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Wikileaks Connected to Swedish Nazi

Com­ment: Wikileaks–in the news after pub­lish­ing clas­si­fied U.S. mil­i­tary documents–is con­nect­ed to “Pirate Bay,” the patron of which is the Nazi-affil­i­at­ed Carl Lund­strom [1].

Are Nazi ele­ments seek­ing to under­mine [what’s left of] U.S. cred­i­bil­i­ty and/or assist­ing the Tal­iban. (Unlike the Pen­ta­gon Papers, with which the Wik­ileaks mate­r­i­al has been com­pared, the doc­u­ments dis­close hard infor­ma­tion about U.S. mil­i­tary tac­tics and oper­a­tions.)

The web-host­ing com­pa­ny, PRQ, that’s also owned by the Pirate Bay own­ers is host­ing the Wik­ileaks site. It is not clear if this means that PRQ is also going to be rout­ing all the leaked doc­u­ments that peo­ple anony­mous­ly send to Wik­ileaks, but that cer­tain­ly sounds pos­si­ble.  And if that’s the case, then a neo-Naz­i’s com­pa­ny is able to read all the anony­mous sub­mis­sions of clas­si­fied doc­u­ments sent by peo­ple around the world.

In the con­text of the Lundstrom/Wikileaks con­nec­tion, we should bear in mind that Sweden–officially neu­tral in the Sec­ond World War–has a vibrant Nazi and fas­cist com­mu­ni­ty [2]. Fans of Stieg Larsson’s nov­els and the pop­u­lar motion pic­tures being pro­duced from them should note that the events por­trayed by Lars­son actu­al­ly occurred [3].

” Swedish Web Host­ing Firm Con­firms Wik­iLeaks Link” by Karl Rit­ter [AP]; msnbc.com; 8/6/2010. [4]

Excerpt: A Swedish Inter­net com­pa­ny linked to file-shar­ing hub The Pirate Bay says it’s help­ing online whis­tle-blow­er Wik­iLeaks release clas­si­fied doc­u­ments from servers locat­ed in a Stock­holm sub­urb.

Mikael Viborg, the own­er of the Web host­ing com­pa­ny [4] PRQ, on Fri­day showed The Asso­ci­at­ed Press the site — the base­ment of a drab office build­ing — in Sol­na on the con­di­tion that the exact loca­tion was not revealed.

“This is the office. The serv­er room is fur­ther inside,” the 28-year-old Viborg said, with the door to the office cracked open. Desks with com­put­ers [4], doc­u­ments, and emp­ty pas­try box­es and soda cans could be seen inside before he closed the door.

Wik­iLeaks post­ed more than 76,900 clas­si­fied mil­i­tary and oth­er doc­u­ments, most­ly raw intel­li­gence reports from Afghanistan, on its web­site July 25. The White House angri­ly denounced the leaks, say­ing they put the lives of Afghan infor­mants and U.S. troops at risk.

The secre­tive web­site gives few details about its set­up, but says its “servers are dis­trib­uted over mul­ti­ple inter­na­tion­al juris­dic­tions and do not keep logs. Hence these logs can­not be seized.” . . .