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Reflections On The Fun and Games of 1/6/2021

Mr. Emory’s entire life’s work is avail­able on a 32GB flash dri­ve, avail­able for a con­tri­bu­tion of $65.00 or more (to KFJC). Click Here to obtain Dav­e’s 40+ years’ work, com­plete through Fall of 2020 [through FTR #1156]. [1]

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[5]

Gen­er­al Smed­ley But­ler

COMMENT: Reflect­ing on this week’s events in Wash­ing­ton D.C., a num­ber of things impressed them­selves upon us.

Even Paul Krug­man of the staid New York Times char­ac­ter­ized the storm­ing of the Capi­tol Build­ing by Trump back­ers as “fas­cism.”

Nei­ther he, nor—frankly—anyone else in this coun­try should be sur­prised.

Not only has the polit­i­cal momen­tum of these events been build­ing for decades, but the phe­nom­e­non has been pro­pelled in no small mea­sure by amne­sia.

In FTR #602 [6]—among oth­er programs—we detailed the 1934 coup attempt direct­ed against Franklin Delano Roo­sevelt by pow­er­ful indus­tri­al and finan­cial inter­ests. Hop­ing to enlist Dou­glas MacArthur as the leader of the plot, the con­spir­a­tors set­tled upon Gen­er­al Smed­ley But­ler of the Marine Corps.

But­ler betrayed the con­spir­a­cy, which was inves­ti­gat­ed by the McCor­ma­ck-Dick­stein Com­mit­tee. This chap­ter in Amer­i­can his­to­ry has dis­ap­peared down the mem­o­ry hole.

The armed con­fronta­tion in the Capi­tol also remind­ed us of a con­fronta­tion that took place in Park­land Hos­pi­tal on 11/22/1963.

A con­tin­gent of Secret Ser­vice agents and Kennedy aide Ken­neth O’Donnell con­front­ed and threat­ened Park­land physi­cians who were going to autop­sy Pres­i­dent Kennedy’s body in accor­dance with law.

(Author Joseph McBride presents con­vinc­ing evi­dence that O’Donnell faced prob­a­ble indict­ment for cor­rup­tion. He helped arrange the Kennedy motor­cade route through Dealey Plaza, set­ting JFK up for assas­si­na­tion. O’Donnell suc­cumbed to alco­holism, dying in 1977.)

McBride—drawing on schol­ar­ship by numer­ous authors and researchers—concludes that the Fed­er­al agents were intent on pre­vent­ing an autop­sy in Dal­las, so that JFK’s body could be sur­gi­cal­ly altered to obscure the fact that Kennedy was killed in a cross­fire.

The “offi­cial ver­sion” of the murder—an insti­tu­tion­al­ized his­tor­i­cal fiction–maintains that Oswald—the lone assassin—slew Kennedy by fir­ing from the rear.

“ . . . . [Park­land physi­cian Dr. Charles] Cren­shaw recalled, ‘A man in a suit, lead­ing the [fed­er­al] group, hold­ing a sub­ma­chine gun, left lit­tle doubt in my mind who was in charge. That he wasn’t smil­ing best describes the look on his face . . . . Keller­man took an erect stance and brought his firearm into a ready posi­tion. The oth­er men in suits fol­lowed course by drap­ing their coat­tails behind the butts of their hol­stered pis­tols.’ When Dr. Rose insist­ed on hold­ing the body in Dal­las for autop­sy, explain­ing, ‘You can’t lose the chain of evi­dence,’ one of the men in suits screamed, ‘God­damit, get your ass out of the way before you get hurt,’ and anoth­er snapped, ‘We’re tak­ing the body now.’ . . . .

Into the Night­mare: My Search for the Killers of John F. Kennedy and Offi­cer J.D. Tip­pit by Joseph McBride; High­tow­er Press [SC]; Copy­right 2013 by Joseph McBride; ISBN 978–1939795250; pp. 168–170. [7]

. . . . What I found most reveal­ing at the time in The Death of a Pres­i­dent is its account of the Secret Ser­vice and Kennedy aides, led by the late President’s appoint­ments sec­re­tary, Ken­neth O’Donnell, steal­ing the president’s body from Park­land Hos­pi­tal. Dis­cov­er­ing that star­tling report of a pre­vi­ous­ly unknown event—including a vio­lent con­fronta­tion between the White House fac­tion and the Dal­las Coun­ty med­ical exam­in­er, Dr. Earl F. Rose—was one of the water­shed moments in my under­stand­ing of the case. . . .

. . . . If Dr. Rose had not been blocked from per­form­ing the autop­sy, the his­to­ry of the case might have been rad­i­cal­ly dif­fer­ent. The thor­ough­ness and integri­ty of the autop­sies Dr. Rose per­formed at Park­land Hos­pi­tal on both Tip­pit and Oswald have nev­er been ques­tioned, unlike that of the shod­dy, incom­plete, and dis­hon­est autop­sy of Kennedy by mil­i­tary doc­tors at Bethes­da Naval Hos­pi­tal in Mary­land, a key ele­ment in the coverup. . . .

. . . . When I read that remark­able and (bizarrely approv­ing) account of crim­i­nal behav­ior at Park­land Hos­pi­tal by fed­er­al agents and mem­bers of the late president’s own staff, a bru­tal act of aggres­sion against a pub­lic offi­cial try­ing to do his legal duty, I could no longer fail to rec­og­nize, by the spring of 1967, that “some­thing was rot­ten in the state of Den­mark.” . . . .

. . . . The threat of vio­lence in Manchester’s account was left large­ly implic­it. A more explic­it account was lat­er pro­vid­ed by Dr. Charles A. Cren­shaw, one of Kennedy’s attend­ing physi­cians at Park­land, who wit­nessed the con­fronta­tion. In his 1992 book, JFK: Con­spir­a­cy of Silence, Cren­shaw recalled, “A man in a suit, lead­ing the [fed­er­al] group, hold­ing a sub­ma­chine gun, left lit­tle doubt in my mind who was in charge. That he wasn’t smil­ing best describes the look on his face . . . . Keller­man took an erect stance and brought his firearm into a ready posi­tion. The oth­er men in suits fol­lowed course by drap­ing their coat­tails behind the butts of their hol­stered pis­tols.” When Dr. Rose insist­ed on hold­ing the body in Dal­las for autop­sy, explain­ing, “You can’t lose the chain of evi­dence,” one of the men in suits screamed, “God­damit, get your ass out of the way before you get hurt,” and anoth­er snapped, “We’re tak­ing the body now.”

“Strange, I thought, this Pres­i­dent is get­ting more pro­tec­tion dead than he did when he was alive,” writes Dr. Cren­shaw. “Had Dr. Rose not stepped aside, I’m sure they would have shot him. They would have killed me and any­one else who got in their way.” The inter­ven­ing years “nei­ther erased the fer that I felt nor dimin­ished the impres­sion that that inci­dent made upon me.”

Why were the con­spir­a­tors so adamant about tak­ing the body out of Dal­las that they were will­ing to resort to mur­der to do so, if it came to that?

Lifton’s Best Evi­dence, which caused one of the great par­a­digm shifts in my under­stand­ing of the case, assem­bles a wealth of fac­tu­al evi­dence to prove that Kennedy’s body was sur­rep­ti­tious­ly altered. The pur­pose of the alter­ation was to obscure the orig­i­nal wounds and make it appear that Kennedy was shot only from behind and not from the front. . . .