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Important Link Between JFK and MLK Assassinations and a Fateful Meeting on 11/21/1963

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LBJ and JFK

COMMENT: In his 2016 book about the assas­si­na­tion of Mar­tin Luther King (The Plot to Kill King), William Pep­per high­lights a link between the mys­te­ri­ous Raul (one of Pat­sy James Earl Ray’s han­dlers), Jack Ruby and the Hunt fam­i­ly of Texas. For­mer FBI agent Don Wil­son came across the infor­ma­tion while pur­su­ing some­one who fit the descrip­tion of a King assas­si­na­tion sus­pect. Key details in Wilson’s sto­ry:

  • ” . . . . The per­son matched the pho­to­graph being cir­cu­lat­ed of the sus­pect. Wil­son said he and his part­ner were inclined to appre­hend the per­son they had spot­ted, and radioed the field office for per­mis­sion to do so. The oper­a­tor told them to hold on, went off the line for instruc­tions, came back on and instruct­ed them to ‘return to base.’ Sur­prised and dis­ap­point­ed, they did as they were told. To this day, Don Wil­son finds it strange and unac­cept­able that they were not allowed to detain the sus­pect and yet were not giv­en any expla­na­tion. . . .”
  • ” . . . . When the field office received a request from the Atlanta police to check out a white Mus­tang, which had been parked for some days at the Capi­tol Homes Hous­ing Project, he went along with a senior col­league to the scene. The sus­pi­cion was that the car, with Alaba­ma license plates, had been involved in the King assas­si­na­tion. Wil­son said that when he opened the car door on the pas­sen­ger’s side, an enve­lope and some papers fell out. Instinc­tive­ly, he put his foot on the papers, bent over, picked them up, and put them in his pock­et. . . . ”
  • ” . . . . One piece came from a 1963 Dal­las, Texas, tele­phone direc­to­ry. It was part of a page that had been torn out. The tele­phone num­bers on the page includ­ed those of the fam­i­ly of H.L. Hunt, but more sig­nif­i­cant­ly, in hand­writ­ing at the top of the page, was the name “Raul,” the let­ter “J” and a Dal­las tele­phone num­ber, of a club in Dal­las which at the time was run by Jack Ruby, the killer of Lee Har­vey Oswald. . . .”
  • ” . . . . The sec­ond piece of paper con­tained sev­er­al names; along­side of each were sums of mon­ey. It appeared to be some sort of pay­off list, and at the bot­tom was Raul’s name and date for pay­ment. Wil­son also said that he recov­ered a third piece of paper, on which was writ­ten the tele­phone num­ber and exten­sion of the Atlanta FBI field office. . . .”
  • “. . . . I met sep­a­rate­ly with Bev­er­ly Oliv­er, Chari Angel, and Madeleine Brown. Madeleine had not worked for Ruby, but was Lyn­don John­son’s mis­tress for years, and, in fact, had giv­en birth to his only son; she also knew Ruby and fre­quent­ed his main club—the Carousel. When I put the spread of pho­tographs in front of each of them on sep­a­rate occa­sions, each one inde­pen­dent­ly con­firmed that she had seen Ruby with the man we had iden­ti­fied as Raul. In fact, Bev­er­ly remem­bered Raul giv­ing Ruby what appeared to be a large amount of cash in what she described as Pig­gly Wig­gly gro­cery store paper bag. . . .”

Madeleine Brown, LBJ’s for­mer mis­tress, pre­sent­ed con­fir­ma­tion of a meet­ing report­ed by Penn Jones in For­give My Grief, Vol­ume 3, and relat­ed in FTR #962.

LBJ’s mistress–Madeleine Brown–confirmed a meet­ing at the home of oil­man Clint Murchi­son the night before Pres­i­dent Kennedy’s assas­si­na­tion: ” . . . . She said she attend­ed a social gath­er­ing at Clint Murchison’s home. Osten­si­bly, it was an event to hon­or J. Edgar Hoover, who was a close friend of Murchi­son, H.l, Hunt, and the oth­er Texas oil giants. The guest list includ­ed John McCloy, chair­man of Chase Man­hat­tan Bank [and a future mem­ber of the War­ren Commission–D.E.] ; Richard Nixon, George Brown, of the Brown and Root Con­struc­tion Com­pa­ny; R.L. Thorn­ton, pres­i­dent of the Mer­can­tile Bank; and Dal­las may­or Ear­le Cabell, broth­er of Gen­er­al Charles Cabell, for­mer Deputy Direc­tor of the CIA, who was fired by Pres­i­dent Kennedy after the Bay of Pigs.

 Madeleine told me that near the end of the par­ty, John­son made an appear­ance and the group quick­ly went into Murchison’s study behind closed doors. After about twen­ty min­utes, the meet­ing broke up. John­son, anx­ious and red-faced, came up behind her and embraced her with a qui­et grat­ing sound and whis­pered in her ear a mes­sage she would nev­er for­get, ‘After tomor­row, those god­damn Kennedys will nev­er embar­rass me again—that’s no threat, that’s a promise.’ . . .”

1.     The Plot to Kill King by William Pep­per; Sky­horse Pub­lish­ing [SC]; Copy­right 2016 by William Pep­per; ISBN 978–1‑5107–2962‑9; pp. 156–158.

. . . . In ear­ly 1997, Don Wil­son con­tact­ed the King fam­i­ly and me, pro­vid­ing us with some extra­or­di­nary new infor­ma­tion. At first, we com­mu­ni­cat­ed through his son, who was a lawyer in a Chica­go law firm. When we even­tu­al­ly met, it was on April 18 in the lounge of the Admi­rals Club at Chicago’s O’Hare Air­port. He recount­ed two inci­dents. He said that short­ly after the assas­si­na­tion, he and anoth­er agent were rid­ing in the Peachtree area of Atlanta, and  they spot­ted a per­son who, they were cer­tain, was the man want­ed for the mur­der of Dr. King. The per­son matched the pho­to­graph being cir­cu­lat­ed of the sus­pect. Wil­son said he and his part­ner were inclined to appre­hend the per­son they had spot­ted, and radioed the field office for per­mis­sion to do so. The oper­a­tor told them to hold on, went off the line for instruc­tions, came back on and instruct­ed them to  “return to base.” Sur­prised and dis­ap­point­ed, they did as they were told. To this day, Don Wil­son finds it strange and unac­cept­able that they were not allowed to detain the sus­pect and yet were not giv­en any expla­na­tion.

What he told me next was more sig­nif­i­cant. When the field office received a request from the Atlanta police to check out a white Mus­tang, which had been parked for some days at the Capi­tol Homes Hous­ing Project, he went along with a senior col­league to the scene. The sus­pi­cion was that the car, with Alaba­ma license plates, had been involved in the King assas­si­na­tion. Wil­son said that when he opened the car door on the pas­sen­ger’s side, an enve­lope and some papers fell out. Instinc­tive­ly, he put his foot on the papers, bent over, picked them up, and put them in his pock­et. The young agent was ner­vous, think­ing that he might have dis­turbed the evi­dence at the crime scene. Lat­er, when he had an oppor­tu­ni­ty to exam­ine the indi­vid­ual sheets of paper, he was shocked and real­ized that if he turned them over to his supe­ri­ors, they would nev­er see the light of day.

He kept them hid­den for twen­ty-nine years.

One piece came from a 1963 Dal­las, Texas, tele­phone direc­to­ry. It was part of a page that had been torn out. The tele­phone num­bers on the page includ­ed those of the fam­i­ly of H.L. Hunt, but more sig­nif­i­cant­ly, in hand­writ­ing at the top of the page, was the name “Raul,” the let­ter “J” and a Dal­las tele­phone num­ber, of a club in Dal­las which at the time was run by Jack Ruby, the killer of Lee Har­vey Oswald.

The sec­ond piece of paper con­tained sev­er­al names; along­side of each were sums of mon­ey. It appeared to be some sort of pay­off list, and at the bot­tom was Raul’s name and date for pay­ment. Wil­son also said that he recov­ered a third piece of paper, on which was writ­ten the tele­phone num­ber and exten­sion of the Atlanta FBI field office. . . .

. . . . I met sep­a­rate­ly with Bev­er­ly Oliv­er, Chari Angel, and Madeleine Brown. Madeleine had not worked for Ruby, but was Lyn­don John­son’s mis­tress for years, and, in fact, had giv­en birth to his only son; she also knew Ruby and fre­quent­ed his main club—the Carousel.

When I put the spread of pho­tographs in front of each of them on sep­a­rate occa­sions, each one inde­pen­dent­ly con­firmed that she had seen Ruby with the man we had iden­ti­fied as Raul. In fact, Bev­er­ly remem­bered Raul giv­ing Ruby what appeared to be a large amount of cash in what she described as Pig­gly Wig­gly gro­cery store paper bag.

There was no doubt that each of these women cor­rob­o­rat­ed Glen­da Grabow’s infor­ma­tion that Jack Ruby and Raul knew each oth­er. Don Wilson’s mate­ri­als appeared to for­ti­fy that fact. . . .

2.    The Plot to Kill King by William Pep­per; Sky­horse Pub­lish­ing [SC]; Copy­right 2016 by William Pep­per; ISBN 978–1‑5107–2962‑9; p. 203.

 . . . . I had Madeleine, Bev­er­ly, and Chari lined up to trav­el to Mem­phis, but then did not call them.  It was a temp­ta­tion, which had to be resist­ed. It was not easy because I believed these coura­geous women, Madeleine Brown for exam­ple, were very cred­i­ble. Some aspects of Madeleine’s rec­ol­lec­tions of her life and gen­uine love for John­son were com­pelling. In fact, as I have men­tioned pre­vi­ous­ly, she gave birth to his only son. I obtained a copy of John­son’s com­mit­ment (through his local lawyer Jerome Rags­dale) to pro­vide sup­port for Steven, which con­tin­ued even after the pres­i­den­t’s death. That she was able to pro­vide such detail about their rela­tion­ship was impres­sive. Of par­tic­u­lar note (though a digres­sion) was her rec­ol­lec­tion of the Kennedy assas­si­na­tion. She said she attend­ed a social gath­er­ing at Clint Murchison’s home. Osten­si­bly, it was an event to hon­or J. Edgar Hoover, who was a close friend of Murchi­son, H.l, Hunt, and the oth­er Texas oil giants. The guest list includ­ed John McCloy, chair­man of Chase Man­hat­tan Bank; Richard Nixon, George Brown, of the Brown and Root Con­struc­tion Com­pa­ny; R.L. Thorn­ton, pres­i­dent of the Mer­can­tile Bank; and Dal­las may­or Ear­le Cabell, broth­er of Gen­er­al Charles Cabell, for­mer Deputy Direc­tor of the CIA, who was fired by Pres­i­dent Kennedy after the Bay of Pigs.

 Madeleine told me that near the end of the par­ty, John­son made an appear­ance and the group quick­ly went into Murchison’s study behind closed doors. After about twen­ty min­utes, the meet­ing broke up. John­son, anx­ious and red-faced, came up behind her and embraced her with a qui­et grat­ing sound and whis­pered in her ear a mes­sage she would nev­er for­get, “After tomor­row, those god­damn Kennedys will nev­er embar­rass me again—that’s no threat, that’s a promise.” She was stunned, but the net day she real­ized what he meant. . . . it [her sto­ry] was cor­rob­o­rat­ed by employ­ees of Murchison’s house­hold includ­ing the man who picked up Hoover at the air­port. . . .

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