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So You’ve Got a Hate Cult Problem: Living With the Kingston Klan and its ‘Alt-Right’ Cousins

Now that the neo-Nazi car attack on a group of anti-racist pro­tes­tors in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia [1], has once again remind­ed Amer­i­ca that hate groups rep­re­sent a and sig­nif­i­cant threat to the coun­try (and world, if you look around), it’s prob­a­bly worth keep­ing in mind that these groups are in many ways cults. Cults rein­forced by far-right media ecosys­tems that have been steadi­ly rad­i­cal­iz­ing Amer­i­cans as Amer­i­can con­ser­vatism has veered fur­ther and fur­ther to the right. A media ecosys­tem that includes Steve Ban­non’s Bre­it­bart along with sites like Dai­ly Stormer and InfoWars and tells its audi­ence that a cabal that includes every­one from lib­er­als to the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood are all work­ing togeth­er to under­mine white Chris­tians and The West in gen­er­al. It’s the kind of hate land­scape that might make a vio­lent lunatic run over a bunch of anti-neo-Nazi pro­tes­tors. But this is where we are and now a sig­nif­i­cant con­tem­po­rary chal­lenge for Amer­i­can is fig­ur­ing out how to get fel­low Amer­i­cans trapped in such hate cults to rec­og­nize they got sucked into some­thing awful and need to leave it and join Team Nice. Sure, that might be fruit­less in many cas­es, but it’s still impor­tant to try. And nice. And as we’re going to see as we look at a recent report from the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter on the Kingston clan, a ~6,000 mem­ber strong polyg­a­mous inces­tu­ous super-racist apoc­a­lyp­tic cult that runs its own busi­ness empire [2], it’s pret­ty clear that fig­ur­ing out how to encour­age hate cult mem­bers to join their fel­low humans and just mel­low out is a chal­lenge we can’t ignore. Because they might be apoc­a­lyp­tic death cults plan­ning on win­ning a race war and becom­ing div­ing kings. With their own high-end firearms man­u­fac­tur­er. Hate cult recov­ery ser­vices are some­thing soci­ety is going to have to get real­ly good at if its going to sur­vive so we should prob­a­bly work on that.

And adding to the chal­lenge is, of course, Pres­i­dent Don­ald J. Trump. It’s been quite a week for Pres­i­dent Trump’s style of diplo­ma­cy and lead­er­ship. First we have the ongo­ing esca­lat­ing blus­ter talk con­test between Pres­i­dent Trump and Kim Jong-un [3] that includes Trump’s threats to pre-emp­tive­ly nuke North Korea if North Korea con­tin­ues its own threats of nuclear black­mail [4]. And of course Trump sud­den­ly threat­en­ing mil­i­tary action in Venezuela [5]. And then there was Trump’s response to the neo-Nazi car attack on a group of pro­test­ers at a “Unite The Right” ral­ly in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia [1]. A response that could large­ly be sum­ma­rized as “many sides (and not just the neo-Nazis) need to be con­demned for their hatred, big­otry, and vio­lence.” It was that kind of week: when he was­n’t talk­ing the US into a pre-emp­tive nuclear strike, Pres­i­dent Trump was run­ning rhetor­i­cal cov­er for the ‘Alt-Right’ neo-Nazis [6]:

The Huff­in­g­ton Post

Don­ald Trump Blames ‘Many Sides’ For White Suprema­cist Clash­es In Char­lottesville
Trump did not specif­i­cal­ly crit­i­cize the white suprema­cist groups who had orga­nized Saturday’s ral­ly.

By Paige Laven­der , Daniel Marans
08/12/2017 01:21 pm ET | Updat­ed 2 hours ago

Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump respond­ed to vio­lence that erupt­ed [7] this week­end as white suprema­cists and a fringe group clashed in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia.

He refused to sin­gle out the activ­i­ty of white suprema­cists, how­ev­er, argu­ing that there was blame to go around on “many sides.”

“We con­demn in the strongest pos­si­ble terms this egre­gious dis­play of hatred, big­otry and vio­lence on many sides — on many sides. It’s been going on for a long time in our coun­try, not Don­ald Trump, not Barack Oba­ma, it’s been going on for a long, long time,” Trump said at a cer­e­mo­ny for the sign­ing of a bill to reform the Vet­er­ans Affairs health care sys­tem.

“It has no place in Amer­i­ca,” he added. “What is vital now is a swift restora­tion of law and order and the pro­tec­tion of inno­cent lives.”

Trump went on to empha­size that he loves “all the peo­ple of our coun­try,” and called for Amer­i­cans of dif­fer­ent races and back­grounds to remem­ber their shared Amer­i­can­ness.

“We wan­na get the sit­u­a­tion straight­ened out in Char­lottesville and we want to study it,” he said. “We want to see what we’re doing wrong as a coun­try where things like this can hap­pen.”

Trump’s com­ments were his third attempt at address­ing the unrest in Vir­ginia. First, ear­li­er on Sat­ur­day, he con­demned “hate” and “vio­lence,” but didn’t men­tion Char­lottesville by name or direct­ly address any of the groups demon­strat­ing there.

He then fol­lowed up that tweet with anoth­er one 41 min­utes lat­er [9], final­ly men­tion­ing Char­lottesville by name but not ref­er­enc­ing the white suprema­cists whose ral­ly trig­gered the chaos.

Civ­il rights lead­ers crit­i­cized Trump for fail­ing to square­ly denounce the white suprema­cists who orga­nized the ral­ly.

“The president’s remarks were moral­ly frus­trat­ing and dis­ap­point­ing,” for­mer NAACP pres­i­dent Cor­nell Brooks told CNN. “Because while it is good that he says he wants to be a pres­i­dent for all the peo­ple and he wants to make Amer­i­ca great for all of the peo­ple. Let us know this: Through­out his remarks he refused to” call out white suprema­cists by name.

In a state­ment to the Guardian’s Ben Jacobs, [13] a White House spokesper­son defend­ed the president’s reac­tion as, “con­demn­ing hatred, big­otry and vio­lence from all sources and all sides.”

“There was vio­lence between pro­test­ers and counter pro­test­ers today,” the spokesper­son added.

David Duke, a white nation­al­ist and sup­port­er of Trump, crit­i­cized the president’s ini­tial state­ment, argu­ing that, “it was White Amer­i­cans who put you in the pres­i­den­cy.”

Duke said Sat­ur­day [16] the white suprema­cist ral­ly in Char­lottesville is in line with Trump’s “promis­es.” [17]

“We are going to ful­fill the promis­es of Don­ald Trump,” Duke said. “That’s what we believed in. That’s why we vot­ed for Don­ald Trump, because he said he’s going to take our coun­try back.”

Char­lottesville May­or Mike Sign­er thanked Trump for his state­ment:

Vir­ginia Gov. Ter­ry McAu­li­ffe (D) declared a state of emer­gency [19] Sat­ur­day as fist fights broke out in streets, objects were thrown and reporters were cov­ered in raw sewage. The White House said it has been in con­tact with McAuliffe’s office, and Tom Bossert, Trump’s home­land secu­ri­ty advis­er, has had con­tact with local author­i­ties.

...

Trump’s respons­es to inci­dents of vio­lence have var­ied since he took office.

He imme­di­ate­ly con­demned a June attack in Lon­don, call­ing it “hor­rif­ic [20]” while crit­i­ciz­ing Lon­don May­or Sadiq Khan [21] and call­ing for imple­men­ta­tion of his pro­posed trav­el ban against cit­i­zens from sev­er­al major­i­ty-Mus­lim coun­tries. In Feb­ru­ary, he called anti-Semit­ic inci­dents in the Unit­ed States “hor­ri­ble” and “painful.” [22]

But his response to oth­er attacks has been delayed or non-exis­tent.

After sev­er­al days, Trump tweet­ed [23] from the @POTUS account — an offi­cial White House account, not the per­son­al one he most often uses — to rec­og­nize vic­tims of a knife attack in Port­land for “stand­ing up to hate and intol­er­ance” for stand­ing up to a man yelling slurs and hate speech. Trump nev­er issued a response [24] to an attack on a mosque in Min­neso­ta [24] ear­li­er this month.

The vio­lence in Char­lottesville erupt­ed in the mid­dle of Trump’s 17-day “work­ing vaca­tion [25]” at the Trump Nation­al Golf Club in Bed­min­ster, New Jer­sey. Trump has remained active on Twit­ter through­out his vaca­tion, tweet­ing crit­i­cisms at sev­er­al law­mak­ers, mak­ing com­ments on the sit­u­a­tion with North Korea and retweet­ing sto­ries from Fox News.

———-

“Don­ald Trump Blames ‘Many Sides’ For White Suprema­cist Clash­es In Char­lottesville” by Paige Laven­der, Daniel Marans; The Huff­in­g­ton Post; 08/12/2017 [6]

““We con­demn in the strongest pos­si­ble terms this egre­gious dis­play of hatred, big­otry and vio­lence on many sides — on many sides. It’s been going on for a long time in our coun­try, not Don­ald Trump, not Barack Oba­ma, it’s been going on for a long, long time,” Trump said at a cer­e­mo­ny for the sign­ing of a bill to reform the Vet­er­ans Affairs health care sys­tem.”

Yes, shame on those anti-racist pro­tes­tors for their dis­plays of big­otry for towards open proud big­ots. That was a cen­tral ele­ment of Pres­i­dent Trump’s address to the nation fol­low­ing the attack. And that was his third attempt at address­ing the vio­lence at the ral­ly:

...
Trump’s com­ments were his third attempt at address­ing the unrest in Vir­ginia. First, ear­li­er on Sat­ur­day, he con­demned “hate” and “vio­lence,” but didn’t men­tion Char­lottesville by name or direct­ly address any of the groups demon­strat­ing there.

He then fol­lowed up that tweet with anoth­er one 41 min­utes lat­er [9], final­ly men­tion­ing Char­lottesville by name but not ref­er­enc­ing the white suprema­cists whose ral­ly trig­gered the chaos.
...

So that was three attempts, and three fail­ures at any sort of direct con­dem­na­tion of the white pow­er groups and what they were ral­ly­ing for. The third time was def­i­nite­ly not a charm [26].

But there is one line in Trump’s response that it worth tak­ing to heart, albeit prob­a­bly not in the way Trump intend­ed: what can be learn from study­ing this sit­u­a­tion about how to pre­vent the grow­ing of such move­ments so we can move past this and maybe actu­al­ly heal Amer­i­can soci­ety:

...
Trump went on to empha­size that he loves “all the peo­ple of our coun­try,” and called for Amer­i­cans of dif­fer­ent races and back­grounds to remem­ber their shared Amer­i­can­ness.

“We wan­na get the sit­u­a­tion straight­ened out in Char­lottesville and we want to study it,” he said. “We want to see what we’re doing wrong as a coun­try where things like this can hap­pen.”
...

“We wan­na get the sit­u­a­tion straight­ened out in Char­lottesville and we want to study it...We want to see what we’re doing wrong as a coun­try where things like this can hap­pen.”

Well, ok, that’s decent advice. What types of insights can we obtain by tak­ing a step back and study the sit­u­a­tion? Well, for starters, it seems like hav­ing a Pres­i­dent that actu­al­ly open­ly con­demns white nation­al­ist groups would be a good exam­ple of “what we’re doing wrong as a coun­try”. Although that’s more Trump’s fault than the entire coun­try’s. But it’s still quite obvi­ous that there’s quite a few Amer­i­cans that sym­pa­thize with the gen­er­al world­view put on dis­play by the “Unite the Right” marchers.

So in the inter­est of “study­ing our sit­u­a­tion”, per­haps there’s val­ue in tak­ing a clos­er look at a report just put out by the South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter’s August 2017 Intel­li­gence Report [27]. It’s an arti­cle about the kind of group that has a world­view that’s what you might get if you take the neo-Nazi ‘whites are pure and all oth­ers are ene­mies who must be sup­pressed and even­tu­al­ly extin­guished’ total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­an world­view and took it to the extreme. So extreme that they don’t sim­ply fetishize their own race but actu­al­ly their own blood­line, view­ing them­selves as a divine­ly ordained line of the ‘purest’ white peo­ple in his­to­ry with a direct line back to Jesus Christ. So extreme that if they think you have one drop of non-white blood in your ances­try you will be excom­mu­ni­cat­ed. So extreme that they prac­tice incest as a way to not just stay pure but achieve some sort of Aryan super-per­son. So extreme that the rest of the world must be even­tu­al­ly con­quered fol­low­ing a giant race war. And yes, they are Mor­mons. But still not that much more extreme that your stan­dard extrem­ist. That’s the scari­est part.

And since this clan of polyg­a­mists cultists, the Kingston clan, rep­re­sent basi­cal­ly a dis­tilled form of the kind of “us vs them” white suprema­cists mind-virus — a virus that views “oth­ers” as a dehu­man­ized exis­ten­tial threat and the end of the word if white suprema­cy isn’t dom­i­nant — per­haps we can learn some­thing about what moti­vates the kinds of ‘Alt Right’ world­view? Like, is there any sort of mes­sage the broad­er pub­lic can send to peo­ple trapped in such cults that would facil­i­tate them ‘snap­ping out it’? Some way of effec­tive­ly com­mu­ni­cat­ing, “hey, it’s not the end of the world if you leave the cult and join a mul­ti-eth­nic cul­ture that val­ues diver­si­ty + nice­ness (i.e. cel­e­brat­ing diver­si­ty except for the big­otry), and you’ll be wel­comed and MUCH hap­pi­er and ful­filled when you do”. Is there some­thing soci­ety at large can do to facil­i­tate that process that is essen­tial­ly inter­nal dis­cov­ery and epiphany in the hearts and minds of peo­ple trapped in hate cults? If so, that mes­sage would prob­a­bly be quite use­ful on free­ing peo­ple trapped by the Alt-Right hate ide­olo­gies too.

The Kingston Klan’s Extra-Extreme Extrem­ism Keeps it All in the Fam­i­ly

So in the spir­it of Pres­i­dent Trump’s advice, let’s briefly study the Kingston clan, one of the have extreme total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­an move­ments you’ll even come across. First, let’s take a look at this arti­cle about them from 2004 when the incest and abuse with­in the the clan start­ed mak­ing nation­al news.

It’s a notable arti­cle in con­text of ‘Alt-Right’ white pow­er groups ral­ly­ing to “pre­serve our his­to­ry and cul­ture, etc” because, of course, when you’re try­ing to pre­serve a his­to­ry of white suprema­cy and cul­ture you’re obvi­ous­ly try­ing to pre­serve the free­dom to cre­ate a soci­ety dom­i­nat­ed by white suprema­cists and not sim­ply “pre­serve his­to­ry”. As should be clear, when groups like those behind “Unite the Right” cry out about how they’re just fight­ing for their free­dom of speech and expres­sion, or greater tol­er­ance of their views, that’s a pre­pos­ter­ous lie. They’re fight­ing for the hearts and minds of a large enough swath of White Amer­i­ca that would allow them to stage what amounts to a white suprema­cist polit­i­cal rev­o­lu­tion that will allow them to impose a far-right neo-Nazi-style regime of sub­ju­ga­tion of every­one who isn’t a white suprema­cist [28]. The ‘Alt-Right’ far-right move­ments are fight­ing for the free­dom to build up enough sup­port for an even­tu­al white suprema­cist takeover of soci­ety fol­lowed by the dehu­man­iza­tion and sub­ju­ga­tion of all “oth­ers”. That’s part of why it’s so impor­tant to under­stand how such world­views sus­tain their appeal and how to make it clear to sus­cep­ti­ble audi­ences that their lives will be much, much bet­ter in a world that embraces gen­uine nice­ness.

Along those lines, here’s the pub­lic face of the Kingston clan. A group with thou­sands of mem­bers and a bil­lion dol­lar busi­ness empire. A super-racist clan so deeply cor­rupt­ed by a “we’re good, every­one else is evil” mind­set that they teach about an apoc­a­lyp­tic end-times race war where blood will run in the streets. And when this group received a bunch of neg­a­tive press back in 2004, their mes­sage was “we want to live our life and let every­body else live their life” (and even­tu­al­ly wipe every­one else out, but let’s not men­tion that in pub­lic) [29]:

Newsweek

A FAMILY’S TANGLED TIES

By Andrew Murr
On 2/8/04 at 7:00 PM

Lu Ann Kingston was 15 when she mar­ried her first cousin Jere­my Kingston in a hush-hush 1995 wed­ding in Boun­ti­ful, Utah. As mem­bers of a secre­tive soci­ety of “fun­da­men­tal­ist Mor­mons” whose lead­ers prac­ticed polygamy, Lu Ann’s fam­i­ly thought noth­ing of the fact that Jere­my, then 24, was such a close relative–or that he had three oth­er wives. So entwined were the branch­es of the fam­i­ly tree that Lu Ann’s cousin-hus­band was also her nephew.

But the Kingstons’ tan­gled fam­i­ly ties are threat­en­ing to unrav­el, thanks large­ly to the efforts of Lu Ann and anoth­er for­mer Kingston wife, her niece Mary Ann. In 2000, Lu Ann and her two chil­dren fled the 1,000-person soci­ety that mem­bers call The Order, and she lat­er coop­er­at­ed with state pros­e­cu­tors crack­ing down on sex­u­al abuse of teen girls by polyg­a­mists. Last week Jere­my Kingston was sen­tenced to one year in jail after plead­ing guilty to felony incest. Mean­while, Mary Ann Kingston, 22, has brought a $110 mil­lion civ­il suit against 242 Order mem­bers and 97 com­pa­nies they oper­ate, claim­ing that they share col­lec­tive respon­si­bil­i­ty for abuse she suf­fered at the hands of her father and the uncle she mar­ried to become his 15th wife. The two men went to prison in 1999 on charges rang­ing from child abuse to incest.

Mary Ann’s suit argues that Order mem­bers are “joint­ly liable” because her mis­treat­ment grew direct­ly out of the group’s beliefs. (The watch­dog South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter used a sim­i­lar strat­e­gy of group respon­si­bil­i­ty to bank­rupt the white-suprema­cist Aryan Nations in 2000 after its secu­ri­ty guards assault­ed a pair of black motorists.) Mary Ann claims that the Order’s prac­tice of polygamy led her uncle David Kingston, 33, to mar­ry the 16-year-old and sleep with her. When she fled the mar­riage, her father, John Daniel Kingston, drove her to a fam­i­ly ranch near the Ida­ho bor­der and whipped her with a leather belt until she passed out. Kingston spokesman Elden Kingston, 65, calls the suit an effort to “extort mon­ey” (the Order now con­trols a finan­cial empire esti­mat­ed at $100 mil­lion). He hints the fam­i­ly’s lawyers would use hard­ball tac­tics, claim­ing Mary Ann exper­i­ment­ed with sex and drugs, and that mar­ry­ing her to her uncle was an attempt to “help that girl.”

In anoth­er legal threat to the clan, Utah Attor­ney Gen­er­al Mark Shurtl­eff is launch­ing a finan­cial probe of the Kingstons (as well as a sec­ond polyg­a­mous clan). He hopes to bring an orga­nized-crime-style pros­e­cu­tion against the Kingstons, whose high-rank­ing mem­bers run ranch­es, shop­ping cen­ters, a real-estate firm and a coal mine. Elden Kingston denies wrong­do­ing and dis­miss­es the inves­ti­ga­tion as “just anoth­er exam­ple of the state’s long his­to­ry of per­se­cu­tion” of the Kingstons. But for decades after a dis­as­trous 1953 raid wrenched hun­dreds of chil­dren from their par­ents, Utah offi­cials vir­tu­al­ly ignored the sect and oth­er so-called fun­da­men­tal­ists who prac­tice polygamy in defi­ance of the law and the Mor­mon Church’s 1890 ban on plur­al mar­riage. The con­vic­tions of Mary Ann’s father and uncle end­ed the lais­sez-faire peri­od, and pub­lic oppo­si­tion grew last year with the news that polygamy was behind the alleged kid­nap­ping and sex­u­al assault of 14-year-old Eliz­a­beth Smart.

Incest is a Kingston tra­di­tion. The clan’s lead­ers have mar­ried dozens of first cousins, half sis­ters and nieces. The Order’s top man, Paul Kingston, counts a half-dozen such rel­a­tives among his 20-plus wives, accord­ing to ex-mem­bers and Attor­ney Gen­er­al’s inves­ti­ga­tor Ron Bar­ton. Inter­mar­riage of close rel­a­tives dates to Paul’s late father, for­mer leader John Ortell Kingston (who was also Jere­my’s grand­fa­ther and Lu Ann’s father). He taught his fam­i­ly that the Kingstons descend­ed from Jesus Christ through a pair of “Jew­ish princess­es,” recalls for­mer mem­ber Ron Tuck­er, 45, anoth­er of John Ortel­l’s sons.

...

The ongo­ing atten­tion is hav­ing an effect. For­mer mem­bers say Paul Kingston recent­ly had to calm anx­ious mem­bers who feared that Mary Ann’s suit will take away their busi­ness­es and sav­ings. Elden Kingston says the crack­down on under­age mar­riages has “changed a lot of indi­vid­u­als’ feel­ings about young mar­riages.” But they insist on liv­ing their own way. “We pay mil­lions of dol­lars in tax­es,” Elden Kingston com­plains. “We want to live our life and let every­body else live their life.” For the Order, the days of live and let live may be gone.

———-

“A FAMILY’S TANGLED TIES” by Andrew Murr; Newsweek; 02/08/2004 [29].

“The ongo­ing atten­tion is hav­ing an effect. For­mer mem­bers say Paul Kingston recent­ly had to calm anx­ious mem­bers who feared that Mary Ann’s suit will take away their busi­ness­es and sav­ings. Elden Kingston says the crack­down on under­age mar­riages has “changed a lot of indi­vid­u­als’ feel­ings about young mar­riages.” But they insist on liv­ing their own way. “We pay mil­lions of dol­lars in tax­es,” Elden Kingston com­plains. “We want to live our life and let every­body else live their life.” For the Order, the days of live and let live may be gone.”

That was how a clan that views all non-Whites as divine­ly cor­rupt­ed pre­sent­ed itself to the world: we just want to live our own lives. A mes­sage that sounds about as disin­gen­u­ous as the the “Unite the Right” ral­ly of neo-Nazis that claim to mere­ly want to defend their “free speech” and “pre­serv­ing her­itage” (a Robert E. Lee stat­ue) and they are clear­ly ral­ly­ing to pop­u­lar­ize a move­ment with the end goal of a white suprema­cist rev­o­lu­tion and sub­ju­ga­tion of non-whites [30].

At the same time, as the abu­sive iso­lat­ing nature of the Kingston clans cult lifestyle makes clear, the vast major­i­ty of the peo­ple involved are large­ly vic­tims of cult abuse/brainwashing and indoc­tri­na­tion. They’re real­ly sym­pa­thet­ic fig­ures. As are many peo­ple in hate groups. Every­one has their own path into a hate cult and a lot of those paths are pret­ty hor­rif­ic. That’s impor­tant to keep in mind because the fact that the Alt-Right includes a lot of dam­aged peo­ple in need of heal­ing is all the more rea­son for them to leave and join Team Nice. Because if Team Nice is nice it should be pret­ty good at giv­ing that heal­ing.

So with all that in mind, if we’re going to “study our sit­u­a­tion” as Pres­i­dent Trump rec­om­mends, behold the Kingston clan, future divine kings if things go hor­ri­bly awry [2]:

South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter
Intel­li­gence Report

Blood Cult

Stephen Lemons

August 08, 2017
2017 Fall Issue

Utah’s polyg­a­mous Kingston clan mix­es incest and white suprema­cy with old-fash­ioned cap­i­tal­ism

When it comes to racist Sun­day school lessons, the polyg­a­mous Kingston clan could teach the Ku Klux Klan a thing or two.

Dur­ing a recent inter­view with the Intel­li­gence Report, Jes­si­ca Kingston, a for­mer mem­ber of the secre­tive, Salt Lake City-based cult and a star of the A&E real­i­ty series “Escap­ing Polygamy,” remem­bered, when she was 12, her Sun­day school teacher com­ing into class with a buck­et of water and a vial of black food col­or­ing.

The teacher added a drop of dye to the water, and the chil­dren watched as the black­ness slow­ly spread.

“The teacher was like, ‘You can nev­er get that out, that is always there now,’” recalled Jes­si­ca, now 29. “She talked about how you can’t asso­ciate with black peo­ple or any­body of a dif­fer­ent race.”

This racist dis­play was no one-off. Jes­si­ca said she and oth­er chil­dren of the Kingston clan — a group also known as The Order, the Davis Coun­ty Coop­er­a­tive Soci­ety, and the Lat­ter-Day Church of Christ — dropped the N‑bomb all the time, as did their par­ents.

Black peo­ple sup­pos­ed­ly suf­fered from mul­ti­ple scrip­tur­al curs­es, from the mark of Cain and Noah’s curse on Ham in the Old Tes­ta­ment to the racist tenets of ear­ly Mor­monism that have since been renounced or aban­doned by the main­stream Church of Jesus Christ of Lat­ter-day Saints, also known as the LDS or Mor­mon church.

Black blood was “the worst thing you can have,” Jes­si­ca said, par­tic­u­lar­ly since the Kingstons con­sid­er them­selves to be the whitest of the white, descend­ed direct­ly from Jesus Christ and King David, the Mid­dle East­ern ori­gins of both men notwith­stand­ing.

Obsessed with the puri­ty of their blood­line and empow­ered by a sense of enti­tle­ment on par with the divine right of kings, the Kingstons have made incest the cor­ner­stone of a self-serv­ing the­ol­o­gy that loathes non whites, fos­ters homo­pho­bia and abhors gov­ern­ment author­i­ty.

Addi­tion­al­ly, ex-Order mem­bers tell of a reput­ed church prophe­cy of an “End of the World War,” an apoc­a­lyp­tic vision that fore­sees a bloody race war with the Kingstons as the ulti­mate vic­tors, cho­sen by their Heav­en­ly Father to rule the world for a mil­len­ni­um.

But giv­en that the Kingstons com­mand an esti­mat­ed 6,000 adher­ents, boast a busi­ness empire report­ed­ly worth as much as $1 bil­lion and have out­last­ed myr­i­ad bouts with law enforce­ment and the press, these dreams of world dom­i­na­tion may be less delu­sion­al than they first seem.

All Along the Watch­tow­er

The Order denies that it encour­ages racism and homo­pho­bia with­in its ranks.

In a let­ter to the Intel­li­gence Report respond­ing to alle­ga­tions made by for­mer mem­bers, Kent John­son, a spokesman for the Davis Coun­ty Coop­er­a­tive Soci­ety, claimed that The Order’s “foun­da­tion­al prin­ci­ples” include the Gold­en Rule, and that the church rejects any form of racism or big­otry.

“[W]e direct­ly con­demn in action and in words, racist, homo­pho­bic or hate­ful actions against any group or indi­vid­ual,” John­son wrote.

John­son main­tained that The Order’s vast array of busi­ness­es — which includes a gro­cery store, pawn shops, a garbage dis­pos­al busi­ness, an insur­ance com­pa­ny, a polit­i­cal­ly-influ­en­tial bio­fu­els plant, and a high-end firearms man­u­fac­tur­er — employs indi­vid­u­als of var­i­ous racial and eth­nic minori­ties.

The let­ter asserts that one of the ear­li­est mem­bers of the church was a Native Amer­i­can man and that the “Co-op,” as it is some­times called, has been the vic­tim of prej­u­dice and harass­ment by Utah’s “major­i­ty reli­gion” (i.e., the LDS church) because of the former’s “pro­gres­sive” ideas.

Indeed, the group was found­ed dur­ing the Great Depres­sion as a com­mu­nal reli­gious orga­ni­za­tion where mem­bers ded­i­cat­ed their earn­ings and pos­ses­sions to build­ing “the King­dom of God on Earth,” as one church doc­u­ment attests.

Its omi­nous-sound­ing moniker, “The Order,” is a ref­er­ence to the Unit­ed Order, a qua­si-utopi­an soci­ety pro­posed by LDS-founder Joseph Smith, and prac­ticed in some Mor­mon com­mu­ni­ties under the lead­er­ship of ear­ly church pres­i­dent Brigham Young.

The Order can right­ly claim dis­crim­i­na­tion by main­stream Mor­monism, but this is due to its embrace of polygamy, which the LDS church offi­cial­ly aban­doned in 1890 in order for Utah to become a state. The renun­ci­a­tion of polygamy is now church doc­trine, and the Mor­mon church has a pol­i­cy of excom­mu­ni­cat­ing polyg­a­mists. Kingston fore­bears were among those who suf­fered this fate.

Polygamy is out­lawed in Utah, both by the state’s con­sti­tu­tion, and in statute, where it is a third-degree felony, with a pos­si­ble pun­ish­ment of five years in prison. But for their part, The Order and oth­er fun­da­men­tal­ist sects believe the LDS church exists in a state of apos­ta­sy for aban­don­ing what they see as a bedrock prin­ci­ple of their faith.

Accord­ing to church lore, The Order came into exis­tence when founder Charles “Elden” Kingston saw Jesus in the moun­tains above the family’s set­tle­ment in Boun­ti­ful, Utah, inspir­ing him to cre­ate the DCCS in 1935.

The family’s ded­i­ca­tion to “the prin­ci­ple” of polygamy already had been estab­lished by Kingston’s father, who had three wives. Elden con­tin­ued the tra­di­tion. Accord­ing to his­to­ri­an Bri­an Hales’ Mod­ern Polygamy and Mor­mon Fun­da­men­tal­ism: The Gen­er­a­tions After the Man­i­festo, Broth­er Elden, as he was also known, had five wives and 17 chil­dren.

Elden also insti­tut­ed the church law of “one above the oth­er,” requir­ing mem­bers’ blind obe­di­ence to the church’s hier­ar­chy of “num­bered men,” with Elden being Broth­er Num­ber One.

Broth­er Elden died of penile can­cer in 1948, despite the best efforts of some fam­i­ly mem­bers to burn away the can­cer using acid. Elden had pre­dict­ed that he would be res­ur­rect­ed from the dead, so clan mem­bers kept his body on ice for three days, to no avail.

His broth­er, John “Ortell” Kingston, took over the lead­er­ship of The Order — incor­po­rat­ed in the 1970s as the Lat­ter Day Church of Christ. Ortell is cred­it­ed with expand­ing The Order’s busi­ness empire and mak­ing the fam­i­ly immense­ly wealthy. His sev­en sons and two daugh­ters by LaDon­na Peter­son, the sec­ond of his 13 wives, are reput­ed to be the inner cir­cle that runs the cult.

A stern dis­ci­pli­nar­i­an, who in lat­er years looked and dressed like a mor­ti­cian, Ortell made incest a tenet of the clan’s faith, informed by his work breed­ing Hol­stein cows on the Kingstons’ dairy farm.

A 1999 Salt Lake Tri­bune arti­cle mapped the Kingstons’ inces­tu­ous fam­i­ly tree, quot­ing one of Ortell’s 65 kids, ex-Order mem­ber Con­nie Rugg as say­ing, “My father exper­i­ment­ed [with] inbreed­ing with his cat­tle and then he turned to his chil­dren.”

In order to main­tain his family’s “supe­ri­or blood­lines,” Ortell mar­ried and had chil­dren with two of his half-sis­ters and two nieces. He orches­trat­ed all unions with­in the cult, which was main­tained with clas­sic mind con­trol tech­niques, cor­po­ral pun­ish­ment, fast­ing and bizarre dietary prac­tices. Ortell died in 1987, but his prog­e­ny con­tin­ued the polygamy, the inbreed­ing and the mar­riages to young female teens that he insti­tut­ed.

Con­trol of The Order then passed to Ortell’s well-edu­cat­ed son Paul Kingston, one of sev­er­al lawyers in a cult whose mem­bers dress nor­mal­ly and try not to draw atten­tion to them­selves.

Known var­i­ous­ly as “Broth­er Paul,” “the leader,” and “the man on the watch­tow­er” by Order mem­bers, this unre­mark­able, bald­ing mid­dle-aged man report­ed­ly has 27 wives and over 300 chil­dren. Three of his wives are his half-sis­ters. One is a first cousin. Two are nieces.

John Daniel Kingston seen here in 1999, plead­ing no con­test to beat­ing his 16-year-old daugh­ter after she attempt­ed to flee an arranged mar­riage with her uncle David, Kingston’s broth­er.

Sim­i­lar­ly, his old­er broth­er John Daniel Kingston has had 14 wives, four of them his half-sis­ters. Anoth­er is a first cousin.

Like polygamy, incest is a third-degree felony in Utah, and as with polygamy, con­vic­tions are rare. Over the years, state law enforce­ment and the courts have spo­rad­i­cal­ly addressed the incest in the Kingston ranks.

In 1999, Paul’s younger broth­er David Ortell Kingston was con­vict­ed of tak­ing his 16-year-old niece as wife num­ber 15. The incest came to light after the girl tried to escape the arranged “celes­tial” mar­riage — an ille­gal mar­riage, sans license.

Her dis­obe­di­ence incurred the wrath of her father Daniel, who took her to a fam­i­ly ranch near the Ida­ho bor­der and sav­age­ly beat her. The girl, who as an adult would unsuc­cess­ful­ly sue the clan, then walked miles to the near­est gas sta­tion, where she called the police.

Daniel was arrest­ed and even­tu­al­ly spent 28 weeks in a coun­ty jail for felony child abuse. David was sen­tenced to 10 years in prison for the incest, but served only four before being paroled.

In 2003, anoth­er clan mem­ber, Jere­my Kingston plead­ed guilty to incest for tak­ing 15-year-old Lu Ann Kingston as his fourth wife. Jere­my was near­ly 10 years her senior at the time. Due to the Kingstons’ con­vo­lut­ed geneal­o­gy, Lu Ann was both his first cousin and his aunt. As part of a plea bar­gain, Jere­my spent just one year in prison.

The ‘Curse’ of Black­ness

In secret video­tapes of Order church meet­ings aired on Escap­ing Polygamy, Paul’s nephew Nick Young, speak­ing from a church lectern, iden­ti­fies him­self as a num­bered man, num­ber 72, to be pre­cise.

The son of Paul’s sis­ter Rachel — her­self a daugh­ter of Ortell and LaDon­na Kingston — Young was the only cur­rent mem­ber of the Kingston clan, out of the many con­tact­ed for this sto­ry, who con­sent­ed to a live, on-the-record inter­view.

Young is the own­er of Desert Tech, a Utah gun man­u­fac­tur­er, which pro­duces sniper rifles and so-called “bullpup” rifles, The lat­ter, unlike con­ven­tion­al mag­a­zine-fed rifles, have short­er bar­rels, with the gun’s action locat­ed behind the trig­ger. These spe­cial­ty firearms can cost any­where from $2,500 to $8,000 each.

Desert Tech and its rifles have been fea­tured on Fox News, Myth­busters, Dare­dev­il and The Black­list, among oth­er TV shows. Young told Intel­li­gence Report that his com­pa­ny has sold weapons, with the approval of the U.S. State Depart­ment, to gov­ern­ments in Europe and the Mid­dle East, Sau­di Ara­bia being one.

Young also claimed Desert Tech had sold guns to Picatin­ny Arse­nal, the research divi­sion of the U.S. mil­i­tary.

“We haven’t got­ten any big U.S. con­tracts,” Young explained. “Obvi­ous­ly, we would love to.”

Spokes­men for both the U.S. State Depart­ment and for Picatin­ny Arse­nal could nei­ther ver­i­fy nor deny Young’s claims.

The com­pa­ny was found­ed in 2007 with an invest­ment from fam­i­ly mem­bers. Young denied that The Order was racist or taught any form of big­otry, and said he had peo­ple of all races work­ing for him.

“What we’re taught is to love our neigh­bor, that all peo­ple, all races no mat­ter who they are … deserve to be loved,” he explained.

Still, he con­ced­ed that some Order mem­bers may have prej­u­diced beliefs because “in our orga­ni­za­tion peo­ple have free­dom of choice.”

So what about polygamy? Is it a require­ment to gain the high­est lev­els of heav­en?

“Yeah, I believe in it,” he said. “As far as how you end up in heav­en, that’s up to God.”

Young declined to com­ment when asked if he prac­tices polygamy. Intel­li­gence Report then read the names of women believed to be his wives — four in all.

“Okay, I have one legal wife,” he said. “But I do have chil­dren with oth­er women.”

Asked if two women named were in fact his first cousins, Young paused, final­ly reply­ing, “I guess I’m curi­ous as to what you’re try­ing to get at here.”

Before the call end­ed, Young insist­ed that he “didn’t admit to any kind of incest or any­thing.” When Intel­li­gence Report inquired if Young thought there was any­thing wrong with first cousins get­ting mar­ried, Young opined that such issues were between the indi­vid­u­als involved and God.

Nev­er­the­less, for­mer mem­bers of The Order say that incest and racism are inex­tri­ca­bly linked in The Order’s teach­ings.

Dur­ing an inter­view with this reporter, Lu Ann Kingston, whose defi­ance of the cult led to the con­vic­tion of her for­mer “spir­i­tu­al” hus­band Jere­my, recalled that Order mem­bers saw inter­mar­riage as a way to “keep the blood­line pure.”

And by pure, they meant pure white.

All out­siders are con­sid­ered to be beneath Order mem­bers, she explained. But The Order saves most of its bile for blacks and oth­er non whites. Eth­nic jokes and stereo­types were com­mon­ly repeat­ed. Chi­nese peo­ple were called “stu­pid,” and Mex­i­cans were “dirty,” said Lu Ann, adding, “because of their skin.”

Alli­son, a 17 year-old ex-Kingston mem­ber says not much has changed since Lu Ann’s day.

“I didn’t even know the n‑word was bad until I was like 15 or 16,” she told Intel­li­gence Report.

Once free of the cult, Lu Ann, Alli­son and oth­er ex-Order mem­bers have had to unlearn the hatred that was drilled into their heads. The mere rumor of black blood could con­demn some­one in the eyes of Order mem­bers.

That’s what hap­pened with Ron Tucker’s fam­i­ly. Tuck­er is anoth­er of Ortell’s many sons, though not from the favored wife, LaDon­na.

Seat­ed on a couch, sip­ping lemon­ade in his home in a Salt Lake City sub­urb, he resem­bles Paul Kingston quite a bit. The two were play­mates when they were boys.

A loy­al Order mem­ber for years, he lost his faith and end­ed up leav­ing the Order over a curse of sorts, lev­eled at his fam­i­ly by LaDon­na. Sup­pos­ed­ly, LaDon­na had a dream where­in it was revealed that any­one who left The Order would be taint­ed by black blood.

Some­how LaDonna’s curse was trans­ferred to the Tuck­ers via Christy, Ron’s wife, because, Christy’s mom left The Order and mar­ried an Irish­man, before leav­ing him and return­ing to the fold.

“I could see that the lead­ers of The Order real­ly did believe we had black ances­tors,” Ron explained, with Christy next to him, and his adult daugh­ters Emi­ly and Julie near­by.

Boys began to show inter­est in Julie as she matured, but Paul, as the clan’s leader, warned them away, because of Julie’s black blood.

Up to this point, Julie had treat­ed the rumor like a joke. Her younger sis­ter Emi­ly thought it was a joke, too, until one day anoth­er Order kid told her, “We can’t play with you because the Tuck­ers are nig­gers.”

Julie left the cult at age 19. Her par­ents and sib­lings even­tu­al­ly left as well.

Ron says the cult’s jus­ti­fi­ca­tion for its racism goes back to ear­ly Mor­mon teach­ings about a war in heav­en between the forces of Satan and those of Jesus. The bat­tle took place in the spir­i­tu­al pre-exis­tence that Mor­mons believe all souls come from. Blacks were “the less valiant peo­ple in heav­en” who sat on the side­lines while oth­ers took sides, accord­ing to The Order.

Their pun­ish­ment? Dark skin, of course.

Anoth­er of Ortell’s teach­ings: Adolf Hitler had the right idea about cre­at­ing a mas­ter race, but didn’t have the Lord’s help, so he failed.

Tuck­er recount­ed the clan’s ver­sion of the apoc­a­lypse, the “End of the World War,” a riff on a prophe­cy some ascribe to Joseph Smith, called The White Horse Prophe­cy. In it, black peo­ple come close to killing off the white race until they are coun­tered by Native Amer­i­cans, sym­bol­ized by a Red Horse, which gal­lops to the White Horse’s res­cue.

“That will open up for The Order to rise up and take over the world,” Ron said.

The Tuck­ers think this is all hog­wash now, though they were pro­grammed to believe it at the time.

Record­ings of church tes­ti­mo­ny giv­en by var­i­ous Kingstons serve as fur­ther evi­dence of the cult’s big­ot­ed teach­ings.

In one, Ortell warns that there is a move­ment afoot that wants to “homog­e­nize the peo­ple” and “make one race,” by mix­ing all the races up.

In anoth­er, Order attor­ney Carl Kingston warns lis­ten­ers about mar­ry­ing up with “Ham’s kids,” a ref­er­ence to the afore­men­tioned Bib­li­cal curse. “If you have as much as one drop of that blood in your veins,” says Carl, “you’re cursed from hold­ing the priest­hood.”

The lawyer’s words call to mind anoth­er heav­en­ly curse, described in 2 Nephi, Chap­ter 5 of the Book of Mor­mon, where God caused a “skin of black­ness” to come upon a group called the Laman­ites, sup­pos­ed­ly ances­tors of Native Amer­i­cans.

Mod­ern inter­pre­ta­tions of this pas­sage vary, but The Order appar­ent­ly takes quite lit­er­al­ly this idea of “black­ness” being a sign of iniq­ui­ty.

Soy Makes You Gay

LGBT peo­ple fare lit­tle bet­ter in the Kingston clan.

One ex-Order mem­ber, who asked to be referred to as “Scott,” instead of his real name for fear of ret­ri­bu­tion by clan mem­bers, said hatred of gays was big in the Kingston clan, with the word “fag­got” in fre­quent use.

For fun he and oth­er Order men would go to a park fre­quent­ed by gay males, look­ing for vic­tims.

“We would cause harm,” he con­fessed. “Bad harm. Hos­pi­tal harm.”

While part of The Order, Val Snow, a twen­ty-some­thing gay man with a wry sense of humor, believed being gay was like “spit­ting in the eye of God.” Snow is the son of Daniel Kingston, whom he paints as “a lit­tle man with a lot of pow­er.”

From a young age, Snow worked for Order com­pa­nies to help feed his sib­lings, a respon­si­bil­i­ty some Kingston men are known to shirk.

Snow began dat­ing men when he was 22. When this got around to his dad, his father packed up Snow’s belong­ings and left them in the room of a hotel owned by The Order. Daniel’s ulti­ma­tum: Stay in The Order, date no one, and have no con­tact with fam­i­ly. Or leave.

Snow left.

He says The Order regards homo­sex­u­al­i­ty as a choice. If gay men stay in the clos­et, they are allowed to remain in the cult as “work­er bees.”

Snow also remem­bered being taught end-time prophe­cies, with a “cleans­ing” where­in the streets of Salt Lake City would run red with blood.

“All of the gay peo­ple would def­i­nite­ly be the first to go,” he said.

Anoth­er of the cult’s teach­ings was that soy can make you gay, an anti-gov­ern­ment con­spir­a­cy the­o­ry pop­u­lar in some right-wing cir­cles.

“I guess I just had too much soy,” Snow smiled.

Ex-order mem­bers inter­viewed by the Intel­li­gence Report gen­er­al­ly agreed with the char­ac­ter­i­za­tion of the Kingston clan as a “hate group.”

Ron Tuck­er went so far as to call his for­mer brethren “white suprema­cists,” and “ten times more racist” than your run-of-the-mill skin­head.

As for its anti-gov­ern­ment views, alle­ga­tions of fraud against gov­ern­ment enti­ties have long dogged the Kingstons.

In the 1980s, the state of Utah sued John Ortell Kingston over wel­fare fraud relat­ed to his many wives. Rather than sub­mit to DNA tests, which could have revealed the incest in his brood, he coughed up a more than $200,000 set­tle­ment.

More recent­ly, the Kingston-owned Washakie Renew­able Ener­gy (WRE) agreed to pay a $3 mil­lion fine after it was sued by the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment for rak­ing in tax cred­its for bio­fu­els it nev­er pro­duced.

WRE’s influ­ence earned spe­cial scruti­ny in Feb­ru­ary 2016 after the IRS, the EPA and oth­er gov­ern­ment agen­cies raid­ed own­er Jacob Kingston’s house as well as The Order’s bank and oth­er loca­tions, cart­ing away banker’s box after banker’s box of records. Noth­ing has come of the raids yet, and the IRS refused com­ment on the mat­ter when con­tact­ed by this pub­li­ca­tion.

But The Order’s crit­ics say that cult mem­bers see noth­ing wrong with bilk­ing the gov­ern­ment, a time-hon­ored tra­di­tion among FLDS sects, glee­ful­ly referred to as “bleed­ing the beast.”

More trou­bling, dur­ing a con­tentious 2004 cus­tody case that ensued when Jes­si­ca and her sis­ter Andrea fled Daniel Kingston’s house­hold, a judge in the case report­ed­ly was the sub­ject of a death threat, alleged­ly from Kingston clan mem­bers. There was also tes­ti­mo­ny, dur­ing one hear­ing, that some­one in the Kingston clan want­ed to blow up the cour­t­house.

Giv­en such inci­dents, could Order mem­bers be a threat to law enforce­ment?

Ron Kingston says The Order’s lead­er­ship has too much to lose for some­thing like that to hap­pen.

“Paul would rather have the wealth and the mon­ey than the iso­la­tion and the con­flict,” he said.

Matt Brown­ing seems less sure. A retired Ari­zona law enforce­ment offi­cer, Brown­ing is the pres­i­dent and founder of the Skin­head Intel­li­gence Net­work and is in charge of secu­ri­ty for the A&E show, where his wife Tawni works as the cast­ing pro­duc­er.

Brown­ing sees sim­i­lar­i­ties between The Order and the reli­gion-mind­ed racists of the World Church of the Cre­ator and the Chris­t­ian Iden­ti­ty move­ment. There is also some over­lap with Sov­er­eign cit­i­zens, he con­tends.

“They’re basi­cal­ly the Utah Mafioso of the white pow­er world,” Brown­ing told Intel­li­gence Report.

And they are grow­ing. For­mer Order mem­bers tell of babies being born near­ly every week in the church. And dur­ing a recent pic­nic to hon­or the birth­day of patri­arch John Ortell Kingston, Order fam­i­lies descend­ed on a Salt Lake Val­ley park, where hun­dreds of chil­dren of all ages blan­ket­ed the park’s green expanse.

Accounts of clan babies being born with con­gen­i­tal defects and oth­er prob­lems abound, includ­ing dwarfism, albinism and chil­dren born minus fin­ger­nails or with­out gen­i­tals.

...

Don’t the infant deaths and tales of hor­rif­ic defor­mi­ties belie Ortell’s home­spun eugen­ics?

Scott remem­bered that Ortell had an answer for that ques­tion.

“Some­thing along the lines of, to build a super­hu­man, if you have four or five defects to get the one good one, it’s worth it,” he recalled.

“Because that one is going to be genius-lev­el puri­ty, and that’s what The Order is look­ing for.”

———-

“Blood Cult” by Stephen Lemons; South­ern Pover­ty Law Cen­ter Intel­li­gence Report; August 08, 2017 [2]

“Dur­ing a recent inter­view with the Intel­li­gence Report, Jes­si­ca Kingston, a for­mer mem­ber of the secre­tive, Salt Lake City-based cult and a star of the A&E real­i­ty series “Escap­ing Polygamy,” remem­bered, when she was 12, her Sun­day school teacher com­ing into class with a buck­et of water and a vial of black food col­or­ing.”

As Jes­si­ca Kingston recounts, being non-white was basi­cal­ly seen as “the worst thing you can have” and cor­rup­tion of the divine white­ness lin­eage of the Kingstons that went back to direct­ly to Jesus and King David:

...
The teacher added a drop of dye to the water, and the chil­dren watched as the black­ness slow­ly spread.

“The teacher was like, ‘You can nev­er get that out, that is always there now,’” recalled Jes­si­ca, now 29. “She talked about how you can’t asso­ciate with black peo­ple or any­body of a dif­fer­ent race.”

This racist dis­play was no one-off. Jes­si­ca said she and oth­er chil­dren of the Kingston clan — a group also known as The Order, the Davis Coun­ty Coop­er­a­tive Soci­ety, and the Lat­ter-Day Church of Christ — dropped the N‑bomb all the time, as did their par­ents.

Black peo­ple sup­pos­ed­ly suf­fered from mul­ti­ple scrip­tur­al curs­es, from the mark of Cain and Noah’s curse on Ham in the Old Tes­ta­ment to the racist tenets of ear­ly Mor­monism that have since been renounced or aban­doned by the main­stream Church of Jesus Christ of Lat­ter-day Saints, also known as the LDS or Mor­mon church.

Black blood was “the worst thing you can have,” Jes­si­ca said, par­tic­u­lar­ly since the Kingstons con­sid­er them­selves to be the whitest of the white, descend­ed direct­ly from Jesus Christ and King David, the Mid­dle East­ern ori­gins of both men notwith­stand­ing.
...

But they aren’t just try­ing to cre­ate a white suprema­cists cult enclave. The cult’s lead­ers appar­ent­ly also view them­selves as hav­ing a divine right to be kings of the world and prac­tice selec­tive inces­tu­ous breed­ing with­in the clan to achieve some sort of divine super-white­ness. And this is all part of a prophe­cy that involves an even­tu­al race war where the streets will run with blood and that will enable them to emerge vic­to­ri­ous over all. As they see it, Hitler was right in try­ing to cre­ate a Mas­ter Race, but he did­n’t have God’s back­ing and that’s why he failed:

Obsessed with the puri­ty of their blood­line and empow­ered by a sense of enti­tle­ment on par with the divine right of kings, the Kingstons have made incest the cor­ner­stone of a self-serv­ing the­ol­o­gy that loathes non whites, fos­ters homo­pho­bia and abhors gov­ern­ment author­i­ty.

Addi­tion­al­ly, ex-Order mem­bers tell of a reput­ed church prophe­cy of an “End of the World War,” an apoc­a­lyp­tic vision that fore­sees a bloody race war with the Kingstons as the ulti­mate vic­tors, cho­sen by their Heav­en­ly Father to rule the world for a mil­len­ni­um.

...

A 1999 Salt Lake Tri­bune arti­cle mapped the Kingstons’ inces­tu­ous fam­i­ly tree, quot­ing one of Ortell’s 65 kids, ex-Order mem­ber Con­nie Rugg as say­ing, “My father exper­i­ment­ed [with] inbreed­ing with his cat­tle and then he turned to his chil­dren.”

In order to main­tain his family’s “supe­ri­or blood­lines,” Ortell mar­ried and had chil­dren with two of his half-sis­ters and two nieces. He orches­trat­ed all unions with­in the cult, which was main­tained with clas­sic mind con­trol tech­niques, cor­po­ral pun­ish­ment, fast­ing and bizarre dietary prac­tices. Ortell died in 1987, but his prog­e­ny con­tin­ued the polygamy, the inbreed­ing and the mar­riages to young female teens that he insti­tut­ed.

...

Dur­ing an inter­view with this reporter, Lu Ann Kingston, whose defi­ance of the cult led to the con­vic­tion of her for­mer “spir­i­tu­al” hus­band Jere­my, recalled that Order mem­bers saw inter­mar­riage as a way to “keep the blood­line pure.”

And by pure, they meant pure white.

All out­siders are con­sid­ered to be beneath Order mem­bers, she explained. But The Order saves most of its bile for blacks and oth­er non whites. Eth­nic jokes and stereo­types were com­mon­ly repeat­ed. Chi­nese peo­ple were called “stu­pid,” and Mex­i­cans were “dirty,” said Lu Ann, adding, “because of their skin.”

...

Ron says the cult’s jus­ti­fi­ca­tion for its racism goes back to ear­ly Mor­mon teach­ings about a war in heav­en between the forces of Satan and those of Jesus. The bat­tle took place in the spir­i­tu­al pre-exis­tence that Mor­mons believe all souls come from. Blacks were “the less valiant peo­ple in heav­en” who sat on the side­lines while oth­ers took sides, accord­ing to The Order.

Their pun­ish­ment? Dark skin, of course.

Anoth­er of Ortell’s teach­ings: Adolf Hitler had the right idea about cre­at­ing a mas­ter race, but didn’t have the Lord’s help, so he failed.

Tuck­er recount­ed the clan’s ver­sion of the apoc­a­lypse, the “End of the World War,” a riff on a prophe­cy some ascribe to Joseph Smith, called The White Horse Prophe­cy. In it, black peo­ple come close to killing off the white race until they are coun­tered by Native Amer­i­cans, sym­bol­ized by a Red Horse, which gal­lops to the White Horse’s res­cue.

“That will open up for The Order to rise up and take over the world,” Ron said.
...

And this group owns a bil­lion dol­lar busi­ness empire, includ­ing a high-end weapons man­u­fac­tur­er. But don’t wor­ry because, as one of the group lead­ers pro­claims, they’re real­ly all about lov­ing thy neigh­bor and there’s only a few racists in the group:

...
Young is the own­er of Desert Tech, a Utah gun man­u­fac­tur­er, which pro­duces sniper rifles and so-called “bullpup” rifles, The lat­ter, unlike con­ven­tion­al mag­a­zine-fed rifles, have short­er bar­rels, with the gun’s action locat­ed behind the trig­ger. These spe­cial­ty firearms can cost any­where from $2,500 to $8,000 each.

Desert Tech and its rifles have been fea­tured on Fox News, Myth­busters, Dare­dev­il and The Black­list, among oth­er TV shows. Young told Intel­li­gence Report that his com­pa­ny has sold weapons, with the approval of the U.S. State Depart­ment, to gov­ern­ments in Europe and the Mid­dle East, Sau­di Ara­bia being one.

Young also claimed Desert Tech had sold guns to Picatin­ny Arse­nal, the research divi­sion of the U.S. mil­i­tary.

“We haven’t got­ten any big U.S. con­tracts,” Young explained. “Obvi­ous­ly, we would love to.”

Spokes­men for both the U.S. State Depart­ment and for Picatin­ny Arse­nal could nei­ther ver­i­fy nor deny Young’s claims.

The com­pa­ny was found­ed in 2007 with an invest­ment from fam­i­ly mem­bers. Young denied that The Order was racist or taught any form of big­otry, and said he had peo­ple of all races work­ing for him.

“What we’re taught is to love our neigh­bor, that all peo­ple, all races no mat­ter who they are … deserve to be loved,” he explained.

Still, he con­ced­ed that some Order mem­bers may have prej­u­diced beliefs because “in our orga­ni­za­tion peo­ple have free­dom of choice.”
...

“What we’re taught is to love our neigh­bor, that all peo­ple, all races no mat­ter who they are … deserve to be loved,” he explained.

We just want to “love thy neigh­bor”. That was the mes­sage from the guy who found­ed the race war cult’s high-end weapons man­u­fac­tur­ing firm. And it’s worth note that apoc­a­lyp­tic wealthy cults that own their own high-end weapons man­u­fac­tur­er aren’t as uncom­mon as one might hope [31].

The Hate Cult in the White House

Now after look­ing at that pro­file of the Kingston clan, the ques­tion is raised in rela­tion to the larg­er Alt-Right white suprema­cist move­ment that con­tin­ues to use the Trump White House­’s qui­et approval to main­stream itself and present its mem­bers as some sort of aggriev­ed seg­ment of Amer­i­can soci­ety: So what exact­ly is the key dif­fer­ence between the Kingstons’ world­view and that or your typ­i­cal neo-Nazi? Sure, there are undoubt­ed­ly some dif­fer­ences in terms of the religious/incest stuff maybe. But in terms of the mind­less fetishiza­tion of ‘white­ness’ cou­pled with a need for a rigid author­i­tar­i­an hier­ar­chi­cal soci­ety, is there real­ly all that big a dif­fer­ence between an apoc­a­lyp­tic racist theo­crat­ic polyg­a­mist cult that views all non-whites as an exis­ten­tial threat and the gen­er­al ‘Alt-Right’ neo-Nazi world­view that por­trays non-whites, women, gays, and any­one who isn’t a far-right white male as an exis­ten­tial threat to far-right white males? If there are sub­stan­tial fun­da­men­tal dif­fer­ences, it’s unclear what they are because both groups fun­da­men­tal­ly view non-white con­ser­v­a­tives as a dehu­man­ized “oth­er” unwor­thy of “thy neigh­bors” love or an inter­est­ing group of peo­ple worth get­ting to know, but instead an inevitable rival group that rep­re­sents an exis­ten­tial threat that must be extin­guished. And it’s that world­view that Pres­i­dent Trump refus­es to denounce. Because the ‘Alt-Right’ and its sym­pa­thiz­ers are far too impor­tant a polit­i­cal con­stituen­cy (and Trump is kind of of Nazi him­self).

But while we might be tempt­ed to pre­sume that it’s pure­ly crass polit­i­cal cal­cu­la­tions that have led to the Pres­i­den­t’s silence on this mat­ter, as the fol­low­ing piece by Josh Mar­shall points out, that same world­view that sees the every­one who oppos­es Alt-Right as part of some sort of exis­ten­tial threat to con­ser­v­a­tive whites is not sur­pris­ing­ly pop­u­lar in the the upper-ech­e­lons of the White House. As the recent reports of an intra-White House bat­tle in the Nation­al Secu­ri­ty Coun­cil trag­i­cal­ly demon­strates — where Nation­al Secu­ri­ty Advi­sor H.R. McMas­ter recent­ly fired an NSC staffer with close ties to an ‘Alt-Right’ per­son­al­i­ty as part of a larg­er Alt-Right vs non-Alt-Right pow­er strug­gle in the White House — that ‘Alt-Right’ world­view that por­trays all non-Alt-Rights as being part of some grand cabal out to destroy white con­ser­v­a­tives (as opposed to mak­ing a bet­ter world for the con­ser­v­a­tives to enjoy liv­ing in too, just not exclu­sive­ly enjoy) has been turned into a mes­sage where all non-Alt-Rights are all in a grand cabal to destroy Don­ald Trump. And only the Alt-Right is on his side. Every­one from pro­gres­sives, to ‘estab­lish­ment’ Repub­li­cans, the ‘deep state’, and even the the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood are all in a ca bal against Trump. That’s the Team Alt-Right mes­sage in the White House and Trump is report­ed­ly quite recep­tive to it [32]:

Talk­ing Points Memo
Edi­tor’s Blog

The Fringe At The Wheel: Inside The Cernovich/McMaster Derp War

By Josh Mar­shall
Pub­lished August 11, 2017 2:59 pm

Ear­li­er this month, The Atlantic report­ed on a memo [33] writ­ten by a since-fired NSC staffer named Rich Hig­gins. Nation­al Secu­ri­ty Advi­sor H.R. McMas­ter fired Hig­gins in July over the memo. But Hig­gins’ dis­missal was part of McMaster’s broad­er effort to assert con­trol over an NSC which still has or had numer­ous staffers brought in by Mike Fly­nn. Yes­ter­day For­eign Pol­i­cy pub­lished the memo in its entire­ty [34] along with new report­ing about the con­text of the memo, its dis­cov­ery and Hig­gins’ dis­missal.

The memo itself is fair­ly described as nuts. But I want to get into more detail about just what it con­tains because the details are impor­tant on sev­er­al fronts. But before that I want to men­tion a key ele­ment of FP’s report­ing, which I at least think is new in its specifics. If you don’t waste your time on Twit­ter or haven’t close­ly fol­lowed the so-called alt-right, you may not know the name Mike Cer­novich [35]. His Wikipedia page [36] describes him as “an Amer­i­can alt-right social media per­son­al­i­ty, writer, and con­spir­a­cy the­o­rist”, which is not a bad descrip­tion. He was a big pro­mot­er of the ‘piz­za­gate’ con­spir­a­cy the­o­ry which end­ed up almost get­ting peo­ple killed in DC last year. Before that he was a ‘men’s empow­er­ment’ activist who took a more clear­ly polit­i­cal turn in 2016 race. He’s provoca­tive and goofy in as much as a white suprema­cist and Nazi-sym­pa­thiz­er can be goofy.

In any case, since Trump’s inau­gu­ra­tion Cer­novich has been car­ry­ing on a sort of rear­guard action against the Trump White House, notion­al­ly sup­port­ing ‘Trump’ while wag­ing online bat­tles against the mix of ‘glob­al­ists’, sell-outs and ‘deep state’ forces try­ing to undo the Trump rev­o­lu­tion. Through all this Cer­novich has claimed he has sources deep and high up in the Trump White House and that he’s sit­ting on all man­ner of sto­ries that could change every­thing. It has always been clear that Cer­novich does have some ‘sources’ or at least peo­ple leak­ing him stuff or access to some infor­ma­tion ahead of the con­ven­tion­al media because more than once he’s report­ed things on his web­site or Twit­ter which did turn out to be true. But one of my biggest take­aways from the FP piece is that this is appar­ent­ly far more true than at least I real­ized. Indeed, H.R. McMas­ter, in this telling at least, is obsessed with root­ing out the NSC staffers who are leak­ing to Cer­novich and it was that leak hunt that led to the dis­cov­ery of the memo we were dis­cussing above.

...

Here’s a key pas­sage [34]

The con­tro­ver­sy over the memo has its ori­gins in a hunt for staffers believed to be pro­vid­ing infor­ma­tion to right-wing blog­ger Mike Cer­novich, who seemed to have uncan­ny insight into the inner work­ings of the NSC. Cer­novich in the past few months has been con­duct­ing a wide-rang­ing cam­paign against the nation­al secu­ri­ty advi­sor.

“McMas­ter was just very, very obsessed with this, with Cer­novich,” a senior admin­is­tra­tion offi­cial told FP. “He had become this incred­i­ble specter.”

In July, the memo was dis­cov­ered in Higgins’s email dur­ing what two sources described to For­eign Pol­i­cy as a “rou­tine secu­ri­ty” audit of NSC staffers’ com­mu­ni­ca­tions. Anoth­er source, how­ev­er, char­ac­ter­ized it as a McCarthy-type leak inves­ti­ga­tion tar­get­ing staffers sus­pect­ed of com­mu­ni­cat­ing with Cer­novich.

Hig­gins, who had worked on the Trump cam­paign and tran­si­tion before com­ing to the NSC, draft­ed the memo in late May and then cir­cu­lat­ed the memo to friends from the tran­si­tion, a num­ber of whom are now in the White House.

After the memo was dis­cov­ered, McMaster’s deputy, Ricky Wad­dell, sum­moned Hig­gins, who was told he could resign — or be fired, and risk los­ing his secu­ri­ty clear­ance, accord­ing to two sources.

Hig­gins, who agreed to resign, was escort­ed out of the build­ing. He lat­er learned from his col­leagues still at the NSC that his asso­ci­a­tion to this now-infa­mous memo was the rea­son he was removed.

Need­less to say, if McMas­ter is sur­veilling his own staff to find out who is talk­ing to Cer­novich, then Cer­novich is play­ing a big, big role in the unfold­ing Trump admin­is­tra­tion dra­ma. That’s a big deal and a high­ly dis­turb­ing one, which we will come back to.

Now let’s dis­cuss the memo itself. As I said, it’s nuts on many lev­els. But the details of what it con­tains are impor­tant. I have a series of obser­va­tions. Let me lay them out seri­atim.

1: First, an overview. The gist of Hig­gins memo is that Pres­i­dent Trump is under a sus­tained, ille­git­i­mate and con­spir­a­cy dri­ven attack by the forces of “cul­tur­al Marx­ism” which aims to dri­ve him from office. These forces include basi­cal­ly every­one from the far left to estab­lish­ment Repub­li­cans, either as con­spir­a­tors or dupes and fel­low trav­el­ers. Key ele­ments of the dra­ma are that the Amer­i­can left is in league with ‘rad­i­cal Islam’, par­tic­u­lar­ly the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood, to destroy Amer­i­ca from the with­in. Both sides – the forces of the ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’ and the sup­port­ers of Pres­i­dent Trump – are in what amounts to a final, all-or-noth­ing bat­tle. Indeed, Hig­gins argues that the coun­try is now in the midst of a pitched bat­tle for the future exis­tence of Amer­i­ca in which the per­son of Pres­i­dent Trump is a proxy for the future of Amer­i­ca itself. It is a Manichean, verg­ing on polit­i­cal escha­to­log­i­cal vision of con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­ca. This is the con­clud­ing para­graph of the memo, empha­sis added …

The recent turn of events give rise to the obser­va­tion that the defense of Pres­i­dent Trump is the defense of Amer­i­ca. In the same way Pres­i­dent Lin­coln was sur­round­ed by polit­i­cal oppo­si­tion both inside and out­side of his wire, in both overt and covert forms, so too is Pres­i­dent Trump. Had Lin­coln failed, so too would have the Repub­lic. The admin­is­tra­tion has been maneu­vered into a con­stant backpedal by relent­less polit­i­cal war­fare attacks struc­tured to force him to assume a reac­tive pos­ture that assures inad­e­quate respons­es. The pres­i­dent can either dri­ve or be dri­ven by events; it’s time for him to dri­ve them.

2: Trump Era Pol­i­tics is Real­ly War. It is far down the list of prob­lems with this memo and this sit­u­a­tion. But it is to put it mild­ly high­ly irreg­u­lar and prob­lem­at­ic for a for­mer Pen­ta­gon offi­cial who is now an NSC staffer to be cir­cu­lat­ing mem­os on domes­tic ‘polit­i­cal war­fare’. But the memo is replete with the imagery, ter­mi­nol­o­gy and con­cep­tu­al frame­work of war, even down to high-dra­ma, often man­ic descrip­tions of the ‘bat­tle­space’ on which Pres­i­dent Trump is fight­ing the forces of ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’. The memo views oppo­si­tion pol­i­tics in the Trump era as ille­git­i­mate and a form of vio­lent resis­tance against the state.

Again from the memo …

This is not pol­i­tics as usu­al but rather polit­i­cal war­fare at an unprece­dent­ed lev­el that is open­ly engaged in the direct tar­get­ing of a seat­ed pres­i­dent through manip­u­la­tion of the news cycle. It must be rec­og­nized on its own terms so that imme­di­ate action can be tak­en. At its core, these cam­paigns run on mul­ti­ple lines of effort, serve as the non-vio­lent line of effort of a wider move­ment, and exe­cute polit­i­cal war­fare agen­das that reflect cul­tur­al Marx­ist out­comes. The cam­paigns oper­ate through nar­ra­tives. Because the hard left is aligned with lslamist orga­ni­za­tions at local (ANTI FA work­ing with Mus­lim Broth­er­hood doing busi­ness as MSA and CAIR), nation­al (ACLU and BLM work­ing with CAIR and MPAC) and inter­na­tion­al lev­els (OIC work­ing with OSCE­and the UN), recog­ni­tion must giv­en to the fact that they seam­less­ly inter­op­er­ate at the nar­ra­tive lev­el as well. In can­di­date Trump, the oppo­si­tion saw a threat to the “polit­i­cal­ly cor­rect” enforce­ment nar­ra­tives they’ve metic­u­lous­ly laid in over the past few decades. In Pres­i­dent Trump, they see a latent threat to con­tin­ue that effort to ruinous effect and their retal­ia­to­ry response reflects this fear.

As you can see, a per­sis­tent theme of the memo is that what most of us would rec­og­nize as an embat­tled and unpop­u­lar Pres­i­dent fight­ing wide­spread oppo­si­tion is actu­al­ly more like a domes­tic rebel­lion and needs to be addressed as such.

Again from the memo …

Cul­tur­al­ly con­di­tioned to lim­it respons­es to such attacks as yet anoth­er round in the on-going drone from diver­si­ty and mul­ti­cul­tur­al mal­con­tents, these broad­sides are dis­count­ed as polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness run amuck. How­ev­er, polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness is a weapon against rea­son and crit­i­cal think­ing. This weapon func­tions as the enforce­ment mech­a­nism of diver­si­ty nar­ra­tives that seek to imple­ment cul­tur­al Marx­ism. Can­di­date Trump’s rhetoric in the cam­paign not only cut through the Marx­ist nar­ra­tive, he did so in ways that were vis­cer­al­ly com­pre­hen­si­ble to a vot­ing bloc that then made can­di­date Trump the pres­i­dent; mak­ing that bloc self-aware in the process. Pres­i­dent Trump is either the can­di­date he ran as, or he is noth­ing.

Rec­og­niz­ing in can­di­date Trump an exis­ten­tial threat to cul­tur­al Marx­ist memes that dom­i­nate the pre­vail­ing cul­tur­al nar­ra­tive, those that ben­e­fit rec­og­nize the threat he pos­es and seek his destruc­tion. For this cabal, Trump must be destroyed. Far from pol­i­tics as usu­al, this is a polit­i­cal war­fare effort that seeks the destruc­tion of a sit­ting pres­i­dent. Since Trump took office, the sit­u­a­tion has inten­si­fied to cri­sis lev­el pro­por­tions. For those engaged in the effort, espe­cial­ly those from with­in the “deep state” or per­ma­nent gov­ern­ment appa­ra­tus, this rais­es clear Title 18 (legal) con­cerns.

Con­sid­er this pas­sage about the “bat­tle­space”.

Bat­tle­space. These attack nar­ra­tives are per­va­sive, full spec­trum and insti­tu­tion­al­ized at all lev­els. They oper­ate in social media, tele­vi­sion, the 24-hour news cycle in all media, and are entrenched at the upper lev­els of the bureau­cra­cies and with­in the for­eign pol­i­cy estab­lish­ment. They inform the enter­tain­ment indus­try from late night mono­logues, to sit­u­a­tion come­dies, to tele­vi­sion series memes, to movie themes. The effort required to direct this capac­i­ty at Pres­i­dent Trump is lit­tle more than a pro­gram­ming deci­sion to do so. The cul­tur­al Marx­ist nar­ra­tive is ful­ly deployed, per­va­sive, full spec­trum and ongo­ing. Regard­ing the pres­i­dent, attacks have become a relent­less 24/7 effort.

This mix of obser­va­tions and feel­ings might be more sim­ply summed up as “Wow, we seem to be super unpop­u­lar. And we’re being attacked con­stant­ly!”

Many White Hous­es have had this feel­ing. It’s a tough job. But Hig­gins sees it quite dif­fer­ent­ly, as an inte­grat­ed, con­spir­a­to­r­i­al effort to dri­ve the Pres­i­dent from office and destroy the Amer­i­ca he rep­re­sents. Indeed, Hig­gins explic­it­ly cites the doctrine’s of Maoist ‘people’s war’ as the con­cep­tu­al frame­work and the plan Trump’s ene­mies are fol­low­ing. I’m not kid­ding about this. From the memo: “As used here, ‘polit­i­cal war­fare’ does not con­cern activ­i­ties asso­ci­at­ed with the Amer­i­can polit­i­cal process but rather exclu­sive­ly refers to polit­i­cal war­fare as under­stood by the Maoist Insur­gency mod­el. Polit­i­cal war­fare is one of the five com­po­nents of a Maoist insur­gency. Maoist method­olo­gies employ syn­chro­nized vio­lent and non-vio­lent actions that focus on mobi­liza­tion of indi­vid­u­als and groups to action. This approach envi­sions the direct use of non-vio­lent oper­a­tional arts and tac­tics as ele­ments of com­bat pow­er.”

Again, my descrip­tion isn’t seman­tic or hyper­bol­ic. Hig­gins views a vast array of dis­parate domes­tic polit­i­cal move­ments, insti­tu­tions and cul­tur­al voic­es as togeth­er exe­cut­ing an orga­nized plan to dri­ve Trump from office and that the insti­ga­tors of this effort are the far left and Islam­ic rad­i­cals try­ing to per­pet­u­ate ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’.

3: The Domes­tic War is a Meme War: A week ago, the above-men­tioned Cer­novich tweet­ed this much-derid­ed mes­sage.

What is “memet­ic war­fare”? It is essen­tial­ly fight­ing peo­ple on social media with pho­to­shopped images, prop­a­gat­ing ‘memes’ – nugget sized images or blocks of text which inject mes­sages and ideas into the con­ver­sa­tions of a broad­er pub­lic. It also involves dig­i­tal vig­i­lan­tism, orga­nized intim­i­da­tion cam­paigns, threats and a lot more. There’s some­thing to this. And Cer­novich is demon­stra­bly an able prac­ti­tion­er of it. He’s built up a huge fol­low­ing based on pret­ty much just that. At the end of the day though, McMas­ter is a mas­ter of war wars. And ‘memet­ic war­fare’ is real­ly just spend­ing the day mouthing off on Twit­ter. So it’s a bit of a com­i­cal boast. But if you read the Hig­gins memo it is replete with the vocab­u­lary and men­tal world of ‘memet­ic war­fare’. These two men are in con­tact with each oth­er and share the same men­tal and ideation­al world. Which seems to be why McMas­ter fired Hig­gins. To a degree, it’s a slight­ly high­er-brow ver­sion of what you can lis­ten to on Han­ni­ty every night. That’s not sur­pris­ing since – unlike­ly the imag­ined con­spir­a­cies of Hig­gins memo – Han­ni­ty, the Cer­novich crew at the NSC, Trump, Don Jr. and the rest do seem to be in reg­u­lar con­tact with each oth­er.

4: What is ‘Cul­tur­al Marx­ism’? Hig­gins is not the only per­son to use this phrase. But as he uses it ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’ is essen­tial­ly the entire­ty of social move­ments, cul­tur­al change, grow­ing inter­na­tion­al­iza­tion of pub­lic life in Amer­i­ca that dis­tin­guish­es the Amer­i­can of the ear­ly 21st cen­tu­ry from the ide­al­ized pub­lic ver­sion of Amer­i­ca as pre­sent­ed in media and main­stream TV and cin­e­ma in the 1950s. There is arguably such a thing as ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’ – rad­i­cal cri­tiques of Amer­i­can soci­ety, and its cul­ture and eco­nom­ic under­pin­nings, which exist but don’t have a great deal of trac­tion out­side the acad­e­my and some rad­i­cal polit­i­cal cir­cles. There is also the range of cri­tiques of Amer­i­can gen­der and racial norms and pow­er struc­tures that cri­tique ‘patri­archy’ and ‘white suprema­cy’. These are obvi­ous­ly much more per­va­sive debates with­in con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can soci­ety, ones which are dis­pro­por­tion­ate­ly (though by no means exclu­sive­ly) root­ed in the ideas of the younger gen­er­a­tion of Amer­i­cans. They are real, deeply con­test­ed and gen­uine­ly threat­en­ing to a large seg­ment of the US pop­u­la­tion. They’re not ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’ in any sense oth­er than as swear words and trash talk in domes­tic polit­i­cal debates. But even this isn’t real­ly what Hig­gins is talk­ing about. It is a far more expan­sive and watered-down def­i­n­i­tion and set of ideas which are tak­en more or less as givens in cor­po­rate Amer­i­ca under the blan­di­fied catch­words of ‘diver­si­ty’ and ‘inclu­sion’. That’s all ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’ for Hig­gins and all dri­ven by an alliance of ‘the left’ and Islamist rad­i­cals.

5: The Trumpite Milieu: Where does this stuff come from? Hig­gins is a for­mer sol­dier and lat­er a Pen­ta­gon staffer. Some of his writ­ing is sim­ply tak­ing fair­ly con­ven­tion­al mil­i­tary plan­ning jar­gon and apply­ing it to domes­tic pol­i­tics. But read­ing Hig­gins I hear the voic­es of two oth­er men loud and clear: Frank Gaffney and David Horowitz.

Gaffney was a mid-tier Rea­gan Pen­ta­gon appointee who has been a con­stant pres­ence in Wash­ing­ton for the last three decades and has in the years since 9/11 become the pre­em­i­nent author and prop­a­ga­tor of var­i­ous Islam­o­pho­bic con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries. To set expec­ta­tions prop­er­ly, I’m not talk­ing about counter-ter­ror­ism hawks who say the US needs to sur­veil Mus­lim immi­grant pop­u­la­tions or lim­it immi­gra­tion by Mus­lims. Gaffney says the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood has infil­trat­ed the US gov­ern­ment at all lev­els with sleep­er agents and fel­low trav­el­ers. There’s crazy and there’s crazy. Gaffney is in the lat­ter cat­e­go­ry.

As Peter Beinart not­ed ear­li­er this year [39], most main­stream Repub­li­cans have treat­ed Gaffney like a crank for years. (Indeed, he’s for years fought a nitwit bat­tle [40] to expel Grover Norquist from the con­ser­v­a­tive move­ment because Gaffney claims Norquist is a Mus­lim Broth­er­hood agent or fel­low trav­el­er.) But he’s viewed as a major thinker and advis­er in the Trump White House. And Mike Fly­nn was deeply under his influ­ence. Indeed, in 2016 Fly­nn co-authored a book with Michael Ledeen, a com­pa­ra­ble though some­what more obscure fig­ure. Ledeen is a dif­fer­ent, with his own dis­tinct though no less crazy con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries large­ly tied to rad­i­cal Islamist, ter­ror­ist and sim­ply anti-Amer­i­can groups. The upshot is that Fly­nn was total­ly down with and in the Frank Gaffney nut­bag and he staffed the Trump world with peo­ple of the same mind­set. A lot of them are still there.

David Horowitz is a one-time mem­ber of the New Left who’s made his liv­ing for decades as a self-styled Whit­tak­er Cham­bers of the nut­ball right. I can tell you from per­son­al expe­ri­ence that he is sim­ply one of the worst peo­ple in Amer­i­can pub­lic life. Think Roger Stone is ter­ri­ble? Me too. But I’ve met Roger and he’s kind of a blast to spend a bit of time with if you can brack­et out the pol­i­tics. I’ve met Horowitz too. He’s an awful per­son. Hig­gins obses­sion with ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’, ‘polit­i­cal war­fare’, Maoist insur­gency tac­tics and all man­ner of oth­er sub-Marx­ist clap­trap is pure Horowitz. It is both how he thinks and also his schtick with­in the con­ser­v­a­tive move­ment: the guy who knows all the dark truths about ‘the left’ and is shar­ing them with the embat­tled right. Horowitz too is tight with the Trump world and the var­i­ous extrem­ists and con­spir­a­cy the­o­rists who clus­ter around it. I don’t know whether Hig­gins got this stuff direct­ly from Horowitz or just atmos­pher­i­cal­ly because his influ­ence is so per­va­sive in today’s right. But the influ­ence is unmis­tak­able.

For our present pur­pos­es, the impor­tant point is that even though main­stream con­ser­v­a­tives – not to men­tion every­one to their left – have long regard­ed both men as no more than activist bilge water, they are both high­ly influ­en­tial in the Trump White House. Just as impor­tant­ly, while they’ve gen­er­al­ly been regard­ed as jokes by main­stream polit­i­cal reporters, they’ve actu­al­ly spent years prop­a­gat­ing their ideas among the peo­ple we now call the Trump base. So their ideas are as impor­tant as they are non­sen­si­cal and hyper­bol­ic because they are at the cen­ter of pow­er and draw on a mass base of sup­port.

Hig­gins him­self may be out. But the FP piece reports that Don Jr. got hold of his memo dur­ing the firestorm of con­tro­ver­sy over his June 2016 Trump Tow­er meet­ing and loved it. He shared it with his father, Pres­i­dent Trump, who loved it too. He got angry when Sean Han­ni­ty told him that Hig­gins had been fired over it. So even though Hig­gins is out, these ideas are still per­va­sive in the Trump White House and get an enthu­si­as­tic thumbs up from Trump him­self. Even though McMas­ter won the bat­tle, to put it in Hig­gin­sian terms, the war con­tin­ues. And it seems as like­ly as not, on the FP’s report­ing, that McMas­ter will even­tu­al­ly lose.

———-

“The Fringe At The Wheel: Inside The Cernovich/McMaster Derp War” by Josh Mar­shall; Talk­ing Points Memo; 08/11/2017 [32]

“First, an overview. The gist of Hig­gins memo is that Pres­i­dent Trump is under a sus­tained, ille­git­i­mate and con­spir­a­cy dri­ven attack by the forces of “cul­tur­al Marx­ism” which aims to dri­ve him from office. These forces include basi­cal­ly every­one from the far left to estab­lish­ment Repub­li­cans, either as con­spir­a­tors or dupes and fel­low trav­el­ers. Key ele­ments of the dra­ma are that the Amer­i­can left is in league with ‘rad­i­cal Islam’, par­tic­u­lar­ly the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood, to destroy Amer­i­ca from the with­in. Both sides – the forces of the ‘cul­tur­al Marx­ism’ and the sup­port­ers of Pres­i­dent Trump – are in what amounts to a final, all-or-noth­ing bat­tle. Indeed, Hig­gins argues that the coun­try is now in the midst of a pitched bat­tle for the future exis­tence of Amer­i­ca in which the per­son of Pres­i­dent Trump is a proxy for the future of Amer­i­ca itself. It is a Manichean, verg­ing on polit­i­cal escha­to­log­i­cal vision of con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­ca...”

And as Josh Mar­shall ends with, while Rich Hig­gins, the Alt-Right NSC staffer, may have been suc­cess­ful­ly removed by H.R. McMas­ter, his over­all mes­sage of the world being against Trump and the Alt-Right being his only real ally in this is a mes­sage that con­tin­ues to res­onate with­in the White House and Trump him­self:

...
Hig­gins him­self may be out. But the FP piece reports that Don Jr. got hold of his memo dur­ing the firestorm of con­tro­ver­sy over his June 2016 Trump Tow­er meet­ing and loved it. He shared it with his father, Pres­i­dent Trump, who loved it too. He got angry when Sean Han­ni­ty told him that Hig­gins had been fired over it. So even though Hig­gins is out, these ideas are still per­va­sive in the Trump White House and get an enthu­si­as­tic thumbs up from Trump him­self. Even though McMas­ter won the bat­tle, to put it in Hig­gin­sian terms, the war con­tin­ues. And it seems as like­ly as not, on the FP’s report­ing, that McMas­ter will even­tu­al­ly lose.

So as we scratch our heads ask­ing why Pres­i­dent Trump refus­es to denounce white suprma­cists, let’s not for­get that this is an embat­tled White House that appears to view the ‘Alt-Right’ as his only real allies. Might that have some­thing to do with his refusal to denounce them despite the polit­i­cal costs he’s incur­ring for not doing so? They’re his only friends.

And one quick quib­ble with Mar­shal­l’s char­ac­ter­i­za­tion of mil­lieu of fig­ures that have been pro­mot­ing this “lib­er­als and Islamists unit­ed in Cul­tur­al Marx­ism” world­view. Specif­i­cal­ly this sec­tion regard­ing Frank Gaffney:

...
As Peter Beinart not­ed ear­li­er this year [39], most main­stream Repub­li­cans have treat­ed Gaffney like a crank for years. (Indeed, he’s for years fought a nitwit bat­tle [40] to expel Grover Norquist from the con­ser­v­a­tive move­ment because Gaffney claims Norquist is a Mus­lim Broth­er­hood agent or fel­low trav­el­er.) But he’s viewed as a major thinker and advis­er in the Trump White House. And Mike Fly­nn was deeply under his influ­ence. Indeed, in 2016 Fly­nn co-authored a book with Michael Ledeen, a com­pa­ra­ble though some­what more obscure fig­ure. Ledeen is a dif­fer­ent, with his own dis­tinct though no less crazy con­spir­a­cy the­o­ries large­ly tied to rad­i­cal Islamist, ter­ror­ist and sim­ply anti-Amer­i­can groups. The upshot is that Fly­nn was total­ly down with and in the Frank Gaffney nut­bag and he staffed the Trump world with peo­ple of the same mind­set. A lot of them are still there.
...

While it’s true that Frank Gaffney is indeed a crank who focus­es almost exclu­sive­ly on the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood to the point where his analy­sis is non­sense, the work he’s done high­light­ing con­ser­v­a­tive anti-tax extrem­ist Grover Norquists ties to the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood [41] is prob­a­bly one of the few use­ful things Gaffney has ever done. Why? Because the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood is effec­tive­ly the KKK of the Sun­ni world — an elit­ist [42] cor­po­ratist [43] hyper-sec­tar­i­an far-right theo­crat­ic orga­ni­za­tion hell-bent on total dom­i­na­tion of soci­ety and the dehu­man­iza­tion of “oth­ers”. And an under­stand­ing of the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood’s his­to­ry of coor­di­nat­ing with far-right groups, includ­ing exten­sive his­to­ry of coor­di­nat­ing with ex-Nazis and fas­cists [44], is crit­i­cal for under­stand­ing both the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood and the larg­er glob­al move­ment of reac­tionary far-right move­ments oper­at­ing through­out the 20th and 21st cen­tu­ry. These move­ments work with each oth­er and the sto­ry of the Amer­i­can right-wing’s work rela­tion­ship with the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood is impor­tant and Grover Norquist played an impor­tant role in that sto­ry. Espe­cial­ly if peo­ple like Mike Cer­novich are going to push memes that pro­gres­sives are team­ing up with the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood in some sort of grand. Plus, you can’t ful­ly under­stand the post‑9/11 inves­ti­ga­tion into ter­ror financ­ing with­out under­stand­ing that rela­tion­ship and that specif­i­cal­ly includes the role Grover Norquist played in inter­ven­ing on behalf of Mus­lim Broth­er­hood net­works to thwart Oper­a­tion Green­quest [45]. Oth­er than all that, yes, Gaffney is a crank and man­ages to com­plete­ly man­gle any mean­ing­ful under­stand­ing of the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood. While ter­ror attacks or some oth­er nefar­i­ous activ­i­ty by far-right Islamist mil­i­tant groups is cer­tain­ly a con­cern for Amer­i­ca as is the case for all far-right groups, Amer­i­ca isn’t being over­run by Islam­o­fas­cists like Gaffney sug­gests because it’s already over­run by Christo­fas­cists. That ‘space’ is sort of tak­en up already.

But this is where we are: when we step back and “study the sit­u­a­tion”, the sit­u­a­tion appears to be one where a world­view best left to a racist cult is guid­ing the White House. And that White House is, in turn, effec­tive­ly defend­ing via omis­sion a group of neo-Nazis the day after one of them ran down a crowd of anti-racist pro­tes­tors. And if we step back fur­ther we find that same kind of world­view cap­tur­ing the imag­i­na­tion of a sig­nif­i­cant seg­ment of white Amer­i­can con­ser­v­a­tives. And Europe too when you look at the rise of white nation­al­ism there. And of course the Mus­lim world when you look at ongo­ing dom­i­na­tion of hyper-con­ser­v­a­tive strains of Islam and groups like the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood and theo­crat­ic monar­chies. And don’t for­get North Korea. It’s an entire nation run by an insu­lar cult that views the rest of the world as an exis­ten­tial threat. In oth­er worlds, pret­ty much wher­ev­er you look around the globe you’re going to find reac­tionary total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­an groups that view the rest of the world as an exis­ten­tial “oth­ers” threat. And if we’re going to find a real exis­ten­tial threat any­where that’s where it is: groups that can’t live peace­ful­ly with oth­ers and refuse to human­ize oth­ers.

But what do we do about this? Vir­ginia gov­er­nor Ter­ry McCoul­lough made an impor­tant point dur­ing his address to the pub­lic after the neo-Nazi car attack on a crowd of anti-fas­cist pro­tes­tors and hte ‘Uni­fy the Right’ torch­light march. He called for them to “go home”, and said Vir­ginia isn’t a com­mon­wealth that wel­comes them. And the Unit­ed States isn’t does­n’t have space for them [46]. It was an impor­tant rebuke made all the more impor­tant bye the Pres­i­den­t’s silence. But it still rais­es the ques­tion: where do they go? And the answer is the same answer to the ques­tion of “what do we do with [insert total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­an group here]?” And that answer is to be super wel­com­ing when they snap out of it and become non-total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­ans and oth­er­wise con­tin­ue to be unwel­com­ing. They won’t be deport­ed or any­thing. Just unwel­come when they express hate­ful views.

But that’s prob­a­bly not going to be ade­quate. So how about we counter the sys­tem­at­ic dehu­man­iza­tion of “oth­ers” by pub­lic rec­og­niz­ing that the dehu­man­iza­tion of “oth­ers” is an extreme­ly “human” thing to do. Trag­i­cal­ly, but that’s how it is. Through­out his­to­ry it’s been per­va­sive and endur­ing. Across time and cul­tures. Mon­strous acts and ide­olo­gies are all too human. And those help cap­tive by such views aren’t mon­sters. They’re human cap­tives of mon­strous ide­olo­gies. It’s sad­ly human to get caught up in such ide­olo­gies, but also human to expe­ri­ence an epiphany, snap out of it, and move past it. Think of the for­mer mem­bers of the Kingston clan. They were die-hard believ­ers who man­aged to escape. It was­n’t easy, but they did it. And that whole arc of expe­ri­ence, believ­ing in a hate cult and learn­ing to move past it, is a very human expe­ri­ence. On top of that, it’s not just a relief when some­one escapes from a hate cult but it’s actu­al­ly real­ly quite remark­able. Way to go! For real, it’s an amaz­ing and impres­sive achieve­ment. So how about we cel­e­brate that and make it very clear that we rec­og­nize that those trapped in hate cults can be just a hand­ful of per­son­al epipha­nies away from becom­ing great peo­ple who will be wel­come any­where. At least any­where that isn’t a hate cult. Would rec­og­niz­ing the awe­some­ness of escap­ing from a hate cult help our over­all sit­u­a­tion?

Sure, it’s not fair that the side that pro­motes peace and equal­i­ty and diver­si­ty and try­ing to empathize and human­ize oth­ers should be forced to repeat­ed­ly ‘turn the oth­er cheek’ when it comes to find­ing a com­mon path for­ward with groups ded­i­cat­ed to dehu­man­iza­tion of oth­ers and, in many cas­es, their even­tu­al exter­mi­na­tion. But that’s how it is when you’re forced to fight for a more empa­thet­ic soci­ety and an end to thought­less heart­less­ness. It comes with the ter­ri­to­ry. And it’s impor­tant to note that it’s rel­a­tive­ly new ter­ri­to­ry when it comes to try­ing to cre­ate a soci­ety that isn’t sim­ply dom­i­nat­ed by some group but is instead thought­ful­ly based on a real ‘Gold­en rule’ par­a­digm. We know soci­eties like North Korea or Nazi Ger­many can exist and have always exist­ed. Humans are clear­ly capa­ble of that. But this whole tol­er­ance thing, a soci­ety that looks past super­fi­cial­i­ties and tru­ly embraces The Gold­en Rule and pri­or­i­ties the human­iza­tion of “oth­ers”, this is new. And large­ly untest­ed because there’s always been a large swath of soci­ety that nev­er agreed with that vision. So how about we cre­ate a nation­al project that actu­al­ly cel­e­brates the human­iza­tion of “oth­ers” and mov­ing past hat­ing, includ­ing hat­ing the haters. Human­iz­ing the haters. Not as mod­els to fol­low but as real peo­ple trapped in hate cults they did­n’t cre­ate but some­one fell into or were born into. A cel­e­bra­tion of the act of shed­ding pre­vi­ous­ly held big­otries, in effect being “born again”. Could a move­ment of born again ex-haters have any impact?

Sim­i­lar­ly, how about devel­op­ing a a sense of “White Pride” that’s pride in white soci­ety over­com­ing white suprema­cy. And mysog­y­ny. And homo­pho­bia. And all the oth­er unjus­ti­fied hor­ri­ble habits that have infest­ed soci­eties through­out his­to­ry. And add it to “[insert group’s label here] Pride” that cel­e­brates that group’s var­i­ous obsta­cles that they’ve over­come to also achieve a real “Gold­en Rule” cul­ture. The kind of cul­ture one might asso­ciate with a super nice paci­fist hip­pie who loves every­one, as long as they’re not mean. And if they are mean the super nice paci­fist hip­pie loves them in a ‘love the sin­ner, hate the sin’ way and human­izes them. Total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­an move­ments like the ‘Alt-Right’ neo-Nazis explic­it­ly don’t have a space for non-whites. They can’t pos­si­bly be a viable world­view for the real world unless it involves real world mass geno­cide. Which is part of their long-term vision. And the rest of the total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­an world­views of the world are the same way. It’s like extra-psy­cho High­lander sce­nario played out on a trib­al lev­el, where it’s either one total­i­tar­i­an iden­ti­tar­i­an move­ment wins or human­i­ty oblit­er­ates itself. In which case the rest of life on Earth wins. And that leaves and glob­al com­mu­ni­ty of tol­er­ant pro­gres­sive mul­ti-cul­tur­al soci­eties where all the par­tic­i­pat­ing cul­tures are nice and gen­er­al­ly tol­er­ant and Gold­en-rule-ish as the only viable vision for a future that does­n’t destroy itself. Being nice isn’t just nice. It’s logis­ti­cal­ly the only viable modal­i­ty in a glob­al­ized world filled with advanced tech­nol­o­gy and a capac­i­ty for groups to destroy each oth­er.

So if peo­ple like Mike Cer­novich are going wage meme war­fare prop­a­gat­ing hate cult ide­ol­o­gy, how about a counter meme cam­paign cel­e­brat­ing the awe­some logis­ti­cal util­i­ty of empa­thy and gen­er­al nice­ness and how much stronger it makes any soci­ety. And how much nicer it is. Because many peo­ple appear to have for­got­ten or nev­er fig­ured out that life would be much bet­ter for every­one if we dropped the hate cult ideas. So a pro-nice­ness meme cam­paign is sad­ly nec­es­sary.

And make it very clear to to Pres­i­dent Trump that he will be legit­i­mate­ly cel­e­brat­ed if he sheds his ‘Alt-Right’ neo-Nazi sym­pa­thies and uses his lead­er­ship posi­tion to cre­ate a real cul­ture of nice­ness. The best moments in his­to­ry involve over­com­ing the worst moments in his­to­ry and the US is hav­ing a pret­ty bad moment. Trump has a real oppor­tu­ni­ty here after lead­ing us to this hor­ri­ble place. He said he loves “all the peo­ple of our coun­try,” and called for Amer­i­cans of dif­fer­ent races and back­grounds to remem­ber their shared Amer­i­can­ness in his remarks after the attack. If he actu­al­ly demon­strat­ed that by jet­ti­son­ing all the Nazi-sympthiz­ers like Steve Ban­non or Sebas­t­ian Gor­ka from the White House and them lead a Pres­i­den­tial com­mis­sion on Hate or that had an empha­sis on white suprema­cy (since that’s the dom­i­nant hate move­ment in terms of raw num­bers), he could end up being a wild­ly suc­cess­ful pres­i­dent. At least suc­cess­ful on race rela­tions. He still might blow up the world in oth­er ways but at least he would have a ‘heal­ing the racial divide’ feath­er in his pres­i­den­tial cap. And sure, the odds of this hap­pen­ing are extreme­ly low, but that’s the point: mak­ing a for­mal offer to avowed racists who will prob­a­bly go to their graves avowed racists that, hey, the grass real­ly is green­er on the nice side and you’re more than wel­come to come on over. No hard feel­ings. Hugs? It’ll be a “born again” thing and all will be for­giv­en basi­cal­ly. Even Ban­non and Gor­ka could join in as long as they denounce their hate cult-ish ways. Would­n’t it be so much more fun if we all just kind of got along? A “born again” nice Trump could save his pres­i­den­cy and help us all get along by by ditch­ing the neo-Nazis and sav­ing Amer­i­ca from polar­iz­ing per­il. His silence does­n’t bode well but it’s ulti­mate­ly up to him. But it’s up to the rest of us to let him and the rest of the Nazi sym­pa­thiz­ers in high and low places that if they have what­ev­er per­son­al epiphany expe­ri­ence that’s required to snap out of their hate cult world­views, they will be total­ly wel­come on Team Nice. Heal­ing hugs any­one? Espe­cial­ly for Trump if he joinst Team Nice soon. It would be quite a twist for his pres­i­den­cy.

But as is, it appears that much like how the Elders in the Kingston clan paint a pic­ture of a cor­rupt world besieg­ing their com­mu­ni­ty, the ‘Alt-Right’ and the rest of the far-right media uni­verse has been busy sell­ing its audi­ence of pri­mar­i­ly con­ser­v­a­tive white Chris­tians prone to anti-gov­ern­ment sen­ti­ments that liberals/progressives and the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood and pre­sum­ably George Soros and the Illu­mi­nati and etc are all team­ing up against them. So mak­ing it clear that they are trapped in a hate cult dynam­ic and that every­one will be very under­stand­ing when they snap out of it could be a use­ful path for­ward. Or per­haps total­ly use­less but at least we tried. And should pre­sum­ably keep try­ing as is required of Team Nice. More hugs are clear­ly in order.

And who knows, if we even found an effec­tive ‘nice cul­ture’ that actu­al­ly act­ed as an epiphany cat­a­lyst for mem­bers of hate cults and encour­aged them join in on the wel­com­ing nice­ness, it might work for all sorts of oth­er hate cults, like the Mus­lim Broth­er­hood. Jew­ish extrem­ists, or any oth­er hate group that’s clear­ly ter­ri­fied of the rest of the world. Maybe we’ll final­ly find a way out of the North Kore­an mass cult nuclear black­mail sit­u­a­tion. Or at least a sig­nif­i­cant part of a much larg­er solu­tion [47].