Spitfire List Web site and blog of anti-fascist researcher and radio personality Dave Emory.

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What’s in a Nickname?

14th Waf­fen SS Divi­sion (“Galicia”)–composed of Ukrain­ian personnel–being inspect­ed by Hein­rich Himm­ler.

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COMMENT: A pass­ing tid­bit in a New York Times sto­ry about Ukraine caught our eye. The Gray Lady–predictably–didn’t expound on it.

A fight­er in one of the Ukrain­ian gov­ern­men­t’s “vol­un­teer” bat­tal­ions was opin­ing about the Russ­ian army and gave “only his nick­name, Panz­er.”

Fun­ny nickname–“Panzer.”

Won­der where he got it?

(We have cov­ered the ascen­sion of the OUN/B heirs in the Ukraine in a num­ber of pro­grams: FTR #‘s 777778779780781782, 783784794800, 803, 804, 808.)

“Ukraine Town Bears Scars of Russ­ian Offen­sive That Turned Tide in Con­flict” by Car­lot­ta Garl; The New York Times; 9/9/2014.

. . . . ‘The Russ­ian Army is very good,” said a sol­dier in one of Ukraine’s vol­un­teer bat­tal­ions far­ther south, who gave only his nick­name, Panz­er. . . .

 

 

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