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More Collateralized “Death” Obligations

Rober­to Calvi’s Corpse: Was “God’s Banker” set­ting a trend?

Dave Emory’s entire life­time of work is avail­able on a flash dri­ve that can be obtained here. (The flash dri­ve includes the anti-fas­cist books avail­able on this site.)

COMMENT: “Par­ticipo” alerts us to an arti­cle from The New York Post updat­ing the mor­tal­i­ty rate in the finan­cial indus­try. Although the Post–once a very good news­pa­per, now a Mur­doch sheet–spins the sto­ry in a snide sort of way, it is more than a lit­tle inter­est­ing to see the stun­ning casu­al­ty rate in the finan­cial indus­try.

These deaths are occur­ring as numer­ous inves­ti­ga­tions are under­way into var­i­ous kinds of malfea­sance in the glob­al finan­cial sec­tor, manip­u­la­tion of the for­eign exchange rate, in par­tic­u­lar.

We notice that Richard Tal­ley was omit­ted from the list. Tal­ley, you will recall, alleged­ly killed him­self with sev­en or eight shots from a nail gun in the head and tor­so. 

Per­haps the edi­tors felt that not even “Mur­dochi­ans” would buy that one. Or, per­haps, the inves­ti­ga­tion into Tal­ley’s death was reclas­si­fied as a homi­cide case.

Long live the Repub­lic!

UPDATE: “Pter­rafractyl” con­tributes the death of yet anoth­er JP Mor­gan exec­u­tive.

“String of Sui­cides Rock­ing Finan­cial World Baf­fles Experts” by Michael Gray; New York Post; 3/18/2014.

EXCERPT: The finan­cial world has been rat­tled by a rash of appar­ent sui­cides, with some of the best and bright­est among the finance work­ers who have tak­en their lives since the start of the year.

A major­ity of the eight sui­cides of 2014 have been very pub­lic demon­stra­tions, which has sui­cide-pre­ven­tion experts puz­zled.

“Jump­ing is much less com­mon as a method for sui­cide in gen­eral, so I am struck by the num­ber that have occurred in recent months in this indus­try,” said Dr. Chris­tine Mouti­er, chief med­ical offi­cer of the Amer­i­can Foun­da­tion for Sui­cide Pre­ven­tion.

Mouti­er also dis­counts the loca­tion of the act as being the dri­ver behind the rea­son for the sui­cide.

“The sui­cide-research lit­er­a­ture doesn’t help very much with the ques­tion of why the method of these sui­cides is so out in the open,” she added.

MARCH 12: Ken­neth Bel­lando, 28, an invest­ment banker at Levy Cap­i­tal, was found dead on the side­walk out­side his build­ing on Manhattan’s East Side, after alleged­ly jump­ing from the sixth-sto­ry roof, sources said.

MARCH 11: Edmund (Eddie) Reil­ly, 47, a trad­er at Midtown’s Ver­ti­cal Group, jumped in front of an LIRR train near the Syos­set, NY, train sta­tion.

FEB. 28:  Autumn Radtke, CEO of First Meta, a cyber-cur­ren­cy exchange firm, was found dead out­side her Sin­ga­pore apart­ment. The 28-year-old Amer­i­can jumped from a 25-sto­ry build­ing, author­i­ties said.

FEB. 18: Li Jun­jie, a 33-year-old JPMor­gan finance pro, leaped to his death from the roof of the company’s 30-sto­ry Hong Kong office tow­er, author­i­ties said.

FEB. 3: Ryan Hen­ry Crane, 37, a JPMor­gan exec­u­tive direc­tor who worked in New York, was found dead inside his Stam­ford, Conn., home. A cause of death in Crane’s case has yet to be deter­mined as author­i­ties await a tox­i­col­ogy report, a spokesper­son for the Stam­ford Police Depart­ment said.

JAN. 31: Mike Duek­er, 50, chief econ­o­mist at Rus­sell Invest­ments and a for­mer Fed­eral Reserve bank econ­o­mist, was found dead at the side of a road that leads to the Taco­ma Nar­rows Bridge in Wash­ing­ton state after jump­ing a fence and falling down an embank­ment, accord­ing to the Pierce Coun­ty Sheriff’s Depart­ment.

JAN. 28: Gabriel Magee, 39, a vice pres­i­dent with JPMorgan’s cor­po­rate and invest­ment bank tech­nol­ogy arm in the UK, jumped to his death from the roof of the bank’s 33-sto­ry Canary Wharf tow­er in Lon­don.

JAN. 26: William Broeksmit, 58, a for­mer senior risk man­ager at Deutsche Bank, was found hanged in a house in South Kens­ing­ton, accord­ing to Lon­don police.

“Vet­eran Cyclist Killed by Mini­van Knew the Dan­gers All Too Well” by Bill Bush; The Colum­bus Dis­patch; 3/24/2014.

EXCERPT: About a decade ago, Jeff Stephens was bicy­cling shoul­der-to-shoul­der with Joseph A. Giampa­pa when the two wit­nessed anoth­er cyclist get fatal­ly struck by a car right in front of them.

“It was sort of a bond that we had, and I would say it’s a bur­den that we car­ried,” Stephens said yes­ter­day. “We were in very close con­tact for months after that sit­u­a­tion.”

On Sat­ur­day, Stephens, of Wor­thing­ton, got a phone call from the scene of anoth­er acci­dent — this time, it was Giampa­pa who had been struck by a mini­van and killed while bicy­cling north of Troy.

Giampa­pa, 56, of the North­west Side, was an accom­plished long-dis­tance cyclist and cor­po­rate attor­ney for JPMor­gan Chase in Colum­bus. He was a long­time res­i­dent of Vic­to­rian Vil­lage who had moved with his wife, Thel­ma, into a con­do­minium near Dublin about two years ago.

He was able to ride his bike thou­sands of miles in short peri­ods of time and cov­ered some of the most dif­fi­cult ter­rain in bik­ing, includ­ing the same Alpine routes used in the Tour de France, his friends said yes­ter­day.

“He rode many of the famous climbs in the Alps” in both France and Italy, said Greg DuBois, 59, of Wor­thing­ton, who had trav­eled with Giampa­pa on his excur­sions.

“He could just ride phe­nom­e­nal dis­tances with­out stop­ping and with­out get­ting tired.”

...

Giampa­pa was bik­ing north on Troy-Sid­ney Road, near Loy Road, out­side of Piqua just after 11 a.m. Sat­ur­day when a mini­van struck him from behind, Mia­mi Coun­ty Deputy Todd Ten­nant said. Giampa­pa was pro­nounced dead at the scene.

The mini­van dri­ver, Thomas G. Davis, 78, was at fault, Ten­nant said, but charges haven’t been filed.

Ten­nant said charges are pend­ing the out­come of a blood tox­i­col­ogy test. But it didn’t appear as though Davis was intox­i­cated, he added. All of the evi­dence even­tu­ally will be giv­en to a grand jury, Ten­nant said, but pos­si­bly not until May, depend­ing on how long it takes for the blood sam­ples to be processed.

Giampapa’s friends were at a loss about why he was hit.

“It wasn’t a blind turn,” said David Rod­er­ick of Athens, who helped orga­nize the 200-kilo­me­ter (124.3‑mile) event from Spring­field to Quin­cy to Troy and back that Giampa­pa was par­tic­i­pat­ing in.

“It wasn’t on a hill,” Rod­er­ick said. “You could see rid­ers for a very long dis­tance.”

Discussion

7 comments for “More Collateralized “Death” Obligations”

  1. One more?

    Vet­er­an cyclist killed by mini­van knew the dan­gers all too well
    By Bill Bush The Colum­bus Dis­patch • Mon­day March 24, 2014 11:19 AM

    About a decade ago, Jeff Stephens was bicy­cling shoul­der-to-shoul­der with Joseph A. Giampa­pa when the two wit­nessed anoth­er cyclist get fatal­ly struck by a car right in front of them.

    “It was sort of a bond that we had, and I would say it’s a bur­den that we car­ried,” Stephens said yes­ter­day. “We were in very close con­tact for months after that sit­u­a­tion.”

    On Sat­ur­day, Stephens, of Wor­thing­ton, got a phone call from the scene of anoth­er acci­dent — this time, it was Giampa­pa who had been struck by a mini­van and killed while bicy­cling north of Troy.

    Giampa­pa, 56, of the North­west Side, was an accom­plished long-dis­tance cyclist and cor­po­rate attor­ney for JPMor­gan Chase in Colum­bus. He was a long­time res­i­dent of Vic­to­ri­an Vil­lage who had moved with his wife, Thel­ma, into a con­do­mini­um near Dublin about two years ago.

    He was able to ride his bike thou­sands of miles in short peri­ods of time and cov­ered some of the most dif­fi­cult ter­rain in bik­ing, includ­ing the same Alpine routes used in the Tour de France, his friends said yes­ter­day.

    “He rode many of the famous climbs in the Alps” in both France and Italy, said Greg DuBois, 59, of Wor­thing­ton, who had trav­eled with Giampa­pa on his excur­sions.

    “He could just ride phe­nom­e­nal dis­tances with­out stop­ping and with­out get­ting tired.”

    ...

    Giampa­pa was bik­ing north on Troy-Sid­ney Road, near Loy Road, out­side of Piqua just after 11 a.m. Sat­ur­day when a mini­van struck him from behind, Mia­mi Coun­ty Deputy Todd Ten­nant said. Giampa­pa was pro­nounced dead at the scene.

    The mini­van dri­ver, Thomas G. Davis, 78, was at fault, Ten­nant said, but charges haven’t been filed.

    Ten­nant said charges are pend­ing the out­come of a blood tox­i­col­o­gy test. But it didn’t appear as though Davis was intox­i­cat­ed, he added. All of the evi­dence even­tu­al­ly will be giv­en to a grand jury, Ten­nant said, but pos­si­bly not until May, depend­ing on how long it takes for the blood sam­ples to be processed.

    Giampapa’s friends were at a loss about why he was hit.

    “It wasn’t a blind turn,” said David Rod­er­ick of Athens, who helped orga­nize the 200-kilo­me­ter (124.3‑mile) event from Spring­field to Quin­cy to Troy and back that Giampa­pa was par­tic­i­pat­ing in.

    “It wasn’t on a hill,” Rod­er­ick said. “You could see rid­ers for a very long dis­tance.”

    Assum­ing this was­n’t an acci­dent but instead a “mes­sage” to oth­ers, one of the weird risks of that kind of strat­e­gy is that it does­n’t just send a “keep you mouth shut and don’t mess with us”-message. It also sends a “we’re the kind of awful human beings that you should be proud to oppose even if it does­n’t end well because, hey, every­one’s going to go some­day so you might as well do some­thing mean­ing­ful on your way out and do every­thing you can to oppose hor­ri­ble peo­ple like us”-message. You can’t real­ly sep­a­rate those two mes­sages.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | March 28, 2014, 7:00 am
  2. The self-described Robin Hood of Liecht­en­stein just killed the CEO of Bank Frick and then com­mit­ted sui­cide:

    Bloomberg
    Liecht­en­stein Banker Shot Dead in Report­ed Invest­ment FeudBy Jan-Hen­rik Foer­ster and Paul Ver­schu­ur Apr 7, 2014 3:13 PM CT

    A Liecht­en­stein banker was shot dead after a feud involv­ing an invest­ment fund, and police said they believe the alleged killer lat­er com­mit­ted sui­cide.

    The 48-year-old man was shot in the under­ground garage of a finan­cial insti­tu­tion in Balz­ers at 7:30 a.m. local time, the Liecht­en­stein police said on their web­site today. Nei­ther the vic­tim nor the insti­tu­tion was iden­ti­fied in the state­ment. The deceased was Juer­gen Frick, CEO of Bank Frick & Co. AG, accord­ing to Switzerland’s Radio 1, which cit­ed employ­ees of his bank.

    The sus­pect, Juer­gen Her­mann, fled the scene in a Smart car with Liecht­en­stein license plates, accord­ing to police. The author­i­ties lat­er said Her­mann appears to have com­mit­ted sui­cide after they found the vehi­cle in Ruggell, 25 kilo­me­ters (16 miles) north of Balz­ers, with his pass­port and a con­fes­sion.

    “Ser­vice dogs were able to track the sus­pect to the banks of the Rhine,” police said in a state­ment. “Cloth­ing belong­ing to the sus­pect was found there. Because of the cir­cum­stances and the evi­dence, sui­cide has to be assumed.

    Calls to Bank Frick were answered by a voice-mail mes­sage say­ing the com­pa­ny is closed because of “a death.” It gave no fur­ther details. A police spokesman didn’t imme­di­ate­ly respond to tele­phone calls and e‑mails seek­ing com­ment.
    Prime Min­is­ter

    Bank Frick & Co., found­ed in 1998, spe­cial­izes in wealth man­age­ment and invest­ment advice. The firm man­aged about 3.5 bil­lion Swiss francs ($3.9 bil­lion) of assets on behalf of clients at the end of 2012, accord­ing to its web­site. The company’s chair­man is Mario Frick, who was prime min­is­ter of Liecht­en­stein from 1993 to 2001.

    Bank Frick was pre­vi­ous­ly part­ly owned by Bawag PSK Bank AG, the Aus­tri­an lender that almost col­lapsed because of its links with failed U.S. futures firm Ref­co Inc. Bawag owned 26 per­cent and Ref­co had a 4 per­cent hold­ing, accord­ing to a report by the Aus­tri­an Press Agency. After Aus­tria led a bailout of Bawag in 2006, the com­pa­ny sold its stake in Bank Frick, accord­ing to a paper pub­lished the fol­low­ing year on the Euro­pean Commission’s web­site.

    Her­mann is a fund man­ag­er who has been embroiled in a dis­pute with the Liecht­en­stein gov­ern­ment and Bank Frick for many years, accord­ing to Radio 1.
    Her­mann Finance

    The Liecht­en­stein gov­ern­ment and the country’s Finan­cial Mar­ket Author­i­ty “ille­gal­ly destroyed my invest­ment com­pa­ny Her­mann Finance and its funds, depriv­ing me of my liveli­hood,” accord­ing to a web­site reg­is­tered under the name Juer­gen Her­mann of Her­mann Finance AG.

    He has filed law­suits seek­ing recov­ery of 200 mil­lion Swiss francs from the gov­ern­ment and 33 mil­lion francs from Bank Frick, accord­ing to the web­site. The lender “ille­gal­ly enriched itself,” among oth­er alleged crimes, it said.

    A rep­re­sen­ta­tive of Hermann’s lawyer declined to com­ment when reached by tele­phone. A call to an office tele­phone num­ber list­ed on Her­mann Finance’s web­site was answered by an employ­ee of a law firm who said his com­pa­ny isn’t relat­ed to Her­mann Finance.

    Her­mann had been “pub­licly hos­tile” to the country’s Finan­cial Mar­ket Author­i­ty and some of its employ­ees, forc­ing it to take secu­ri­ty mea­sures in con­sul­ta­tion with the police, FMA spokesman Beat Krieger said in an e‑mail today.

    ...

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | April 8, 2014, 8:54 am
  3. I think it’s worth men­tion­ing that Jim Fla­her­ty, Canada’s Finance min­is­ter until just recent­ly, died sud­den­ly of a heart attack. While no indi­ca­tion of foul play has been not­ed by any pun­dits, it’s inter­est­ing that he resigned with­out giv­ing any real rea­son for doing so and then died so soon after. Could it be he learned of the real aims of his cohorts and pos­sessed dan­ger­ous infor­ma­tion that made him expend­able? He may have sought to rep­re­sent his con­stituents in a demo­c­ra­t­ic man­ner although his pol­i­tics at one time were only a lit­tle to the left of Mus­soli­ni. I don’t think this is unrea­son­able spec­u­la­tion giv­en that Harp­er is gear­ing up for anoth­er elec­tion push while tread­ing through the scan­dals con­nect­ed to the Elec­ton Act changes and the recent Sen­ate blow-ups. Many a die-hard right-winger has expe­ri­enced a sim­i­lar change of heart.

    Posted by Brad | April 16, 2014, 12:16 pm
  4. 52 Year-Old French Banker Jumps To Her Death In Paris (After Ques­tion­ing Her Supe­ri­ors)

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014–04-24/52-year-old-french-banker-jumps-her-death-paris-after-questioning-her-superiors

    Tyler Dur­den’s pic­ture
    Sub­mit­ted by Tyler Dur­den on 04/24/2014 23:38 ‑0400

    There have been 13 senior finan­cial ser­vices exec­u­tives deaths around the world this year, but the most notable thing about the sad sui­cide of the 14th, a 52-year-old banker at France’s Bred-Banque-Pop­u­laire, is she is the first female.

    As Le Parisien reports, Lydia (no sur­name giv­en) jumped from the bank’s Paris head­quar­ter’s 14th floor short­ly before 10am.

    FranceTV added that sources said “she ques­tioned her supe­ri­ors before jump­ing out the win­dow,” but the bank denies it not­ing that she had been in ther­pa­py for sev­er­al years.

    FranceTV and Le Parisien reports,

    An employ­ee of the Bred-Banque Pop­u­laire has com­mit­ted sui­cide, Tues­day, April 22 in the morn­ing at the head­quar­ters of the bank. On her arrival at head­quar­ters, quai de la Rapee, in the 12th arrondisse­ment of Paris...

    The inci­dent occurred short­ly before 10 am, 200 meters from the Min­istry of Finance.

    ...

    Accord­ing to our sources, she ques­tioned his supe­ri­ors before jump­ing out the win­dow, that for­mal­ly denies the direc­tion of the Bank.

    “There is absolute­ly no evi­dence for des­ig­nat­ing his rela­tion­ships with his hier­ar­chy as respon­si­ble or let­ter or mes­sage ” insists the direc­tion of the com­mu­ni­ca­tion FranceTV info.

    It also speaks of a “very painful moment for the com­pa­ny” .

    ...

    In an email to all employ­ees con­sult­ed by FranceTV info, the man­age­ment of the bank con­firms the “death by sui­cide” and said “severe­ly affect­ed.” It shows have estab­lished a psy­cho­log­i­cal unit.

    ...

    “For the moment, noth­ing puts the com­pa­ny in ques­tion, says the major­i­ty union SUNI-Bred/UN­SA. The employ­ee got along very well with her new team, her supe­ri­or is very nice.

    “Accord­ing to a close,” Lydia lived alone, in a dif­fi­cult envi­ron­ment.

    The human resources depart­ment states that this inhab­i­tant of Ivry was in ther­a­py for sev­er­al years. Each describes a “secre­tive” but “very well known and pop­u­lar” woman, but “nev­er spoke of it.”

    This is the 14th finan­cial ser­vices exec­tive death in recent months...

    1 — William Broeksmit, 58-year-old for­mer senior exec­u­tive at Deutsche Bank AG, was found dead in his home after an appar­ent sui­cide in South Kens­ing­ton in cen­tral Lon­don, on Jan­u­ary 26th.

    2 — Karl Slym, 51 year old Tata Motors man­ag­ing direc­tor Karl Slym, was found dead on the fourth floor of the Shangri-La hotel in Bangkok on Jan­u­ary 27th.

    3 — Gabriel Magee, a 39-year-old JP Mor­gan employ­ee, died after falling from the roof of the JP Mor­gan Euro­pean head­quar­ters in Lon­don on Jan­u­ary 27th.

    4 — Mike Duek­er, 50-year-old chief econ­o­mist of a US invest­ment bank was found dead close to the Taco­ma Nar­rows Bridge in Wash­ing­ton State.

    5 — Richard Tal­ley, the 57 year old founder of Amer­i­can Title Ser­vices in Cen­ten­ni­al, Col­orado, was found dead ear­li­er this month after appar­ent­ly shoot­ing him­self with a nail gun.

    6 — Tim Dick­en­son, a U.K.-based com­mu­ni­ca­tions direc­tor at Swiss Re AG, also died last month, how­ev­er the cir­cum­stances sur­round­ing his death are still unknown.

    7 — Ryan Hen­ry Crane, a 37 year old exec­u­tive at JP Mor­gan died in an alleged sui­cide just a few weeks ago. No details have been released about his death aside from this small obit­u­ary announce­ment at the Stam­ford Dai­ly Voice.

    8 — Li Jun­jie, 33-year-old banker in Hong Kong jumped from the JP Mor­gan HQ in Hong Kong this week.

    9 — James Stu­art Jr, For­mer Nation­al Bank of Com­merce CEO, found dead in Scotts­dale, Ariz., the morn­ing of Feb. 19. A fam­i­ly spokesman did not say what­caused the death

    10 — Edmund (Eddie) Reil­ly, 47, a trad­er at Midtown’s Ver­ti­cal Group, com­mit­ed sui­cide by jump­ing in front of LIRR train

    11 — Ken­neth Bel­lan­do, 28, a trad­er at Levy Cap­i­tal, for­mer­ly invest­ment bank­ing ana­lyst at JPMor­gan, jumped to his death from his 6th floor East Side apart­ment.

    12 — Jan Peter Schmittmann, 57, the for­mer CEO of Dutch bank ABN Amro found dead at home near Ams­ter­dam with wife and daugh­ter.

    13 — Li Jian­hua, 49, the direc­tor of Chi­na’s Bank­ing Reg­u­la­to­ry Com­mis­sion died of a sud­den heart attack

    14 — Lydia _____, 52 — jumped to her sui­cide from the 14th floor of Bred-Banque Pop­u­laire in Paris

    Aver­age:
    4.68182
    Your rat­ing: None Aver­age: 4.7 (22 votes)

    Posted by participo | April 28, 2014, 2:50 pm
  5. Tyler Dur­den @ Zero­Hedge is on the case:

    Deutsche Bank Lawyer And For­mer SEC Enforce­ment Attor­ney Found Dead In Appar­ent Sui­cide

    Sub­mit­ted by Tyler Dur­den on 10/25/2014 10:52 ‑0400

    Back on Jan­u­ary 26, a 58-year-old for­mer senior exec­u­tive at Ger­man invest­ment bank behe­moth Deutsche Bank, William Broeksmit, was found dead after hang­ing him­self at his Lon­don home, and with that, set off an unprece­dent­ed series of banker sui­cides through­out the year which includ­ed for­mer Fed offi­cials and numer­ous JPMor­gan traders.

    Fol­low­ing a brief late sum­mer spell in which there was lit­tle if any news of bankers tak­ing their lives, as report­ed pre­vi­ous­ly, the banker sui­cides returned with a bang when none oth­er than the hedge fund part­ner of infa­mous for­mer IMF head Dominique Strauss-Khan, Thier­ry Leyne, a French-Israeli entre­pre­neur, was found dead after jump­ing off the 23rd floor of one of the Yoo tow­ers, a pres­ti­gious res­i­den­tial com­plex in Tel Aviv.

    Just a few brief hours lat­er the WSJ report­ed that yet anoth­er Deutsche Bank vet­er­an has com­mit­ted sui­cide, and not just any­one but the bank’s asso­ciate gen­er­al coun­sel, 41 year old Calogero “Char­lie” Gam­bi­no, who was found on the morn­ing of Oct. 20, hav­ing also hung him­self by the neck from a stair­way ban­is­ter, which accord­ing to the New York Police Depart­ment was the cause of death. We assume that any rela­tion­ship to the famous Ital­ian fam­i­ly car­ry­ing that last name is pure­ly acci­den­tal.

    (.... grounds for fur­ther geneal­o­gy research? — p)

    ....

    As a reminder, the oth­er Deutsche Bank-er who was found dead ear­li­er in the year, William Broeksmit, was involved in the bank’s risk func­tion and advised the fir­m’s senior lead­er­ship; he was “anx­ious about var­i­ous author­i­ties inves­ti­gat­ing areas of the bank where he worked,” accord­ing to writ­ten evi­dence from his psy­chol­o­gist, giv­en Tues­day at an inquest at Lon­don’s Roy­al Courts of Jus­tice. And now that an almost iden­ti­cal sui­cide by hang­ing has tak­en place at Europe’s most sys­tem­i­cal­ly impor­tant bank, and by a per­son who worked in a near­ly iden­ti­cal func­tion — to shield the bank from reg­u­la­tors and pros­e­cu­tors and cov­er up its alleged­ly ille­gal activ­i­ties with set­tle­ments and fines — is sure­ly bound to raise many ques­tions.

    (...is this the under­state­ment of the year? — p)

    The WSJ reports that Mr. Gam­bi­no had been “close­ly involved in nego­ti­at­ing legal issues for Deutsche Bank, includ­ing the pro­longed probe into manip­u­la­tion of the Lon­don inter­bank offered rate, or Libor, and ongo­ing inves­ti­ga­tions into manip­u­la­tion of cur­ren­cies mar­kets, accord­ing to peo­ple famil­iar with his role at the bank.”

    He pre­vi­ous­ly was an asso­ciate at a pri­vate law firm and a reg­u­la­to­ry enforce­ment lawyer from 1997 to 1999, accord­ing to his online LinkedIn pro­file and biogra­phies for con­fer­ences where he spoke. But most notably, as his LinkedIn pro­file below shows, like many oth­er Wall Street revolv­ing door reg­u­la­tors, he start­ed his career at the SEC itself where he worked from 1997 to 1999.

    Going back to the pre­vi­ous sui­cide by a DB exec­u­tive, the bank said at the time of the inquest that Mr. Broeksmit “was not under sus­pi­cion of wrong­do­ing in any mat­ter.” At the time of Mr. Broeksmit’s death, Deutsche Bank exec­u­tives sent a memo to bank staff say­ing Mr. Broeksmit “was con­sid­ered by many of his peers to be among the finest minds in the fields of risk and cap­i­tal man­age­ment.” Mr. Broeksmit had left a senior role at Deutsche Bank’s invest­ment bank in Feb­ru­ary 2013, but he remained an advis­er until the end of 2013. His most recent title was the invest­ment bank’s head of cap­i­tal and risk-opti­miza­tion, which includ­ed eval­u­at­ing risks relat­ed to com­pli­cat­ed trans­ac­tions.

    A thread con­nect­ing Broeksmit to wrong­do­ing, how­ev­er, was uncov­ered ear­li­er this sum­mer when Wall Street on Parade ref­er­enced his name in rela­tion to the noto­ri­ous at the time strat­e­gy pro­vid­ed by Deutsche Bank and oth­ers to allow hedge funds to avoid pay­ing short-term cap­i­tal gains tax­es known as MAPS (see How RenTec Made More Than $34 Bil­lion In Prof­its Since 1998: “Fic­tion­al Deriv­a­tives”)

    Clear­ly Deutsche Bank is slow­ly becom­ing Europe’s own JPMor­gan — a crim­i­nal bank whose past is final­ly catch­ing up to it, and where legal fine after legal fine are only now start­ing to slam the bank­ing behe­moth. We will find out just what the nature of the lat­est lit­i­ga­tion charge is next week when Deutsche Bank reports, but one thing is clear: in addi­tion to mort­gage, Libor and FX set­tle­ments, one should also add gold. Recall from around the time when the first DB banker hung him­self: it was then that Elke Koenig, the pres­i­dent of Ger­many’s top finan­cial reg­u­la­tor, Bafin, said that in addi­tion to cur­ren­cy rates, manip­u­la­tion of pre­cious met­als “is worse than the Libor-rig­ging scan­dal.”

    ...con­tin­u­ing:

    It remains to be seen if Calogero’s death was also relat­ed to pre­cious met­als rig­ging although it cer­tain­ly would not be sur­pris­ing. What is sur­pris­ing, is that slow­ly things are start­ing to fall apart at the one bank which as we won’t tire of high­light­ing, has a big­ger pyra­mid of notion­al deriv­a­tives on its bal­ance sheet than even JPMor­gan, amount­ing to 20 times more than the GDP of Ger­many itself, and where if any inter­nal inves­ti­ga­tion ever goes to the very top, then Europe itself, and thus the world, would be in jeop­ardy.

    Posted by participo | October 25, 2014, 8:44 am
  6. http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014–10-25/deutsche-bank-lawyer-and-former-sec-enforcement-attorney-found-dead-apparent-suicide

    Anoth­er Deutsche Banker And For­mer SEC Enforce­ment Attor­ney Com­mits Sui­cide

    Sub­mit­ted by Tyler Dur­den on 10/25/2014

    Back on Jan­u­ary 26, a 58-year-old for­mer senior exec­u­tive at Ger­man invest­ment bank behe­moth Deutsche Bank, William Broeksmit, was found dead after hang­ing him­self at his Lon­don home, and with that, set off an unprece­dent­ed series of banker sui­cides through­out the year which includ­ed for­mer Fed offi­cials and numer­ous JPMor­gan traders.
    Fol­low­ing a brief late sum­mer spell in which there was lit­tle if any news of bankers tak­ing their lives, as report­ed pre­vi­ous­ly, the banker sui­cides returned with a bang when none oth­er than the hedge fund part­ner of infa­mous for­mer IMF head Dominique Strauss-Khan, Thier­ry Leyne, a French-Israeli entre­pre­neur, was found dead after jump­ing off the 23rd floor of one of the Yoo tow­ers, a pres­ti­gious res­i­den­tial com­plex in Tel Aviv.

    Just a few brief hours lat­er the WSJ report­ed that yet anoth­er Deutsche Bank vet­er­an has com­mit­ted sui­cide, and not just any­one but the bank’s asso­ciate gen­er­al coun­sel, 41 year old Calogero “Char­lie” Gam­bi­no, who was found on the morn­ing of Oct. 20, hav­ing also hung him­self by the neck from a stair­way ban­is­ter, which accord­ing to the New York Police Depart­ment was the cause of death. We assume that any rela­tion­ship to the famous Ital­ian fam­i­ly car­ry­ing that last name is pure­ly acci­den­tal.

    Here is his bio from a recent con­fer­ence which he attend­ed:

    Char­lie J. Gam­bi­no is a Man­ag­ing Direc­tor and Asso­ciate Gen­er­al Coun­sel in the Reg­u­la­to­ry, Lit­i­ga­tion and Inter­nal Inves­ti­ga­tion group for Deutsche Bank in the Amer­i­c­as. Mr. Gam­bi­no served as a staff attor­ney in the Unit­ed Secu­ri­ties and Exchange Commission’s Divi­sion of Enforce­ment from 1997 to 1999. He also was asso­ci­at­ed with the law firm of Skad­den, Arps, Slate Meagher & Flom from 1999 to 2003. He is a fre­quent speak­er at secu­ri­ties law con­fer­ences. Mr. Gam­bi­no is a mem­ber of the Amer­i­can Bar Asso­ci­a­tion and the Asso­ci­a­tion of the Bar of the City of New York.

    As a reminder, the oth­er Deutsche Bank-er who was found dead ear­li­er in the year, William Broeksmit, was involved in the bank’s risk func­tion and advised the fir­m’s senior lead­er­ship; he was “anx­ious about var­i­ous author­i­ties inves­ti­gat­ing areas of the bank where he worked,” accord­ing to writ­ten evi­dence from his psy­chol­o­gist, giv­en Tues­day at an inquest at Lon­don’s Roy­al Courts of Jus­tice. And now that an almost iden­ti­cal sui­cide by hang­ing has tak­en place at Europe’s most sys­tem­i­cal­ly impor­tant bank, and by a per­son who worked in a near­ly iden­ti­cal func­tion — to shield the bank from reg­u­la­tors and pros­e­cu­tors and cov­er up its alleged­ly ille­gal activ­i­ties with set­tle­ments and fines — is sure­ly bound to raise many ques­tions.

    The WSJ reports that Mr. Gam­bi­no had been “close­ly involved in nego­ti­at­ing legal issues for Deutsche Bank, includ­ing the pro­longed probe into manip­u­la­tion of the Lon­don inter­bank offered rate, or Libor, and ongo­ing inves­ti­ga­tions into manip­u­la­tion of cur­ren­cies mar­kets, accord­ing to peo­ple famil­iar with his role at the bank.”

    He pre­vi­ous­ly was an asso­ciate at a pri­vate law firm and a reg­u­la­to­ry enforce­ment lawyer from 1997 to 1999, accord­ing to his online LinkedIn pro­file and biogra­phies for con­fer­ences where he spoke. But most notably, as his LinkedIn pro­file below shows, like many oth­er Wall Street revolv­ing door reg­u­la­tors, he start­ed his career at the SEC itself where he worked from 1997 to 1999.

    “Char­lie was a beloved and respect­ed col­league who we will miss. Our thoughts and sym­pa­thy are with his friends and fam­i­ly,” Deutsche Bank said in a state­ment.

    Going back to the pre­vi­ous sui­cide by a DB exec­u­tive, the bank said at the time of the inquest that Mr. Broeksmit “was not under sus­pi­cion of wrong­do­ing in any mat­ter.” At the time of Mr. Broeksmit’s death, Deutsche Bank exec­u­tives sent a memo to bank staff say­ing Mr. Broeksmit “was con­sid­ered by many of his peers to be among the finest minds in the fields of risk and cap­i­tal man­age­ment.” Mr. Broeksmit had left a senior role at Deutsche Bank’s invest­ment bank in Feb­ru­ary 2013, but he remained an advis­er until the end of 2013. His most recent title was the invest­ment bank’s head of cap­i­tal and risk-opti­miza­tion, which includ­ed eval­u­at­ing risks relat­ed to com­pli­cat­ed trans­ac­tions.

    A thread con­nect­ing Broeksmit to wrong­do­ing, how­ev­er, was uncov­ered ear­li­er this sum­mer when Wall Street on Parade ref­er­enced his name in rela­tion to the noto­ri­ous at the time strat­e­gy pro­vid­ed by Deutsche Bank and oth­ers to allow hedge funds to avoid pay­ing short-term cap­i­tal gains tax­es known as MAPS (see How RenTec Made More Than $34 Bil­lion In Prof­its Since 1998: “Fic­tion­al Deriv­a­tives”)

    From Wall Street on Parade:

    Broeksmit’s name first emerged in yesterday’s Sen­ate hear­ing as Sen­a­tor Carl Levin, Chair of the Sub­com­mit­tee, was ques­tion­ing Satish Ramakr­ish­na, the Glob­al Head of Risk and Pric­ing for Glob­al Prime Finance at Deutsche Bank Secu­ri­ties in New York. Ramakr­ish­na was down­play­ing his knowl­edge of con­ver­sa­tions about how the scheme was about chang­ing short term gains into long term gains, deny­ing that he had been privy to any con­ver­sa­tions on the mat­ter.

    Levin than asked: “Did you ever have con­ver­sa­tions with a man named Broeksmit?” Ramakr­ish­na con­ced­ed that he had and that the fact that the scheme had a tax ben­e­fit had emerged in that con­ver­sa­tion. Ramakr­ish­na could hard­ly deny this as Levin had just released a Novem­ber 7, 2008 tran­script of a con­ver­sa­tion between Ramakr­ish­na and Broeksmit where the tax ben­e­fit had been acknowl­edged.

    Anoth­er exhib­it released by Levin was an August 25, 2009 email from William Broeksmit to Anshu Jain, with a cc to Ramakr­ish­na, where Broeksmit went into copi­ous detail on exact­ly what the scheme, inter­nal­ly called MAPS, made pos­si­ble for the bank and for its client, the Renais­sance Tech­nolo­gies hedge fund. (See Email from William Broeksmit to Anshu Jain, Released by the U.S. Sen­ate Per­ma­nent Sub­com­mit­tee on Inves­ti­ga­tions.)

    At one point in the two-page email, Broeksmit reveals the mas­sive risk the bank is tak­ing on, writ­ing: “Size of port­fo­lio tends to be between $8 and $12 bil­lion long and same amount of short. Max­i­mum allowed usage is $16 bil­lion x $16 bil­lion, though this has nev­er been approached.”

    Broeksmit goes on to say that most of Deutsche’s mon­ey from the scheme “is actu­al­ly made by lend­ing them spe­cials that we have on inven­to­ry and they pay far above the reg­u­lar rates for that.”

    It would appear that with just months until the reg­u­la­to­ry crack­down and Con­gres­sion­al kan­ga­roo cir­cus, Broeksmit knew what was about to pass and being deeply impli­cat­ed in such a scheme, pre­ferred to take the pain­less way out.

    The ques­tion then is just what major reg­u­la­to­ry rev­e­la­tion is just over the hori­zon for Deutsche Bank if yet anoth­er banker had to take his life to avoid being cross-exam­ined by Con­gress under oath? For a hint we go back to anoth­er report, this time by the FT, which yes­ter­day not­ed that Deutsche Bank will set aside just under €1bn towards the numer­ous legal and reg­u­la­to­ry issues it faces in its third quar­ter results next week, the bank con­firmed on Fri­day.

    In a state­ment made after the close of mar­kets, the Frank­furt-based lender said it expect­ed to pub­lish lit­i­ga­tion costs of €894m when it announces its results for the July-Sep­tem­ber peri­od on Octo­ber 29.

    The extra cash will add to Deutsche’s already size­able lit­i­ga­tion pot, where the bank has yet to be fined in con­nec­tion with the Lon­don inter­bank rate-rig­ging scan­dal.

    It is also fac­ing fines from US author­i­ties over alleged mort­gage-backed secu­ri­ties mis­selling and sanc­tions vio­la­tions, which have already seen rivals hit with heavy fines.

    Deutsche has also warned that dam­age from glob­al inves­ti­ga­tions into whether traders attempt­ed to manip­u­late the for­eign-exchange mar­ket could have a mate­r­i­al impact on the bank.

    The extra charge announced on Fri­day will bring Deutsche’s total lit­i­ga­tion reserves to €3.1bn. The bank also has an extra €3.2bn in so-called con­tin­gent lia­bil­i­ties for fines that are hard­er to esti­mate.

    Clear­ly Deutsche Bank is slow­ly becom­ing Europe’s own JPMor­gan — a crim­i­nal bank whose past is final­ly catch­ing up to it, and where legal fine after legal fine are only now start­ing to slam the bank­ing behe­moth. We will find out just what the nature of the lat­est lit­i­ga­tion charge is next week when Deutsche Bank reports, but one thing is clear: in addi­tion to mort­gage, Libor and FX set­tle­ments, one should also add gold. Recall from around the time when the first DB banker hung him­self: it was then that Elke Koenig, the pres­i­dent of Ger­many’s top finan­cial reg­u­la­tor, Bafin, said that in addi­tion to cur­ren­cy rates, manip­u­la­tion of pre­cious met­als “is worse than the Libor-rig­ging scan­dal.”

    It remains to be seen if Calogero’s death was also relat­ed to pre­cious met­als rig­ging although it cer­tain­ly would not be sur­pris­ing. What is sur­pris­ing, is that slow­ly things are start­ing to fall apart at the one bank which as we won’t tire of high­light­ing, has a big­ger pyra­mid of notion­al deriv­a­tives on its bal­ance sheet than even JPMor­gan, amount­ing to 20 times more than the GDP of Ger­many itself, and where if any inter­nal inves­ti­ga­tion ever goes to the very top, then Europe itself, and thus the world, would be in jeop­ardy.

    At this point it is prob­a­bly worth remind­ing to what great lengths reg­u­la­tors would go just to make sure that Deutsche Bank would nev­er be dragged into a major lit­i­ga­tion scan­dal: recall that the chief enforcer of the SEC dur­ing the most crit­i­cal peri­od fol­low­ing the great crash of 2008, Robert Khuza­mi, worked pre­vi­ous­ly from 2002 to 2009 at, drum­roll, Deutsche Bank most recent­ly as its Gen­er­al Coun­sel (see “Robert Khuza­mi Stands To Lose Up To $250,000 If He Pur­sues Action Against Deutsche Bank” and “Cir­cle Jerk 101: The SEC’s Robert Khuza­mi Over­saw Deutsche Bank’s CDO, Has Recused Him­self Of DB-Relat­ed Mat­ters”). The same Khuza­mi who just land­ed a $5 mil­lion per year con­tract (with a 2 year guar­an­tee) with yet anoth­er “law firm”, Kirk­land and Ellis. One won­ders: if and when the ham­mer falls on Deutsche Bank, will it per­chance be defend­ed by the same K&E and its lat­est promi­nent hire, Robert Khuza­mi him­self?

    But usu­al­ly it is best to just avoid lit­i­ga­tion alto­geth­er. Which is why per­haps some­times it is eas­i­est if the weak­est links, those whose knowl­edge can impli­cate the peo­ple all the way at the top, qui­et­ly com­mit sui­cide in the mid­dle of the night...

    Posted by Swamp | October 25, 2014, 11:25 am
  7. @SWAMP and Par­ticipo–

    Sharp eyes–good show!

    Although both of you researched the same arti­cle, I’ve includ­ed both of your con­tri­bu­tions.

    SWAMP includ­ed the entire text of the Zero­hedge post.

    Par­ticipo high­light­ed sev­er­al key pas­sages.

    I am skep­ti­cal that Mr. Gam­bi­no was­n’t con­nect­ed to the major crime fam­i­ly.

    The mob has been mov­ing into Wall Street and the finan­cial indus­try for some time.

    Keep up the good work,

    Dave

    Posted by Dave Emory | October 25, 2014, 1:11 pm

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