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Analyzing “Clausewitzian Economics”: Greek Politician Compares German Economic Hegemony to WWII

Dave Emory’s entire life­time of work is avail­able on a flash drive that can be obtained here. [1] The new drive is a 32-gigabyte drive that is current as of the programs and articles posted by late spring of 2015. The new drive (available for a tax-deductible contribution of $65.00 or more) contains FTR #850 [1].  

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[6]COMMENT: In past programs [7], we examined the Greek and Eurozone debt crises in the context of the theories of Friedrich List and Carl von Clausewitz, as well as the realization of those theories through successful manipulation of the transnational corporate landscape through both world wars and the “postwars” that followed them.

Recently, a the Greek mayor of Corfu encapsulated that development rather succinctly: “What they didn’t manage in World War II they are managing now,” Kostas Nikolouzos, the left-wing mayor of Corfu, said of Germany, voicing a common sentiment. “It may sound extreme, but it’s true.” . . .

“Ailing Greek Airport Poses Test for Bailout Plan” by Jack Ewing; The New York Times; 9/19/2015; p. B3. [8]

. . . . The other eurozone countries are demanding that the government turn over airport management to Fraport, the company that runs the Frankfurt Airport and airports in eight other countries, including those in St. Petersburg, Russia, and Lima, Peru. But many Greeks, including the local government on Corfu, see that as an imperialistic incursion and are vowing to resist with all means necessary, including lawsuits and strikes.

That the airport contractor in question comes from Germany, which many Greeks consider their chief antagonist among eurozone creditors, only adds to the tensions. For many Greeks, the airports deal is symbolic of their broader concerns about the bailout: They fear that the government is surrendering vital national assets at an extreme discount to Germans intent on forcing the country into economic subjugation.

“What they didn’t manage in World War II they are managing now,” Kostas Nikolouzos, the left-wing mayor of Corfu, said of Germany, voicing a common sentiment. “It may sound extreme, but it’s true.” . . .