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Islamic State “Brothers” Now Fighting in Ukraine Under Pravy Sektor Administrative Command

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Chechens in Ukraine (pho­to cred­it Reuters)

COMMENT: Two dif­fer­ent types of fas­cist cadres are oper­at­ing in tan­dem in Ukraine–in addi­tion to the OUN/B heirs such as the Pravy Sek­tor for­ma­tions, Chechen fight­ers (almost cer­tain­ly allied with some ele­ment of Mus­lim Broth­er­hood) are now fight­ing along­side them and under the Pravy Sek­tor admin­is­tra­tive com­mand.

The Chechen for­ma­tions are described as “broth­ers” of the Islam­ic State.

The Boston Marathon bomb­ing appears to have been blow­back from a covert oper­a­tion back­ing jihadists in the Cau­ca­sus.

It is impos­si­ble under the cir­cum­stances to cov­er our research into the Ukraine cri­sis. Pre­vi­ous pro­grams on the sub­ject are: FTR #‘s 777778779780781782783784794800803804, 808811817818824826829832833837849850, 853Listeners/readers are encour­aged to exam­ine these pro­grams and/or their descrip­tions in detail, in order to flesh out their under­stand­ing.

“Ukraine Merges Nazis and Islamists” by Robert Par­ry; Con­sor­tium News; 7/7/2015.

In a curi­ous­ly upbeat account, The New York Times reports that Islam­ic mil­i­tants have joined with Ukraine’s far-right and neo-Nazi bat­tal­ions to fight eth­nic Russ­ian rebels in east­ern Ukraine. It appears that no com­bi­na­tion of vio­lent extrem­ists is too wretched to cel­e­brate as long as they’re killing Russ-kies.

The arti­cle by Andrew E. Kramer reports that there are now three Islam­ic bat­tal­ions “deployed to the hottest zones,” such as around the port city of Mar­i­upol. One of the bat­tal­ions is head­ed by a for­mer Chechen war­lord who goes by the name “Mus­lim,” Kramer wrote, adding:

“The Chechen com­mands the Sheikh Mansur group, named for an 18th-cen­tu­ry Chechen resis­tance fig­ure. It is sub­or­di­nate to the nation­al­ist Right Sec­tor, a Ukrain­ian mili­tia. … Right Sec­tor … formed dur­ing last year’s street protests in Kiev from a half-dozen fringe Ukrain­ian nation­al­ist groups like White Ham­mer and the Tri­dent of Stepan Ban­dera.

“Anoth­er, the Azov group, is open­ly neo-Nazi, using the ‘Wolf’s Hook’ sym­bol asso­ci­at­ed with the [Nazi] SS. With­out address­ing the issue of the Nazi sym­bol, the Chechen said he got along well with the nation­al­ists because, like him, they loved their home­land and hat­ed the Rus­sians.”

As casu­al­ly as Kramer acknowl­edges the key front-line role of neo-Nazis and white suprema­cists fight­ing for the U.S.-backed Kiev regime, his arti­cle does mark an aber­ra­tion for the Times and the rest of the main­stream U.S. news media, which usu­al­ly dis­miss any men­tion of this Nazi taint as “Russ­ian pro­pa­gan­da.” . . .

. . . . Now, the Kiev regime has added to those “forces of civ­i­liza­tion” — resist­ing the Russ-kie bar­bar­ians — Islam­ic mil­i­tants with ties to ter­ror­ism. Last Sep­tem­ber, Marcin Mamon, a reporter for the Inter­cept, reached a van­guard group of these Islam­ic fight­ers in Ukraine through the help of his “con­tact in Turkey with the Islam­ic State [who] had told me his ‘broth­ers’ were in Ukraine, and I could trust them.”

The new Times arti­cle avoids delv­ing into the ter­ror­ist con­nec­tions of these Islamist fight­ers. . . .

 

Discussion

3 comments for “Islamic State “Brothers” Now Fighting in Ukraine Under Pravy Sektor Administrative Command”

  1. This appears to be the exe­cu­tion of a strat­e­gy of NSDAP to have Islamist coop­er­ate with the Naz­i’s. The book “Islam and Nazi Ger­many’s War” by David Motadel on page 313 states “In the last months of the war, in the Berlin Bunker, Hitler lament­ed that the Third Reich’s efforts to mobi­lize the Mus­lim world had not been strong enough. “All Islam vibrat­ed at the news of our vic­to­ries” and Mus­lims had been “ready to rise in revolt,” he told Bor­mann. Just think what we could have done to help them, even to incite them, as would have been both our duty and inter­est!”

    The book cites the fol­low­ing source: “The Tes­ta­ment of Adolph Hitler: The Hitler-Bor­mann Doc­u­ments, Feb­ru­ary — April 1945, ed. Fran­cois Geout Transl. R. H. Stevens, intro. H. R. Trevor- Rop­er Lon­don, 1961”(17 Feb­ru­ary 1945) Pages 69–75.

    Posted by Waffen SS | July 19, 2015, 6:43 pm
  2. Just to add to the com­ment above — Mr Emory has painstak­ing­ly doc­u­ment­ed the form and struc­ture of the con­nec­tion between cer­tain strands of Islam and fas­cism for decades as even a cur­so­ry trip through the archives will show.

    Most recent­ly, the absolute essen­tial mul­ti-part series with author Peter Lev­en­da goes into some detail on the links between the Third Reich and its attempts to co-opt the more extrem­ist strands of Islam­ic ide­ol­o­gy.

    Pre­vi­ous­ly, the very men­tion of the “N” word by the NATO media prox­ies was con­sid­ered taboo and yet in recent weeks, there has been an orches­trat­ed dis­clo­sure, that yes, there are nazi and fas­cist forces in Ukraine — in the form of a “few bad apples” that the “demo­c­ra­t­i­cal­ly mind­ed” Kiev regime is cur­rent­ly tack­ling. A cyn­ic would sug­gest this is sim­ply a form of sheep-dip­ping and the Right Sec­tor have prob­a­bly been told to “cool it” with the overt Nazi/Fascist insignia (of course the Stepan Ban­dera ref­er­ences can stay, giv­en the fact very few in the west know the name).

    The embed­ding of Chechen reac­tionar­ies in the con­flict has the fin­ger­prints of west­ern state and mil­i­tary intel­li­gence all over it.

    Posted by Paul Harvey | July 20, 2015, 2:00 pm
  3. The Dai­ly Beast has a new piece on the Chechen Jihadists fight­ing in Ukraine after fight­ing for ISIS and how, with talk of mak­ing Right Sec­tor part of the SBU, there’s grow­ing spec­u­la­tion that a Chechen ‘vol­un­teer bat­tal­ion’ is just a mat­ter of time:

    The Dai­ly Beast

    Chechen Jihadists Join Ukraine’s Fight­ers
    FROM ONE WAR TO THE NEXT

    Anna Nemtso­va

    09.04.15 1:00 AM ET

    Chechen Jihadis Leave Syr­ia, Join the Fight in Ukraine
    A bat­tal­ion of fight­ers from the Cau­ca­sus is deployed on Kiev’s side in the Ukraine war. But their pres­ence may do more harm than good.

    MARIUPOL, Ukraine — Just an hour’s dri­ve from this city under siege, at an old resort on the Azov Sea that’s now a mil­i­tary base, mil­i­tants from Chechnya—veterans of the jihad in their own lands and, more recent­ly, in Syr­ia—now serve in what’s called the Sheikh Mansur Bat­tal­ion. Some of them say they have trained, at least, in the Mid­dle East with fight­ers for the so-called Islam­ic State, or ISIS.

    Among the irreg­u­lar forces who’ve enlist­ed in the fight against the Russ­ian-backed sep­a­ratists in the Don­bas region of east­ern Ukraine, few are more con­tro­ver­sial or more dan­ger­ous to the cred­i­bil­i­ty of the cause they say they want to serve. Russ­ian Pres­i­dent Vladimir Putin would love to por­tray the fight­ers he sup­ports as cru­saders against wild-eyed jihadists rather than the gov­ern­ment in Ukraine that wants to inte­grate the coun­try more close­ly with West­ern Europe.

    Yet many Ukrain­ian patri­ots, des­per­ate to gain an edge in the fight against the Russ­ian-backed forces, are will­ing to accept the Chechen mil­i­tants on their side.

    Over the past year, dozens of Chechen fight­ers have come across Ukraine’s bor­der, some legal­ly, some ille­gal­ly, and con­nect­ed in Don­bas with the Right Sec­tor, a far-right-wing mili­tia. The two groups, with two bat­tal­ions, have lit­tle in com­mon, but they share an ene­my and they share this base.

    The Dai­ly Beast spoke with the Chechen mil­i­tants about their pos­si­ble sup­port for the Islam­ic State and its affil­i­ate in the North­ern Cau­ca­sus region of Rus­sia, which is now called the Islam­ic State Cau­ca­sus Emi­rate and is labeled a ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion by both Rus­sia and the Unit­ed States.

    The Chechen fight­ers said they were moti­vat­ed by a chance to fight in Ukraine against the Rus­sians, whom they called “occu­piers of our coun­try, Ichk­eriya,” anoth­er term for Chech­nya.

    Indeed, they were upset that Ukrain­ian author­i­ties did not allow more Chechen mil­i­tants to move to Ukraine from the Mid­dle East and the moun­tains of the Cau­ca­sus. The Sheikh Mansur Bat­tal­ion, found­ed in Ukraine in Octo­ber 2014, “needs re-enforce­ment,” they said.

    The man the Chechens defer to as their “emir,” or leader, is called “Mus­lim,” a com­mon fore­name in the Cau­ca­sus. He talked about how he per­son­al­ly crossed the Ukrain­ian bor­der last year: “It took me two days to walk across Ukraine’s bor­der, and the Ukrain­ian bor­der con­trol shot at me,” he said. He lives on this mil­i­tary base here open­ly enough but is frus­trat­ed that more of his recruits can’t get through. “Three of our guys came here from Syr­ia, 15 more are wait­ing in Turkey,” he told The Dai­ly Beast. “They want to take my path, join our bat­tal­ion here right now, but the Ukrain­ian bor­der patrol is not let­ting them in.”

    Mus­lim pulled out a piece of paper with a name of anoth­er Chechen head­ing to join the bat­tal­ion. The hand­writ­ten note said that Amayev Khavadzhi was detained on Sep­tem­ber 4, 2014, in Greece and now could be deport­ed to Rus­sia. (Khayadzhi’s lawyer in Greece told The Dai­ly Beast on the phone that there was a chance that his defen­dant would be trans­ferred to his fam­i­ly in France instead.)

    “Two more of our friends have been detained, and are threat­ened with depor­ta­tion to Rus­sia, where they get locked up for life or Kady­rov kills them,” Mus­lim told The Dai­ly Beast, refer­ring to the pro-Putin strong­man of Chech­nya, Ramzan Kady­rov.

    The com­man­der point­ed at a young beard­ed mil­i­tant next to him: “Mansur came here from Syr­ia,” Mus­lim said. “He used ISIS as a train­ing base to improve his fight­ing skills.” Mansur stretched out his right hand, which was dis­fig­ured, he said, by a bul­let wound. Two more bul­lets were still stuck in his back, he said.

    “No pho­tographs,” Mansur shook his head when a jour­nal­ist tried to take his pic­ture. Not even of his hand, not even from the back: “My reli­gion does not allow that.”

    ...

    Mansur said he did not have to run across the bor­der under a hail of of bul­lets like Mus­lim. “We man­aged to reach an agree­ment with the Ukraini­ans,” he said.

    The arrival of pro-Ukrain­ian Chechen fight­ers from abroad helped relieve some of the immi­gra­tion prob­lems of Chechens already liv­ing in Ukraine, the mil­i­tants explained.

    Kady­rov had sent some of his Chechens to fight on the Russ­ian side of the con­flict last year, said Mus­lim, and as a result “there was a tem­po­rary dan­ger that Chechen fam­i­lies might be deport­ed from Ukraine… But as soon as we start­ed com­ing here last August, no Chechen in Ukraine had rea­sons to com­plain.”

    Were for­mer fight­ers com­ing to Ukraine from Syr­ia because they were dis­ap­point­ed (or appalled) by the ide­ol­o­gy of ISIS?

    “We have been fight­ing against Rus­sia for over 400 years; today they [the Rus­sians] blow up and burn our broth­ers alive, togeth­er with chil­dren, so here in Ukraine we con­tin­ue to fight our war,” the com­man­der said. Many in Ukraine remem­bered the Chechen war of the mid-1990s as a war for inde­pen­dence, which briefly was giv­en, then tak­en away.

    Since then the war in the Cau­ca­sus has mor­phed into ter­ror­ism, killing about 1,000 civil­ians, many of them chil­dren, in a series of ter­ror attacks. And what­ev­er the com­mon ene­my, that pos­es a seri­ous prob­lem for Kiev if it embraces such fight­ers.

    “The Ukrain­ian gov­ern­ment should be aware that Islam­ic rad­i­cals fight against democ­ra­cy,” says Var­vara Pakhomenko, an expert at the Inter­na­tion­al Cri­sis Group. “Today they unite with Ukrain­ian nation­al­ists against Rus­sians, tomor­row they will be fight­ing against lib­er­als.”

    Pakhomenko says some­thing sim­i­lar hap­pened in Geor­gia in 2012 when the gov­ern­ment there found itself accused of coop­er­a­tion with Islam­ic rad­i­cals from Europe, Chech­nya, and the Pankisi Gorge, an eth­nic Chechen region of Geor­gia.

    For inter­na­tion­al observers cov­er­ing ter­ror­ism in Rus­sia and Cau­ca­sus in the past 15 years, the pres­ence of Islam­ic rad­i­cals in Ukraine sounds “dis­as­trous,” mon­i­tors from the Inter­na­tion­al Cri­sis Group told The Dai­ly Beast.

    But many ordi­nary Ukraini­ans and offi­cials in Mar­i­upol sup­port the idea of retain­ing more Chechen mili­tia fight­ers. “They are fear­less fight­ers, ready to die for us, we love them, any­body who would pro­tect us from death,” said Gali­na Odnorog, a vol­un­teer sup­ply­ing equip­ment, water, food, and oth­er items to bat­tal­ions told The Dai­ly Beast. The pre­vi­ous night Ukrain­ian forces report­ed six dead Ukrain­ian sol­diers and over a dozen wound­ed.

    “ISIS, terrorists—anybody is bet­ter than our lame lead­ers,” says local leg­isla­tive coun­cil deputy Alexan­der Yaroshenko. “I feel more com­fort­able around Mus­lim and his guys than with our may­or or gov­er­nor.”

    The Right Sec­tor bat­tal­ion that coop­er­ates with the Chechen mil­i­tants is a law unto itself, often out of con­trol, and tend­ing to incor­po­rate any­one it wants into its ranks. In July two peo­ple were killed and eight wound­ed in a gun and grenade bat­tle between police and Right Sec­tor mili­tia in west­ern Ukraine. On Mon­day, Right Sec­tor mil­i­tants trig­gered street bat­tles in the cen­ter of Kiev that left three police­men dead and over 130 wound­ed.

    Yet the gov­ern­ment in Kiev has been con­sid­er­ing the trans­fer of the Right Sec­tor into a spe­cial unit of the SBU, Ukraine’s secu­ri­ty ser­vice, which has made many peo­ple won­der whether the Chechen mili­tia will be join­ing the gov­ern­ment units as well. So far, nei­ther the Right Sec­tor bat­tal­ion nor the Chechen bat­tal­ion have been reg­is­tered with offi­cial forces.

    In Ukraine, which is los­ing dozens of sol­diers and civil­ians every week, many things could spin out of con­trol but “it would be unimag­in­able to allow for­mer or cur­rent ISIS fight­ers to join any gov­ern­ment-con­trolled or ‑spon­sored mil­i­tary unit,” says Paul Quinn-Judge, senior advis­er for Inter­na­tion­al Cri­sis Group in Rus­sia and Ukraine. “It would be polit­i­cal­ly dis­as­trous for the Poroshenko admin­is­tra­tion: No West­ern gov­ern­ment in its right mind would accept this, and it would be an enor­mous pro­pa­gan­da gift for the Krem­lin. The Ukrain­ian gov­ern­ment would be bet­ter served by pub­li­ciz­ing their deci­sions to turn ISIS vets back at the bor­der.”

    Yes, giv­en the incred­i­ble embrace of groups like Right Sec­tor, includ­ing the pos­si­bil­i­ty that they might be made into a spe­cial unit of the SBU, why not cre­ate a Chechen ISIS bat­tal­ion?

    “The Ukrain­ian gov­ern­ment should be aware that Islam­ic rad­i­cals fight against democ­ra­cy,” says Var­vara Pakhomenko, an expert at the Inter­na­tion­al Cri­sis Group. “Today they unite with Ukrain­ian nation­al­ists against Rus­sians, tomor­row they will be fight­ing against lib­er­als.”

    ...
    The Right Sec­tor bat­tal­ion that coop­er­ates with the Chechen mil­i­tants is a law unto itself, often out of con­trol, and tend­ing to incor­po­rate any­one it wants into its ranks. In July two peo­ple were killed and eight wound­ed in a gun and grenade bat­tle between police and Right Sec­tor mili­tia in west­ern Ukraine. On Mon­day, Right Sec­tor mil­i­tants trig­gered street bat­tles in the cen­ter of Kiev that left three police­men dead and over 130 wound­ed.

    Yet the gov­ern­ment in Kiev has been con­sid­er­ing the trans­fer of the Right Sec­tor into a spe­cial unit of the SBU, Ukraine’s secu­ri­ty ser­vice, which has made many peo­ple won­der whether the Chechen mili­tia will be join­ing the gov­ern­ment units as well. So far, nei­ther the Right Sec­tor bat­tal­ion nor the Chechen bat­tal­ion have been reg­is­tered with offi­cial forces.
    ...

    “Today they unite with Ukrain­ian nation­al­ists against Rus­sians, tomor­row they will be fight­ing against lib­er­als.” Yep. Prob­a­bly still unit­ed with at least some Ukrain­ian nation­al­ists at that point too.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | September 6, 2015, 9:43 am

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