under German pressure – a considerable expansion of its foreign policy and military activities. (german-foreign-policy.com reported.[10]) Even in transatlantic relations, there is “no guarantee of cooperation for eternity with us Europeans,” declared Chancellor Merkel, last week.[11] That is why “Europe” must considerably expand it radius of political and military action.

The Question of the Bomb

Wolfgang Ischinger has begun to take the question of “German nuclear armament” into consideration. Currently, it is better to avoid a debate on the EU’s “own nuclear arsenal,” the German diplomat declared. The nuclear power Great Britain is leaving the EU, while the nuclear power France is not “willing and capable” of “Europeanizing its nuclear potential.” However, “at the moment,” it would be “a political mistake to debate an alternative of arming Germany with nuclear weapons,” also “because we would provide an argument to critics in Moscow and in Europe that the central power Germany not only seeks to dominate Europe with financial policy, but also – in violation of all treaties – joint control over nuclear weapons.”[12] Ischinger did not elaborate on what conditions could invalidate his argument of temporal limitation (“at the moment”), nor did he express conclusive arguments against Germany’s acquiring nuclear weapons.

[1] See Leading from the Center [26].
[2] Trump: “Merkel-Asylpolitik ein schlimmer Fehler”. www.krone.at 16.01.2017.
[3] “Wir müssen auf das Schlimmste gefasst sein”. www.welt.de 17.01.2017.
[4] “Maximale Unberechenbarkeit”. www.swr.de 03.01.2016.
[5] Außenminister Steinmeier nach dem EU-Außenrat. Pressemitteilung des Auswärtigen Amts. Berlin, 16.01.2017.
[6] “Wir müssen auf das Schlimmste gefasst sein”. www.welt.de 17.01.2017.
[7] See Ostgeschäfte [27] and Reversal of Business Trend with Russia [28].
[8], [9] Daniel-Dylan Böhmer, Thorsten Jungholt: “Frau Merkel muss sich warm anziehen”. www.welt.de 13.01.2017.
[10] See The European War Union [29], Strategische Autonomie [30] and Shock as Opportunity [31].
[11] Merkel: Keine “Ewigkeitsgarantie” für Unterstützung Europas durch die USA. www.welt.de 12.01.2017.
[12] Daniel-Dylan Böhmer, Thorsten Jungholt: “Frau Merkel muss sich warm anziehen”. www.welt.de 13.01.2017.

3. Among the various and sundry disastrous outcomes of Trump’s policies may well be a cyber-terrorist incident from a nation-state actor or a lone malefactor, this the result of a federal hiring freeze.

“What Does Trump’s Hiring Freeze Mean for Federal Cyber Shortage?” by Mohana Ravindranath; Nextgov; 1/24/2017. [15]

On his first official day in office after inauguration, President Donald Trump has made good on his plan to institute a federal hiring freeze—part of his effort to slash the federal workforce. 

Details are sparse: Trump has said there would be exceptions for the military, and a White House memo [16] notes the freeze would be waived “when necessary to meet national or public safety responsibilities.”

Some experts fear a temporary hiring freeze could exacerbate a chronic problem in the federal government: a widespread shortage of cybersecurity talent.

A hiring freeze could signal to essential cybersecurity talent—especially those who might consider joining the public sector from higher-paying industry jobs—that there’s no need or desire for them in the federal government, Alan Chvotkin, executive vice president of the Professional Services Council, told Nextgov. . . .

5. Exemplifying a disconnect that is sure to help bring our economy down, Labor Secretary Puzder lauds the value of machines over humans. While he is correct that machines do not do many things that he sees as counter-productive, he ignores the fact that machines don’t by food at Carl’s Junior or Hardees, the food chains for which he is chief executive. No machine has ever bought anything.

When automation, inflation of the price of consumer goods that are imported and have had tariffs slapped on them by “The Donald,” lack of health care forcing working people to devote increasingly scarce resources toward maintaining their and/or their families’ health, the subversion of minimum wage, overtime and unionization laws and statutes and increasing concentration of economic ownership have brought American consumers to their knees, our consumer-based economy will collapse.

“Donald Trump’s Pick for Labor Secretary Has Said Machines Are Cheaper, Easier to Manage than Humans” by Steven Overly; The Washington Post ; 12/8/2016. [17]

Fast food executive Andrew Puzder, who President-elect Donald Trump is expected to tap as labor secretary [18], has advocated replacing some human workers with machines as a way for businesses to reduce costs associated with rising wages and health-care expenses.

While machines require regular maintenance and can sometimes malfunction, Puzder said, they are also easier to manage than humans and don’t pose the same legal risks. “They’re always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there’s never a slip-and-fall, or an age, sex, or race discrimination case,” Puzder told Business Insider in March [19].

Puzder serves as the chief executive of CKE Restaurants, the corporate parent behind fast food chains Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. . . .

6. With Betsy De Vos appointed as Secretary of Education, the already dismal, frightening civic awareness of our public school students figures to get worse. In and of itself, that is cause for extreme pessimism.

As our society disintegrates from the interplay of various economic, political and military factors, the calls for “someone to do something” to repair our dysfunctional society are likely to increase exponentially.

“Bully Pulpit” by Kristina Rizca; Mother Jones; January/February 2017. [20]

. . . . When, 2011, the World Values Survey asked US citizens in their late teens and early 20s whether democracy was a good way to run a country, about a quarter said it was “bad” or “very bad,” an increase of one-third since the late 1990s. Among citizens of all ages, 1 in 6 now say in would be fine for the “army to rule,” up from 1 in 16 in 1995. In a different national survey, about two-thirds of Americans could not name all three branches of the federal government or which party controlled the House of Representatives. In a third study, almost half of the respondents said the government should be permitted to prohibit a peaceful march. . . .