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Prepare to Be Assimilated: Resistance Is Futile

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COMMENT: As science develops much faster than human ethics, stories are appearing that could lead to despair. Indeed, some of the things we are witnessing may signal the end of our civilization as we know it.

At a basic level, we–the human race–are the same femur-cracking, marrow-sucking neanderthals we’ve always been. Yet technologies are emerging that may enable the darkest impulses of human nature to be consummated. 

Using a brain-signal cap, University of Washington researchers were able to manifest a manual response by transferring an impulse OVER THE INTERNET!

Consider the implications of technology like this. Soldiers and/or police could become virtual automatons wearing helmets incorporating such technology. The ability of totalitarian politicians and/or economic plutocrats to manifest utter control of those whom they wish to subjugate might become exponentially easier.

Enjoy!

“I Am Thinking You’ll Read this Story” by Dan Vergano; USA Today; 8/28/2013.

EXCERPT: Shades of Darth Vader and demonic possession?

Brain researchers say that for the first time, one person has remotely triggered another person’s movement, a flicking finger, through a signal sent to him by thought.

On Aug. 12, University of Washington researcher Rajesh Rao sent the finger-flicking brain signal to his colleague, Andrea Stocco, in a first demonstration of human-to-human brain signaling, a university announcement said.

A video of the experiment shows Rao observing a video game gunbattle while wearing an electrical brainsignal reading cap. By imagining his right finger flicking during the game, he triggered a cannon-firing keystroke by Stocco, who sat in a distant lab, wearing a cap designed to send magnetic stimulation signals to his brain. In effect, Rao’s thought was transferred across the campus, via the Internet, to trigger the motion in Stocco. He described it as feeling like an involuntary twitch, according to the announcement. . . .

. . . . “The Internet was a way to connect computers, and now it can be a way to connect brains,” Stocco said in a statement. . . .

. . . . Outside researchers such as Duke University’s Miguel Nicolelis note that similar experiments have used computers to deliver magnetic signals before, triggering involuntary motions. What is new here is the use of a signal picked up from one person’s brain to spur the motion.

“What they did is like using a phone signal to trigger a magnetic jolt to the brain,” Nicolelis said. “It’s not a true brain-to-brain interface where you would have communication of signals between people. This is one-way,” Nicolelis said. “So, I would say it is a little early to declare victory on creating a true human brain interface.”

Discussion

One comment for “Prepare to Be Assimilated: Resistance Is Futile”

  1. With over-the-internet remote control of finger movements on the horizon, something tells me there’s going to be a lot more people in the future typing into search engines things like “Why should I only buy Google’s products and how is it that company can be so awesome?”. It’s just a hunch:

    The Independent
    Inside Google HQ: What does the future hold for the company whose visionary plans include implanting a chip in our brains?

    Ian Burrell’s visit to the legendary “Googleplex” at Mountain View comes at an awkward time for the company

    Ian Burrell Author Biography, Saturday 20 July 2013

    The power of computing, and the thrill of its apparently infinite possibilities, has also long been a source of fear.

    Going into a San Francisco second-hand book shop, shortly before a visit to Google’s headquarters in California, I happened upon a copy of Dick Tracy, an old novel based on Chester Gould’s cartoon strip starring America’s favourite detective.

    For a 1970 publication, the plot seemed remarkably topical. Dick, and his sidekick Sam Catchem, find themselves battling a sinister character known as “Mr Computer” who wants to control the world. His strange powers enable him to remember everything he hears or sees and recall it instantly. This is a bad guy who can store data, analyse voice patterns and read private thoughts.

    My visit to the legendary “Googleplex” at Mountain View comes at an awkward time for the company. Edward Snowden’s revelations about the snooping of the US Government’s National Security Agency (NSA) in its clandestine electronic-surveillance programme PRISM have provoked a crisis of trust in Silicon Valley. Larry Page, Google co-founder and CEO, rushed out a blog to deny claims in leaked NSA documents that it – in parallel with other American internet giants – had been co-operating with the spying programme since 2009. “Any suggestion that Google is disclosing information about our users’ internet activity on such a scale is completely false,” he said.

    Trust is everything to Google. It stands on the verge of a technological breakthrough that can transform its relationship with us. Already, it is universally recognised as the world leader in searching for information. It handles around 90 per cent of internet searches in the UK: when we want to know something, most of us turn to Google. But it wants more – it wants to become our constant companion.

    The rapid evolution of mobile technology has brought new opportunities to a business generating annual revenue in excess of $50bn (£33.7bn). It began, just 15 years ago, as a service that enabled you to type a request into a personal computer and be given links to associated websites. Things have rather moved on. Soon Google hopes to have the ubiquitous presence of a personal assistant that never stops working, capable of conversing naturally in any language. Ultimately, as Page and co-founder Sergey Brin have asserted, the goal is to insert a chip inside your head for the most effortless search engine imaginable. Some will find this prospect exciting. Others might want to call for Dick Tracy.

    The first stage of this new level of intimacy is Google Glass, which I am invited to trial as part of a briefing on the company’s future plans.

    My first impression is that this revolutionary contraption is remarkably unobtrusive. It looks like a pair of glasses and, at 36 grams, weighs about the same as a typical pair of sunglasses due to its largely titanium frame. Despite the chunkiness of the right temple – made from plastic and where all the technology is stored – there is no sense of imbalance.

    Google Glass is part of a wider ecosystem and is not currently intended as an alternative to a mobile phone but as a complement to it. Glass needs the mobile in your pocket to locate your position and connect to your contacts via 4G and Bluetooth. Rather than encouraging users to be constantly gibbering in public, the default position for this device is “off”, I am told. The screen has been positioned above the eye line and at two o’clock on a clock face to ensure that the people f you are with know from your squint when you are consulting Glass.

    But none of these caveats can conceal the scale of Google’s ambition. It is staking its future on a vast store of information called the Knowledge Graph, which is growing at an exponential rate. When it launched in May 2012, Knowledge Graph was a pool of 3.5 billion facts on 500 million of the world’s most searched subjects. In a little over a year the knowledge held on the Google servers has grown to 18 billion facts on around 570 million subjects.

    “If you look back 10 years there was a computer on my desk and today there’s a computer in my pocket and it still has a screen and a keyboard,” says Huffman.

    “But fast forward a bit and… I think there is going to be a device in the ceiling with microphones, and it will be in my glasses or my wristwatch or my shirt. And like the Google Glass it won’t have a keyboard… you just say ‘OK Google, blah-blah-blah’ and you get what you want.”

    Where will it end? Gomes agrees that a chip embedded in the brain is far from a sci-fi fantasy. “Already people are beginning to experiment with handicapped people for manoeuvring their wheelchairs,” he says. “They are getting a few senses of direction with the wheelchair but getting from there to actual words is a long ways off. We have to do this in the brain a lot better to make that interaction possible. We have impatience for that to happen but the pieces of technology have to develop.”

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | September 28, 2013, 7:13 pm

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