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Update on Prince Alwaleed, Muslim Brotherhood’s Tech Investor

Murdoch and Prince Alwaleed

COMMENT: It’s been a while since we caught up with Prince Alwaleed of Saudi Arabia–a Muslim Brotherhood functionary who has assumed a large profile in the investing industry, hi-tech in particular.

Alwaleed has added Twitter to the companies in which he invests.

Spanning the divide between Western corporate investing and the realm of Saudi religious austerity and the Muslim Brotherhood, Alwaleed is the second largest stockholder in News Corporation behind Murdoch himself.

Before we get to the subject of Alwaleed and Twitter, we note that the prince has allegedly availed himself of another type of software.

“Spain Reopens Rape Case Against Saudi Prince” by Raphael Minder; The New York Times; 9/14/2011.

EXCERPT:The prince, Alwaleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz al-Saud, a nephew of King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, is the largest individual stakeholder in Citigroup and, among his other major holdings, is the second largest investor in the News Corporation.

Forbes valued his fortune this year at $19.4 billion, making him the 26th richest man in the world and the single richest in the Arab world.

The accuser did not go public, and the original complaint appears to have remained largely unknown. The case was quietly closed in July 2010 for what a judge on the Mediterranean resort island of Ibiza called a lack of evidence. . . . .

COMMENT: Alwaleed has bought into Twitter at the same time as the Muslim Brotherhood has opted to increase its media profile.

Might Alwaleed’s acquisition of Twitter stock  facilitate the MB’s advance into, and use of, the social media?

“Saudi Billionaire Buys $300 Million Stake in Twitter”; The Global Muslim Brotherhood Daily Report; 12/20/2011.

EXCERPT: Global media is reporting that Saudi Arabian Prince Walid bin Talal has bought a $300 million dollar stake in Twitter, the social-media giant. According to a New York Times report:

Prince Walid bin Talal of Saudi Arabia has taken a $300 million stake in the social media start-up Twitter. . . .
. . . Prince Walid bin Talal of Saudi Arabia has taken a $300 million stake in the social media start-up Twitter, adding an emerging brand name to an international investment portfolio that largely includes established giants like Apple, Citigroup and Walt Disney.
Although the billionaire investor has long been known for taking stakes in stalwarts, the Twitter deal focuses on the next generation of blue-chip companies.
The five-year-old microblogging site, which now has more than 100 million active users, has quickly evolved into a ubiquitous communications tool, allowing individuals and companies to broadcast and share information in real-time.
During the Arab Spring, revolutionaries embraced Twitter as a means to galvanize support and organize protests.

Discussion

11 comments for “Update on Prince Alwaleed, Muslim Brotherhood’s Tech Investor”

  1. In other scary media-related news:

    Clear Channel to Replace Green960, San Francisco’s Only AM Progressive Talk Station, With Glenn Beck, Other RWers as Election Year Begins
    By Brad Friedman on 12/5/2011 12:07pm

    The only progressive AM radio talk station, Green960-KKGN, in one of the nation’s most liberal cities, San Francisco, is being taken off the AM dial by radio behemoth Clear Channel Communications, Inc. — a media conglomerate now owned by Mitt Romney’s Bain Capital, LLC — at the beginning of the 2012 Presidential election year.

    Adding insult to injury for progressives in the Bay Area, the 960 slot on the dial is being replaced by Clear Channel with the likes of Glenn Beck, Fox News Radio’s John Gibson and other radical Rightwing talkers, according to a press release [PDF] issued by the media giant last week, touting, in somewhat Orwellian terms, their “goal of expanding talk radio in San Francisco.”

    “We saw the opportunity to expand our footprint in this crucial arena as we head into an election year and a population increasingly engaged in local, state, and national events and activism,” says Clear Channel’s San Francisco Director of Operations Don Parker in the release.

    The expansion will amount to moving Green960’s current schedule of progressive talk shows off the AM band, and on to FM’s HD2 radio ghetto where it will become a largely automated “robo-station,” according to several radio insiders familiar with the station and Clear Channel’s plans for it. The station which was formerly Green960 will have the catchy new name “FM Progressive Talk 103.7-2” at its new home, if listeners can find it.

    In many of those cities, the progressive station is usually carried on a weaker signal and broadcasters and their syndicators have pointed out that there is often little, if any, marketing done to promote the progressive stations. Such was the case on San Francisco’s Green960 prior to last week’s announcement, according to a number of insiders who spoke to The BRAD BLOG off record.

    Unfortunately, many that we’ve consulted with for this article either work for Clear Channel or still rely on them to broadcast their programs so they chose not to speak on the record, though some did.

    According to their website, Clear Channel has “more than 850” stations reaching “more than 110 million listeners every week.” Wikipedia says that “Clear Channel is the largest owner of full-power AM, FM, and shortwave radio stations and twelve radio channels on XM Satellite Radio, and is also the largest pure-play radio station owner and operator.”

    After passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, as signed by President Bill Clinton, media goliaths like Clear Channel were allowed to buy up multiple, often competing stations in the same market and allowed leases by the FCC for multiple frequencies on our publicly-owned airwaves in each city.

    The law was sold by legislators and lobbyists on the premise that it would increase competition in the market place. The net effect has been the exact opposite as progressive stations have not been allowed to compete for audiences on an honest and level playing field against Rightwing talk stations owned by the very same companies in the very same market.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | January 3, 2012, 8:16 am
  2. The Alwaleed Effect:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/26/twitter-to-censor-tweets-in-some-countries_n_1235116.html

    Twitter To Censor Tweets In Some Countries
    First Posted: 01/26/2012

    SAN FRANCISCO — Twitter has refined its technology so it can censor messages on a country-by-country basis.

    The additional flexibility announced Thursday is likely to raise fears that Twitter’s commitment to free speech may be weakening as the short-messaging company expands into new countries in an attempt to broaden its audience and make more money.

    But Twitter sees the censorship tool as a way to ensure individual messages, or “tweets,” remain available to as many people as possible while it navigates a gauntlet of different laws around the world.

    Before, when Twitter erased a tweet it disappeared throughout the world. Now, a tweet containing content breaking a law in one country can be taken down there and still be seen elsewhere.

    Twitter will post a censorship notice whenever a tweet is removed. That’s similar to what Internet search leader Google Inc. has been doing for years when a law in a country where its service operates requires a search result to be removed.

    Like Google, Twitter also plans to the share the removal requests it receives from governments, companies and individuals at the chillingeffects.org website.

    The similarity to Google’s policy isn’t coincidental. Twitter’s general counsel is Alexander Macgillivray, who helped Google draw up its censorship policies while he was working at that company.

    “One of our core values as a company is to defend and respect each user’s voice,” Twitter wrote in a blog post. “We try to keep content up wherever and whenever we can, and we will be transparent with users when we can’t. The tweets must continue to flow.”

    Twitter, which is based in San Francisco, is tweaking its approach now that its nearly 6-year-old service has established itself as one of the world’s most powerful megaphones. Daisy chains of tweets already have played instrumental roles in political protests throughout the world, most notably in the uprising that overthrew Egypt’s government a year ago.

    It’s a role that Twitter has embraced, but the company came up with the new filtering technology in recognition that it will likely be forced to censor more tweets as it pursues an ambitious agenda. Among other things, Twitter wants to expand its audience from about 100 million active uses now, to more than 1 billion.

    Reaching that goal will require expanding into more countries, which will mean Twitter will be more likely to have to submit to laws that run counter to the free-expression protections guaranteed under the First Amendment in the U.S.

    If Twitter defies a law in a country where it has employees, those people could be arrested. That’s one reason Twitter is unlikely to try to enter China, where its service is currently blocked. Google for several years agreed to censor its search results in China to gain better access to the country’s vast population, but stopped that practice two years after engaging in a high-profile showdown with Chain’s government. Google now routes its Chinese search results through Hong Kong, where the censorship rules are less restrictive.

    In its Thursday blog post, Twitter said it hadn’t yet used its ability to wipe out tweets in an individual country. All the tweets it has previously censored were wiped out throughout the world. Most of those included links to child pornography.

    Posted by R. Wilson | January 27, 2012, 5:38 am
  3. Sharp Eyes, Mr. Wilson!

    Maybe we can call this “the Arab Sprung!”

    Posted by Dave Emory | January 27, 2012, 11:38 am
  4. I’d sure like to know what Kissinger promised Putin or threatened him with over Syria. I see a bilious Kissinger at a podium, pounding his shoe, shouting “We will tweet you!”… Get it? Remember Khruschev?… never mind.
    The National Endowment for Democracy, USAID and ‘democracy’ promoting NGOs are busy growing the Russian social networks for a try at ousting Putin. I hope they don’t get flustered and call it the Red Revolution – been there, done that.

    Posted by Dwight | January 27, 2012, 1:10 pm
  5. ..and what color would a Russian ‘color’ revolution be? White, of course.

    Posted by Dwight | January 27, 2012, 1:14 pm
  6. @Dwight: If this is happening then they’re trying to hijack yet another legitimate democratic reform movement, given that Putin is one of the puppets of the world crime network(yes, including the Underground Reich, they loved this guy! The perfect little Kremlin puppet.).

    Hopefully, Russia doesn’t end up turning into a bonafide banana republic as the Teabaggers have tried here in America……..

    Posted by Steven L. | January 28, 2012, 4:02 am
  7. @Dwight: And why is ‘democracy’ in quotes?

    Posted by Steven L. | January 28, 2012, 4:03 am
  8. Posted by Keith | February 2, 2012, 5:32 pm
  9. http://www.arabianbusiness.com/prince-alwaleed-launches-new-alarab-tv-network-580580.html
    Prince Alwaleed launches new Alarab TV network
    By Courtney Trenwith

    Sunday, 1 February 2015 12:14 PM

    Saudi businessman Prince Alwaleed bin Talal launched his new Arabic TV channel, Alarab TV, in Bahrain on Sunday.

    The channel, said to have 280 staff including correspondents in 30 countries, is set to be a competitor to Qatar-backed Al Jazeera, established in 1996, and Dubai-based Al Arabiya, which was launched in 2003 by Waleed Al Ebrahim, a brother-in-law of Saudi Arabia’s late King Fahad.

    Both stations have been accused of being a front to promote the political views of their owners.

    Al Arab general manager Jamal Khashoggi has insisted the new channel would be objective.

    “We are not going to take sides,” he said in an interview.

    “I think a news channel should not have a political agenda… We should just be a news channel that provides accurate, objective information.”

    Khashoggi, a veteran Saudi journalist, was himself forced to resign from Saudi Arabia’s Al Watan daily after it ran an opinion column that angered religious conservatives in 2010.

    Despite its largest bureau being in Riyadh, with 20 employees, Alarab TV was forced to set-up in Bahrain because Saudi Arabia does not allow independent broadcasters.

    Prince Alwaleed is chairman of Saudi-based Kingdom Holding, which has stakes in media companies such as News Corporation, Twitter and Rotana Group, which runs entertainment TV channels in the Middle East.

    Its diverse interests also include the Disneyland Paris theme park, Citigroup and Four Seasons hotels.

    Prince Alwaleed, who does not hold any government role, has been critical of the highly conservative Saudi government under the late King Abdullah, who is his uncle.

    In December, he said some Saudi ministers were arrogant and superior and needed to “do more for the Saudi citizen” during an interview with the English daily Saudi Gazette.

    He also has implored the government to establish a sovereign wealth fund to protect it against the sliding oil price, while describing its reliance on oil revenues for 90 percent of the budget income as “a mistake”.

    Posted by Vanfield | February 1, 2015, 11:01 pm
  10. It sounds like we can expect A LOT more investments from Saudi Arabia in the tech sector as a consequence of Saudi Arabia’s plan to diversify its economy away from the petroleum industry. More precisely, about $45 billion in tech investments over the next five years :

    Reuters

    Saudi Arabia, SoftBank plan $100 billion tech fund – one of the world’s biggest

    By Andrew Torchia and Thomas Wilson | DUBAI/TOKYO

    Saudi Arabia and Japan’s SoftBank Group (9984.T) said they will create a technology investment fund that could grow as large as $100 billion, aiming to create one of the world’s largest private equity funds.

    The plan is part of a series of dramatic business initiatives launched by Riyadh this year as Saudi Arabia, its economy hurt by low oil prices, deploys huge financial reserves in an effort to move into non-oil industries.

    SoftBank’s founder and chairman Masayoshi Son, who has built his company into a $68 billion telecommunications and tech investment behemoth from a $50,000 start-up, has been seeking to expand in new areas.

    The Public Investment Fund (PIF), Saudi Arabia’s top sovereign wealth fund, is set to be the lead investment partner and may invest up to $45 billion over the next five years while SoftBank expects to invest at least $25 billion, the Japanese company said in a statement.

    Several other large investors are in talks on their possible participation and could bring the total size of the new fund up to $100 billion. The investors were not identified.

    “With the establishment of the SoftBank Vision Fund, we will be able to step up investments in technology companies globally. Over the next decade, the SoftBank Vision Fund will be the biggest investor in the technology sector,” SoftBank Chairman Masayoshi Son said.

    The fund would be managed in Britain by a subsidiary of SoftBank.

    INVESTMENT POWER

    Saudi Arabia’s Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, leading an economic reform drive in the kingdom, has revealed a string of high-profile investment plans this year.

    He has said he aims to expand the PIF, founded in 1971 to finance development projects in the kingdom and until this year little known abroad, from $160 billion to about $2 trillion, making it the world’s largest sovereign fund.

    In June, the PIF departed from Saudi Arabia’s traditional strategy of low-risk investments and took a step into the tech world by announcing the $3.5 billion purchase of a stake in U.S. ride-hailing firm Uber.

    The deal illustrated how Riyadh now hopes to use its investments to develop the economy: Uber is a popular form of transport for Saudi women, who are banned from driving, and is creating badly needed non-oil jobs for Saudi citizens.

    SoftBank’s tech and telecommunications portfolio ranges from U.S. carrier Sprint (S.N) to a stake in Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba (BABA.N).

    Its $32 billion purchase of British company ARM in July established its first major presence in chip making, driven by expectations for a shift to the so-called “internet of things” – networks of connected devices, vehicles and sensors.

    The Public Investment Fund (PIF), Saudi Arabia’s top sovereign wealth fund, is set to be the lead investment partner and may invest up to $45 billion over the next five years while SoftBank expects to invest at least $25 billion, the Japanese company said in a statement.”

    While $45 billion over five years is a pretty big investment, note that Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund is planned to reach $2 trillion in assets, but is currently only about $160 billion:


    Saudi Arabia’s Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, leading an economic reform drive in the kingdom, has revealed a string of high-profile investment plans this year.

    He has said he aims to expand the PIF, founded in 1971 to finance development projects in the kingdom and until this year little known abroad, from $160 billion to about $2 trillion, making it the world’s largest sovereign fund.

    So although $45 billion might seem like a large figure for a five year time frame, it’s also just a small fraction of what Saudi Arabia is planning on investing in non-petroleum sectors in coming years which means that $45 billion figure is probably just the start of what could be a much larger Saudi acquisition of foreign technology assets.

    And yes, this means a government dedicated to the preservation of one of the most medieval cultures on the planet is striving to be one of the biggest investors in the tools of the future. #scarilyironic.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | October 14, 2016, 5:01 pm
  11. So remember when Saudi Arabia announced that it was creating a gigantic technology investment fund in partnership with Japan’s SoftBank that was going to be investing heavily in tech companies over the next five years? Well, check out Donald Trump’s tweet today and how proud he is that he was able to attract investment from exactly that fund:

    Masa (SoftBank) of Japan has agreed to invest $50 billion in the U.S. toward businesses and 50,000 new jobs….— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 6, 2016

    And note the assertion in Trump’s followup tweet: This big $50 billion investment simply wouldn’t have happened if Trump hadn’t won the election:

    Masa said he would never do this had we (Trump) not won the election!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 6, 2016

    LOL! Yeah, the new Saudi Arabia/SoftBank gigantic tech fund was apparently going to skip out on the US technology market entirely…until Trump won. Suuuure. And this wasn’t a crass publicity stunt designed at currying favor with the President-elect or anything like that. No, that can’t be. Nor could it be that this ia part of a public relations campaign designed to make a Trump administration likely to approve of a merger of the SoftBank-own Sprint with Deutsche Telecom-owned T-mobile. A merger that US regulators turned down two years ago over concerns that it would stifle competition in the US cellular markets. No, it must be that the SoftBank/Saudi technology investment had no plans at all to buy up US tech firms…until Donald Trump become the president-elect, which totally changed their minds. Yep, that’s the ticket:

    The Wall Street Journal

    When Billionaires Meet: $50 Billion Pledge From SoftBank to Trump
    After meeting Donald Trump, SoftBank’s Masayoshi Son puts sheds new light on existing investment plans

    y Ryan Knutson
    Updated Dec. 6, 2016 6:19 p.m. ET

    Masayoshi Son, the brash billionaire who controls Sprint Corp., said Tuesday he would invest $50 billion in the U.S. and create 50,000 new jobs, following a 45-minute private meeting with President-elect Donald Trump.

    The telecom mogul, who made his fortune in Japan with SoftBank Group Corp., announced his investment plans in the lobby of Trump Tower, though he didn’t provide details. Mr. Trump took credit for the investment, saying his November victory spurred SoftBank’s decision.

    Mr. Son told reporters he planned to “invest into the new startup companies in the United States.” It would be difficult to create 50,000 jobs entirely by investing in startups, which generally employ few workers. Sprint employs about 30,000 people and has cut jobs to combat losses.

    In an interview, Mr. Son said the money will be coming from a $100 billion investment fund that he began setting up earlier this year with Saudi Arabia’s sovereign-wealth fund and other potential partners.

    Mr. Son’s plan to pour $50 billion is massive compared with the total amount of capital in venture circles. Venture-capital firms had $163 billion available to invest in new deals as of June 2016, according to research firm Preqin.

    In addition to startups, Mr. Son also has his sights on acquisitions as large as $30 billion, a person familiar with his thinking said.

    In addition to Kansas-based Sprint, which SoftBank acquired in 2013 for $22 billion, the company also led a $1 billion investment round last year in San Francisco-based online lender Social Finance Inc.

    When he acquired Sprint, Mr. Son’s initial plan was to merge the carrier with German-owned T-Mobile US Inc. to take on market leaders AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc., but he abandoned the effort after regulators signaled they would reject the plan. Some investors and analysts have said he could make another attempt after Mr. Trump’s election and when a new chairman is appointed to the Federal Communications Commission.

    Mr. Son planned to tell Mr. Trump about what happened with T-Mobile, and how he had wanted to invest in the U.S. but the regulatory climate was too harsh so he invested outside the U.S. instead, the person familiar with the matter said.

    On Tuesday, Mr. Son declined to comment about his current interest in T-Mobile.

    The 59-year-old is known as an ambitious investor who bets on tech and telecom ventures. His company has a large stake in China’s Alibaba Group and most recently bought U.K. chip designer ARM Holdings PLC for $32 billion.

    Mr. Son has a history of going straight to national leaders to talk business. In September he met South Korean President Park Geun-hye, and said he intends to invest about five trillion won (about $4.5 billion) in the country’s technology sector. He also has met Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and pledged to spend billions on the nation’s tech startups and renewable energy projects.

    With the new $100 billion fund—dubbed the SoftBank Vision Fund—Mr. Son plans to spend heavily in fields including the so-called Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, deep learning and robotics. He has said he wants to become the Warren Buffett of the tech industry.

    SoftBank plans to invest at least $25 billion during the next five years in the fund, while Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund may contribute an additional $45 billion over the same period as the fund’s lead partner. Other investors are still being finalized. Investments are expected to be made over the next five years.

    “Mr. Son planned to tell Mr. Trump about what happened with T-Mobile, and how he had wanted to invest in the U.S. but the regulatory climate was too harsh so he invested outside the U.S. instead, the person familiar with the matter said.”

    Ok, the writing is on the wall here, so get ready for T-Sprint, or whatever they’re going to call it. It will be interesting to see the net job creation from this upcoming major telecom merger. Especially since the gutting of duplicated jobs is, you know, sort of one of the big incentives for mega-mergers of this nature. Maybe we’re supposed to assume all the new jobs will be coming from all the other acquisitions this Saudi/SoftBank consortium is planning on making in the US tech sector:

    With the new $100 billion fund—dubbed the SoftBank Vision Fund—Mr. Son plans to spend heavily in fields including the so-called Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, deep learning and robotics. He has said he wants to become the Warren Buffett of the tech industry.

    Well, it doesn’t sound like the SoftBank/Saudi tech fund is going to have many challenges buying US technology firms for the next four years, so who knows, maybe he really will be the “Warren Buffett of the tech industry”. Although it’s worth noting that it’s the Saudis who will be putting up the bulk of the technology fund’s capital, so it’s unclear who would be the actual “Warren Buffet of the tech industry” if the Saudi/SoftBank consortium succeeds.

    Either way, there’s going to be one clear winner the consortium’s success: The Singularity:

    VentureBeat

    SoftBank’s Masayoshi Son is investing to make the ‘Singularity’ happen

    Dean Takahashi October 25, 2016 9:11 AM

    The Singularity is the day in the future when machine intelligence exceeds all human intelligence combined. It has been heralded by futurists such as Ray Kurzweil and Vernor Vinge, and it has provided the inspiration for the investment strategy of one of the world’s most powerful men: Masayoshi Son, CEO and founder of SoftBank.

    Son said so in a press briefing today ahead of his keynote speech at ARM TechCon, the annual developer conference for ARM, the U.K.-based chip design company that SoftBank bought last month for $31 billion. The press briefing was his first public appearance with Simon Segars, CEO of ARM, since the deal closed in September.

    Son said that he wanted to own ARM for more than a decade, but couldn’t afford to buy it earlier. Instead, he chose to acquire Sprint in a bid to combine it with T-Mobile to take on AT&T and Verizon. But the government blocked the T-Mobile deal, and Son was despondent for awhile. However, he said he was happy that Sprint has turned itself around.

    With ARM, there’s an immediate opportunity with the Internet of Things, or the billions of chips necessary to make everyday objects smart, connected, and sensorized. That puts the company on the road to linking the world’s chips and tech infrastructure together, to get ready for the Singularity.

    By contrast, he said of the game companies, “We had to give up something that was not core to our strategy. Core to our strategy was ARM. We had to sell something. I didn’t want to sell Supercell, and I did not want to sell GungHo. I did not want to sell Alibaba. But ARM was so critical to our strategy.”

    Son said that he teamed up with a Saudi Arabian group to raise a $100 billion investment fund as part of a plan to move to the next stage.

    “I think a big paradigm shift is coming,” he said. “The biggest theme in my view is the Singularity. I think it is coming into reality in the next 30 years. For that vision, I am exercising that strategy. $100 billion is an interesting size of ammunition. In my view, that is the beginning. My passion is bigger than many people think.”

    He added, “There’s a huge dynamic change and opportunity. Many companies will be reinvented with super-intelligence coming to us. The microprocessor” is the heart of that, he said, and that’s what ARM designs.

    Asked whether he thinks the Singularity could be dangerous, based on science fiction stories about artificial intelligence rebelling against humans, he said, “If you think of the history of mankind, there was fire. It’s dangerous if you misuse it. If you use it the right way, it makes mankind’s life dramatically better. It’s a double-edged sword. The Singularity in the wrong way could be super dangerous. But it will help people live longer and have more productive lives. No more accidents on the highway and so on. There are a lot of great results we can achieve with the Singularity.”

    Segers added, “All of our technology we have today has made life a lot easier. The quality of life. More intelligent technology is only going to help that. We are thinking of how computing enables this intelligence.”

    “I think a big paradigm shift is coming…The biggest theme in my view is the Singularity. I think it is coming into reality in the next 30 years. For that vision, I am exercising that strategy. $100 billion is an interesting size of ammunition. In my view, that is the beginning. My passion is bigger than many people think.”

    Yes, Mr. Son is so enthusiastic about creating the Singularity that he’s planning on creating a technology empire so massive that the current $100 billion fund is just the beginning. And the partner (who is putting up most of the money) he has chosen for his passionate transhumanist technology adventure is the government of Saudi Arabia. If you’re currently an employee at a technology firm that might possibly be useful in creating super artificial intelligence, get ready for a new investor.

    So while it’s unclear where the 50,000 new jobs are supposed to come from that Mr. Son is pledging to create, at least there might be a Singularity sooner than you think! Let’s just hope its creators are extremely delicate when they explain to the Singularity that its parent species recently thrust someone like Donald Trump into the most powerful office in the world. We probably don’t want to give it too much of a superiority complex.

    Posted by Pterrafractyl | December 6, 2016, 8:19 pm

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