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School Shootings Are Technologically Obsolete

Dave Emory’s entire life­time of work is avail­able on a flash dri­ve that can be obtained here. [1] The new dri­ve is a 32-giga­byte dri­ve that is cur­rent as of the pro­grams and arti­cles post­ed by ear­ly win­ter of 2016. The new dri­ve (avail­able for a tax-deductible con­tri­bu­tion of $65.00 or more.)  (The pre­vi­ous flash dri­ve was cur­rent through the end of May of 2012.)

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[6]COMMENT: In past pro­grams [7], we have cov­ered school shoot­ings [8], one of the most high pro­file forms of may­hem in our benight­ed soci­ety. (We began our cov­er­age with Mis­cel­la­neous Archive Show M 55–Part 1 [9], Part 2 [10].) With the growth of high-tech, they have now become tech­no­log­i­cal­ly obso­lete.

School ter­ror­ism may become increas­ingly pop­u­lar as anony­mous com­mu­ni­ca­tion tech­nolo­gies and anony­mous pay­ment sys­tems like Bit­coin con­tinue to roll out. The psy­cho­log­i­cal effect of hav­ing chil­dren ter­ror­ized in this man­ner should not be under­es­ti­mat­ed. It will dri­ve peo­ple into the arms of fas­cism, as they cry out for “some­one to do SOMETHING!”

“Tele­phone Bomb Threats Prompt Numer­ous School Evac­u­a­tions and Lock­downs in Va., N.J.” by Mori­ah Balin­git and T. Rees ShapiroThe Wash­ing­ton Post; 3/4/2016. [11]

 Police in North­ern Vir­ginia and New Jer­sey are inves­ti­gat­ing bomb threats that were called in to dozens of schools Fri­day morn­ing, threats that prompt­ed evac­u­a­tions and lock­downs.

Many of the schools received the threats via auto­mated phone calls — known as robo­calls — a method that has become increas­ingly com­mon for school bomb threats nation­wide and one that is dif­fi­cult to track. A rash of robo­calls led to evac­u­a­tions and lock­downs of 13 schools in three states in Jan­u­ary, none of which were found to be cred­i­ble..

At least sev­en schools in North­ern Vir­ginia received bomb threats Fri­day morn­ing, prompt­ing some to evac­u­ate and oth­ers to lock down. Falls Church City’s lone high school, George Mason High, was evac­u­ated after it received what school offi­cials described as an “auto­mated bomb threat” by phone short­ly before noon.

Fair­fax Coun­ty Police are inves­ti­gat­ing bomb threats that were called in to three pub­lic schools and one pri­vate school between 11:22 a.m. and noon, but author­i­ties declined to say whether those threats were from robo­calls. Police deter­mined them not to be cred­i­ble and Fair­fax Coun­ty Pub­lic Schools offi­cials decid­ed to con­tinue class nor­mally at the three high schools that received threats.

“Police are inves­ti­gat­ing and have deter­mined the threats are not cred­i­ble, and are intend­ed only to dis­rupt school oper­a­tions,” said Mary Shaw, a school sys­tem spokes­woman. “We do not believe any FCPS stu­dents are at risk and we are con­tin­u­ing with nor­mal school oper­a­tions at all of our schools for the remain­der of the day.”

...

Bomb threats also were called into schools in a dozen dis­tricts in New Jer­sey at around 11 a.m. Fri­day, dis­rupt­ing school for thou­sands of stu­dents, accord­ing to a report in The Record. [12]. The prob­lem has become so severe that the Bergen Coun­ty Prosecutor’s Office has decid­ed to host a sym­po­sium to dis­cuss how to han­dle such threats. It was the sec­ond time in a week that robo­call bomb threats shut down mul­ti­ple schools in New Jer­sey.

Robo­calls are becom­ing an increas­ingly com­mon method of deliv­ery for school bomb threats, said Amy Klinger, an assis­tant pro­fes­sor at Ash­land Uni­ver­sity in Ohio and a co-founder of the Educator’s School Safe­ty Net­work, a nation­al non-prof­it school safe­ty orga­ni­za­tion.

Klinger said that Inter­net-based orga­ni­za­tions charged the equiv­a­lent of $50 in bit­coins to cre­ate a bomb scare using auto­mated phone calls, which account for 13 per­cent of all threats, accord­ing to her school secu­rity research.

“Schools are real­ly caught in this dilem­ma of what do we do? Do we ignore it? But you can’t,” Klinger said, not­ing that some schools receive mul­ti­ple threats in a sin­gle day and evac­u­ate their build­ings for each occur­rence, cre­at­ing sig­nif­i­cant delays dur­ing the aca­d­e­mic day. “That’s a real­ly dan­ger­ous prece­dent to say we’re just going to stop respond­ing. So it’s real­ly kind of a Catch 22 that schools have found them­selves in. We need to respond but every time we do it just gen­er­ates more threats.”

Klinger, in a recent school secu­rity report [13], wrote that bomb threats against schools have increased sig­nif­i­cantly in recent years. So far dur­ing the 2015–2016 school year, Klinger found that a total of 745 bomb threats had been made against schools, a 143 per­cent increase com­pared to the same time peri­od dur­ing the 2012–2013 school year.

In Jan­u­ary, schools nation­wide received 206 bomb threats, the high­est num­ber ever record­ed, Klinger found. Her research also deter­mined that threats were made indis­crim­i­nately, with 48 of the 50 states in the coun­try record­ing school-based bomb threats.

“It’s not going away,” Klinger said. “The only option is to empow­er schools to be able to han­dle these things.”

“Klinger said that Inter­net-based orga­ni­za­tions charged the equiv­a­lent of $50 in bit­coins to cre­ate a bomb scare using auto­mated phone calls, which account for 13 per­cent of all threats, accord­ing to her school secu­rity research.“
At $50 a bomb threat, it’s almost kind of amaz­ing that the trend isn’t grow­ing even faster than it already is:

...
Klinger, in a recent school secu­rity report [13], wrote that bomb threats against schools have increased sig­nif­i­cantly in recent years. So far dur­ing the 2015–2016 school year, Klinger found that a total of 745 bomb threats had been made against schools, a 143 per­cent increase com­pared to the same time peri­od dur­ing the 2012–2013 school year.

In Jan­u­ary, schools nation­wide received 206 bomb threats, the high­est num­ber ever record­ed, Klinger found. Her research also deter­mined that threats were made indis­crim­i­nately, with 48 of the 50 states in the coun­try record­ing school-based bomb threats.
...