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Telling It Like It Is: Texas Tea Party Activist Articulates the Movement’s Fascist Ideology

Technocrats marching in support of austerity: ready to slash budgets

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COMMENT:  A Texas Tea Party leader has spilled the beans, explicitly articulating the classical fascism of the Tea Party.

With the exception of the name, there is nothing new about these folks.

“Texas Tea Party Leader Pro­motes Fas­cist Party as ‘Pro-Constitution, Pro-America’” by David Edwards; The Raw Story; 3/19/2013.

EXCERPT: A tea party leader in Texas is defend­ing his pro­mo­tion of the Amer­i­can Fas­cist Party as some­thing he thought was “pro-Constitution, pro-America.”

James Ives, who was listed as the pres­i­dent of the Greater Fort Bend County Tea Party in 2011, con­firmed to The Texas Tri­bune on Mon­day that he had made a pro­mo­tional video for the Amer­i­can Fas­cist Party and advo­cated tea party prin­ci­ples on a Fas­cist Party mes­sage board.

In the video, a man who looks like Ives sits in front of a Fas­cist Party logo wear­ing a uni­form with yel­low shoul­der patches. Another photo shows a uni­formed man sit­ting in front of a fas­cist cross. The blog that inspired Nor­we­gian mass shooter Anders Behring Breivik describes fas­cist solar crosses as “sym­bolic rep­re­sen­ta­tions buried deep in the regions of the brain where the pri­mal responses to stim­uli are rage, awe, and fear.” . . . 

. . . “From my point of view, it was all pro-Constitution, pro-America,” Ives explained to the Tri­bune. “I never did any­thing… There really weren’t enough peo­ple involved to be a gath­er­ing, let alone a rally. It was basi­cally a scat­ter­ing of peo­ple across the con­ti­nent just complaining.”

The tea party leader claimed that he his par­tic­i­pa­tion in the Fas­cist Party was part of an effort to write a novel about what he thought was a cabal. But instead of writ­ing that novel, Ives wrote on the mes­sage board about how build­ing the Fas­cist Party in Amer­ica was “our spirit, our calling.”

“It will be our great­est chal­lenge, and our sweet­est vic­tory, to finally sur­pass this dark men­ace, this numb­ing threat from the shad­ows, and replace it with the pure sun­beam that is our Fas­cist Faith, our Fas­cist Truth,” Ives wrote.

Discussion

2 comments for “Telling It Like It Is: Texas Tea Party Activist Articulates the Movement’s Fascist Ideology”

  1. It’s always interesting to see the Tea Party forced to choose between two things it loves. Scary, but interesting. For instance, which one takes the top priority prize: Funding a vast national security behemoth or showing the world how much they hate undocumented immigrants. Take a guess…

    TPM DC
    STUNNER: House GOP Votes Down Own Bill To Avert Shutdown

    By Sahil Kapur
    Published February 27, 2015, 5:15 PM EST

    WASHINGTON — In a huge embarrassment for Republican leaders, the House voted down their bill Friday to avert a Homeland Security shutdown hours before the midnight deadline.

    The House GOP plan was to pass a three-week stopgap bill to delay the immigration fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions until March 19.

    But even that failed to pass, losing conservatives who considered it too much of a surrender to a lawless president as well as Democrats who demanded a yearlong DHS funding bill without any restrictions on Obama’s immigration policies.

    The vote was 203-224. Fifty-two Republicans voted against it, while 12 Democrats voted for it.

    “This was a conscience vote about trying to uphold the Constitution,” Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC), one of the “no” votes, told TPM. “If you’re supposed to cave in because you don’t want 30,000 people to lose their paychecks — how do you make a stand if you don’t take a stand? … It’s the only option we have.”

    The vote was held open for long after time technically expired, in the hope that members would switch their votes and pass it. Numerous lawmakers yelled for “regular order” on the House floor, calling for the vote to end. After it was called, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) advised members that further votes may happen on Friday or the weekend. Unless both chambers act to avert a shutdown, DHS funding will expire on Saturday at 12:01 a.m.

    The House’s next move is unclear, GOP lawmakers said.

    “I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s a lapse” in DHS funding, Rep. Steve Womack (R-AR) told reporters.

    After the bill was voted down, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) called for Boehner to avoid a DHS shutdown by allowing a vote on the Senate-passed bill that fully funds the department.

    “The Republican Congress has shown that it simply cannot govern. Two months into the Republican Congress, we are already staring a Homeland Security shutdown square in the face, even as terrorists around the world threaten to strike America,” Reid said in a statement. “Now is the time to drop the partisan political games and come together to avoid a Homeland Security shutdown for the good of our country.”

    Many House Republicans weren’t ready to cave yet and pass a yearlong DHS funding bill, as the Republican-led Senate did on Friday morning. As it turned out, many weren’t even ready to pass a short-term funding bill.

    “I’ve been making statements, as has the Speaker, since [December] that the president’s action was unconstitutional. So I’d have to be going back on that,” Rep. Tom Rooney (R-FL) told reporters. “Right now I’m leaning to … standing my ground that what I’ve been saying for the last three months hasn’t been political bullshit. … The bottom line is you’ve got to be able to explain yourself to your constituents that you are not a total hypocrite.”

    Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) voted for the bill — a rare move given that the speaker typically doesn’t vote. His allies tried in vain to persuade members that the real battle was in court and that they should pass the DHS bill.

    “Right now I’m leaning to … standing my ground that what I’ve been saying for the last three months hasn’t been political bullshit. … The bottom line is you’ve got to be able to explain yourself to your constituents that you are not a total hypocrite.” That appears to be the general sentiment amongst the 52 GOP that voted against the GOP-led bill. So now the employees of the Department of Homeland Security are going to go without pay so they extra-crazy members of the GOP can show they aren’t hypocrites. Aha.

    Keep in mind that there’s a last minute push to get a one-week extension on DHS funding so a shutdown might be avoided. But if it doesn’t pass by midnight tonight…

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | February 27, 2015, 6:20 pm
  2. a one week extension on DHS funding after it couldn’t get the three week extension passed earlier in the night. And presumably, in a week, we’ll be right back here although House Speaker John Boenher is claiming that no promises were made about the new vote a week from now so we don’t really know what’s going to happen in the next week. We just know that it will probably be more GOP insanity. Whether or not it’s the regularly scheduled GOP insanity or some new surprise remains to be seen:

    National Journal
    Democrats to the Rescue: Congress Averts Shutdown for One More Week
    Republicans could not muster support for the three-week bill and had to move a one-week measure instead.

    By Daniel Newhauser, Alex Brown and Sarah Mimms

    February 27, 2015 It was Democrats to the rescue—again.

    A huge bipartisan coalition came together Friday night to approve a one-week funding bill for the Homeland Security Department, preventing a partial government shutdown with just a couple of hours to spare.

    Nearly every House Democrat joined most Republicans to pass the measure 357-60 after GOP leaders failed to squeeze out a short-term victory earlier Friday when the chamber rejected a three-week funding bill amid fierce opposition from conservatives, who were angered that the bill didn’t include provisions defunding President Obama’s immigration executive orders.

    Democrats now hope the chamber will get to vote by March 6 on the Senate-passed long-term clean DHS funding bill, though Republican leaders claim no promises have been made on that front. But Speaker John Boehner will still have to cope with fallout from his own GOP troops, who are furious that he has not been able to sufficiently battle back against Obama on a variety of fronts.

    The dramatic 203-224 vote on the three-week bill, held open for several minutes to no avail, came after a day’s worth of intense lobbying by the leadership of skeptical members across the conference, particularly in the end. In total, 52 Republicans joined all but a dozen Democrats in voting against the measure, which was supposed to go to the Senate so it could be approved later Friday. White House spokesman Josh Earnest indicated that Obama would sign it, even though he would still prefer a full-year clean bill of the type the Senate passed Friday morning.

    Rep. Mike Simpson, a Boehner ally, suggested that the House could pass some version of the long-term Senate funding bill with the votes of “Democrats and a few of the adults” on the GOP side. That may well happen after the one-week funding measure was approved.

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi sent a letter to colleagues Friday night urging them to support the seven-day bill. “Your vote tonight will assure that we will vote for full funding next week,” she wrote. Because the measure came up under suspension of the rules, two-thirds support was required to pass.

    But Republicans quickly pushed back on the notion that they had struck an agreement with Democrats. “No such deal or promise was made,” said Boehner spokesman Michael Steel.

    Just before 8:30 p.m. on Friday night, the Senate passed a one-week continuing resolution under unanimous consent. The move means that now that the CR has passed the House, the Senate automatically deems that it has passed in the upper chamber as well. With that, the Senate recessed for the week.

    At an earlier meeting of the House Freedom Caucus, a new coalition representing the chamber’s most conservative members, Rep. Raul Labrador said the group had made a legislative proposal to leadership. They suggested leaders put on the House floor the same three-week CR, but with a provision mandating that it expires in a week if the Senate refuses a conference committee.

    Even a win for House GOP leaders may be fleeting, as they and their Senate counterparts will have to find a lengthier DHS funding solution that can clear both chambers by March 6, the new-and-improved shutdown deadline. House conservatives are insistent on blocking Obama’s immigration policies, but Senate Democrats say they won’t give the necessary 60 votes to anything but a clean funding bill.

    Republican leaders’ search for votes for the DHS bill became serious enough that they decided to scratch from Friday’s schedule the other bill set to be considered—a rewrite of the No Child Left Behind education measure. It also was proving to be a tough sell within the GOP conference: Conservatives objected to reauthorizing a large federal program, while state interests were putting significant pressure on members, particularly those from Florida, New Jersey, and New York.

    Though members were cautiously optimistic about the DHS measure coming out of a conference meeting Thursday night, the long delay portended trouble for the stopgap bill. Leaders knew they’d lose a sizable contingent of conservatives, who believe that Obama’s executive action on immigration has plunged the nation into a constitutional crisis and who refuse to vote for any measure funding the agency tasked with implementing the action.

    “I don’t know how I go home and tell people that the outcome would have been different if Harry Reid had still been in charge” of the Senate, complained Rep. Mick Mulvaney.

    And Rep. Steve Pearce said he was angry at the way the entire week was handled, as the House had to act at the very last minute.

    “This is a protest vote on the way the whole thing is working,” Pearce said. “This is not a way to govern.”

    But lawmakers aligned with leadership were frustrated by the conservatives’ move.

    “They’re caving into Obama’s recklessness by not showing they know how to tactically get three more weeks to continue the fight. … You can’t say you want to fight and not understand tactically how to fight,” said Rep. Devin Nunes, another close Boehner ally.

    A larger circle of disillusioned members—including some centrists—emerged as well, and leadership sources found the target number of votes to pass the bill elusive. Democrats did not make the task any easier for their GOP counterparts.

    If House Republicans couldn’t pass a short-term funding bill for the Homeland Security Department, Democrats thought they’d have the leverage to force Boehner to fund the agency for the full year. The problem: Their plan relied on the logic of the House Republicans whose judgment they’ve questioned all week.

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi told her members to vote against Republicans’ three-week bill to fund DHS, a rare step to oppose a “clean” shutdown-aversion measure. That’s because the Senate has passed a full-year funding bill—one Democrats much prefer—and Pelosi thought Boehner would be forced to take up the Senate bill if his short-term CR went down. “If this were to fail, they would have no choice but to take up the Senate bill,” she said in her Friday press conference.

    Passage of the long-term bill would come with largely Democratic votes, and the ire of much of Boehner’s caucus.

    Rep. Steve Israel said every one of his fellow Democrats would help GOP leaders pass the Senate’s long-term funding bill. “We have consistently bailed them out,” Israel said.

    But Democrats were convinced that the speaker can’t afford to let the agency shut down, and they put that theory to the test. “If the [CR] goes down here, I think there will be great pressure and justification for Speaker Boehner saying to his people, ‘We tried and it went down, and we’re now going to pass [the Senate] bill,’ ” House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer said in an interview.

    Before the Democratic whip operation sprung into action, members sounded torn on whether to support the bill. “I don’t want to see it shut down, but I think that running the Department of Homeland Security for two months, three weeks at a time is absolutely irresponsible,” said Democratic Rep. Cedric Richmond. “Teachers do lesson plans longer than that.”

    Across the Capitol, Sen. Chuck Schumer had some simple advice for the GOP.

    “The vote this afternoon means only one thing: Speaker Boehner, follow Leader McConnell and put the Senate bill on the floor now. It will pass and DHS will not shut down,” Schumer said.

    Senate Republicans, meanwhile, were largely unwilling Thursday to criticize the House’s strategy, but establishment members and conservatives alike acknowledged that it is unlikely to get them anywhere. Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire called the three-week CR “delaying the inevitable.”

    Sen. Ted Cruz said he is hopeful that the standoff will work out in conservatives’ favor, but warned that the party’s strategy since December has been one that was always “doomed to failure.”

    “In funding virtually the entirety of the federal government [in December], leadership deliberately gave away virtually all of our leverage, putting us into a box canyon where the predictable result was what just happened: leadership caving, joining with Harry Reid and Obama and giving in entirely. That was a mistake. We shouldn’t have given up the leverage in the first place,” Cruz said, adding that he “eagerly await[s] leadership’s next steps”.

    You have to love Ted Cruz’s lament:

    Sen. Ted Cruz said he is hopeful that the standoff will work out in conservatives’ favor, but warned that the party’s strategy since December has been one that was always “doomed to failure.”

    “In funding virtually the entirety of the federal government [in December], leadership deliberately gave away virtually all of our leverage, putting us into a box canyon where the predictable result was what just happened: leadership caving, joining with Harry Reid and Obama and giving in entirely. That was a mistake. We shouldn’t have given up the leverage in the first place,” Cruz said, adding that he “eagerly await[s] leadership’s next steps”.

    Yes, why didn’t the GOP shut the ENTIRE government down instead? Nothing insane about that!

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | February 27, 2015, 8:03 pm

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