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Austria’s Largest Daily Endorses Nazi Revisionist Candidate

“Austrian Far-Right Icon Eyes Presidency” by Veronika Oleksyn [AP]; google.com; 3/3/2010.

A woman who has crit­i­cized anti-Nazi law and is mar­ried to an extreme right­ist is run­ning for pres­i­dent in Aus­tria, and crit­ics con­tend her can­di­dacy could tar­nish the rep­u­ta­tion of a coun­try still marred by its con­nec­tion to the Holocaust.

Bar­bara Rosenkranz, 51, is not expected to win the April 25 elec­tion, despite her endorse­ment from the owner of Austria’s most widely read news­pa­per, the Kro­nen Zeitung. [Ital­ics mine–D.E.]

But she is likely to lead a cam­paign against pop­u­lar Pres­i­dent Heinz Fis­cher laced with the anti-foreigner and anti-European Union rhetoric her far-right Free­dom Party generates.

She is most widely known for her belief that Austria’s law ban­ning the glo­ri­fi­ca­tion of the Nazis is a hin­drance to free­dom of expres­sion and vio­lates the country’s con­sti­tu­tion. In the same vein, she also has defended doubts over Nazi gas chambers.

Her hus­band, Horst Jakob Rosenkranz, was part of a far-right polit­i­cal party that was banned for being too radical. . . .

Discussion

One comment for “Austria’s Largest Daily Endorses Nazi Revisionist Candidate”

  1. “Over half of Austrians think the Nazis would be elected if the party was readmitted to politics-
    75 years after Hitler annexed country, poll reveals worrying views about banned party”

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/over-half-of-austrians-think-the-nazis-would-be-elected-if-the-party-was-readmitted-to-politics-8528218.html

    “As Austria prepares to mark the anniversary of its annexation by Nazi Germany, an opinion poll has shown that more than half of the population think it highly likely that the Nazis would be elected if they were readmitted as a party.

    A further 42 per cent agreed with the view that life “wasn’t all bad under the Nazis”, and 39 per cent said they thought a recurrence of anti-Semitic persecution was likely in Austria.

    The disturbing findings were contained in a poll conducted for the Vienna newspaper, “Der Standard” in advance of Tuesday’s 75th anniversary of Austria’s Nazi annexation – a date which still counts as one of the most shameful and controversial in the country’s history.

    Tens of thousands of Austrians gave Adolf Hitler and his troops a rapturous welcome when they invaded the country unopposed in March 1938. Austria fought World War II as part of Nazi Germany and many Austrians helped run Nazi death camps. Yet for decades, post-war Austria frequently perpetuated the myth that it was a victim of Nazi oppression. Der Standard said its poll was designed to show how today’s Austrians judged Nazi rule.

    Neighbouring Germany’s popular “Stern” magazine described the poll’s findings as shocking today. The poll also showed that 61 per cent of Austrian adults wanted to see a “strong man” in charge of government, and 54 per cent said they thought it would be “highly likely” that the Nazis would win seats in they were allowed to take part in an election.

    Some 46 per cent of those polled said they believed Austria was a victim of Nazi oppression in 1938, while 61 per cent said they believed that “enough” had been done to reappraise Austria’s Nazi past.

    The poll’s damning findings have been echoed by organisations such as the Israel office of the Simon Weisenthal Center which, among other things, has accused Austria of a “consistently terrible record” on tracking down Holocaust perpetrators over the past 30 years.

    In an attempt to improve Austria’s record on Nazi-era reappraisal, the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra announced yesterday that it would publish details about its Nazi collaboration during the Third Reich. The move follows allegations that the orchestra has whitewashed its past.

    The orchestra is expected to reveal that it expelled 13 musicians because they were Jewish or opposed the Nazi annexation, and that some of its members were Nazis themselves. Five of those expelled are believed to have later died in concentration camps.”

    Posted by Swamp | March 11, 2013, 10:03 am

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