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School Shootings Are Technologically Obsolete

Dave Emory’s entire life­time of work is avail­able on a flash drive that can be obtained here. [1] The new drive is a 32-gigabyte drive that is current as of the programs and articles posted by early winter of 2016. The new drive (available for a tax-deductible contribution of $65.00 or more.)  (The previous flash drive was current through the end of May of 2012.)

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[6]COMMENT: In past programs [7], we have covered school shootings [8], one of the most high profile forms of mayhem in our benighted society. (We began our coverage with Miscellaneous Archive Show M 55–Part 1 [9], Part 2 [10].) With the growth of high-tech, they have now become technologically obsolete.

School terrorism may become increas­ingly pop­u­lar as anony­mous com­mu­ni­ca­tion tech­nolo­gies and anony­mous pay­ment sys­tems like Bit­coin con­tinue to roll out. The psychological effect of having children terrorized in this manner should not be underestimated. It will drive people into the arms of fascism, as they cry out for “someone to do SOMETHING!”

“Tele­phone Bomb Threats Prompt Numer­ous School Evac­u­a­tions and Lock­downs in Va., N.J.” by Moriah Balin­git and T. Rees ShapiroThe Wash­ing­ton Post; 3/4/2016. [11]

 Police in North­ern Vir­ginia and New Jer­sey are inves­ti­gat­ing bomb threats that were called in to dozens of schools Fri­day morn­ing, threats that prompted evac­u­a­tions and lockdowns.

Many of the schools received the threats via auto­mated phone calls — known as robo­calls — a method that has become increas­ingly com­mon for school bomb threats nation­wide and one that is dif­fi­cult to track. A rash of robo­calls led to evac­u­a­tions and lock­downs of 13 schools in three states in Jan­u­ary, none of which were found to be cred­i­ble..

At least seven schools in North­ern Vir­ginia received bomb threats Fri­day morn­ing, prompt­ing some to evac­u­ate and oth­ers to lock down. Falls Church City’s lone high school, George Mason High, was evac­u­ated after it received what school offi­cials described as an “auto­mated bomb threat” by phone shortly before noon.

Fair­fax County Police are inves­ti­gat­ing bomb threats that were called in to three pub­lic schools and one pri­vate school between 11:22 a.m. and noon, but author­i­ties declined to say whether those threats were from robo­calls. Police deter­mined them not to be cred­i­ble and Fair­fax County Pub­lic Schools offi­cials decided to con­tinue class nor­mally at the three high schools that received threats.

“Police are inves­ti­gat­ing and have deter­mined the threats are not cred­i­ble, and are intended only to dis­rupt school oper­a­tions,” said Mary Shaw, a school sys­tem spokes­woman. “We do not believe any FCPS stu­dents are at risk and we are con­tin­u­ing with nor­mal school oper­a­tions at all of our schools for the remain­der of the day.”

Bomb threats also were called into schools in a dozen dis­tricts in New Jer­sey at around 11 a.m. Fri­day, dis­rupt­ing school for thou­sands of stu­dents, accord­ing to a report in The Record. [12]. The prob­lem has become so severe that the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office has decided to host a sym­po­sium to dis­cuss how to han­dle such threats. It was the sec­ond time in a week that robo­call bomb threats shut down mul­ti­ple schools in New Jersey.

Robo­calls are becom­ing an increas­ingly com­mon method of deliv­ery for school bomb threats, said Amy Klinger, an assis­tant pro­fes­sor at Ash­land Uni­ver­sity in Ohio and a co-founder of the Educator’s School Safety Net­work, a national non-profit school safety organization.

Klinger said that Internet-based orga­ni­za­tions charged the equiv­a­lent of $50 in bit­coins to cre­ate a bomb scare using auto­mated phone calls, which account for 13 per­cent of all threats, accord­ing to her school secu­rity research.

“Schools are really caught in this dilemma of what do we do? Do we ignore it? But you can’t,” Klinger said, not­ing that some schools receive mul­ti­ple threats in a sin­gle day and evac­u­ate their build­ings for each occur­rence, cre­at­ing sig­nif­i­cant delays dur­ing the aca­d­e­mic day. “That’s a really dan­ger­ous prece­dent to say we’re just going to stop respond­ing. So it’s really kind of a Catch 22 that schools have found them­selves in. We need to respond but every time we do it just gen­er­ates more threats.”

Klinger, in a recent school secu­rity report [13], wrote that bomb threats against schools have increased sig­nif­i­cantly in recent years. So far dur­ing the 2015–2016 school year, Klinger found that a total of 745 bomb threats had been made against schools, a 143 per­cent increase com­pared to the same time period dur­ing the 2012–2013 school year.

In Jan­u­ary, schools nation­wide received 206 bomb threats, the high­est num­ber ever recorded, Klinger found. Her research also deter­mined that threats were made indis­crim­i­nately, with 48 of the 50 states in the coun­try record­ing school-based bomb threats.

“It’s not going away,” Klinger said. “The only option is to empower schools to be able to han­dle these things.”

“Klinger said that Internet-based orga­ni­za­tions charged the equiv­a­lent of $50 in bit­coins to cre­ate a bomb scare using auto­mated phone calls, which account for 13 per­cent of all threats, accord­ing to her school secu­rity research.“
At $50 a bomb threat, it’s almost kind of amaz­ing that the trend isn’t grow­ing even faster than it already is:


Klinger, in a recent school secu­rity report [13], wrote that bomb threats against schools have increased sig­nif­i­cantly in recent years. So far dur­ing the 2015–2016 school year, Klinger found that a total of 745 bomb threats had been made against schools, a 143 per­cent increase com­pared to the same time period dur­ing the 2012–2013 school year.

In Jan­u­ary, schools nation­wide received 206 bomb threats, the high­est num­ber ever recorded, Klinger found. Her research also deter­mined that threats were made indis­crim­i­nately, with 48 of the 50 states in the coun­try record­ing school-based bomb threats.