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Analyzing “Clausewitzian Economics”: Greek Politician Compares German Economic Hegemony to WWII

Dave Emory’s entire life­time of work is avail­able on a flash dri­ve that can be obtained here. [1] The new dri­ve is a 32-giga­byte dri­ve that is cur­rent as of the pro­grams and arti­cles post­ed by late spring of 2015. The new dri­ve (avail­able for a tax-deductible con­tri­bu­tion of $65.00 or more) con­tains FTR #850 [1].  

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[6]COMMENT: In past pro­grams [7], we exam­ined the Greek and Euro­zone debt crises in the con­text of the the­o­ries of Friedrich List and Carl von Clause­witz, as well as the real­iza­tion of those the­o­ries through suc­cess­ful manip­u­la­tion of the transna­tion­al cor­po­rate land­scape through both world wars and the “post­wars” that fol­lowed them.

Recent­ly, a the Greek may­or of Cor­fu encap­su­lat­ed that devel­op­ment rather suc­cinct­ly: “What they didn’t man­age in World War II they are man­ag­ing now,” Kostas Nikolouzos, the left-wing may­or of Cor­fu, said of Ger­many, voic­ing a com­mon sen­ti­ment. “It may sound extreme, but it’s true.” . . .

“Ail­ing Greek Air­port Pos­es Test for Bailout Plan” by Jack Ewing; The New York Times; 9/19/2015; p. B3. [8]

. . . . The oth­er euro­zone coun­tries are demand­ing that the gov­ern­ment turn over air­port man­age­ment to Fra­port, the com­pa­ny that runs the Frank­furt Air­port and air­ports in eight oth­er coun­tries, includ­ing those in St. Peters­burg, Rus­sia, and Lima, Peru. But many Greeks, includ­ing the local gov­ern­ment on Cor­fu, see that as an impe­ri­al­is­tic incur­sion and are vow­ing to resist with all means nec­es­sary, includ­ing law­suits and strikes.

That the air­port con­trac­tor in ques­tion comes from Ger­many, which many Greeks con­sid­er their chief antag­o­nist among euro­zone cred­i­tors, only adds to the ten­sions. For many Greeks, the air­ports deal is sym­bol­ic of their broad­er con­cerns about the bailout: They fear that the gov­ern­ment is sur­ren­der­ing vital nation­al assets at an extreme dis­count to Ger­mans intent on forc­ing the coun­try into eco­nom­ic sub­ju­ga­tion.

“What they didn’t man­age in World War II they are man­ag­ing now,” Kostas Nikolouzos, the left-wing may­or of Cor­fu, said of Ger­many, voic­ing a com­mon sen­ti­ment. “It may sound extreme, but it’s true.” . . .