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Rare Journalistic Glimpse of Japanese Political and Historical Revisionism

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[5]COMMENT: In numer­ous pro­grams [6] and posts, we have set forth [7] the re-insti­tu­tion [8] of the dom­i­nant polit­i­cal [9], f [10]inan­cial [10] and indus­tri­al [11] ele­ments of Impe­r­i­al Japan­ese fas­cism [12] in the wake of World War II [13].

Part of the fall-out from that trag­ic polit­i­cal and his­tor­i­cal real­i­ty is the re-writ­ing [14] of the his­to­ry [15] of that time, on both sides of the Pacif­ic Ocean.

Review­ing a recent film set against the back­ground of Unit 731 (a rel­a­tive rar­i­ty in, and of, itself), The New York Times not­ed the insti­tu­tion­al­ized his­tor­i­cal revi­sion­ism that is part of con­tem­po­rary Japan­ese life.

” . . . . In Tokyo, black vans often prowl the streets spout­ing pro­pa­gan­da that rewrites the country’s role in the war. And pub­lish­ers churn out books dis­put­ing the most basic facts about atroc­i­ties. . . .”

“New Film Touch­es on a Taboo in Japan: World War II Atroc­i­ties” by Ben Doo­ley; The New York Times; 10/11/2020; p. 17 [West­ern Edi­tion]. [16]

. . . . Japan­ese mis­sions abroad rou­tine­ly crit­i­cize depic­tions of the Impe­r­i­al Army’s wartime broth­el sys­tem, where women were often forced into sex­u­al slav­ery. In Tokyo, black vans often prowl the streets spout­ing pro­pa­gan­da that rewrites the country’s role in the war. And pub­lish­ers churn out books dis­put­ing the most basic facts about atroc­i­ties. . . .