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President Elect of Philippines Dislikes U.S. over a Possible “Golden Lily” Incident

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[6]COMMENT: An inter­est­ing devel­op­ment in U.S.–Asian rela­tions con­cerns Philip­pine pres­i­dent-elect Rodri­go Duterte’s resent­ment of the U.S. over a pos­si­ble covert oper­a­tion that appears to over­lap the decades-long U.S. intel­li­gence involve­ment with the vast amount of Gold­en Lily loot secret­ed in the Philip­pines and accessed by Japan, Amer­i­can intel­li­gence and right-wing oper­a­tives to finance their activ­i­ties.

An Amer­i­can who called him­self Michael Ter­rence Meir­ing and made oblique jokes about being with the CIA was seri­ous­ly injured in an explo­sion in the Philip­pines city of Davao, whose may­or at the time was Duterte.

IF Meir­ing was, in fact, work­ing for the Agency, it may well have been in con­nec­tion with the decades-old search for and use of the Gold­en Lily trea­sure stashed by the Japan­ese dur­ing the clos­ing phase of World War II.

(FTR #‘s 427 [7]428 [8]446 [9]451 [10]501 [11]509 [12]688 [13]689 [14] deal with the sub­ject of the Gold­en Lily pro­gram suc­cess­ful­ly imple­ment­ed by the Japan­ese to loot Asia.)

Mr. Duterte has made state­ments that would make us VERY ner­vous if we were pro­vid­ing his med­ical insur­ance. It will be inter­est­ing to see if CIA does some “health alter­ation” on him.

“Mys­te­ri­ous Blast in Philip­pines Fuels Rodri­go Duterte’s ‘Hatred’ of U.S.” by Richard C. Pad­dock; The New York Times; 5/13/2015. [15]

. . . . In an inter­view [16] last year before he announced his can­di­da­cy, Mr. Duterte went so far as to acknowl­edge “hatred” for the Unit­ed States stem­ming from the obscure episode, when an Amer­i­can named Michael Ter­rence Meir­ing was charged with pos­ses­sion of explo­sives but man­aged to flee the Philip­pines.

Mr. Meir­ing called him­self a trea­sure hunter and joked about being with the C.I.A., mean­ing “Christ in Action.” He told the hotel staff not to touch a met­al box in his room, appar­ent­ly with good rea­son. On May 16, 2002, the box explod­ed, man­gling his legs and dam­ag­ing the hotel.

But three days lat­er, despite severe injuries and the charges against him, Mr. Meir­ing van­ished from his hos­pi­tal room. Philip­pine offi­cials lat­er said that men wav­ing F.B.I. badges had tak­en him in the dark of night and flown him out of the coun­try with­out their per­mis­sion.

Mr. Duterte expressed out­rage that the Unit­ed States would help a crim­i­nal sus­pect leave the coun­try with­out regard to Philip­pine law. He also fanned spec­u­la­tion that Mr. Meir­ing was involved in covert oper­a­tions con­duct­ed by the Unit­ed States in the Philip­pines. . . .

. . . . In the state­ment, accord­ing to pub­lished reports [17], the embassy acknowl­edged that F.B.I. agents went to the Ever­green Hotel to inves­ti­gate the explo­sion but “cat­e­gor­i­cal­ly” denied that the agency “had any role in Mr. Meiring’s depar­ture.”

The Meir­ing affair has long been the sub­ject of con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries in the Philip­pines. Much remains unex­plained, includ­ing why there were explo­sives in Mr. Meiring’s room and who mount­ed the oper­a­tion that helped him escape.

“Why should the U.S. take him out of the coun­try? That’s the puz­zle,” said a for­mer high-rank­ing Philip­pine intel­li­gence offi­cial who declined to be iden­ti­fied because he was not direct­ly involved in the case.

Accord­ing to news reports, Mr. Meir­ing had been going to Davao City on the island of Min­danao for many years, usu­al­ly stay­ing in the same suite at the Ever­green. He had doc­u­ments allow­ing him to hunt for trea­sure — which was believed to have been left by occu­py­ing Japan­ese forces dur­ing World War II — and an iden­ti­ty card allow­ing him to trav­el in ter­ri­to­ry held by sep­a­ratist Islam­ic rebels. . . .